Master of Arts Degree in International Development with Persons with Disabilities

Posted on 9 February 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I graduated from the following program in 2009. I feel it can provide a good background in the field for people who want to work with people with disabilities in developing countries to support them in their struggle for human rights and to escape poverty. The most valuable course for me personally was a course in project design that helped me gain more confidence in my ability to evolve a clearly focused project idea and develop it into a cohesive plan of action.

Master of Arts Degree in International Development with Persons with Disabilities

Do you want to work with persons with disabilities in developing countries in ending the discrimination, stigmatization and exclusion they endure in violation of their guaranteed human rights? Imagine yourself becoming the expert to implement policies and practices inclusive of people with disabilities within federal agencies, international organizations and non-governmental organizations and in their overseas development assistance programs?

The Master of Arts degree in International Development at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC focuses on advocating for and with persons with disabilities. The program’s coursework is taught through a transformative lens where political, social and development issues become a means through which ID graduates study topics, such as, the latest global trends and issues concerning disability and development, gender, models of disability, the micropolitics of development, the design of sustainable and effective development projects and programs, and economic development. Your two years of coursework includes a practicum placement at one of several Washington, DC agencies, as well as an internship overseas using the skills you will learn through your coursework at Gallaudet and the international experiences you will be exposed to in our nation’s capitol.

For more information, please go to our website: http://edf.gallaudet.edu and/or write to amy.wilson@gallaudet.edu

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Conference: Working with Children with Special Needs and Their Families: Kyrgyzstan and Intl Experience

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Events and Conferences, Families, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

International conference 7-9 April 2009

[Note application deadline March 6, 2009.]

Dear colleagues!

The Association of Parents of Disabled Children of Bishkek and the Public Association “Shoola Kol” in partnership with HealthProm UK-based charity and the Ministry of Labor and Social Development organizes the 3-day International conference «Innovative approaches to working with children with special needs and their families: Kyrgyzstan and international experience» which will take place at the Dostuk Hotel, Bishkek, on 7-9 April 2009.

Conference aims:

* Present and discuss various approaches to providing support to children with special needs and their families
* Search for ways of cooperation between organizations that support children with special needs and their families in Kyrgyzstan and abroad
* Experience exchange

The conference will see the representatives of government and municipal agencies, nongovernmental local and international organizations that have practical experience in providing early support, education, social support and healthcare services to children with special needs, as well as in the advancement and protection of the rights of people with disabilities.

Conference format: reports, discussion, presentations, workshops, seminars.

During the conference there will be Kyrgyzstan and international experience presented on the following:

* latest models of providing early support to children with multiple disabilities
* innovative approaches of psychological and pedagogical support to children with special needs
* complex rehabilitation and socialization of children and young people with special needs
* protection and advancement of rights of people with disabilities and their families

The final programme of the conference will be developed on the needs and expectations of the participants that sent applications.

The conference invites: heads and specialists of social protection, educational and healthcare government and municipal agencies and nongovernmental organizations that provide support to children with special needs (including with multiple disabilities) and their families.

The selection of participants will based on the applications forms. The applications should be sent before the 6 March 2009 by email ardi.kyrgyzstan@gmail.com of fax: 0312 517634

Participants will be selected before 20 March 2009.

The working language of the conference is Russian, translators will be provided for international participants.

For more information please contact:

ARDI, Bishkek, m-r Kok-Zhar, h.1, polupodval 4, Tel/fax: +996 312 517634, e-mail: ardi.kyrgyzstan@gmail.com



Thank you to Azat Israilov for submitting this announcement to We Can Do. All inquiries, as always, should be directed to the people organizing the opportunity that interests you, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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NEWS: African Decade of Persons with Disabilities Extended to 2019

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ANNOUNCEMENT:

AFRICAN DECADE OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES EXTENDED TO DECEMBER 2019

A. CONGRATULATIONS AND GOOD NEWS!

We are ecstatic!

This is to announce that the AU Continental Decade of Persons with Disabilities has been extended to December 2019.

The Windhoek Declaration on Social Development adopted by Ministers in Charge of Social Development on 31 October 2008, adopted Resolution 6, which reads as follows:

‘6. ADOPT the extension of the Continental Decade of Persons with Disabilities for the period 2010-2019; CALL for the evaluation of the existing Decade and its Plan of Action (1999-2009) and the speedy conclusion of the evaluation and restructuring of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)’

In addition to the resolution extending the Decade, the Windhoek Declaration also adopted resolution 5(x) which reads as follows:

‘5. Further commit ourselves to implement the priority strategies under the key thematic social issues spelt out in the Social Policy Framework for Africa, through the following:

(x) Empowering and providing persons with disabilities with equal opportunities, safeguarding their rights and enlisting their participation and mainstreaming them in all development programmes’

The new Social Development Policy adopted by the Ministers in Windhoek Namibia has detailed coverage of disability work. We encourage organisations to get a copy of this policy and apply its contents in your programming processes.

We would like to thank all organisations (notably Pan African Federation Of the Disabled (PAFOD), African Union of the Blind (AFUB), and others), Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) Staff and leaders, Panel of Experts/Parliamentarians, Pan African Parliament, African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI), the African Union Social Affairs Commission, our Development Partners (Disabled Persons Organizations Denmark [DPOD], Sida, UK Department for International Development [DFID], and Southern Africa Trust), Christian Blind Mission (CBM) and those that supported our down-line networks and DPOs for their support during the first Decade and the campaign towards extension.

We look forward to hard work during the next ten years. We now have the benefit of learning from the mistakes that we made and the experience of managing an initiative of this nature.

B. MORE INFORMATION ON THE FIRST DECADE

The African Union declared the first decade of the new millennium (1999-2009) as the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities. In 2001 the African Union’s Labour and Social Affairs Commission along with its African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI) and the ILO held a meeting in Addis Ababa. In this meeting they designed a Continental Plan of Action (CPOA) to guide the member states of the African Union on how to implement the African Decade. The adoption of the African Decade of Disabled Persons (ADDP) placed responsibility on African States to implement Decade Programme activities.

With this declaration, the African Union adopted a Continental Plan of Action (CPOA) with twelve objectives that African States were to implement over the period.

The twelve objectives cover a wide range of themes that are of critical importance to improvement in the lives of persons with disabilities in Africa. These themes include ideas and strategies to:
1. Formulate and implement national policies, programmes and legislation to promote the full and equal participation of persons with disabilities.
2. Promote the participation of persons with disabilities in the process of economic and social development
3. Promote the self-representation of people with disabilities in all public decision-making structures.
4. To enhance support services for disabled persons.
5. Promote special measures for children, youth, women and elderly persons with disabilities.
6. Ensure and improve access to rehabilitation, education, training, employment, sports, the cultural and physical environment.
7. To promote and protect disability rights as human rights
8. To support the development of and strengthen Disabled Persons’ Organizations
9. Mobilize resources

These objectives where meant to be implemented by Africa States, with the cooperation of civil society organisations.
Prepared By:

Kudakwashe A.K. Dube, CEO
SADPD



This announcement is being circulated by The Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD). Their website is at http://www.africandecade.org.za and is worth exploring for anyone with an interest in human rights or social and economic development for people with disabilities in Africa. I modified this announcement to spell out most of the acronyms.

I received this announcement via the mailing list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development.

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NEWS: World Bank, Syracuse U. Join Forces Against Poverty Among Disabled People

Posted on 2 February 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, News, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2008

Contact: Jaime Winne Alvarez
Phone: (315) 443-3784
jlwinne@syr.edu
World Bank: Phillip Hay
Phone: (202) 473-1796
Email:phay@worldbank.org

Global disability and poverty efforts get key boost from agreement between SU’s Burton Blatt Institute and World Bank

A promising new collaboration between the World Bank and Syracuse University could spur global efforts to reduce poverty for an estimated 400 million people with disabilities living in developing countries. The Burton Blatt Institute: Centers of Innovation on Disability at Syracuse University (BBI) and the World Bank have signed an agreement to support activities of the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD), an international disability network initiated by the World Bank and committed to promoting inclusive development as a means to achievement of Millennium Development Goals.

Established in 2006 with assistance from the World Bank and set up by a multi-stakeholder task force, the GPDD brings together organizations, government agencies, multinational lenders and research centers focused on reducing the link between disability and poverty, and promoting inclusive development activities. BBI will receive $350,000 from the World Bank’s Development Grant Facility (DGF)—with another $350,000 likely in 2009—to support the growth and organizational development of the GPDD. In turn, the GPDD will share information, expand knowledge, improve public policies and practices, and foster collaboration to improve education and economic opportunity for individuals with disabilities and their families worldwide.

“This is a great honor and unique opportunity for BBI and Syracuse University,” says Peter Blanck, BBI chairman and SU University Professor. “Both BBI and the GPDD share the same mission of advancing the civic, economic and social participation of people with disabilities worldwide. This collaboration and support system will help further accelerate the inclusion of people with disabilities into the social and economic mainstream.”

“This new collaboration will connect the expertise and resources of our Burton Blatt Institute to the GPDD and the World Bank in ways that will promote inclusive economic and social development across the globe,” says SU Chancellor and President Nancy Cantor.

“Given that people living with disabilities are among the poorest of the poor worldwide, we welcome this agreement with BBI and Syracuse University as another step forward in dismantling the link between poverty and disability,” says Joy Phumaphi, vice president of the World Bank’s Human Development Network. “The social and economic exclusion of people with disabilities in developing countries requires the attention and investment of resources by development institutions, government and nongovernmental organizations.”

Maria Reina has been jointly selected by BBI and GPDD leadership to serve as executive director of the leadership network in an open, international competitive process. Reina, director of international projects at BBI’s Washington, D.C., office since 2006, has diverse experiences working on disability research, advocacy and development work, including an intensive dedication to the United Nations Ad Hoc Committee for the Disability Convention. She previously worked for the Center for International Rehabilitation; the Institute for International Disability Advocacy; the Institute for International Cooperation and Development; the Argentinean Disabled People Organization, Cilsa; and the University Institute San Martin in Rosario, Argentina, where she was an adjunct professor.

“As a person with a disability from Argentina, I have traveled to developing countries and witnessed the physical and attitudinal barriers that diminish full participation and contributions of people with disabilities,” says Reina.

During the next six months, BBI and the GPDD will mobilize disability-led organizations worldwide—in cooperation with governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector—to identify best practice strategies that promote inclusion in economic and social development. Through research, training and community development activities, the GPDD will increase participation of people with disabilities in national poverty reduction efforts in developing countries.

“Improved access to education, health care, technology and transportation are needed to reduce the barriers of stigma and discrimination,” says Kalle Könkkölä, GPDD task force chair.

The World Bank provides critically needed financial and technical assistance to developing countries, and is composed of a number of development institutions owned by 185 member countries, including the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA). The mission of both institutions is to reduce global poverty and to improve living standards of developing countries around the world.

While IBRD focuses on middle income and credit-worthy poor countries, IDA focuses on the poorest countries in the world. The World Bank Group provides loans, interest-free credit and grants to developing countries, and is a knowledge leader in development. For more information, visit http://worldbank.org.

BBI fosters public-private dialogue to advance civic, economic and social participation of persons with disabilities in a global society. BBI takes its name from Burton Blatt (1927–85), a pioneer in humanizing services for people with mental retardation, a staunch advocate of deinstitutionalization, and a national leader in special education. The institute currently has offices in Syracuse, New York City, Washington, D.C., Atlanta and Tel Aviv. For more information, visit http://bbi.syr.edu.

For more information on GPDD, contact Reina at (202) 296-2042 or mvreina@law.syr.edu.



We Can Do received this press release via the mailing list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD). Individuals can sign up for the GPDD email distribution list for free; follow the link for more details.



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