Why Fight Disablism? A Global Perspective: Blogging against Disablism Day (BADD) 2012

Posted on 1 May 2012. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Why fight disablism?

The short answer takes one paragraph:  Because disablism is more than just an attitude.  Because when people hold disablist attitudes toward people with disabilities, people with disabilities are excluded, isolated, left out, left behind, and pushed to the margins of society.  Disabled people are hurt in physical ways that can leave bruises, rope burns, broken bones, and even dead bodies.  And people with disabilities also are hurt in not so physical ways that, sometimes they say are even worse.

The long answer would have to involve listening to one billion people on the face of the Earth describing the one billion ways that disablism impacts their lives.  Because one billion is the number of people with disabilities living in the world today.  And, chances are, all of them would have a slightly different answer to what disablism means.  And it’s not just disabled people and their loved ones who think that various forms of prejudice that people with disabilities is an important issue.  Two major international organizations—the World Bank and the World Health Organization (WHO)—have this to say about the effects of the social inequities that people with disabilities experience daily:

“Across the world, people with disabilities have poorer health outcomes, lower education achievements, less economic participation and higher rates of poverty than people without disabilities. This is partly because people with disabilities experience barriers in accessing services that many of us have long taken for granted, including health, education, employment, and transport as well as information.”

They cite many inter-related causes for these effects.  And these include negative attitudes that others may sometimes hold toward people with disabilities:

“Beliefs and prejudices constitute barriers to education, employment, health care, and social participation. For example, the attitudes of teachers, school administrators, other children, and even family members affect the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream schools. Misconceptions by employers that people with disabilities are less productive than their non-disabled counterparts, and ignorance about available adjustments to work arrangements limits employment opportunities.”

If you want to read their evidence for yourself, check out the World Report on Disability that the World Bank and WHO released, with a big media splash, in September 2011:   http://www.who.int/disabilities/world_report/2011/report/en/index.html
This publication is available in any of the major United Nations languages, namely, English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Russian, Arabic, and Chinese

I’m fortunate that my passion for international disability rights coincides with my career path: I’m now at an organization based in Washington, DC, called the U.S. International Council on Disability (USICD). When people ask me what the U.S. International Council on Disabilities (USICD) does, there are a few basic answers I could give.  I can say that USICD works to mobilize the U.S. disability community to become more engaged with the international disability rights movement.  It works to promote U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which is the first legally binding international human rights treaty to specifically protect the human rights of people with disabilities.  It promotes disability inclusion in U.S. foreign assistance programs abroad.  And, via the Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL) project, which I manage, we are working to deliver disability rights knowledge to advocates and policy makers in developing countries who have limited Internet connectivity.  No, it’s not an “anti-disablism” organization per se.  But I suspect that its mission would align well with the values of many of the people participating in the 2012 edition of Blogging Against Disablism Day (BADD).

I’ll probably spend a good part of May browsing through the many excellent blog posts I anticipate will be presented as part of this year’s Blogging against Disablism Day (BADD) on May 1, 2012.  For the past several years, this event has been hosted by the disability blogger at “Diary of a Goldfish”, which means her blog is the go-to link for finding all the other BADD posts for 2012.  (And for archived BADD posts from past years also.)  Usually a hundred or more bloggers participate, all with something fresh to say about what disablism means to them.  Many are themselves people with disabilities.  Many other bloggers are friends, families, and allies of disabled people.  I hope you will explore the other BADD contributions, also!  In past years, most participating bloggers have been from developed countries.  But I hope that bloggers from developing countries will also consider making contributions to the event, either this year (it’s not too late!) or in future years.  Enjoy the day!

Advertisements
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 21 so far )

E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24

Posted on 4 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, accessibility, Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

NEWS: US Secretary of State Clinton on International Disability Rights

Posted on 25 February 2009. Filed under: Human Rights, News, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This was from a State Department town hall meeting on February 4, see: http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2009a/02/116022.htm)

QUESTION: Good afternoon, Madame Secretary. It’s an honor to be working under your leadership, and I look forward to the challenges that you present. My name is Stephanie Ortoleva. I work in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

I basically wanted to ask you a question about what do you think can be the role that we can play, which you’ve illuminated – you’ve given us a little bit of illumination on that – but also what role can our colleagues who work in women’s rights organizations and disability rights organizations, what role can those colleagues play in supporting you in your efforts to advance the rights of women and the rights of people with disabilities as part of an integral part of United States foreign policy?

SECRETARY CLINTON: That’s a wonderful question. I thank you for it. You know, I think it was 1997, I came to this auditorium, the Dean Acheson Auditorium, with Madeleine Albright, who was Secretary of State, and addressed a large crowd like this about the commitment that the Clinton Administration had to including women as an integral part of foreign policy, not as an afterthought, not as an adjunct, but in recognition of the fact that we know from a myriad of studies and research that the role of women is directly related to democracy and human rights. And I feel similarly about people with disabilities.
It’s important to recognize that expanding the circle of opportunity and increasing the democratic potential of our own society, as well as those across the world, is a continuing process of inclusion. And I look forward to working on behalf of the rights of women and people with disabilities, and others as well, as we pursue our foreign policy. Because I think it sends a clear message about who we are as a people, the evolution that we have undergone.

I remember as First Lady traveling to many countries that had no recognition of the rights of people with disabilities. They were literally warehoused, often in the most horrific conditions. There were no laws. There were no requirements for education or access. And it struck me then and – we’ve made some progress, but insufficient. It certainly is part of my feeling now that we have to always be hoping and working toward greater inclusion as a key part of what our values are and what we believe democracy represents. So I’m going to look to working with those of you in the Department and at USAID and with our allies and friends outside who have carried on this work over the years. And you can count on my commitment to you on that.



I first received this quote via Joan Durocher.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

NEWS: Disability Inclusion in Poverty Reduction Strategy in Mozambique

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Case Studies, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note from We Can Do editor: Many developing countries are required to develop a “Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper” (PRSP) as a condition for receiving debt relief from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). This strategy paper is meant to describe how the country will reduce poverty among its citizens. A country’s PRSP can have a profound impact on the policies and programs it implements to fight poverty. But not all PRSPs are fully inclusive of people with disabilities. This can mean they are left behind while others are gaining new opportunities to lift themselves out of poverty. Rosangela Berman Bieler, at the Inter-American Institute on Disability recently circulated the following email on the mailing list for the Global Partnership on Disability and Development describing how people with disabilities were included in the process of developing the PRSP in Mozambique.]

by Rosangela Berman Bieler

Dear Colleagues:

This message is to share a brief report on the Inclusive Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper project in Mozambique, launched in January in Maputo. Our civil society counterparts in Mozambique are FAMOD (Forum of Disability Organizations) and Handicap International. Maria Reina and Deepti Samant of the Global Partnership on Disability and Development Secretariat also joint us for part of the mission.

During the mission, we could establish many alliances with local and international agencies and government officials. Among the various activities that we were involved, we had a very good and participatory DPO training with 25 leaders of FAMOD. Following the meeting, FAMOD is constituting a working group, composed by civil society organizations, to follow up on country Projects like the FTI on Education for All, the Mozambique Tourism Anchor Program (IFC), School Health (MoE), HIV-AIDS and other possible entry points.

We also had a presentation meeting for general stakeholders, held at the World Bank Office in MZ. The activity was a success – full house and many potential partners from all sectors, very interested in working with inclusive approaches for the next cycle of the Country’s poverty reduction plan that may follow the current PARPA, finishing in 2009.

Besides other Inclusive PRSP training and activities to be held in MZ during 2009, we are also planning with GPDD, an International Seminar on Accessibility and Inclusive Tourism in Maputo, in June, and we are looking forward to be able to work in alliance with all the agencies working in the field as well. Inclusive approaches in Tourism can generate local accessibility and development for those who live in the country. Mozambique can really benefit from such an initiative.

In the field of Education, we are very excited with the possibility of having the local NGOs and Networks – such as the Education for All Network that accompanied us during the events – to interact and influence the school construction that will happen now, for the FTI, to make sure they are built accessible.

We are also working in synchrony with the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities, that will go on until 2019. It is possible that MZ hosts the launching of the African Campaign on HIV-AIDS and Disability in October. There are two major FAMOD projects going on in the field and hopefully this can also generate good mainstreaming opportunities.

Our plan is to involve other Portuguese Speaking Countries in most of these activities, as language is on other important cause of exclusion from participation. Hopefully Development Agencies working in other Lusophone countries in Africa (Angola, Cape Verde, Guiné Bissau, Sao Tomé and Prince), and also in East Timor, will be able to partner with this initiative and facilitate this process as well.

All the best,

Rosangela Berman Bieler
Inclusive Development Specialist

Inter-American Institute on Disability & Inclusive Development
– Doing our part on the construction of a society for all –

Rosangela Berman Bieler
Executive Director
Inter-American Institute on Disability & Inclusive Development
Website: www.iidi.org

[Another Note from We Can Do editor: People who wish to learn more about the PRSP process, and how it can be more inclusive of people with disabilities, are encouraged to consult the on-line manual, “Making PRSP Inclusive” at http://www.making-prsp-inclusive.org/]



I received Rosangela Berman Bieler’s note via the GPDD mailing list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

TRAINING: Labour Market Inclusion of People with Disabilities, 20-29 April 2009

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

“Labour market inclusion of people with disabilities”
International Labour Organization (ILO) Training course for professionals from developing and transition countries

Dates: 20 – 29 April 2009 – Language: English – Venue: Turin, Italy

Application deadline: March 13, 2009

The ILO International Training Centre is offering a course on “Labour market inclusion of people with disabilities” (course A901286). The course language will be English and registration is open to staff involved in policy making, planning, implementation, research of Ministries, Social Partners and other institutions working on disability and social inclusion. Please note that this course is especially designed for participants from developing and transition countries.

The course programme offers the possibility to learn more about legislation and mechanisms for labour market inclusion of people with disabilities in developing and transition countries, provides the opportunity to get to know different international experience and good practice.

The conditions of participation are the following:

COSTS
The price of the course is EURO 2,950. This amount includes the cost of training and subsistence (full board and lodging at the Turin Centre).

FELLOWSHIPS
The ILO International Training Centre offers a number of partial fellowships to co-finance the costs of the course. If you wish to apply for a fellowship, please contact us as soon as possible. The partial fellowships are for EURO 1,200, the difference is EURO 1,750.

AIR TRAVEL
Not included is the cost of international air travel from the country of origin to Turin, which has to be covered by the participants.

APPLICATION
In order to register and to apply for a partial fellowship, candidates should send us:
1. A completed nomination form (Word format, 67 Kb);
2. A “letter of commitment” by the participant’s organization (or a donor organization) stating that it will cover:
a) the cost of the course, namely EURO 2,950 – or in case you request a fellowship, the remaining cost of the course of EURO 1,750.-;
b) the international return ticket to Turin.

These documents should be sent to:
Ms. Alessandra MOLZ: a.molz@itcilo.org. Tel: +39011693 6428
Ms. Elisabetta BELLORA: e.bellora@itcilo.org. Tel: +39011-693 6561. Fax: +39011-693 6451

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION
13 March 2009
.

Yours sincerely,
Alessandra Molz
Programme officer
Employment and Skills Development Programme

ILO INTERNATIONAL TRAINING CENTRE
Viale Maestri del Lavoro, 10, 10127 Torino, ITALIA
Tel.: +39-011-693 64 28, Fax: +39-011-693 64 51

Interested in our courses? Visit our on-line training calendar:
http://www.itcilo.org/calendar
http://www.itcilo.org

Tiene interés en nuestros cursos? Nuestro calendario de actividades se encuentra en:
http://www.itcilo.org/calendar/view?set_language=es
http://www.itcilo.org/es



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD) email-based discussion group .
Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

JOB POST: Project Manager: Making HIV-AIDS Strategies Inclusive, Tanzania

Posted on 6 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

CCBRT is Seeking to Employ a Project Manager for a PEPFAR funded Project

“Making HIV/Aids Strategies Inclusive for People with Disabilities”

Application Deadline February 21, 2009

*Introduction*
Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation Tanzania (CCBRT) is a locally registered Non Governmental Organization (NGO) first established in 1994. It is the largest indigenous provider of disability rehabilitation services in the country. CCBRT aim is to improve the quality of life of people living with disabilities as well as their families and to enable them to claim and use their legitimate human rights.

*Objective*
The PEPFAR project is aimed to considerably increase access for people with disabilities and their care givers to appropriate HIV/AIDS prevention, care, treatment and support services in Tanzania. The project is funded by PEPFAR for the duration of 3 years beginning 2009. CCBRT will coordinate the project in collaboration with the Government of Tanzania, civil society and other stakeholders.

* *

*The Project Manager will have the following responsibilities*

· Setting up, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project.

· Recruitment of part time HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinators in consultation with the Community Program Director.

· Setting up of the National Platform in consultation with governmental, non-governmental and international stakeholders.

· Selection of target districts and partners in consultation with TACAIDS and NACP.

· Coordination and monitoring of the development of minimum guidelines (VCT, care and treatment), development and distribution of various Information Education and Communication (IEC) materials, and respective training manuals.

· Initiation, coordination and evaluation of trainings in collaboration with technical experts and target organizations.

· Further development of IEC, training materials and programs after lessons learnt in collaboration with technical experts.

· Establishment of follow up mechanisms to support trained experts.

· Establishment of collaborations and referral mechanisms between district authorities, disability and HIV/AIDS organizations.

· Provision and coordination of technical / advisory support to partners.

· Assessment and approval of small project proposals for infrastructure adjustments and campaigns in collaboration with CBM US and a representative of the National Platform.

· Development of public awareness programs on disability, equal right and HIV/AIDS.

· Generation of lessons learnt and continuous integration during the project implementation.

· Development of a reader on making HIV/Aids strategies inclusive in collaboration with technical experts.

· Development of annual work plans and setting of annual targets.

· Compilation of narrative / financial reports in collaboration with the CCBRT Finance Manager.

· Coordination and support of the work of the CCBRT Health, HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinator and three HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinators.

*Experience*
The project manager should have

· a minimum of 5 years working experience in HIV/AIDS

· In depth knowledge about HIV/AIDS strategy framework in Tanzania including HSHSP, NGPRS, NMSF as well as HIV/AIDS related working structures and relevant stakeholders in Tanzania.

· Experience in guideline and training programme development

· Proven working experience with vulnerable groups, preferably persons with disabilities

· Good analytic, report writing and presentation skills

· Experience in coordinating and managing larger teams

· Strong written and oral communication ability, both Kiswahili and English

CCBRT will offer an attractive salary package.

The Project manager is expected to start working latest 16th March 2009.

*How to apply*
If you believe you are the ideal candidate with the necessary background, please submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae detailing your experience, supportive documents as well as contact details of three referees to info@ccbrt.or.tz or by post to

CCBRT Executive Director/ P.O Box 23310, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Tel: +255 (0) 22 260 1543 / +255 (0) 22 260 2192 Fax: +255 (0) 22 2601544

Email: info@ccbrt.or.tz Website: http://www.ccbrt.or.tz

*People with disability are highly encouraged to apply.*

*Closing date for applications: 21st Feb* (only short listed candidates will be contacted)



I received this job post via the Intl-Dev news distribution service, which people can subscribe to via email for free.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 5 so far )

ILO Training Course: Labour Market Inclusion of People with Disabilities, April 20-29, 2009, in Turin, Italy

Posted on 19 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Fellowships & Scholarships, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

“Labour market inclusion of people with disabilities”
International Labour Organization Training course for professionals from developing and transition countries

Dates: 20 – 29 April 2009 – Language: English – Venue: Turin, Italy
Application deadline: 13 March 2009

Turin, 12 January 2009
Dear Sir or Madam,
I have the pleasure of announcing that the ILO International Training Centre is offering a course on “Labour market inclusion of people with disabilities” (course A901286). The course language will be English and registration is open to staff involved in policy making, planning, implementation, research of Ministries, Social Partners and other institutions working on disability and social inclusion. Please note that this course is especially designed for participants from developing and transition countries.

The course programme offers the possibility to learn more about legislation, mechanisms and mechanisms for labour market inclusion of people with disabilities in developing and transition countries and provides the opportunity to get to know different international experience and good practice.

The conditions of participation are the following:

COSTS
The price of the course is EURO 2,950. This amount includes the cost of training and subsistence (full board and lodging at the Turin Centre).

FELLOWSHIPS
The ILO International Training Centre offers a number of partial fellowships to co-finance the costs of the course. If you wish to apply for a fellowship, please contact us as soon as possible. The partial fellowships are for EURO 1,200, the difference is EURO 1,750.

AIR TRAVEL
Not included is the cost of international air travel from the country of origin to Turin, which has to be covered by the participants.

APPLICATION
In order to register and to apply for a partial fellowship, please send us:

1. A completed nomination form (attached);
2. A “letter of commitment” by the participant’s organization (or a donor organization) stating that it will cover:
a) the cost of the course, namely EURO 2,950 – or in case you request a fellowship, the remaining cost of the course of EURO 1,750.-;
b) the international return ticket to Turin.
These documents should be sent to:
Ms. Alessandra MOLZ: a.molz@itcilo.org. Tel: +39011693 6428
Ms. Elisabetta BELLORA: e.bellora@itcilo.org. Tel: +39011-693 6561. Fax: +39011-693 6451
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION
13 March 2009.

Yours sincerely,
Alessandra Molz
Programme Officer



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list. People interested in attending this conference will wish to contact the organizers directly (NOT We Can Do) to request that a nomination form be sent to them. (Contact the organizers at a.molz@itcilo.org or e.bellora@itcilo.org.)

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

Statement on the Millennium Development Goals and Disability, from the Africa Regional Conference

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

THE STATEMENT OF THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE, HELD AT THE PANAFRIC HOTEL, NAIROBI, KENYA 15TH TO 17TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

We, the 200 delegates of the Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference from the, Central, Eastern, Northern, Western and Southern sub regions of Africa met in Nairobi, Kenya, at the Panafric Hotel on 15th to 17th September 2008, to examine the status of MDGs in respect to the inclusion and mainstreaming of disability;

And further to enhance the capacity of leaders from the disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in African countries;

Noting that MDGs have no specific reference to persons with disabilities and therefore their continued exclusion in the campaign processes, policies, planning, programmes and implementation;

Concerned also that disability has not been mentioned in the midway Millennium Development Goals Report;

Further acknowledging that the convention on the rights of PWDs has recently come into effect, to among other things strengthen the resolve for inclusion of people with disabilities;
We note with dismay the continued categorisation of people with disabilities as vulnerable which further marginalises us and consigns us to invisibility, we state that we wish to be recognised as actors in the development processes;

We Resolve As Delegates That We Shall;
• Communicate the outcome of this conference to our governments to review, prioritise and include issues of disability in their Country Statements during their high level meetings on MDGs in New York, in the September 2008 Summit
• Call on our Governments to move and support a motion during the UN General Assembly, calling for the establishment of a new UN Special Agency on Disability; to provide leadership, coordination, harmonisation and enhanced monitoring and reporting.
• Engage our Governments to ensure that People with Disabilities are protected from adverse effects from rising costs and related vulnerabilities and participate and benefit from existing social protection schemes
• Lobby Governments through the African Development Bank and related partners to establish an African Disability Equity Fund to support economic empowerment, entrepreneurship and business of people with disabilities
• Encourage the use of professional campaigners including goodwill ambassadors in promoting disability inclusion
• Recognise the efforts of parents, friends and guardians of people with disabilities and recognise them as part of the wider disability movement
• Uphold the principle of gender equity in disability
• Promote the use of positive language in reference to people with disabilities
We Urge The UN Through Member States;
• To establish a Specialist Agency on Disability in the league of UNICEF and UNIFEM to provide leadership and global accountability on matters related to the disabled people
• To prioritise include and partner with the disability movement in its entire millennium campaign initiatives and develop the strategies for doing so in the September summit
We Urge The AU And Related Bodies To;
• Set up a Disability Desk within all African regional bodies to monitor the implementation of both the convention and human rights violation of people with disabilities within the respective regions.
• Mainstream disability into their programmes and performance management systems
• Establish peer review mechanism and performance management system for disability in Africa
• Ensure political and social economic representation of people with disabilities in NEPAD and develop terms of reference for their participation.
• Work with DPOs to urgently review the structure and mandate of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)
• Extend the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities for another ten years by means of a proclamation by the meeting of the African Heads of State planned for January 2009
• Facilitate self- representation of PWDs in all commissions, Pan Africa Parliament and other structures

We Call On The Secretariat Of African Decade Of Persons With Disability to;
• Establish a programme to develop human resource capacity for policy analysis to act as a watch dog in monitoring disability inclusion
• Allocate responsibilities, roles and duties to the regional federations and other partners in order to ensure effective, well – monitored follow up and implementation strategies
We urge all Government to;
• Ratify, domesticate and implement the UN convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
• Work with DPOs in nominating the members of the panel of experts in convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
• Recognise DPOs as agents of change and therefore as partners in development planning and programmes
• Include people with disabilities and disability into their poverty reduction and development programmes
• Put into place affirmative action to enhance participation in political social and economic sectors
• Include disability data collection within the general national data collection systems recognising diversity in disability
• Use data to inform planning and service delivery and monitoring and evaluation
• Highlight and include disability in the existing MDG indicators in partnership with the disability movement.

We Call On Development Partners To;
• Prioritise disability as a tool for planning and analysis for development assistance and international cooperation in all their international cooperation and assistance (aid, debt relieve and trade)
• Include and consult people with disabilities and their respective organisations in planning, implementation, monitoring and reporting
• Include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes

We Resolve That As Disabled Peoples Organisations We Shall;
• Advocate to ensure that disability issues are mainstreamed in all government, UN agencies and development partners policies, plans and programmes particularly those related to MDGs
• Endeavour to understand the structures of various government, UN agencies and development partners with a view to engaging with them more effectively for full inclusion of people with disabilities
• Advocate development partners to include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes
• Engage and influence the social development process
• Participate in the Social Protection processes to ensure people with disabilities are included
• Advocate and lobby to be included in national poverty reduction strategies and other national development plans and initiatives
• Explore avenues of partnership with private sector in their economic empowerment programes
• Utilize our individual and collective capacity to cause the implementation of programmes related to the MDGs for the benefit of people with disabilities
• Build our own capacity to engage with our government on their commitments and agreement at national and international levels
• Ensure that whatever is agreed at regional or national workshops cascades downward to people with disabilities at the grassroots and rural areas
• Familiarise ourselves with the disability policies of different development agencies and ensure that they benefit us
• Strengthen our unity and common voice in planning, implementation and monitoring processes whilst at the same time recognising diversity in disability
• Restructure and reform our internal governance structures to adopt modern management and good governance systems and increase transparency and accountability to our members
• Nurture and mentor youth with disabilities into leadership succession plans and support them towards social economic empowerment
• Make a paradigm shift from the charity model to the human rights and social development model
• Strategically engage with media for both awareness and advocacy and built our capacity to engage with media
• Sensitise and capacitate the media to various disability needs and to urge them to be inclusive in their presentation and reporting
• Link with African Universities to promote evidence based disability research and to promote disability inclusive academic programmes
• Review through our Governments the Accra Development Plan of Action and cause its implementation for the benefit of PWDs in Africa

These resolutions are the outcomes of the conference, formulated and spoken by the delegates at this esteemed Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference.



This statement from the Africa Regional Conference was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Training Workshop on AIDS and Disability, 19-20 November 2008, Soesterberg, The Netherlands

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The application deadline is October 1, 2008, to attend the training seminar November 19-20, 2008. Inquiries should be directed to Enablement, or to h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT We Can Do.

The number of disabled people worldwide is considerable – the figure of 650 million is often quoted. People with a disability and their families also account for 20% of the world’s poorest people. But so far most HIV-AIDS programmes are not accessible to people with disabilities.
International attention to the rights of people with disabilities is increasing especially since May 2008, when the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities has come into effect. However governments and policy makers have generally yet to include disability issues in their AIDS strategic plans. Even within specific disability programmes it is not yet common to ensure that clients of such programmes do have access to appropriate information and services that are related to HIV-AIDS and reproductive health. Leaving disabled people out of HIV-AIDS prevention and care is shortsighted. Given the rapid growth of the epidemic and the size of the global disabled population (an estimated 10% of the world‘s citizens); the AIDS crisis cannot be addressed successfully unless individuals with disability are routinely included in all HIV-AIDS prevention, treatment and outreach efforts!

Local Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) teams, professionals, people with disabilities and their families share the same fears, misconceptions and risks as the rest of the general public with regard to the virus. They urgently need to receive accessible and appropriate information on HIV-AIDS. The launch of the new United Nations CBR Guidelines December 2008 in Bangkok will mean that information on HIV-AIDS will become more easily available for CBR teams as these guidelines pay specific attention to this subject. The goal of the section focusing on HIV-AIDS is to ensure ‘access for all’ to HIV-AIDS information, services and programmes. This goal involves three key areas: increasing individual knowledge, reducing stigma and discrimination and mitigating the impact HIV-AIDS has on families and communities.

During this 2-day workshop outstanding researchers and practitioners will ensure that participants will become sensitized towards the need for inclusion of disabled people within their mainstream HIV-AIDS programmes. They will also discuss strategies, tools and experiences in HIV/AIDS programmes that include disabled people and in CBR and disability programmes which integrate HIV-AIDS with their other activities.

Prospective participants are
• policy makers & planners as well as project staff working in the field of
development cooperation
• policy makers & planners as well as project staff of mainstream HIV¬AIDS organisations
• AIDS activists
• interested academic staff from various university faculties

Overall goal
Mainstream development and HIV¬AIDS organisations understand the importance of inclusion of disabled people in their HIV-AIDS programmes.

Objectives
Participants have an increased awareness about the vulnerability of persons with disabilities to the risk and impact of HIV and AIDS;
Participants have tools and arguments for how to ensure inclusion of disability in HIV-AIDS policies, strategies and programs; Participants are able to advocate within their own organizations for equal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support services for persons with disabilities.

Content
The following content is being discussed:
• Sexual and Reproductive Health: a right of disabled people
• The situation of HIV-AIDS among disabled people world wide
• Specific risk factors
• Inclusion of disabled people in mainstream HIV-AIDS programmes: why (not)?
• Inclusive HIV-AIDS programming
• Effectiveness of inclusive HIV-AIDS programmes
• Community Based Rehabilitation and HIV-AIDS

Lecturing methods
• Short lectures by experts,
• Discussions
• Small group work
• Case study analysis

Lecturing staff Dr. Nora Groce (USA) is a medical anthropologist, interested in the area of global health and international development with particular emphasis on cross-cultural systems of health care and health as human rights issues. Her research interests include issues of disability in international health and development, violence as a global public health problem and equity in access to health care in ethnic and minority communities. Current Research Projects of Nora Groce are:
• Disability and HIV/AIDS knowledge among Disabled Populations (and the Yale University/World Bank Global Survey on HIV/AIDS and Disability);
• World Bank Health Systems Assessment Project;
• Violence against Disabled Children; and
• HIV/AIDS Education in Indigenous Communities: Rites of Passage

George O. Obuya (Kenya) is project co-coordinator of the Deaf Social Counselling & HIV/AIDS Education Program. He is representing the Dar-es Salaam (Tanzania) based and recently formed African Deaf Union in the African Decade for Persons with Disability HIV/AIDS Steering Committee, as well as a senior board member of the Kenya National Association of the Deaf (KNAD).

Jessica de Ruijter is the advocacy officer at VSO Netherlands. She has much experience in the area of HIV prevention and started advocacy on HIV and disability since January 2008. She is also the co-chair of the DCDD working group HIV and Disability.

Dr Peter Rule is a Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Adult Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. He recently completed a three-country study for the World Bank on HIV & AIDS and Disability. He has experience of working with NGOs in KwaZulu-Natal in the fields of adult literacy, disability, gender, HIV/AIDS and early childhood development.

Geert Vanneste is a health and rehabilitation consultant who worked for Christoffel BlindenMission (CBM) in Rwanda (1987-1994) and Tanzania (1994-2007). His main expertise is in the area of CBR but increasingly he became involved in Health and Hospital Management and HIV-AIDS issues. Currently he is Independent Consultant and living in Belgium.

The workshop will be conducted under the leadership of Roelie Wolting and Huib Cornielje and supported by the HIV-AIDS working group of the Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development.

Dates
19th and 20th of November 2008
(10.00 to 17.00 hours)

Venue
Kontakt der Kontinenten, Soesterberg, The Netherlands

Course fees
€ 500,00 (including tea/coffee, lunches and a course map)

Maximum number of participants
24

Application and Further Information
Interested people should apply well in advance (before the 1st of October 2008) by filling out the attached application form.

Huib Cornielje Enablement Langenhorst 36 2402PX Alphen aan den Rijn
Tel: +31-172-436953
Fax: +31-172-244976 E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl Internet: www.enablement.nl
We gratefully acknowledge the financial support provided by CORDAID.

Interested participants should send the following information to h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT to We Can Do.

Application form for Disability- HIV&AIDS training
19th and 20th of November 2008

This form to be submitted to: Enablement, Langenhorst 36, 2402PX, Alphen aan den Rijn, The Netherlands. E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl

General Information participant

First name
Family Name
Address
Postal code
City
Country
Telephone
Cell Phone
Fax
E-mail address
Employer/organisation
Profession or function within organisation
Organisation name (if different from information above)
Address
Postal Address
Postal Code
City
Telephone
Cell phone
Fax
E-mail address
Website

Dietary requirements?
If any special requirements please specify

Signature of applicant
Date
Place

Again, send application form to h.cornielje@enablement.nl



The above text was taken from an announcement being circulated by Enablement, an organization committed to disability and rehabilitation management, particularly in less developed nations.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Disability Awareness Action newsletter, Our Rights, Issue 2, August 2008

Posted on 3 September 2008. Filed under: Children, Cognitive Impairments, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Our Rights – issue 2, August 2008

DAA’s newsletter for Disability Lib.

In the interest of solidarity, this newsletter is sent around by email to disabled people and their organisations across the world, and we invite you to forward it freely. We have provided links to internet sites, web pages and video clips, but understand that not all links are technically accessible to all users. From October Our Rights will be available in electronic format and on our website. For our contact details follow this link http://www.daa.org.uk/

Contents
Welcome Hello from DAA
Disability LIB partners
• Central Office
ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth
Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Mind Politics
Stigma
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
Being an Un-Person
Sceptical about The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
60 years of UN Convention on Human Rights
Inclusion means … being given a £50 token?
International News
Canada says ‘go home’ to disabled child
Sex in the City, and world wide
From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
Sit-in at Nursing Home
And Finally …

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page
******************
Welcome Hello from DAA
Thank you to all of you who took the time to respond to our first issue. We are delighted to be back! We have had replies from around the world.

“I am very happy indeed to get the DAA Newsletter – this is one newsletter that I eagerly look forward to. The articles provided me with new insights and sharpen my understanding.”
“Great newsletter!”
“I access DAA website regularly and will disseminate DAA newsletter to all my contacts.”
“Have just read your first bulletin and I am impressed with its coverage.”
“thanks a lot for your nice news letter. Hope it can help my people in bangladesh.”

Thank you for all your comments. We have improved our technical set-up, so fewer newsletters should land in Junk or Spam email boxes. From October you can access the newsletter on our website. You can request picture supported and word versions. We continue to strive to make our articles interesting, relevant and accessible. Please let us know how we are doing. This edition has two main themes: the body politics of bio-ethics and inclusion. We will also tell you again who we are and what we hope to achieve. Enjoy!
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Disability LIB partners
The project has its own website and central office. www.disabilitylib.org.uk
Disability LIB
6 Market Road
London
N7 9PW
England UK
Telephone: 0844 800 4331
Email: contact@disabilitylib.org.uk

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
The Social Inclusion Campaign Award from the Sheila McKechnie Foundation was given to the director of ALLFIE, Tara Flood. Tara is also chair of DAA. Tara and the Alliance run a campaign ‘We know inclusion works’. This is in response to the negative reporting in the media. You are invited to send your stories about how inclusion works to info@allfie.org.uk

“Inclusion for me is about society, which respects the humanity of its people.” says a disabled young person in Nottinghamshire. “Inclusion happens when everyone feels appreciated and welcome to participate.”
Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education.

Inclusion is going to school with your friends. “I kept asking myself what words a mother would use to explain to her daughter why they did not want her at her school. Except that she was disabled. If my daughter had only been black, and not disabled too, would the school have been able to do the same?”
Preethi Manuel mother of Zahrah.

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth

The media reported that a nine-year-old girl called Lin was moving her lips, but did not actually sing at the opening of the Olympic Games in China. The beautiful voice we all heard was from a different girl, the seven year-old Yang Peiyi. Apparently Yang was not shown on stage nor on television, because she has crooked teeth. Her face and her smile were regarded as not photogenic enough, so she was hidden to avoid damaging China’s international image.

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Often we find disabled people are hidden, out-of-sight and at the margins of society. Society’s underlying cultural preferences in terms of the body and mind is for a particular image of beauty and health: a superficial one.

Our impairment difference is treated like a ‘stigma’, a characteristic that is deeply discredited within one’s society and for which we are rejected. Our difference, it seems, is challenging.

“I experienced a nervous breakdown 20 years ago. Despite recovering from that, then going on to achieve academically and build a good marriage, my family remain wary of me. My sister is bringing up her child to refer to me as “crazy”. She even considers it funny to do so. I have tried to express how hurtful I find this, but my feelings have been overlooked.”
7th August 2008, Guardian ‘Stigmatised by my own family’

In a unique research called ‘Shout’ almost 4,000 mental health service users were involved. The charity Rethink found that 87% of people said they had direct personal experience of stigma and discrimination and reported the negative impact of stigma on their lives.

The damage caused was wide-ranging; the areas affected include employment, family, friendships, neighbours, accessing education, reporting crime, relationships with health professionals, and feeling confident enough to visit the shops, go to the pub or take part in activities in the community, it says.
The Stigma Shout report can be found at http://www.rethink.org/how_we_can_help/campaigning_for_change/moving_people/stigma_shout.html

But this problem goes deeper. If a girl can be excluded for crooked teeth, where does it end? Our society allows science and law to de-select disabled lives.
For impairment reasons they tamper with genetics in an attempt to screen out difference. We have laws that allow late abortion because of so called ‘defects’.We allow bio-ethics to de-select impairment.

In 2004, UKCPD (formerly the British Council of Disabled People) asked “Can human rights apply if we select children or value people’s quality of life on the basis of their genetic make-up or impairment?” http://www.bcodp.org.uk/library/genetics/3disabhr.pdf
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/06/mentalhealth
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/07/mentalhealth.familyandrelationships

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
on last month’s theme: Forced Interventions
Being an Un-Person… (8’47’’)
“This is from a handout I gave while speaking at training for staff who work with people who have developmental disabilities. It is about what it means to be dehumanized and it applies to a far greater group of people than the original audience. It is, to make it clear, something that is done to us by other people, not something intrinsic to who we are.

Being an Un-person means that people talk in front of you as if you aren’t there… It means that your existence seems to fill people with disgust and fear. … If you communicate with behaviour, you will be punished, restrained, drugged or put in a behaviour program.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c5_3wqZ3Lk

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Sceptical
A sceptical view was expressed about the usefulness of the Convention. How does it protect the rights of people with mental health issues?

“My organization are skeptical on the UN Convention re Legal Intervention for people with mental health issues and the sense of disabled people being able to join the armed forces.”

For a discussion of how different Articles in the Convention can work together, go to page 47 in this 2007 publication: http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_WORDversion.doc
The text of Article 12 can be accessed at http://www.mindfreedom.org/kb/mental-health-global/united-nations/article-12-un

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
This year (2008) we celebrate 60 years of the United Nations Convention on Human Rights, the first international commitment on human rights.

A web campaign http://www.everyhumanhasrights.org/ urges us to embrace the values and goals of the Declaration. To protect the rights of our fellow global villagers and to encourage others to do the same in our communities, workplaces and schools. We are asked to affirm these principles:

“Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, lanaguage, relition, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.” Every Human has Rights

However, our rights as disabled people are not spelled out specifically. It makes no specific mention of the meaning of rights as disabled people. Our experience is that we are often invisible, excluded or forgotten. We are not always included into the general phrase of ‘human’ inhuman rights.

That is why we needed a specific convention and why we are campaigning for our countries to ratify the Convention of the Rights of Disabled Persons.

UN Convention text resources:
Details of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People can be found at
http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=12&pid=150
http://www.un.org/disabilities/convention/conventionfull.shtml
Easy Read version of the Convention
http://www.officefordisability.gov.uk/docs/international-agreement-rights-disabled-people.pdf
For Easy Read versions of the Convention’s extra agreements (Optional Protocols) go to
http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/convention/nz.htm
A child-friendly text of the Convention can be accessed at
http://www.unicef.org/Child_friendly_CRPD.pdf

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Inclusion means … being given a £50 gift token?
A grammar school in Lincolnshire, England, did not listen to a boy with Autism when planning and arranging the 11-plus entrance exam. Under the Disability Discrimination Act any barriers to learning have to be removed, for example by making alternative arrangements or providing reasonable adjustments.

His mother said: “We knew he would struggle with the change in surroundings. Our primary school head teacher suggested we ask if he could sit the test there, or at least in a room on his own. But when I went to the school I was told, ‘No, we don’t make any allowances’.”

As the barriers of unfamiliar surroundings, a crowded room full with unfamiliar people were not removed, the boy was extremely distressed and failed the exam.

The ombudsman Anne Seex said the school had not considered its duties under the Disability Discrimination Act.

The boy was admitted to another grammar school on the basis of his exam results at the end of primary school (called SATs) and his junior school’s recommendation.

The school has apologised, has given the boy a £50 gift token and agreed to handle future cases differently.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/lincolnshire/7542948.stm
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/article4460621.ece

International News

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Canada
Paul and Barbara-Anne Chapman had sold their home in Britain and bought a farmhouse in Nova Scotia, Canada. The local authorities supported and welcomed them.

However, when the family arrived at the airport a border guard refused them entry. Several questions were raised about their work permit, clearance for their black Labrador and about their daughter Lucy, who has Angelman syndrome.

The family claim they were told by a border guard that because Lucy is disabled she would never be allowed into the country, and that she had a lifetime ban.

Mrs Chapman said: “My dog was allowed to stay. My dog has a higher status than my daughter in Canada, just because she is disabled.”

Canada’s immigration rules in section 38 do have a clause that states that you are not eligible for immigration if you would make an excessive demand on health and social services. Presently, “excessive demand” is usually defined as exceeding $15,000 of publicly funded health care costs over the next 5 years. However, in certain family applications, children are exempt from this rule of no entry due to health care costs.

The Convention on the Rights of Disabled People places obligations on countries to protect disabled people’s rights and freedoms. This includes the right to free movement and residency.

Entry to one’s own country is specifically mentioned in Article 18 of the Convention: “Are not deprived, arbitrarily or on the basis of disability, of the right to enter their own country.”

Entry into another country is protected in Article 18, where it says that disabled people should “not be deprived, on the basis of disability, of their ability to obtain, possess and utilize … relevant processes such as immigration proceedings, that may be needed to facilitate exercise of the right to liberty of movement.”

Mr and Mrs Chapman hired a Canadian lawyer to fight the decision.

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=278
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/canada/2519496/Canada-refuses-entry-to-disabled-girl.html

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Sex in the City… and world-wide.
Research has shown that disabled people are being denied the choice to full sexual relationships.

“I want to meet a girl I can become friends with, take to the pub and the cinema and then after a couple of months see where it goes,” Joseph Greene, 23.

The national charity Family Planning Association FPA has organised an information and poster campaign about the right to have sex and relationships. FPA gives people information and advice about sexual health. This is particularly important in view of the continuing rise and impact of HIV (see reports below).

Easy Read, posters and campaign info at
http://www.fpa.org.uk/news/campaigns/current%5Fcampaigns/detail.cfm?contentid=1021
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7540103.stm
http://www.fpa.org.uk/products/learning_disabilities_publications/detail.cfm?contentid=1037

‘Let’s talk About Sex’ was launched in June 2008 for young people with life-limiting health conditions, in a bid to open up a taboo subject and to better support these young people to have the opportunity to experience relationships and explore their sexuality, in a safe, supportive and empathetic environment.
http://www.act.org.uk/content/view/153/1/

Our rights and dignity in connection with these personal areas are protected in the Convention. Article 23 of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People specifically refers to forming relationships and accessing age-appropriate information, reproductive and family planning education.

As part of their obligations, countries who have ratified the Convention, have a duty to develop and change customs or practices. This includes working towards a change in attitude towards disabled people and sex.

Article 4 of the Convention asks governments to develop or change customs and practices which contradict the rights. Community norms, customs and practices of what people believe or how professionals deal with disabled people may go against the ideals laid down in the Convention.

“What is acceptable in the community is for a disabled person to marry another disabled person so that together they share their curse”, says a disabled local councillor in Uganda.
http://www.disabilitykar.net/docs/stories_women.doc

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
On August 6th a very important international panel discussion took place. ‘Beyond Barriers: Disability and HIV/AIDS’ gave information about studies from across the world – Brazil, South Africa, Cameroon, and Canada.

Disabled people were found to be consistently more vulnerable to infection. People with learning difficulties and disabled women are often exposed to riskier situations; women in particular experience more unprotected sex than the general population, often as a result of sexual violence.

A researcher in Kwa Zulu-Natal, where there is no disability-specific sex education, encountered a “let sleeping dogs lie” attitude in schools. As a result, she found that disabled children had little access to education or legal protection and were more vulnerable to abuse and infection.

n Cameroon, a study focused on a young deaf population, found that sexual debut was on the whole earlier and riskier than in the general population.
http://eliminateaids.blogspot.com/2008/08/beyond-barriers-disability-and-hivaids.html

The Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV/AIDS is an advocacy tool for all Campaign partners and supporters. We invite you to download this printer-ready version in English, French and Portuguese to disseminate at your various meetings and conferences!
http://www.africacampaign.info/a-nos-lecteurs-francais/index.html
http://www.africacampaign.info/recent-publication/index.html
http://www.dcdd.nl/data/1208782834413_Kampala%20Declaration%20on%20Disability%20and%20HIVAIDS.pdf

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
This article argues that despite national laws and certain improvements towards disability rights, El Salvador has only made nominal progress in implementing disability legislation and awareness.

In the context of El Salvador’s twelve-year armed conflict, 70,000 individuals were killed and another 300,000 people were disabled as a result of war.

However, this estimate conflicts with official statistics released by the Ministry of Economy in August 2008. Jesus Martinez, Director of the Landmine Survivors Network-El Salvador is extremely uncomfortable with the results of this 2008 Census.

“It should include accurate and trustworthy statistics about all of the disabled individuals living in this country.” he says.

Disabled people need to be counted in order to be visible in policy action, planning and prioritisation. Article 31 asks countries to find out about disabled people. State parties need collect appropriate information, including statistical and research data, to enable them to formulate and implement policies, which make a reality of the rights in the Convention.

If the Convention marks “a paradigm shift” in attitudes and approaches, then disabled people are not objects that are being counted, but subjects, who have rights and freedoms. As a result of this shift in thinking, ratification of the Convention should also mark a shift in creating a more inclusive society in El Salvador.
http://upsidedownworld.org/main/content/view/1384/74/

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Sit-in at Nursing Home
Demonstrators organised a sit-in and called for closure of a nursing home in Philadelphia. “There is no justice for someone in a nursing home,” read a sign held by one of the demonstrators.

The group’s goal was to persuade Mayor Nutter to help find homes for 50 or so disabled residents over the next six months, then get out of the nursing-home business. They were successful! Details at:
http://www.adapt.org/ http://www.philly.com/philly/hp/news_update/20080818_Protesters_seek_to_close_Phila__nursing_home.html

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

And Finally …
Discrimination is a putrid shade of yellow
It tastes like stale vomit
It smells like rancid fish
Discrimination reminds me of corruption, anger and despair
And sounds like a hooded coward running scared
Discrimination feels like nobody cares …
Extract from Bipolar works blog, 2007

Thank you for your time.
We are pleased to hear from you.
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

Supported by the National Lottery through the Big Lottery Fund.



Thank you to Disability Awareness Action for giving open permission to disseminate and re-publish their newsletter.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Global Forum for Inclusion 2008: Transforming Rights into Action, Nov 17-26, 2008

Posted on 26 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Families, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following open letter of invitation comes from Diane Richler, President of Inclusion International.

GLOBAL FORUM FOR INCLUSION 2008: Transforming Rights into Action. 17-26 Nov 2008.

The Forum for Inclusion 2008: Transforming Rights into Action is Co-Hosted by Inclusion International and the Canadian Association for Community Living

To be held at the Westin Hotel in Ottawa, Canada in November 2008, this Forum will engage self-advocates, families, activists, professionals and partners from around the world. Focused on the new UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Forum will look at how to transform rights into actions that lead to full inclusion and citizenship for people with intellectual disabilities.

Several events will take place in Ottawa: International Gathering of Families (November 17-18); International Gathering of Self-Advocates (November 17-18); International Conference: Putting the UN Convention into Action for People with Intellectual Disabilities (November 18-19); and Inclusion in Focus: Spotlight on Canada, at the 50th Anniversary Conference of the Canadian Association for Community Living (November 19-21). These events will be followed by study tours in Canada and the United States.

For information on these events, registration, accommodation and more please visit:
WWW.INCLUSION2008.COM Conference information is available in English, French, or Spanish.

If you need letters of invitation or have questions concerning your attendance, please contact
Raquel González R.Gonzalez@uel.ac.uk

We hope to see you there!

Diane Richler
President of Inclusion International



Thank you to Inclusion International for sending this announcement to be posted here. Interested parties should please contact them directly to inquire about the conference, NOT We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 7 so far )

Mainstream Grantmaking and People with Disabilities

Posted on 20 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Funding, Human Rights, Inclusion, Resources | Tags: , , , , , |

Do people with disabilities need or deserve special attention from mainstream human rights organizations or grantmakers who don’t plan to specialize in their concerns? Is there a role for people with disabilities in mainstream human rights projects? How and why should people with disabilities be included in human rights campaigns that focus on other population groups such as women, ethnic minorities, or the poor? How can including people with disabilities help everyone in achieving human rights goals for all population groups? What role can grassroots organizations, and the funders that support them, play in this process?

Organizations and grantmakers can both consult a pair of brochures that explain how and why non-governmental organizations and funders can and should take disability into account when planning or funding mainstream international human rights programs. They are entitled “Human Rights and Disability: Embracing a paradigm shift: A Funder Opportunity” and “Human Rights and Disability: Embracing a paradigm shift: An NGO Opportunity.” Each brochure is two pages long, and is available in both PDF format and Word format. They can be downloaded for free at:

http://www.disabilityfunders.org/human_rights

These brochures are targeted at mainstream funders and organizations. Grassroots disability advocates could also use them in their outreach efforts to persuade organizations and funders of the need to be more inclusive of their concerns in mainstream human rights programs.

Mainstream organizations and grantmakers who are serious about including disabled people in their programs will want to note that this pair of brochures only gives a broad overview of the issues involved. If you are seeking more detailed, concrete guidance in how to incorporate people with disabilities in your projects, then you will want to explore other resources on inclusive development that have been featured at the We Can Do blog.

Also explore some of the publications available at the Disability Funder’s website.



I first learned of the Disability Funder’s Network when I was working on a project recently to pull together a collection of links for the Disability Rights Fund website (watch their space for an extensive collection of resources due to go up in late August or early September 2008).

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

REPORT: Personal Mobility, Accessibility for Disabled People in South East Europe

Posted on 20 August 2008. Filed under: Blind, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, Mobility Impariments, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Countries that have chosen to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) are now required to protect the right of people with disabilities to personal mobility; and to an accessible environment. But disabled people in the South-Eastern countries of Europe, such as Kosovo, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia, Albania, Croatia, and Hungary, are often denied the right simply to move from one place to another on the same basis as other people in their society. They lack mobility aids such as prosthestic devices, wheelchairs, and crutches; public buildings, and even their own homes, are not accessible to them; and neither is public transportation.

People who wish to learn more about the conditions that limit the mobility of people with disabilities in South East Europe–and what can be done to improve their situation–can consult a report entitled “Free movement of people with disabilities in south east Europe: an inaccessible right?” (PDF format, 1 Mb) This report addresses the mobility and accessibility needs of people with mobility impairments; people who are blind or have vision impairments; people with intellectual disabilities; and deaf people. The 124-page report was published by Handicap International in 2006.

The first part of the report discusses the current situation, and barriers, faced by people with various disabilities in South East Europe. The second part describes good practices that have successfully made the environment more accessible for people with disabilities throughout the region. The third part discusses the importance of awareness raising; the laws and policies needed to improve the situation; the need for training in universal design; and the importance of including people with disabilities in planning all new construction. The report closes with a series of recommendations.

The full report can be downloaded for free in
http://www.disabilitymonitor-see.org/documents/dmi2_eng/dmrII_webeng.pdf

People interested in creating accessible environments, and in the principles of universal design, may also be interested in learning about a free, on-line book on Universal Design and Visitability.



We Can Do learned about this report by exploring the newest resources to be posted at the AskSource.info database on disability issues; health issues; and development.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

UN Launches Blog-Based Discussion on Inclusion and Development

Posted on 9 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Please direct inquiries to the email addresses provided in the announcement below, not to We Can Do. Dirija por favor las preguntas a los correos electronicos abajo, no a We Can Do. Veuillez diriger les questions vers les email address fournis ci-dessous, pas a We Can Do.

Version française; Versión español

Dear Colleagues and Partners,

The adoption of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities marks a renewed commitment of the United Nations to improving the situation of people with disabilities, wherever they are. A man, a woman, or a child suffering from any kind of disability is much more likely to be poor, unemployed or discriminated against than a person without a disability. The disparity is even starker in developing countries.

More than 50 United Nations Development Program (UNDP) country offices in recent years have implemented programmes to recognize and respect the rights of persons living with disabilities, to provide them with training to help navigate better in life and to stand a better chance to be employed, to improve their participation in decision-making, to address the needs of millions of people who became disabled because of devastating conflicts and disasters. This year, UNDP made a commitment at the highest level to consolidate and strengthen our work to support persons with disabilities. On the other hand we are also looking at UNDP as employer and are decided to make our organization more accessible for employees, partners, and guests living with a disability.

In that context, we invite you to a blog-based discussion on Inclusion and Disability, to be held from 9 June to 9 July 2008. The blog-based discussion departs from traditional discussion methods. It is hosted on an interactive collaborative space hosted by UNDP Bratislava Regional Centre and enables each participant to share their views and resources. The lead
moderators will be:

  • Lance Clark, UNDP Resident Representative and UN Resident Coordinator, UNDP Serbia
  • Milena Isakovic, Programme Officer, UNDP Serbia
  • Marielza Oliveira, Programme Advisor, Regional Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Louise Nylin, Human Rights Advisor, Bratislava Regional Centre
  • Susanne Milcher, Social Inclusion Advisor, Bratislava Regional Centre
  • Ronald Wiman, author of the Manual on Inclusive Planning, Senior Social Development Advisor, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and STAKES, Finland
  • Geraldine Glassman, HR Associate, BOM/OHR/Staff Wellbeing Unit

To enrich the discussion, we encourage you to invite your colleagues and partners from UN agencies, the civil society, governments and media.

The outcomes of this discussion will help develop a UNDP policy and programming guidance document, as well as help formulate a more inclusive human resource strategy of UNDP.

To participate or contribute to the discussion, please notify by sending an e-mail to pr-net@groups.undp.org or to martin.santiago@undp.org

The specific details on how to participate will be shared on Monday 9 June.

We look forward to your participation.

Best regards,

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Director, Poverty Practice
Director, Office of Human Resources

Co-chairs of UNDP’s Task Force on Disability

Version française
Chers Collègues et Partenaires,

L’ adoption de la Convention sur les Droits des Personnes Handicapées marque le renouvellement de l’engagement des Nations Unies à améliorer les conditions de vie des personnes handicapées, où qu’ils soient. Un homme, une femme ou un enfant affecté par une forme d’handicap court plus que d’autres, en pleine possession de leurs moyens, le risque d’être pauvre, sans emploi ou victime de discrimination. La différence est encore plus frappante dans les pays en développement.

Au cours des dernières années, plus de 50 bureaux de pays du PNUD ont mis en œuvre des programmes visant à reconnaître et respecter les droits des personnes handicapées, à leur fournir la formation nécessaire à pouvoir mieux se diriger dans la vie et être plus en mesure d’être recruté pour emploi, à augmenter leur participation dans la prise de décision, à répondre aux besoins de millions de personnes qui sont devenues victimes d’un handicap à la suite de conflits et catastrophes dévastateurs. Cette année, c’est à l’échelon le plus élevé que le PNUD s’est engagé à consolider et renforcer notre travail d’appui aux personnes handicapées. En outre, c’est aussi en tant qu’employeur que nous examinons le rôle du PNUD et nous sommes déterminés à faire en sorte que notre organisation soit plus accessible aux employés, partenaires et hôtes souffrant d’un handicap.

Dans ce contexte, nous vous invitons à une discussion sur le thème de L’Intégration et le Handicap hébergée sur un blog et prévue du 9 Juin au 9 Juillet 2008. Une discussion à partir d’un blog se démarque de méthodes traditionnelles de discussion. Elle sera hébergée sur un espace collaboratif interactif aménagé par le Centre Régional de Bratislava du PNUD et donne à chaque participant l’occasion de partager son point de vue et ses ressources. Les principaux modérateurs seront:

  • Lance Clark, Représentant Résident PNUD et Coordonateur Résident de l’ONU, PNUD Serbie
  • Milena Isakovic, Administrateur de Programme, PNUD Serbie
  • Marielza Oliveira, Conseiller pour les Programmes, Bureau régional d’Amérique Latine et des Caraïbes
  • Louise Nylin, Conseiller pour les Droits de l’Homme, Centre Régional de Bratislava
  • Susanne Milcher, Conseiller en matière d’Intégration Sociale, Centre Régional de Bratislava
  • Ronald Wiman, auteur du Manual on Inclusive Planning, (Manuel de Planification de l’Intégration) Conseiller principal en matière de Développement Social, Ministère des Affaires Etrangères et STAKES, Finlande
  • Geraldine Glassman, Associé RH, BOM/OHR/Staff Wellbeing Unit (cellule de bien-être du personnel)

Nous vous encourageons à enrichir la discussion en invitant vos collègues et partenaires d’agences onusiennes, de la société civile, des gouvernements et des médias.

Les résultats de cette discussion contribueront tant à l’élaboration d’un document d’orientation de politique et de programmation du PNUD, qu’à la formulation d’une stratégie de ressources humaines plus intégrante au sein du PNUD.

Pour participer ou contribuer à la discussion, prière de nous en avertir en envoyant un mail à pr-net@groups.undp.org ou à martin.santiago@undp.org.

Les détails spécifiques sur les modalités de participation seront communiqués le lundi 9 Juin.

Dans l’attente de votre participation.

Meilleures salutations,

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Directeur, Pratique de la Lutte contre la Pauvreté
Directeur, Bureau des Ressources Humaines

Co-présidents de l’équipe spéciale duPNUD œuvrant sur les personnes handicapées

Version Español
Estimados colegas y socios,

La adopción de la Convención sobre los Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad marca un compromiso renovado de las Naciones Unidas a mejorar la situación de las personas con alguna discapacidad, sean de donde sean. Es mucho más probable que un hombre, mujer o niño que padezca cualquiera discapacidad sea pobre, desempleado o discriminando que una persona sin ninguna discapacidad. La disparidad es incluso más dura en los países en vías de desarrollo.

Durante los últimos años más de 50 oficinas de la UNDP en diferentes países han implementado programas para reconocer y respetar los derechos de las personas con alguna discapacidad, para suministrarles la formación necesaria para ayudarles a navegar por la vida con más facilidad y para que tengan más oportunidades de empleo, para su mejor participación en la toma de decisiones, y además los programas tratan de dirigirse a las necesidades de los miles de personas que son discapacitadas por causa de conflictos y desastres devastadores.

Este año la UNDP se está comprometido al nivel más alto, para consolidar y reforzar nuestro trabajo de apoyo a personas discapacitadas. Por otro lado, estamos también viendo a la UNDP como empleador y estamos decididos en hacer que nuestra organización sea más accesible a empleados, socios e invitados con discapacidades.

En este contexto, os invitamos a una discusión basada en un blog sobre Inclusión y Discapacidad, que tendrá lugar desde el 9 de junio hasta el 9 de julio de 2008. La discusión en un blog se desvía de los métodos tradicionales de discusión. Se encuentra en un espacio interactivo colaborativo presentado por el Centro Regional de la UNDP en Bratislava y permite que cada participante pueda compartir sus puntos de vista y sus recursos. Los moderadores clave serán:

  • Lance Clark, UNDP Representante Residente y Coordinador Residente, UNDPSerbia
  • Milena Isakovic, Oficial de Programa, UNDP Serbia
  • Marielza Oliveira, Asesor de Programa, Agencia Regional para América Latina y el Caribe
  • Louise Nylin, Asesor Derechos Humanos, Centro Regional de Bratislava
  • Susanne Milcher, Asesor de Inclusión Social, Centro Regional de Bratislava
  • Ronald Wiman, autor delManual on Inclusive Planning, Asesor Superior de Desarrollo Social, Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores y STAKES, Finlandia
  • Geraldine Glassman, Asociada de Recursos Humanos, BOM/OHR/Unidad del Bienestar de Empleados

Para enriquecer la discusión, os animamos a invitar a vuestros colegas y socios de las agencias de la ONU, la sociedad civil, los gobiernos y la prensa.

Los resultados de esta discusión ayudarán a desarrollar un documento de orientación de política y programación además de ayudar a formular una estrategia de recursos humanos de la UNDP más inclusiva.

Para participar o contribuir a la discusión, por favor, notificarnos con un correo electrónico a pr-net@groups.undp.org o responder a martin.santiago@undp.org.

Los detalles específicos de cómo participar estarán disponibles el lunes 9 de junio.

Esperamos vuestra participación.

Saludos

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Director, Poverty Practice
Director, Office of Human Resources
Co-chairs of UNDP’s Task Force on Disability



We Can Do first learned about the UNDP blog-based discussion on Inclusion and Development via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserv.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

REPORT Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children

Posted on 23 May 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

There are 77 million children around the world who have never entered a primary school classroom. Most are from poor families in developing countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. And, according to a recent report (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), one-third of them have disabilities.

This is an enormous proportion when you consider that the World Health Organization estimates that only about 10 percent of the overall world population are people with disabilities. The World Bank has estimated that possibly as many as 15 to 20 percent of the world’s poorest people have disabilities. But even by this estimate, children with disabilities are still disproportionately represented among primary-school-aged children who are not in school.

So, what can be done to address this challenge? A recent 74-page report, Education’s Missing Millions: including disabled children in education through EFA FTI processes and national sector plans (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), explores this question. Education’s Missing Millions was funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) through a Partnership Programme Agreement with World Vision UK.

Country governments and international donors have been working together on the Education For All Fast Track Initiative (FTI) to put all primary-school aged children into a classroom by the year 2015. This goal cannot possibly be met until disabled children, too, are able to obtain an education. Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb)
analyzes education sector plans that the FTI has endorsed in 28 countries to examine how well they include children with disabilities.

Some efforts have taken place to include disabled children in education in some of these countries. However, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) still identifies many gaps that must be addressed. For example, many countries do not even have data on how many of their children have disabilities. Also, few countries have explored how they can use funding mechanisms or incentives to support the inclusion of children with disabilities. And countries often do not work as closely as they could with parents, communities, or non-government organizations (NGOs).

Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) calls upon FTI partners to actively target children with disabilities to ensure that they, too, can obtain a free, good-quality education. The report makes a series of recommendations for pragmatic ways in which country governments and donors can promote dialogue about policies and practices within the FTI Partnership; act as a “champion” for inclusion; and close gaps in data, policy, capacity, and financing that would otherwise exclude disabled children.

Both grassroots advocates and policy makers may be interested in the 8th chapter, on local community and NGO initiatives. This chapter presents examples of projects that helped promote the inclusion of a wider number of disabled children in the classroom and their communities.

You can download the full report, Education’s Missing Millions, in PDF format (1.2 Mb) at:

http://www.worldvision.org.uk/upload/pdf/Education%27s_Missing_Millions_-_Main_Report.pdf

People interested in education for children with disabilities in general may also be interested in reading about a report on the human rights approach to Education For All (EFA). Or you might be interested in joining a network on inclusive education in Eastern Africa; this is an email discussion group that allows you to exchange ideas and information with other people via email.



We Can Do found Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) by browsing the <a href=”http://www.AskSource.infoAskSource.info database on disability, health, and development.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

Bonn Declaration on Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Emergency Situations

Posted on 8 April 2008. Filed under: Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Inclusion, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following Declaration was published at a recent international conference in Bonn, focused on people with disabilities in humanitarian emergency situations.

International Conference: Disasters are always inclusive. Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Emergency Situations
Bonn, 7 – 8 November, 2007

BONN DECLARATION
Preface – Situation Analysis
In humanitarian emergency situations, persons with disabilities are amongst the most vulnerable groups of society and tend to be disproportionately affected by the impacts of disasters. At the same time, they often remain ‘invisible’, even though their number statically makes up approximately ten percent of any population. Persons with disabilities, be they of physical, sensory, intellectual or psychological nature, are most often not included in the various stages of disaster response and in disaster preparedness measures, neither as recipients of aid to meet their basic as well as specific needs, nor as active stakeholders and designers or planners of aid measures, voicing their own needs and opinions. In addition, the incidence of new disabilities created by disasters is often not sufficiently taken into account and not responded to in an adequate, long-term manner, neither by local Governments, local NGOs or Disabled Peoples’ Organizations (DPOs), nor by intervening international NGOs. This lack of long-term rehabilitation perspective can lead to detrimental or even fatal outcomes for injured disaster victims, even after the disaster has long since passed and is no longer present in public awareness. This includes the neglect of severe trauma symptoms, which, if not professionally dealt with, can result in permanent psychological disabilities.

As a basis for a change of mindsets as well as for concrete action, the UN Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights and Dignity of Persons with Disabilities, adopted in December 2006, constitutes the crucial instrument of international law to claim and reinforce equality and full participation of persons with disabilities. Article 11 calls for State parties to undertake “all measures to ensure protection and safety for persons with disabilities in situations of risk, including situations of armed conflict, humanitarian emergencies and the occurrence of natural disasters”.

In humanitarian emergency situations, humanitarian aid agencies and other stakeholders are called to comply with minimum standards and indicators of humanitarian aid in order to secure and protect lives, especially of vulnerable groups such as women, children, elderly and persons with disabilities. These minimum standards and indicators can be valuable guidelines, but are not yet sufficiently explicit and practical with regard to inclusion of persons with disabilities (for example refer to the handbook of The Sphere Project, 2004 edition).

In conclusion to the international conference “Disasters are always inclusive! Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Emergency Situations”, held November 7 and 8, 2007, a number of recommendations for inclusive disaster preparedness and emergency response in the sense of “Humanitarian Aid for ALL” were deduced. It was the common understanding that the most important and at the same time most difficult requirement is to change mindsets in such a way that inclusion becomes a matter of course. From there to actual practical adjustments towards inclusiveness of disaster preparedness and response programs is a much easier step.

I. Recommendations for Inclusive Disaster Response in General
II. Recommendations for Inclusive Disaster Preparedness Planning
III. Recommendations for Inclusive Response in Acute Emergency Situations and Immediate Rehabilitation Measures
IV. Recommendations for Inclusive Post-Disaster Reconstruction and Development Measures

I. Recommendations for Inclusive Disaster Response in General
It is important to ensure inclusion of persons with disabilities, their families and communities as well as Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs) at every stage of disaster response, from planning to implementation, in order to cater for basic as well as special needs of persons with disabilities in pre, acute and post disaster situations.

Recommendations instrumental for inclusion in all stages of disaster response are:
1) Enable full participation of persons with disabilities and their families as active stakeholders and advisors;
2) Guarantee full accessibility for persons with disabilities and their families to information and services in pre, acute and post disaster situations;
3) Strive for involvement and creation of ownership of local government structures with regard to inclusive disaster response measures;
4) Lobby for government action plans for inclusion / disability mainstreaming in disaster response;
5) Strive for cooperation and networking between humanitarian aid agencies and organisations specialising in disability issues, both on the national and international level;
6) Define and learn from “best practices” of inclusion / disability mainstreaming in disaster response;
7) Adapt existing disaster response guidelines to include criteria and practical indicators for inclusion of disability issues;
8) Provide easily applicable methodologies and tools for practical inclusive action in disaster response;
9) Establish (self-)evaluation mechanisms to monitor and improve the quality of inclusion measures in disaster response;
10) Allocate adequate funding for disability issues in disaster response budgets as well as in development aid budgets for disaster prone areas.

II. Recommendations for Inclusive Disaster Preparedness Planning
Special focus must be directed towards inclusive disaster preparedness planning to ensure effective inclusive disaster response when an emergency actually takes place (be prepared = best case scenario).

Since the emergency affects local people in situ on the level of local communities, disaster preparedness planning must be community-based. Tailor-made community based disaster preparedness planning can then respond adequately to the special situations and needs of ALL, including vulnerable groups such as persons with disabilities, in a given community.

Recommendations instrumental for inclusive disaster preparedness planning are:
1) Raise sensitivity and awareness that disaster preparedness is important for all members of a community;
2) Raise sensitivity and awareness that persons with disabilities have basic and special needs that require specific attention in an emergency situation;
3) Mobilize and strengthen the capacities of local human resources, in particular individuals with disabilities, their families (especially the parents of the intellectually disabled), their village communities, local government structures, existing local DPOs, local research institutes etc;
4) Provide theoretical and practical training on disability issues (knowledge and skills) for relief workers, volunteers, family members etc. – Possible training topics: understanding disability and related basic and special needs; understanding and overcoming barriers; acquiring and improving practical skills by exercising communication techniques and evacuation methods adapted to the needs of persons with disabilities etc;
5) Involve disabled people themselves, their families and local DPOs in local needs assessments (participatory vulnerability mapping of communities);
6) Involve and train disabled people themselves, their families and local DPOs for participation in local disaster response task forces;
7) Establish a system of accountability for all involved stakeholders (local NGOs, voluntary task forces, local government structures etc), based on a catalogue of criteria / indicators and easily applicable self-monitoring systems to determine the degree and quality of inclusive preparedness.

III. Recommendations for Inclusive Response in Acute Emergency Situations and Immediate Rehabilitation Measures
Most often the “best case scenario”, meaning that inclusive disaster preparedness planning has taken place and preparedness measures are implemented, is not given at the incidence of disaster. Nevertheless, it is possible to include persons with disabilities in relief and in immediate rehabilitation measures.

Recommendations instrumental for inclusive relief and immediate rehabilitation after an acute emergency are:
1) Include issues of disability in rapid assessments of aid relevant sectors;
2) As a tool for rapid assessments, use easy to handle (updated) checklists which comprise disability related questions;
3) Find and provide assistance for the ‘invisible’ persons with disabilities already living in the disaster affected communities, including those with intellectual and psychological disabilities;
4) Pay adequate professional medical attention to newly injured or disabled persons to avoid medical complications, secondary disabilities or even fatal outcomes;
5) Avoid aggravation of injuries or new disabilities by inadequate transportation of injured persons during evacuation;
6) Pay adequate attention to the emotional and social needs of disaster victims to help them overcome normal trauma symptoms;
7) Pay adequate professional psychological attention to disaster victims displaying severe traumatic symptoms to avoid long-term psychic disabilities;
8) Include local and international experts for special focuses in rapid assessment teams and advisory teams, such as disability experts, psycho-social trauma counsellors, experienced persons with disabilities etc;
9) Strive for coordination of intervening stakeholders on the spot, for example through cluster meetings of local and international NGOs representing different aid sectors, including disability specific organisations;
10) Build alliances with other vulnerable groups, because what you do for one group (persons with disabilities) is often also valuable for others (elderly persons, pregnant or nursing mothers, mothers with many children etc);
11) Incorporate tools for inclusion in the context of relief and immediate rehabilitation into the next revision of The Sphere Project handbook (knowing about these tools is also an aspect of preparedness);
12) Link relief and immediate rehabilitation activities with long-term rehabilitation and development by negotiation and cooperation with local Governments and authorities.

IV. Recommendations for Inclusive Post-Disaster Reconstruction and Development Measures
Inclusive reconstruction and development, focussing on participation and empowerment of all groups of society and especially of vulnerable groups, leads to better living conditions than before the disaster and at the same time to a higher level of preparedness and thus reduction of vulnerability in the face of a potential next disaster.

Recommendations instrumental for inclusive post-disaster reconstruction and inclusive development are:

1) Apply principles of universal accessibility for ALL, including flexibility for adaptations to various needs of persons with disabilities when implementing housing reconstruction projects;
2) Include universal accessibility features when involved in planning and reconstruction of infrastructure and public facilities;
3) Involve beneficiaries as active participants in every stage of the reconstruction project cycle;
4) Facilitate and monitor inclusive planning and reconstruction with the help of expert advice from skilled and specialized persons with disabilities;
5) Allocate sufficient time for sensitization, awareness raising, negotiation and cooperation with key (local) stakeholders, such as affected communities, persons with disabilities and their families, DPOs, local authorities (community and national levels), professionals (architects, engineers) etc;
6) Lobby for government policies and minimum standards for barrier-free reconstruction, including reconstruction of infrastructure and public facilities (refer to article 9 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities);
7) Raise awareness for cost efficiency of barrier-free reconstruction from the very beginning as compared to subsequent technical adjustments;
8) Further develop and apply tools (checklists, manuals) for barrier-free reconstruction and adapt them to local environments (adjustment of minimum standards to local context);
9) Strive for continuation of medical care and rehabilitation as well as psycho-social support for persons injured or disabled by the disaster through their integration into long-term local public health programs;
10) Support the development of a referral system linking existing facilities required in long-term rehabilitation;
11) Develop self-help capacities of persons with disabilities and their families through livelihood programs (professional training, income generating projects);
12) Monitor and evaluate long-term rehabilitation and development measures to make necessary changes for improved impact and sustainability;
13) Make disaster preparedness planning a crucial element of and a trigger for inclusive community development (refer to paragraph I. of this document).
_____________________________________________________________________

The Bonn Declaration was composed and published as result of the international conference “Disasters are always inclusive. Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Emergency Situations” which took place from 7 – 8 November, 2007, in Bonn/Germany.

The conference was organized by Disability & Development Cooperation (bezev), Kindernothilfe, Christian Blind Mission, Caritas Germany International Dptm., Handicap International and Der Paritätische Gesamtverband.

Further information and documents on ‘Humanitarian Aid for All’, Inclusive Disaster Preparedness and Response are available under: www.bezev.de

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

NEWS: Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum Founded

Posted on 8 April 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Ghulam Nabi Nizamani has asked that people circulate the following press release.

COMMONWEALTH DISABLED PEOPLES’ FORUM

Press Release

A New Voice Shouts to the Commonwealth –
Nothing About us Without Us.

Disabled youth and adult people from 16 Commonwealth countries came together from 15-17 March, 2008 in London to launch a unique Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum (1), the purposes of which will be to provide a link between disabled people’s organisations in all Commonwealth countries and all the political structures of the Commonwealth.

At the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in October 2007 the civil society challenge to CHOGM was to mainstream disability in sustainable development, to ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (CRPD) and to adopt disability inclusive policies. This cannot be achieved without a strong, democratic forum of disabled youth and adults to ensure implementation.

We had a vibrant and dynamic series of meetings to consolidate the vision, constitution and activities of the Forum (2). The youth met separately to devise their own creative methods of self representation and organisation. We came together in a final agreement of how to go forward together. It is essential that the voice of young disabled people is heard clearly in the work of the CDPF. They are the future leaders and builders of our shared vision of a Commonwealth built on equality, human rights and respect for diversity.

The major focus of our work in the next two years, including a major conference before CHOGM in 2009, will be to ensure that Commonwealth countries sign, ratify and implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. As Rachel Kachaje said at the Launch of the CDPF, hosted by the Commonwealth Foundation at Marlborough House,
‘Disabled people see that hope springs out of the convention – hope for a new, inclusive world where disabled people can be seen as fully human’

We, All Sanghar Handicaps’ Association Pakistan are very proud to have part of this exciting new beginning and look forward to working with our disabled colleagues to ensure our full inclusion in all the nations of our shared Commonwealth.

For further information contact:
Ghulam Nabi Nizamani
South Asia /South East Asia Regional Representative
Bakhoro Road Sanghar-68100, Pakistan. (3)
Ph # +92-333-2916281
Email: ghulamnabi.nizamani@gmail.com (4)

(1) This meeting was funded by the Commonwealth Foundation, DFID, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and ADD.
(2) Officers elected were: Chair: James Mwanda (Uganda), Vice Chair: George Daniel (Tinidad & Tobago), Secretary: Javed Abidi (India), Treasurer: Richard Rieser (UK), Women’s Representative: Rachel Kachaje, (Malawi) Youth Representatives: Laura Kanusu (Uganda)
George Kasara (Kenya), Regional Representatives: Ghulam Nabi Nizaamani (Pakistan), Lesley Emmanuel (Antigua), Setareki Macanawai (Fiji), Steve Estey (Canada) Thomas Ongolo (South Africa).
(3) The registered office of the CDPF will be in India and there will be a liaison office in the UK to work directly with the Commonwealth Secretariat and Foundation.
(4) This email address can be changed after website of CDPF.



In addition to the above press release, Ghulam Nabi Nizamani also made the following note in mid March:

The following countries from South Asia and South East Asia are member countries of Commonwealth. These Countries are invited to submit application for Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum (CDPF) Country Focal Point.
Bangladesh
Brunei Darussalam
India
Malaysia
Maldives
Pakistan
Singapore
Sri Lanka

The Organization must be National Level Organization in respective country if in any country there will be no National Organization we will support to encourage to estabilish National organization in that country. Please also send establishment date of Organization, Network in the Country, Some credible work done in past. Please send information by mail or email before the first week of April 2008.

Cheers!
Ghulam Nabi Nizamani
Regional Representative CDPF
South and South East Asia

Note: We have no contact from Brunei Darussalam please help us for finding National organization there.



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for sharing the above press release. Any inquiries should please be emailed to him directly at ghulamnabi.nizamani@gmail.com.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 5 so far )

JOB POST: Secretary General, Rehabilitation International

Posted on 20 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Michael Fox, president of Rehabilitation International, has been circulating the following announcement; note that the application deadline is March 28, 2008:

As advised at the RI 2007 Assembly in Djerba, Tunisia – our Secretary General Tomas Lagerwall has decided to leave RI later this year – and return to Sweden after a seven year term with RI.

Accordingly, and on behalf of the RI Selection Committee, I am pleased to invite submissions from applicants worldwide for this important role of RI Secretary General – as following details and information.

Regards

Michael Fox
RI President
www.riglobal.org
Sydney phone 612 6552 9333

4 February 2008

RI Secretary General – New York

RI was established in 1922, and is a well recognised and respected international disability and rehabilitation advocacy organisation. RI is a global cross-disability and cross-disciplinary NGO providing a unique meeting ground for participants in a field that has disciplinary and ideological opinions and differences. RI has well-established partnerships with the UN and its agencies as well as other international and regional organisations in the field of disability. Further information on RI and our UN and global networks are available at www.riglobal.org.

RI is a democratic organisation governed by an Assembly – representing RI member organisations in almost 100 countries. The RI Annual Assembly is a global forum to discuss developments in disability issues and general policies and programs of the organisation. The RI Executive Committee provides strategic direction, formulates and considers policies and oversees the budget of the organisation. The RI EC consists of 22 members composed of the RI President, President-elect or Past President, Treasurer and representatives of RI Regions and expert Commissions.

RI is a matrix organisation, with regional leadership in Africa, the Arab Region, Asia, Europe, Latin America and North America as well as thematic Commissions in particular fields of expertise, to assist in developing and expanding program activities in accordance with RI strategic goals. The RI Foundation was established in 2006 and provides the basis for significant growth and development of the RI agenda worldwide.

RI and its members are involved in a range of advocacy projects and activities to promote the RI goal of advancing and achieving the rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities worldwide. The next RI World Congress is scheduled in Quebec City, Canada during August 2008. RI also works toward increasing international collaboration and advocates for policies and legislation recognising the rights of people with disabilities and their families, including the ratification and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

RI Secretary General
RI is managed by a full time Secretariat in our New York City head office. The Secretary General is the CEO of the organisation and our current incumbent has successfully managed this role since 2001.

We now require the services of a resourceful, experienced and dynamic candidate for the role of RI Secretary General. There will be a suitable and agreed transition period for the successful candidate.

CLOSING DATE FOR APPLICATIONS Friday 28 March 2008

DUTY STATION New York, United States of America

ACCESSIBILITY RI New York offices are ADA accessible

Responsibilities and Competencies of Secretary General
The responsibilities and competencies of the successful applicant will include

* Implementation of RI policies, strategies and programs as determined by the RI General Assembly and RI EC – and as agreed with, and in close consultation with, the President, Executive Committee and RI Foundation Board

* Effective management and implementation of the RI Strategic Plan – with balanced commitment to RI Global activities and development of the RI Foundation

* Demonstrate professionalism, judgement, technical awareness and leadership

* Excellent interpersonal skills and ability to operate effectively across organisational boundaries – with ability to establish and maintain effective working relations with people of different national and cultural backgrounds

* Solicit input by genuinely valuing other peoples ideas and expertise – and willing to learn from others

* Ability to operate in a changing environment with innovation and professionalism

* Take the lead with respect to the preparation and implementation of the work program, ensuring that resources are utilised effectively and prudently to implement activities in accordance with the RI Mission, budget and available human and financial resources

* Monitor and review the work program and budget by conducting regular analysis to assess progress of actual work versus the program

* Define requirements and work with system units with respect to improving budget reporting systems and cost effective utilisation of program resources

* Supervise and provide guidance on financial administration and management information issues and practices to Board members, in conjunction with the Finance Committee

* Support, manage, travel and organise RI events as required

* Supervise staff at RI New York and other locations as required

* Provide guidance and leadership to RI staff

* Promote RI membership growth in conjunction with the Membership Committee

* Oversee work related to billing and receipt of income from various services, monitoring and evaluation of individual contractors for services

* Represent RI at international, regional and national meetings related to disability rights and related issues – including IDA, the International Disability Alliance

* Collaborate with relevant organisations including United Nations, World Bank, DPOs, foundations, the private sector, NGOs and civil society at large

* Participate in inter-agency consultations, meetings, and conferences related to disability rights and services issues

* Organise and participate in expert group meetings, workshops and seminars on disability rights and services as required

* Provide advisory services to and collaborate with UN agencies, governments, DPOs, NGOs, regional groups, private sector groups and other stakeholders on disability rights, services and related issues

Qualifications

Education – A minimum of first level university degree with a relevant combination of academic qualifications and experience.

Work Experience – A minimum of 5 years progressively responsible experience in change management, human resources and financial / budget operations, with relevant professional experience in international, governmental and non-governmental organisations.

The RI Secretary General role calls for very good administrative, diplomacy and management skills. First hand disability related experience is preferred.

Languages – Fluency in oral and written English is required. Fluency and / or working knowledge of other languages is desirable.

Other Skills – Ability to use relevant computer technology and software.

Remuneration
A competitive compensation and benefits package is offered – subject to professional experience, family situation and other criteria as may be applicable. Immigration procedures can be negotiated as required.

Selection Process
Applicants will be short listed on the basis of academic credentials, experience, availability and other relevant factors. Additional information may be requested from candidates.

Short listed applicants will be invited to come to New York or elsewhere as appropriate, for an interview with representatives of the RI Selection Committee. Candidates will be interviewed on various criteria including related knowledge, skills, abilities, personality and availability.

The intention is for the new RI Secretary General to be appointed by June 2008.

How To Apply
Interested persons from any nationality worldwide are invited to apply for this important position. This invitation to apply for the role of RI Secretary General is open to everyone.

Detailed responses including Resumes / CVs, and a minimum of two written references, are to be submitted by Friday 28 March 2008. Submissions can be sent by email, post of fax to

Marca Bristo, RI North America Vice President

c/o Access Living
115 W Chicago Ave
Chicago, IL 60610 USA

Email mbristo@aol.com or
Fax 1 312 640 2140

All applications will be confidential to the Selection Committee and RI Executive Committee, until the successful candidate is announced.

We look forward to your application

Regards

Michael Fox AM
RI President
Sydney Australia



We Can Do retrieved this announcement from the email discussion list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD). Individuals may join their mailing list for free. Please note that interested parties should contact Rehabilitation International directly, not We Can Do.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (https://wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere OTHER THAN We Can Do, BlogAfrica, or RatifyNow, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people without their permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

RESOURCE: How to Include Disabled Women in Your Organizations

Posted on 23 January 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/yv5ouo]

Certain resources can help women’s organizations and international development agencies better include disabled women in their program activities. Skip to the resource list.

Women with disabilities confront many of the same challenges that other women in developing countries face, such as gender-based discrimination. But they also face some additional challenges, such as discrimination based on their disability. Some women’s organizations would like to advocate for the needs of disabled women in the same way that they advocate for all women. And international development agencies also want to ensure that they meet the needs of disabled women in the same way that they strive to meet the needs of all the poor people in the countries where they work.

But sometimes mainstream organizations aren’t sure how to begin. What barriers might they unknowingly create that make it harder for disabled women to participate in their programs’ activities or to make their needs known to their organization? What further barriers exist in society that may need to be overcome before an organization can more effectively serve women with disabilities? How can women’s organizations and international development agencies remove these barriers?

Several resources, listed below, can help. Mainstream organizations may wish to use these as guides to make their programs more accessible. Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) may wish to use these when communicating with mainstream organizations to persuade them to make change.

MIUSA’s “Checklist for Inclusion”
Mobility International USA (MIUSA) has a free checklist available (PDF format, 10 Mb). This 19-page self-assessment guide is written for mainstream international development agencies. It provides a series of questions that women’s organizations and international development agencies can use to help them identify what they’re already doing right and what things could be improved upon. For example: when you choose a meeting location, do you make sure that it is wheelchair accessible (ground-floor location with doors wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs, etc.)? Does your organization make its print materials available in non-print (Braille; diskette) and also large-print versions? Does your organization make qualified sign language interpreters available for its training, conference, and other program activities?

MIUSA’s International Development and Disability (IDD) Program
MIUSA’s International Development and Disability (IDD) program strives to bridge the disability community and the international development community in promoting the inclusion of people with disabilities as leaders and participants in development. It provides technical assistance and advice to both disabled people’s organizations and development agencies on gender and disability inclusion. In addition to their Checklist for Inclusion, organizations may wish to learn more about MIUSA activities, publications, videos, and other resources at MIUSA’s IDD web site:

http://www.miusa.org/idd/index_html

In particular, note that the checklist on inclusion was originally written as part of a more comprehensive guidebook on disability inclusion entitled Building an Inclusive Development Community: A Manual on Including People with Disabilities in International Development Programs.

Can’t afford the book? Or want to supplement it with free resources? Consult MIUSA’s page of links to free resources:

http://www.miusa.org/idd/keyresources

Also, read some “best practice” stories (case studies) of other organizations that have successfully promoted disability inclusion in their activities:

http://www.miusa.org/publications/freeresources/mti

Another item that might be of interest is an article written by Sarah Rosenhek at the Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID) about her experience learning about gender and disability through participating in MIUSA’s August 2006 Gender Disability and Development Institute (GDDI). Her article, entitled “Strengthening Women’s Rights Organizations through Inclusion: Lessons Learned from the Gender, Disability and Development Institute,” includes pragmatic advice for other women’s organizations that Rosenhek learned at the institute.

VSO’s Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability
Volunteer Service Overseas has a publication available on-line for free entitled A Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability (PDF format, 2 Mb). This handbook guides mainstream international development organizations in finding ways to overcome the stigma that can be associated with disability; how to actively integrate more disabled workers in the workplace; how to integrate more disabled participants in program activities; and how to integrate disability into organizational policy. Each chapter has case studies that describe how other organizations have implemented the advice given in this handbook. Download the handbook itself at

http://www.asksource.info/pdf/33903_vsomainstreamingdisability_2006.pdf (PDF format, 2 Mb)

The VSO’s Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability was previously featured at We Can Do, with an overview of its contents.

Siyanda On-line Database of Gender and Development Materials
Siyanda is targeted at development specialists who want to integrate gender equality issues into their work,whether or not they specialize in gender issues. This database makes iteasy to search for, and locate, full-length materials, that can bedownloaded for free. Its library of documents includes items in multiple languages including English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, and others. Try a key word search for “disabilities.”



We Can Do learned about the MIUSA resources and the Siyanda on-line database through contacts at MIUSA.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

REPORT: State of Disabled People’s Rights in Kenya (2007)

Posted on 17 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Blind, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Human Rights, Mobility Impariments, Reports, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/27gxpy]

A recent publication, entitled “State of Disabled People’s Rights in Kenya (2007) Report,” analyzes national and regional Kenyan legislation on disability; government programs and policies on disability, and case law in disability. The report also presents the results of interviews with disabled people in three selected regions within Kenya about their human rights situation, in respect to dignity, autonomy, equality, and inclusion. Deaf people, blind people, and people with mobility impairments, and intellectual disabilities were interviewed. An overview of the disability rights movement in Kenya is given.

The examination of legislation and policies found that the Constitution of Kenya guarantees the human rights and liberties of all citizens. However, although the constitution outlaws discrimination on grounds such as race, tribe, or color, it does not specifically outlaw discrimination on the basis of disability. Further, anti-discrimination laws have not been enforced in cases where disability-related discrimination has occurred.

Interviews with individual disabled people in Kenya found that nearly three-quarters had been denied the right to make decisions affecting their own lives. Also, 80% report experiencing segregation, isolation, and lack of support for their needs. More than one-third reported that their own families had committed abuse or violence on them, and more than 45 percent said their families did not allow them to participate in family activities on the same basis as other family members.

The report recommends strengthening the capacity of Disabled People’s Organizations to address human rights issues; mainstreaming disability rights issues into government bodies and the national development strategy; involving disabled people and their organization in improving anti-discrimination legislation; and making the court process more accessible to disabled people so they can more effectively challenge disability-based discrimination.

The “State of Disabled People’s Rights in Kenya (2007) Report” was commissioned by the African Union of the Blind in collaboration with the Kenyan Union of the Blind, the World Blind Union, and the Centre for Disability Rights Education and Advocacy (CREAD), with support from the Swedish International Development Agency, the Swedish Association of the Visually Impaired, and Disability Rights Promotion International (DRPI).

The report can be read on-line at http://www.yorku.ca/drpi/Kenya07.html#startContent

The report also can be downloaded in PDF format (1.2 Mb) at http://www.yorku.ca/drpi/files/KenyaReport07.pdf



This article has been reposted at the RatifyNow.org web site with permission of author. RatifyNow is an organization working to maximize the number of countries signing, ratifying, and implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

We Can Do Retrospective: The First 100 Posts (and Then Some)

Posted on 22 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Arts, autism, Blind, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Commonwealth Nations, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Deaf, Democratic Participation, Disability Studies, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, East Asia and Central Asia, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Events and Conferences, Families, Fellowships & Scholarships, Funding, Guest Blogger, Health, HIV/AIDS, Housing, Human Rights, Immigration, Inclusion, Interpreting, Introduction to "We Can Do", Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation, Remittances, Reports, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Violence, Volunteer Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Skip introduction, go straight to the Table of Contents

If you’re new to We Can Do, what interesting information, news, or resources might you have overlooked from the past few months? Although some older items may no longer be interesting, others may still be relevant and helpful a year or three from now. This post can help guide you through the first 100-plus posts at this blog. You can click from the table of contents below to any section of this page that interests you–and then another click on “table of contents” can take you back to the contents, or “top of this page” takes you back to this introduction.

Top of this page


Table of Contents

Table of Contents; Top of this page

About We Can Do

To learn more about the purpose of We Can Do, see About We Can Do. For more on its guiding philosophy, go to Why We Can Do.

Thinking about submitting your own written materials, job posts, conference announcements, or resources to We Can Do? Check the Wish list for written materials and resources.

Want to receive an alert in email when a new post goes up at We Can Do? You can Subscribe to We Can Do for free.

I changed the organization and appearance of We Can Do in early October to its present format.

Table of Contents; Top of this page

The Five Most Popular We Can Do posts

The five listed here are the ones that have attracted the most “page views” since We Can Do began in late July. You may notice that not all of these are featured in the 10 “most popular posts” listed in the right-hand navigation bar. That’s because the navigation bar only lists posts that have received a lot of traffic very recently (I think within the past few days; its done automatically by wordpress so I’m not sure how it works). But here I’m listing the five that have the highest TOTAL page views.

Table of Contents; Top of this page

The Five Most Under-Rated We Can Do posts

Are these posts really under-rated? You’ll have to read them and decide for yourself. But in choosing these five, I used two criteria: 1. These are posts that have received fewer than 100 visitors–sometimes far fewer. 2. These are posts that I think could be helpful or interesting to readers and maybe deserve more attention than they have gotten. These are in no particular order:

Table of Contents; Top of this page

Finding Practical Resources and Case Studies or Helpful Organizations

Finding organizations; Resources for inclusive development; Human rights resources; Case studies; Other helpful resources

Finding organizations
Mainstream international development agencies sometimes say that they don’t know how to find people with disabilities, or their representative organizations, in the developing countries where they work. Reviewing the July post entitled Finding Local Disability Organizations may help point you in the right direction. Also see Disability Organizations in Afghanistan, Asia, Kenya, Uganda.

Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) sometimes aren’t sure where to find mainstream development organizations and resources that might be willing to collaborate with them.

There is an international network of organizations for families of people with Rubinstein Taybi Syndrome.

Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

Resources for Inclusive Development
Both disability advocates and mainstream development organizations want to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind when countries and organizations fight poverty or improve public health, education, water, and other services. But it can be a challenge to figure out how to make projects and government policies more inclusive. The following resources can help:

Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

Resources on the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
By now, you may be aware that a global movement is taking place to ratify the international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Many relevant resources are now being produced in relation to the CRPD, some of which have been posted or featured here at We Can Do:

  • Read the CRPD “translated” into plain English.
  • UNICEF has developed a child-friendly version of the CRPD to help children understand disability rights
  • Disabled People International offers two toolkits on ratifying and implementing the CRPD for disability advocates who want to help ensure that all disabled people have their human rights recognized.
  • A handbook on disability rights targeted at parliamentarians can help parliamentarians, people who work in close contact with government agencies, and disability advocates in general, better understand the CRPD.
  • The United Nations’ new web site, UN Enable, is one of the best, and most official, places to find information on the CRPD.
  • Handicap International has produced its own Teaching Kit on the CRPD.
  • The International Disability Equality Agency (IDEA) has issued Equalize It! A Manifesto for Disability Equality in Development Cooperation that expresses their position on how to ensure disability equality in the international development field.
  • Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Case Studies
    Reviewing case studies of projects implemented elsewhere can be a valuable source of ideas that could help you figure out how to run or implement your own projects. I would love to post many more best-practice and failed-practice case studies than I have available right now. If you think you have something worth sharing, please check my Wish List of Written Materials and Resource and contact me at ashettle [at] patriot.net.

    But for now, here are two case studies:

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Other Helpful Resources

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Finding Useful Sources of Information and Research

    Finding academic research, papers, resources, or statistics
    Looking for academic research and academic papers; resources that can be used by people working in the field; or sources of statistics? Some of the following posts may be helpful:

    Information on people with disabilities
    Interested in learning about the living conditions of people with disabilities in specific nations, or in specific thematic areas? Some of the following may be of interest:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Funding Sources

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Academic Papers

    We Can Do has published, or re-published, academic papers, or linked to same, on a range of subjects, including:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    News

    September 2007; October 2007; November 2007; Early December 2007

    September 2007
    At one point in September, the international disability community prematurely thought we might be On the Verge of Making History by ratifying the disability rights community.

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    October 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    November 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Early December 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Opinion Pieces

    So far, the opinion pieces here are all by me. But I would like for We Can Do to be host to an active exchange of ideas and differing perspectives. If you have a strong opinion about something, please consider submitting it. Yes, that includes opinions that disagree with mine! Consult the Wish list for written materials and resources for ideas of the kinds of topics I’m trying to cover at We Can Do.

    Meanwhile, here are a few of my own opinion pieces:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Call for Papers (for Conferences, Journals, Other)

    You might be just now starting your academic career as an undergraduate or graduate student. Or perhaps you have been doing quantitative or qualitative research, or writing policy analysis, or case studies, or social analysis, for years. Either way, if you’re looking for opportunities to present, publish, or otherwise disseminate your papers or run a workshop, then check out these upcoming or ongoing opportunities:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    International Conferences and Events

    Looking for a conference to attend? Here are a few upcoming events:
    January 2008; February 2008; March 2008; April 2008; May 2008; August 2008; September 2008; November 2008

    January 2008
    The South Asian Conference on Autism is being held in New Delhi, India in January 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    February 2008

  • The Disabilities Initiatives in Development Seminar, also in Bangladesh also in February 2008.
  • One for all: Persons with Disabilities Initiative in Development, again in Bangladesh in February 2008.
  • The International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies at the University of Central Lancashire in Preston, UK is holding a conference on sign language research in the UK in February 2008.
  • A conference on the deaf community, sign languages, social issues, civil rights, and creativity will be held on the campus of Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, USA.
  • The Techshare India 2008 Conference on accessibility will be held in New Delhi, India, in February 2008.
  • Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    March 2008
    The 8th annual meeting of the Gulf Disability Society will meet in United Arab Emirates in March 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    April 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    May 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    August 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    September 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    November 2008
    The Association on Women’s Rights in Development (AWID)’s International Forum on Women’s Rights and Development will be held in Cape Town, South Africa in November 2008. A call for proposals is open until January 28, 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Jobs, Internships, Volunteer Opportunities

    We Can Do will probably never be a comprehensive job-board. Serious job, internship, or volunteer placement hunters will want to explore other means of finding opportunities. For example, jobs, internships, and volunteer opportunities in the international field generally, or in the disability field generally, can sometimes be found at www.idealist.org. But I do occasionally happen to come across a job announcement. Here are a few that may still be open to applications:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Education and Training Opportunities

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Opportunities

    Missed call for papers; Missed training opportunities; Missed job, internship, and volunteer opportunities; Missed events and conferences

    Some of the material I post at We Can Do is time-sensitive material. That means the conferences announced here have come and gone; job posts have been filled; and deadlines are over. So, if it’s too late for you to do anything about any of the following announcements, then why bother listing them? First, some conference organizers issue compilations of papers and presentations or other interesting materials after their event is over. If a topic interests you, it may be worth communicating with event organizers to see if any follow-up publications are available. Second, organizations that offer one conference, job opportunity, call for papers, etc., may offer something similar in the future. Many conferences, for example, meet every one, two, three, or four years. Monitoring, joining, or communicating with organizations of interest to you could help ensure that you learn about the next opportunity in time to plan for it.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Call for Papers
    The German Journal for Disability and Development called for papers on art and disabilities to be submitted by the end of November 2007.

    Also browse through the listing of upcoming conferences and missed conferences.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Training Opportunities

    In October 2007, the International Labour Organisation had a training course for professionals from developing countries.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Jobs, Internships, and Volunteer Opportunities
    Remember that it is too late to apply for these specific opportunities. These are listed here in case you want to check out the sponsoring organizations for future opportunities like these:

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Event and Conference Opportunities

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    What’s Next for We Can Do?

    I am not yet satisfied with We Can Do. I still see many gaps that I want to repair. I want to find, and post, more materials of a pragmatic nature. By which I mean, material that people in the field can put to immediate use in improving the lives of disabled people in developing countries. If you think you can help me locate helpful materials, please review my Wish list for written materials and resources and contact me.

    I also want to reach more development professionals at mainstream development organizations and more employees and volunteers at international disability organizations. And I want to reach more small DPOs and individual advocates in more developing countries. The knowledge shared at We Can Do cannot help until it is brought to people with disabilities living in poverty in developing countries. That “final mile” can only be bridged by readers like YOU.

    If you want to help, I hope you will consider telling your colleagues and contacts about We Can Do. If you run a web site or a blog, please consider linking to We Can Do at https://wecando.wordpress.com. If you have the skills, the time, and the commitment to launch a We Can Do mirror site translation into some other language, please talk to me (leave a comment or email me at ashettle [at] patriot.net). And please do feel free to print out the more helpful We Can Do posts to share with people you know in developing countries who do not have easy access to the Internet.

    For those of you who like numbers: We Can Do had 285 page views in July; 851 in August; 1305 in September; 2936 in October; 4862 in November; and more than 5100 in the first three weeks of December. And who is responsible for making these numbers happen? Why—you, of course! So, thank you for visiting We Can Do.

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

    RESOURCE: Book on Universal Design and Visitability

    Posted on 24 November 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Inclusion, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

    New Resource On Universal Design & Visitability

    To be disabled too frequently also means to be excluded. And often it is, not only people, but also buildings that exclude. In the early years of learning to include people with disabilities in the mainstream of society, this was partly resolved through renovating buildings as an after-thought. For example, one might tear down steps to install a ramp in their place. But what if a building could be designed to include everyone from the beginning? Not just disabled people but also people of all ages, shapes, and sizes, with all needs? What if architects worked on inclusion from the very earliest stages of thinking, planning, and drawing blue prints? That brings us to the concept of universal design:

    “Universal design implies a process that goes beyond minimum access codes and standards, to design environments that are comfortably usable by people from childhood into their oldest years. Integrating the core principles of universal design–equitable use, flexibility in use, simple and intuitive, perceptible information, tolerance for error, low physical efforts, and size and shape for approach and use–can improve livability and quality of life for everyone.”

    A new, free on-line book discusses these concepts in more depth. Individual chapters are written by authors from around the world, including Brazil and Thailand. The book can be downloaded for free in PDF format at https://kb.osu.edu/dspace/handle/1811/24833. It is available both in regular print and in a large-print version.

    Please do share your opinions about this book in the comments area below. I also welcome submissions of a more thorough book review from someone who is familiar with the concept of universal design as applied in developing countries; any such submissions can be sent to me via email at ashettle [at] patriot [dot] net.

    The remaining text in this post comes from an announcement written and forwarded by other sources:

    Universal Design and Visitability: From Accessibility to Zoning
    Edited by Jack L Nasar and Jennifer Evans-Cowley

    https://kb.osu.edu/dspace/handle/1811/24833

    This book is available for down load at no cost through the generous support of The National Endowment for the Arts Universal Design Leadership Initiative, The Ohio State University’s Knowlton School of Architecture, John Glenn School of Public Affairs, Kirwin Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator’s Office.

    We hope it advances your interest and understanding of this exciting and ever-widening approach and assists in the teaching of universal design, developing policies that encourage the use of universal design as a process for planning and designing environments that are attractive, comfortable and usable.

    CONTENTS

    Preface by Jack L. Nasar and Jennifer Evans-Cowley

    Forward by Deborah Kendrick

    The Seven Principles of Universal Design into Planning Practice by Wolfgang F. E. Preiser

    Toward Inclusive Housing and Neighborhood Design: A Look at Visitability by Jordana L. Maisel

    Universal Design, Architecture and Spatial Cognition without Sight by Shohreh Rashtian

    Universal Design in Public Transportation: “Segway” to the Future by Katharine Hunter-Zaworski

    As Your County Gets Older…Planning for Senior Housing Needs in Howard County, Maryland by Stephen Lafferty

    Making universal design work in zoning and regional planning: A Scandinavian approach by Olav Rand Bringa

    Research and Teaching Of Accessibility and Universal Design In Brazil: Hindrances and Challenges In a Developing Country by Cristiane Rose Duarte and Regina Cohen

    Universal Design Guidelines to Accommodate Wheelchair Occupants in the Thai Context by Antika Sawadsri

    Universal Design in the Institutional Setting: Weaving a Philosophy into Campus Planning by L. Scott Lissner


    This book can be downloaded at https://kb.osu.edu/dspace/handle/1811/24833.

    Most of the text for this blog post was taken from an announcement sent to me via one of my contacts. The announcement originally was distributed on the Disability-Research Discussion list managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds. Following the link will allow you to browse through the list archives or join the list.


    Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do.

    Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

      About

      Ending poverty among and oppression toward disabled people in developing countries.

      RSS

      Subscribe Via RSS

      • Subscribe with Bloglines
      • Add your feed to Newsburst from CNET News.com
      • Subscribe in Google Reader
      • Add to My Yahoo!
      • Subscribe in NewsGator Online
      • The latest comments to all posts in RSS

      Meta

    • The Mwanza Computer Literacy Project

      The Mwanza Computer Literacy Project

      The Tusaidiane Disabilities Resources and Charity Organization of Tanzania (TDRCT) would like to improve computer literacy and self-employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Mwanza, Tanzania, and promote their empowerment.

      This organization is run by people who themselves have disabilities. I have known the man who founded this organization for some years. If his organization can quickly raise $5000 from 40 donors within a few days, then GlobalGiving will feature their organization on its website. This will enable them to attract more prospective funders. I have made a donation to them, I hope others will consider doing the same.
      Give Now


      Site Meter

    • Help the U.S. Ratify the Disability Treaty!

      Image of an hour glass overlaid on image of the Capitol building in DC. Text says, "Time is running out! Now is the time for the Senate to Act! Ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities! www.disabilitytreaty.org #CRPD

      Learn why the CRPD matters and how to take action at www.disabilitytreaty.org!

    • Subscribe!

    • Bookmark and Share
    • Translate!

    • Connect to Andrea Shettle via Linked In

    • Archives

    • Topic Categories

    • Make WeCanDo Your “Favorite”

    • Stumble Upon It!

      Stumble It! Share this blog with other readers via "Stumble Upon"!
    • Follow We Can Do in Facebook!

    • We Can Do is in the GDRL!

    • Blog Stats

      • 720,159 hits
    • Map of Visitors

      Map
    • Meta

    • Facebook Networked Blogs

    Liked it here?
    Why not try sites on the blogroll...

    %d bloggers like this: