Join the Thunder for the “Disability Treaty” (CRPD)!

Posted on 6 June 2014. Filed under: Announcements, CRPD, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[This was first posted two days ago at my other blog, Rambling Justice.]

Help bring attention to the “Disability Treaty” (Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, CRPD)!  We need the U.S. to ratify this important international human rights treaty protecting the civil rights of 1 billion people with disabilities worldwide. Sign up your Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr account NOW to join the next “Thunder Clap It” for the CRPD at http://thndr.it/1ky8p97 !

What’s A “Thunder Clap It”?

A “Thunder Clap It” is when 100 or more people sign on their Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr account to all send out the same message at the same time to all their followers.  To participate, you need to sign up in advance.  The next CRPD “Thunder Clap It” will be at 2pm EST on June 10, 2014 (1pm Central Time, 11am Pacific Time).  Sign up BEFORE this time or you will miss the Thunder Clap.

How Do I Sign Up?

  • Go to this link: http://thndr.it/1ky8p97
  • A message will ask you to share a message to support the #CRPD.
  • You will find three buttons—one each for Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr.  You need to have an account in at least one of these three in order to participate.
  • Click on whichever button is appropriate.  You will have an opportunity to personalize your message to your followers.
  • Hit the “Add My Support” button.
  • If you have successfully signed up, then you should appear at the top of the list of “Recent Supporters” in the right hand side bar.  Refresh the page if needed.

What Else?

Learn more about the CRPD and other ways to help at http://disabilitytreaty.org.  Sign up for the CRPD “action alert” mailing list at the link!  Ask your friends to do the same!

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Disability and Development Online Consultations March 8-28, 2013

Posted on 13 March 2013. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, indigenous people, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, universal design, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

These online consultations (from March 8 to 28th, ie RIGHT NOW) are an opportunity to influence important decisions about how people with disabilities will be included in efforts to reduce poverty around the world.

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have been profoundly influential in making decisions on how to prioritize foreign assistance and government funds in more than 100 developing countries. The global community is now working to identify what goals should replace them after 2015. This means that the next few months will be critical for ensuring that people with disabilities are not again forgotten.  It is important for the global disability community, our constituency organizations, and professionals in the fields of international development and human rights be engaged.

Read below and follow the links for more detail on how individuals can participate in this on-line dialogue.

Online Consultations
As part of the preparatory process for the United Nations General Assembly High-level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD), the HLMDD Online Consultations (HOC) will be conducted from 8 to 28 March 2013. The consultations are co-organised by DESA and UNICEF under the existing platform of the World We Want 2015 (http://www.worldwewant2015.org/enable) in multiple languages.

Please register at: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/register.  If you have difficulty registering, then please email enable@worldwewant2015.org for assistance.

Simultaneous consultations will take place in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. The site is compatible with screen readers, however, if you are unable to access the site, please email your response to: enable@worldwewant2015.org. Please note that the forum is moderated, therefore your post will not appear immediately but will be posted within twenty-four hours.
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Why Fight Disablism? A Global Perspective: Blogging against Disablism Day (BADD) 2012

Posted on 1 May 2012. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Why fight disablism?

The short answer takes one paragraph:  Because disablism is more than just an attitude.  Because when people hold disablist attitudes toward people with disabilities, people with disabilities are excluded, isolated, left out, left behind, and pushed to the margins of society.  Disabled people are hurt in physical ways that can leave bruises, rope burns, broken bones, and even dead bodies.  And people with disabilities also are hurt in not so physical ways that, sometimes they say are even worse.

The long answer would have to involve listening to one billion people on the face of the Earth describing the one billion ways that disablism impacts their lives.  Because one billion is the number of people with disabilities living in the world today.  And, chances are, all of them would have a slightly different answer to what disablism means.  And it’s not just disabled people and their loved ones who think that various forms of prejudice that people with disabilities is an important issue.  Two major international organizations—the World Bank and the World Health Organization (WHO)—have this to say about the effects of the social inequities that people with disabilities experience daily:

“Across the world, people with disabilities have poorer health outcomes, lower education achievements, less economic participation and higher rates of poverty than people without disabilities. This is partly because people with disabilities experience barriers in accessing services that many of us have long taken for granted, including health, education, employment, and transport as well as information.”

They cite many inter-related causes for these effects.  And these include negative attitudes that others may sometimes hold toward people with disabilities:

“Beliefs and prejudices constitute barriers to education, employment, health care, and social participation. For example, the attitudes of teachers, school administrators, other children, and even family members affect the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream schools. Misconceptions by employers that people with disabilities are less productive than their non-disabled counterparts, and ignorance about available adjustments to work arrangements limits employment opportunities.”

If you want to read their evidence for yourself, check out the World Report on Disability that the World Bank and WHO released, with a big media splash, in September 2011:   http://www.who.int/disabilities/world_report/2011/report/en/index.html
This publication is available in any of the major United Nations languages, namely, English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Russian, Arabic, and Chinese

I’m fortunate that my passion for international disability rights coincides with my career path: I’m now at an organization based in Washington, DC, called the U.S. International Council on Disability (USICD). When people ask me what the U.S. International Council on Disabilities (USICD) does, there are a few basic answers I could give.  I can say that USICD works to mobilize the U.S. disability community to become more engaged with the international disability rights movement.  It works to promote U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which is the first legally binding international human rights treaty to specifically protect the human rights of people with disabilities.  It promotes disability inclusion in U.S. foreign assistance programs abroad.  And, via the Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL) project, which I manage, we are working to deliver disability rights knowledge to advocates and policy makers in developing countries who have limited Internet connectivity.  No, it’s not an “anti-disablism” organization per se.  But I suspect that its mission would align well with the values of many of the people participating in the 2012 edition of Blogging Against Disablism Day (BADD).

I’ll probably spend a good part of May browsing through the many excellent blog posts I anticipate will be presented as part of this year’s Blogging against Disablism Day (BADD) on May 1, 2012.  For the past several years, this event has been hosted by the disability blogger at “Diary of a Goldfish”, which means her blog is the go-to link for finding all the other BADD posts for 2012.  (And for archived BADD posts from past years also.)  Usually a hundred or more bloggers participate, all with something fresh to say about what disablism means to them.  Many are themselves people with disabilities.  Many other bloggers are friends, families, and allies of disabled people.  I hope you will explore the other BADD contributions, also!  In past years, most participating bloggers have been from developed countries.  But I hope that bloggers from developing countries will also consider making contributions to the event, either this year (it’s not too late!) or in future years.  Enjoy the day!

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Disabled women activists change the world through YouTube music video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)

Posted on 6 January 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, News, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mobility International USA
Website: www.miusa.org

Disabled women activists change the world through YouTube music video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)

January 6, 2011 – Signing and singing with passion in Arabic, Spanish and English, 54 disabled women activists from 43 countries celebrate the achievements, pride and solidarity of women with disabilities around the world. These leaders are revolutionizing the status of women and girls worldwide. Filmed during MIUSA’s 5th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD), the Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)  music video release marks the beginning of MIUSA’s 30th Anniversary year-long celebration.

Please share the YouTube link to Music Video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxxomUVsSik

Our goal is to reach 2,500 views and to raise funds through donations for the next WILD program empowering women and girls with disabilities. Every donation large or small brings us closer to that goal! To donate, visit http://www.miusa.org/donate/wild.

WILD delegates in the video come from Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Bangladesh, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria, Palestinian Territories, Peru, Philippines, South Africa, Sri Lanka, St. Lucia, Syria, Turkey, Uganda, United States of America, Vietnam, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The video is captioned. For the text video description in English click here.

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to empower people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development. For more information visit www.miusa.org.

###

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Fellowship Opportunity: at disability advocacy organization in Washington, DC, USA

Posted on 12 May 2010. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Fellowships & Scholarships, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear Colleagues,

The United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD), in partnership with Atlas Corps, has made available one fellowship position to work with USICD in Washington, DC for one year, beginning in September 2010. This is an exciting opportunity for a mid-career professional from another country, working in the nongovernmental sector, to spend a year working in Washington working and learning with our organization in areas such as advocacy, program development and nonprofit administration. Their experience will be further enriched by the professional development activities that occur throughout their placement, provided by Atlas Corps.

I have attached the candidate qualifications description we have developed with Atlas Corps. Please share this with any international networks with whom you participate. I am particularly enthused to have individuals with first-hand experience in disability in the applicant pool. Applications are now coming in; time is short, so please do not delay to encourage those people you know who may be interested to review the materials and consider applying. You can learn more about Atlas Corps here: http://www.atlascorps.org/ and in the information below; Atlas Corps manages the application process and is the point of contact for all applicants. Further information about USICD is available here: www.usicd.org.

Thank you,
David Morrissey

________________________________________
About Atlas Corps Fellowship

Atlas Corps coordinates the rigorous selection process as well as logistics including living stipend, visa, flight, health insurance, taxes, and end of service award. The Host organization pays a cost share that covers a percent of the expenses.

This is a unique opportunity to receive a talented, mid-career, citizen sector (nonprofit/NGO) leader from overseas who is recruited specifically for your organization. Host applications are accepted year round. The fellowship program runs a fall class from September to August and a spring class from March to February.

Host Benefits:
• The Host organization receives a full-time, yearlong, international Fellow who is a leader in the nonprofit/NGO sector with 3-10 years of relevant experience. The average Atlas Corps Fellow is 28 years old, is fluent in English, and has a bachelor’s or master’s degree. (Volunteers going to Bogota are also fluent in Spanish.)
• Atlas Corps recruits at least two strong candidates for the Host organization based on a job description provided by the Host. The Host interviews candidates and selects their top choice from Atlas’ pool of vetted candidates.
• Atlas Corps provides Fellows with assistance in obtaining a visa, ten days advance orientation and training, health insurance, round trip international travel to host assignment, living stipend, and ongoing monthly training.
• The Host joins an international network of nonprofit organizations and rising nonprofit leaders who work together and share best practices.
Host Responsibilities:
• Host agrees to pay Atlas Corps a cost share for the Fellow over the course of the year, beginning 30-45 days prior to fellow’s start date.. Payments are made quarterly. Host is not responsible for taxes, health insurance, visa, or additional compensation.
• Host interviews candidates and selects their top choice. The Fall Fellows start at Host organization in early September and Spring Fellows start in March.
• Host agrees to provide a workstation (desk, phone, computer).
• Host agrees to provide meaningful work opportunities for the Fellow and will develop a Fellow work plan during the recruitment process.
• Host agrees to embrace the two-way notion of the Atlas Corps program that values the contributions of rising nonprofit leaders from the global south.

Open Position: Atlas Corps Fellow
Job Summary: The United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD) is looking for an Atlas Corps Fellow to serve in the Washington, DC area.
USICD’s mission is to catalyze and help focus the energy, expertise and resources of the US disability community and the US government to optimize their impact on improving the lives and circumstances of people with disabilities worldwide, and to be an active member of the global disability rights movement. The selected fellow will join a groundbreaking organization supporting the rights of people with disabilities in the US and abroad.

As a member of a small team and working under the direction of the Executive Director, the Atlas Corps Fellow will have a working and learning experience with USICD. The Fellow will provide integral support to the administrative and programmatic functions of the organization, to include:

• Assisting the Executive Director with various administrative tasks related to operating a U.S.-based nonprofit organization
• Assisting the program management staff in implementing various USICD initiatives in the areas of CRPD education and global disability rights information dissemination
• Supporting the Board of Directors’ activities through communications and logistic planning
• Respond to the inquiries of USICD members and constituents for information and disseminating announcements via electronic and print mailings
• Uploading content to the USICD website
• And developing their own portfolio of projects, presentations, and global network building unique to their role as an Atlas Corps Fellow with USICD, under the guidance and advice of the Executive Director.

Qualifications Summary:

USICD seeks a dynamic, energetic individual who:
• Understands disability as a human rights issue, beyond the more traditional charity or medical models
• Has at least basic awareness of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities treaty -OR- the universal human rights framework in general
• Has some first-hand experience in the disability community, as a family member, advocate, or self-identified person with a disability
• Has developed skills speaking, presenting/teaching, and writing in English
• Has strong computer and internet use skills; experience with web publishing or content management a plus
• Some experience in nonprofit or civil society/NGO administration
A commitment to the advancement of people with disabilities and knowledge of disability cultures in the United States and internationally are desirable. First-hand experience with disability preferred.



Interested applicants will please note that this blog site, We Can Do, is NOT the appropriate conduit for applying for this fellowship opportunity. Instead, people who wish to apply are requested to contact Atlas Corps directly, as instructed in the announcement above. You may apply via the Atlas Corps website at http://www.atlascorps.org/. At the Atlas Corps website, click on the button that says “Apply here.” Then on the next screen, click “Apply to United States.” Follow the instructions provided on that page. Thank you and good luck in your endeavors.

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HIV and Disability Policy Brief Released

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Health, HIV/AIDS, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability advocates have long known from observation that people with disabilities around the world are often at higher risk for HIV/AIDS. The difficulty has been in persuading mainstream educators and service providers of this fact. A new policy brief on disability and HIV can help advocates educate governments, mainstream organizations, and agencies about the need to include people with disabilities in HIV-related programs and services.

Disabled people are routinely excluded, sometimes by accident and sometimes on purpose, from mainstream education outreach programs on HIV and from health care services meant for people with AIDS. But a growing body of evidence shows that people with disabilities have an active sex life and are as likely as anyone else in engage in risky behaviors. They also are far more likely to be targeted for sexual assault, particularly from men who have HIV. The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS), World Health Organization (WHO), and the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) have jointly released a new, 8-page policy brief on disability and HIV. This policy brief summarizes what is known about disabled people and their high risk level for being infected with HIV. It also summarizes some of the reasons why they have been excluded from mainstream programs meant to prevent HIV transmission. For example, many workers in the field mistakenly assume that people with disabilities don’t have sex or never abuse drugs. Or they may simply neglect to consider the needs of deaf people who need information delivered in sign language or highly visual materials; blind people who need materials in audio or Braille formats; people with intellectual disabilities who need information in plain language; or people with mobility impairments who may need to attend training workshops held in wheelchair accessible buildings.

The Disability and HIV Policy Brief includes a set of recommendations for governments, including suggestions such as ratifying the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); providing HIV information in different formats tailored for different disability groups; providing people with disabilities with the same range of HIV, sexual, and reproductive health services as the rest of the population; ensuring that people with disabilities are trained to provide HIV-related education and care; and more. The policy brief also includes a few recommendations for civil society (for example, Non-Governmental Organizations) as well as for international agencies. The last section of the policy brief describes an example of AIDS-related activities in South Africa.

Learn more about the new policy brief at http://www.unaids.org/en/KnowledgeCentre/Resources/FeatureStories/archive/2009/20090409_Disability_HIV.asp. Or download the 8-page policy brief in PDF format (207 Kb) at http://data.unaids.org/pub/Manual/2009/jc1632_policy_brief_disability_en.pdf.



We Can Do learned about this policy brief via a notice posted to the IDA CRPD Forum email discussion group. I then gathered additional information about the UNAIDS web site and from the policy brief in PDF format (207 Kb).

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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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Call for Disabled Role Models in Asian Region for Brochure

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Comments or Information, Call for Nominations or Applications, East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

by Aiko Akiyama

Please note that the deadline to submit pictures and bios is May 31, 2009.

Dear colleagues,

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the
Pacific (ESCAP) is putting together a brochure entitled, “Agents of
Change,” to promote the social model of disability and explain the changes that will need to be made to meet the requirements of Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action, which is the regional policy guideline on disability. As a part of the brochure, we would like to have pictures and messages of mentors with disabilities from the region as they themselves are agents of change.

We would like to ask for your collaboration in this endeavor. We would likes to have active thematic photos of persons with different impairments in the region, who work in certain professions as well as a
caption or a statement about how you see “disability” and a message to
younger generations of persons with impairments in the region.

Thus far, we have a picture and a message of a deaf pharmacist from
Japan, are also waiting for a picture of a blind architect from the
Philippines and another picture from Kyrgyzstan. We are also planning on
shooting a picture of a pizza baker, inT hailand, who is physically
disabled. We would like to have pictures of a person with intellectual
disability, a picture of a person who is a survivor of psychiatry, a
picture of deaf blind person all of whom are working in certain professions which they are proud of. Moreover, we would like to particularly welcome pictures from South Asia and the Pacific.

Time is of the essence and we would appreciate your urgent attention
to this request. We would appreciate if you can e-mail us pictures (sharper images are appreciated) towards the end of this month 31 May 2009. The
brochure is in draft form at the moment and you contributions would help us finalize it. Before the brochure final draft goes out to the printer, a copy will be circulated for those who are interested for peer review. Let me know if you are interested in that process.

Please send us pictures and messages to Mr Osama Rajkhan (rajkhan.unescap@un.org) and Aiko Akiyama (akiyama@un.org).

I look forward to hear from you soon and best regards.

Aiko Akiyama
Social Affairs Officer
Social Development Division (SDD)
UNESCAP
THAILAND
Email: akiyama@un.org
http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/disability/index.asp



I received this announcement from Aiko Akiyama via the AsiaPacificDisability listserver. Please note that all inquiries, pictures, and bios should please be directed to Mr Osama Rajkhan (rajkhan.unescap@un.org) and Aiko Akiyama (akiyama@un.org), NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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Call for Papers: World Religions and Disability: Cross-Cultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Call for Papers, Disability Studies, indigenous people, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

Call for papers
Title: World Religions and Disability: Cross-Cultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Edited by: Darla Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus
Deadline for abstract submissions: May 1, 2009
Email: dschumm@hollins.edu and mjstoltz@valdosta.edu

The editors of World Religions and Disability: Cross-Cultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives invite contributions for an inter-disciplinary and cross-cultural collection of essays that critically examine how the religions of the world represent, understand, theologize, theorize and respond to disability and/or chronic illness. Religious teachings and practices help to establish cultural standards for what is deemed “normal” human physical and mental behavior and in establishing a moral order for the fit and healthy body and mind. Religion plays an important role in determining how disability is understood and how persons with disabilities are treated or mistreated in a given historical-cultural context.

The existent literature exploring intersections between religion and disability typically focuses on a single religious tradition or cultural context, often prioritizing a Judeo-Christian approach. In response to the challenges and opportunities posed by a post-modern, pluralistic, global world, our goal in this volume is to promote interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and inter-religious conversations regarding world religions and disability. We welcome a wide variety of methodological and theoretical approaches including ethnography, historical, cultural, or textual analysis, personal narrative, and theological/philosophical investigation. Contributors are especially encouraged to incorporate into their analysis literature and theoretical perspectives from the growing field of disability studies. Our aim is to produce a comparative text discussing religion and disability which gives voice to scholars and practitioners of many of the world’s rich and varied religious traditions, a

Abstracts not to exceed 600 words are due by May 1, 2009 and should be sent to: dschumm@hollins.edu and mjstoltz@valdosta.edu. The abstracts will be reviewed and decisions will be made regarding inclusion in the volume by June 15, 2009. Please note that acceptance of an abstract does not guarantee inclusion in the collection; editors will review and make final decisions upon receipt of the completed essays.

Any questions may also be directed to Darla Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus at the addresses listed above.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
Asian religions and disability
Indigenous and/or native religions and disability
Disability and inter-religious comparison, contrast, and dialogue
Celtic, Druid, and/or Wiccan religions and disability
Religious and/or sacred texts and disability
Religion, prejudice, ethics and disability
Religious conceptions of creation, evil, sin, healing, suffering and disability
Religious/philosophical conceptions of the body or self and disability
Founders of religions (i.e. Mohammad, Buddha, Jesus, etc.) and their encounters with disability
The shaping of identity, religion, and disability
Religious rituals and the inclusion or exclusion of persons with disabilities
Critical perspectives on religion and disability
Theologies of disability

[Note from We Can Do editor: It is my hope that some readers might consider submitting abstracts/papers focusing on religion and disability in the context of developing countries, particularly in relation to topics such as poverty, human rights, or international development.]



I received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email news dissemination service, which people can subscribe to for free.

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Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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JOB Post: Education Specialist, Fast Track Initiative, World Bank

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Education, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ob # 090252
Job Title Education Spec.
Job Family Education
Location: Washington, DC
Appointment International Hire
Job Posted 17-Feb-2009
Closing Date 03-Mar-2009
Language Requirements
English [Essential]
Appointment Type Term (Duration: 2 yrs)
Background / General description
THIS IS A 2 YEAR TERM POSITION WITH POSSIBLE EXTENSION TO 3 YEARS.
To apply go to http://extjobs.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64273552&piPK=64273556&theSitePK=1058433&JobNo=090252&order=descending&sortBy=job-req-num&location=ALL&menuPK=64262364

The Fast Track Initiative (FTI) is a global partnership launched in 2002 to accelerate progress toward the Millennium Development Goal of universal quality primary education by 2015. All low-income countries which demonstrate serious commitment to achieving universal primary completion can receive support from FTI. The FTI is a high visibility and politically sensitive aid platform which currently provides technical and financial support to over 50 countries, with the majority in Africa. The FTI provides direct financial support to countries with endorsed education sector plans through a multi-donor Catalytic Fund which currently has over $1,400 million in commitments through 2009, making it the second largest source of financing for basic education in low income countries. It will also provide support to conflict-affected and other fragile states through the recently created Education Transition Fund managed by UNICEF. The FTI Partnership is supported by a Secretariat housed in the World Bank in Washington, DC.

Duties and Accountabilities
The Education Specialist will provide support to countries developing education sector plans and programs to reach the most vulnerable populations who constitute the majority of out-of-school children. S/he will also work with FTI Secretariat Staff, FTI partners, country donors, civil society organizations and the World Bank to provide substantive input and technical support on a range of education and development topics such as improving quality/learning outcomes; fragile states; strengthening in-country processes; donor harmonization; improving gaps in policy, financing, data, and capacity development; and FTI’s response to HIV/AIDS, gender, and disability issues. S/he will report to the Head of the FTI Secretariat and support and collaborate with the FTI Secretariats’ Senior Education Specialists who lead FTI’s work on learning outcomes and country level processes. Specific responsibilities will include:
1. Out of School/Vulnerable Children Coordinate partnership planning and processes to address key constraints for vulnerable populations to achieving the education MDG.
• Assist in designing, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating a targeted outreach program to reach the populations most at risk of not benefiting from EFA/FTI programs.
• Develop a results framework for working with vulnerable populations. Develop and monitor indicators and activities linked to specific marginalized populations (gender, poverty, rural/urban, disability, and child labor).
• Provide background research on education and development policies as appropriate.
• Strengthen the policy dialogue within the FTI partnership by researching the donor partners’ statements on policy (user fees, language of instruction, disability, gender, etc.) and identifying common principles and shared understandings.
• Liaise with the Interagency Task Team on HIV/AIDS and education and strengthen mechanisms to ensure that this collaboration between education and HIV/AIDS is brought down to the country level.
• Represent the FTI Secretariat on the INEE Working Group on Education and Fragility

2. Country Focal Point Serve as focal point for a select number of FTI endorsed and potential countries.
• Act as first line of contact for all FTI communications with coordinating agency.
• Provide and seek information on ESP development and implementation, including FTI trust fund issues, application procedures, and key events such as joint annual reviews.
• Ensure tools such as the capacity development, inclusion/equity, HIV/AIDs, School Health are utilized when LDGs are developing their ESPs.
• Conduct the FTI Secretariat’s support and advice on ‘Light Touch’ review of ESPs prior to endorsement.
• Monitor and provide guidance to fragile states as they progress through the single entry process.

3. Learning Outcomes Support the FTI Secretariat and Partnership’s work to develop its work plan and activities on learning outcomes within the FTI partnership.
• Provide research and other support for the FTI task team on education quality.
• Provide support for the coordination of partnership planning and processes for measuring learning outcomes in FTI countries.
• Assist in communicating with country Local Education Groups/Coordinating agencies (CA) to gauge interest in their participating in international assessments of learning/quality.

Selection Criteria
• Education: An advanced degree in education or related fields.

• A minimum of 5 years of relevant experience working in the education sector.

• Strong knowledge of and commitment to the principles and procedures of the FTI.

• Knowledge of fragile states policies and financing mechanisms.

• Demonstrated knowledge of and experience in the use of education data, and social and institutional research analytical tools.

• Knowledge of education operations in the World Bank or other major donor or UN agencies.

• Experience with dialogue with government and other partners, including bilateral donors, multilateral organizations, and NGOs.

• Proven ability to work with peers, managers, and a diverse range of partners including donors, civil society groups, governments, and academic institutions.

• Ability to work well in a small team, operate under pressure, deliver high quality work within deadlines, and meet team objectives.

The World Bank Group is committed to achieving diversity in terms of gender, nationality, culture and educational background. Individuals with disabilities are equally encouraged to apply. All applications will be treated in the strictest confidence.

To apply go to http://extjobs.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64273552&piPK=64273556&theSitePK=1058433&JobNo=090252&order=descending&sortBy=job-req-num&location=ALL&menuPK=64262364



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD) mailing list. For other jobs at the World Bank, consult the World Bank Employment page. Most jobs at the World Bank are not disability related, but a few are.

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JOB POST: Local Diagnostic Expert, Handicap International, Maputo, Mozambique

Posted on 12 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Handicap International is looking for Local Diagnostic Expert
COUNTRY : Mozambique CITY : Maputo
Starting date: 01/04/09 (April 1, 2009)
Length of the assignment : one year
Closing date for application : 01/03/09 (March 1, 2009) Advertisement reference : HB-LDE-Moz0902

Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit-making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, in response to humanitarian crises and the effects of extreme poverty. Handicap International implements programmes of assistance to persons and local organisations, inclusion programmes and programmes focusing on the fight against the main causes of disability. It runs projects in almost 60 countries, with the support of a network of 8 national associations ( Germany, Belgium, Canada, United-States, Luxembourg, United Kingdom and Switzerland)
The organisation employs almost 3300 people worldwide, 330 of whom work in France and in its European and North American sections.
For more details on the association: http://www.handicap-international.fr/en/s/index.html

JOB CONTEXT :
This project is the result of a short emergency project, which objective was to support the victims of PAIOL, the arsenal explosion in Maputo in 2007. The PAIOL project highlights the lack of knowledge and skills of basic services to welcome and take care of people with disabilities. It was also the opportunity to work with the municipalities of Maputo and Matola, and to make a first assessment on the situation of people with disabilities.

This post is based in RAVIM offices, our principal partner for the project. The characteristics of the relationships between the Local Diagnostic Expert, Handicap International Project Team and RAVIM will be detailed within the Partnership Agreement Addendum between Handicap International and RAVIM.

JOB DESCRIPTION :
Challenges and goals :
The decentralization process is quite complex in Maputo and Matola: all the different levels of governmental representatives are present (district, municipal, province and nation). One of the issues will be to get involved and coordinate with all these different governmental levels, in a same objective. The local diagnostic should clarify which are the main competences for each administrative level: district, municipal, province and nation, in the frame of the decentralization process.

Activities :
In collaboration with RAVIM, you will support the realisation of a local diagnosis on the social and economical situation of people with disability, the social representation of Disability and the situation of existing healthcare and social services, regarding the welcoming of vulnerable people (including people with disability and people living with or affected by HIV/AIDS).
Your responsibilities will be to:
==> carry out the local diagnosis
==> analyze the local diagnostic results and propose recommendations in respect to the project objectives.
==> create a database and directory of services
==> organize the dissemination of the results of the local diagnosis among the civil society and government
==> prepare the final evaluation of the project, based on monitoring tools and mechanisms to evaluate the progress of the situation of people with disability and healthcare and social services at regular intervals
==> capitalize documentation and tools used during these activities

CANDIDATE PROFILE :
Mandatory :
We are looking for someone with a Master in Local development field, Social sciences or a Diploma in the healthcare and social sector. Ideally with experience in implementing local/territorial and participative diagnosis or/and realisation of quantitative and qualitative survey,

You have good analysis and synthesis capacities and a good team spirit, you have already worked on mobilising people around a common objective.

Complementary :
Experience in a developing country, knowledge on Disability, inclusive approach and HIV/AIDS

REQUIRED LANGUAGE SKILLS : Portuguese mandatory, English a plus

JOB ENVIRONMENT : possibility to travel with family, access to international school and hospital

EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS :
Volunteer : 750 or 850 Euros monthly indemnity + living allowance paid on the field + accommodation + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance
Salary : 2000 to 2300 gross salary + 457 Euros expatriation allowance + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance + family policy

Please send resume and covering letter with the reference: HB-LDE-Moz0902 to :
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL – 14, avenue Berthelot – 69361 LYON CEDEX 07
by Email : recrut04@handicap-international.org
or by our website : www.handicap-international.org
Please do not telephone

Candidates from Canada or the United States, and nationals of these countries, should send their application to the following address :
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL CANADA
1819 Boulevard René Lévesque, bureau 401 – MONTRÉAL, QUÉBEC – H3H 2P5
Or by email : jobs@handicap-international.ca or fax : 514-937-6685
Please do not telephone



I received this job announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development mailing list.

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Master’s Degree in International Development and Disability

Posted on 10 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , |

Gallaudet University offers a Master’s Degree in International Development which prepares students to collaborate with a variety of groups which wish to include people with disabilities in their organizations, development projects and programs. The degree draws on theories and material from disability studies, international relations, public policy, research and evaluation. Students study significant topics in international relations that affect the economic and social development of countries worldwide, including:

· the theories and strategies of international development;
· the political, social and developmental issues surrounding disability that result in the continued oppression and marginalization of disabled people around the globe;
· the links between disability and development in the areas of human rights, poverty, the environment, health, gender, children, and conflict and emergency situations such as natural disasters;
· the inclusion of disability issues in mainstream development practice;
· participatory approaches in planning, implementation, monitoring, reviewing and evaluation, National and International policy framework, and;
· practice and theory of living and studying in cultures different from one’s own.

Applications for Gallaudet University’s Master’s Degree in International Development are due April 1st, 2009 in order to start in August 2009.

For those in the Washington, DC area, a Graduate School Open House will be held on campus this Friday, February 13th, 2009, from 10 am – 3:00 pm.

For more information about the Master’s Degree, please visit: http://edf.gallaudet.edu/x2607.xml

or contact Amy Wilson at amy.wilson@gallaudet.edu



Thank you to Dr. Amy Wilson for sending this announcement to be posted at We Can Do. It is in good part thanks to Amy, and to the courses I have taken through her international development program at Gallaudet, that I have built such a strong network of contacts in the international disability community and learned many of the things I need to know to run this blog site.

Even if you cannot pursue a full Master’s Degree at this time, then I personally recommend their on-line class, EDF 772, “International Development with People with Disabilities in Developing Countries” as an excellent overview of the field. If you miss the April 1, 2009 deadline (to be accepted for the incoming August 2009 class), then check their web site for deadlines for next year.

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Enabling Education Network Desires Feedback for Website Redesign

Posted on 5 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note to We Can Do readers: For years, people in the field of disability inclusive education have turned to the Enabling Education Network (EENET) for information, resources, and opportunities for debate. EENET has disseminated the following announcement, and is seeking responses by the end of February 2009.]

This year EENET is going to redesign its website. A very kind volunteer in EENET Asia has offered to do all the work for free. So, now we need to get some feedback from people who use the website, so that we can make sure we create a new website that is more useful and user-friendly.

The attached questions may help you give feedback. But please do tell us anything you want about the website — what is good, what is bad and what you would like to see on the website in future.

Please share this request for feedback with anyone else you know who uses the EENET website.

Thanks in advance for any feedback you can give.
Best wishes
Ingrid

EENET website redesign

In 2009 EENET’s website – www.eenet.org.uk –– is going to be redesigned and relaunched. This will be the first significant redesign since the website was created in 1997. So it’s important that we get it right!

The detailed evaluation of EENET in 2006 told us that there are various aspects of the website that are not user-friendly, and users sometimes find it difficult to locate the information they want from the huge selection available.

We now want to top up the evaluation results with some more recent feedback on what you like and don’t like, and what you want to see on the new website.

The following questions are of particular interest to us, but please feel free to send comments about other aspects of the website as well.

Thank you in advance for your help.

1) Organising documents
There are two main options for how we can organise the content on the website:

(a) we could list documents according to type of document (e.g. training manuals, short articles, long reports, etc). Under this option you would see a list of, for instance, all the training manuals available covering all aspects of inclusive education

(b) we could list documents according to inclusive education themes (e.g. gender, working children, disability, refugees, emergencies, etc). With this option you would see all the information available under that theme (you would see a list of all articles, reports, manuals, posters, links to other websites, etc on the theme of, for instance, ‘inclusive education and refugees’).

Which option would you prefer and why?
We could design the site so that both options are available, but before we take this more complicated route, we first want to know if one option is a lot more popular than the other!

2) Search facility
The current search facility within the EENET website is using outdated technology and isn’t very helpful. To help us improve the search facility, please tell us how you search for items on the EENET website. Do you mostly search for items according to:

  • subject area
  • a known document title
  • country
  • name of an organisation/NGO
  • a known author name
  • other (please specify)

3) Which website section(s) do you find most useful? Why?

4) Which website section(s) do you find least useful? Why?

5) Is there anything about the website that you find particularly confusing or frustrating? If so, how could we overcome this problem?

6) Documents in other languages
We currently have a separate section where users can go directly to a list of documents in other languages (it contains a random selection, as we rely on volunteers to do translations). Should we keep this separate section http://www.eenet.org.uk/other_langs/documents.shtml? Or should we remove this section and simply list any translations next to their English versions?

7) Word, PDF or html
Which format do you prefer / find most convenient for accessing and reading documents? Please explain why you prefer this format.

  • Html pages that you read online
  • PDF file downloads
  • Word file downloads

8) Please tell us about anything else that you think will help us make an EENET website that meets your needs!

If you are not already familiar with it, please explore the EENET website at www.eenet.org.uk. Then, send your responses to the above questions to EENET at info@eenet.org.uk by the end of February 2009.



I received this announcement via EENET’s Eastern Africa email discussion group, which focuses on discussion related to disability inclusion education in Eastern Africa.

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INTERNSHIP: Lawyers on Disability in Africa

Posted on 24 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

INTERIGHTS. London, UK.

Closing date: February 09, 2009.
Description:

Internship for Lawyers Working on Disability in Africa
Equality Programme

INTERIGHTS’ Equality Programme is pleased to invite applications for an internship as part of the development and implementation of its work to advance the rights of people with disabilities in Africa. The three-month internship will begin in April 2009 and will be based in London.

This full-time placement will provide an opportunity for a lawyer with knowledge of disability issues and litigation experience in Africa to develop their legal skills whilst assisting our programme with:

· Legal research on international and comparative human rights law and practice with respect to the protection of the rights of people with disabilities;

· Preparation of materials for legal training on the application and development of equality standards;

· Strategic programme development.

Where possible, the intern may attend meetings with human rights practitioners, human rights lectures, or visit other international or national human rights organisations based in London.

INTERIGHTS will arrange and pay for travel. The intern will receive a monthly salary of £1,200. Accommodation is not provided but INTERIGHTS can advise on finding a suitable place to stay.

To Apply:

Before applying, applicants are encouraged to read the attached person specification. To apply please send a covering letter, a curriculum vitae indicating two referees and a recent writing sample of no more than two thousand words.

Applications should be sent to Chloe Marong, Legal Team Administrator, by email to cmarong@interights.org.
The closing date for applications is Monday 09 February 2009.

Persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Website: http://www.interights.org/Vacancies/index.htm
Article License: Copyright – Article License Holder: INTERIGHT

Person Specification
Essential
• Law qualification
• Extensive experience in litigating before domestic and/or regional courts in Africa
• Experience of working in the human rights sector in Africa
• Experience of working in the area of disability rights
• Sophisticated understanding of issues relating to the human rights of people with disabilities and relevant legal standards
• Strong research, analytical and writing skills
• Fluency in English

Desirable
• Connections with disabled people’s groups in home region / internationally
• Familiarity with international human rights standards and mechanisms
• Familiarity with non-discrimination and equality legal standards internationally
• Previous experience of working in an NGO setting
• Fluency in French

Persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

About INTERIGHTS
INTERIGHTS is an international legal centre based in London which develops and promotes the legal protection of human rights worldwide. Set up as a charity in 1982, in co-operation with lawyers, non-governmental organisations and judges, it has since promoted the effective use of human rights law by fully realising and exploiting all legal avenues available to protect these rights, and by providing greater global access to information on judicial decisions concerning human rights. INTERIGHTS holds consultative status with the United Nations’ Economic and Social Council, the Council of Europe and the African Commission for Human and Peoples’ Rights, and is authorised to present collective complaints under the European Social Charter. A registered charity, INTERIGHTS is dependent on grants from foundations and on donations from individuals. (See www.interights.org)

The Equality Programme works to address discrimination in many forms, based on disability, gender, race, ethnicity, religion and sexual orientation at national and regional level.

INTERIGHTS is committed to equal opportunities.



I received this announcement via Joan Durocher, who frequently disseminates announcements like this one from a range of sources.

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Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan

Posted on 19 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Pakistan Disabled People’s Organization

Subject: Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan

Respected All,

Greetings from Pakistan Disabled Peoples’ Organization (PDPO/DPI – Pakistan),

The issue of disability is gaining more and more importance all over the world as well as in Pakistan due the disability movement for a “rights based society” initiated by organizations of PWDs themselves since almost two decades. World Bank, World Health Organization and other donor and development agencies have included this issue in their mandates. Governments have framed various policies for PWDs including reservation of jobs, concession facilities in travelling, special training institutions etc. The Government of Pakistan has made efforts to support the rights of Persons with Disabilities in the view of BMF and National Policy on disability and now Alhamdurillah Pakistan has signed the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

However, despite these efforts, the sad fact is that most people with disabilities especially women with disabilities and their families remain completely un-served by government, NGOs and even DPOs.

Women with disabilities are disadvantaged in several key areas when compared with other women, men with disabilities, and the society as a whole. These women face a triple handicap and discrimination due to their disability, gender and developing world status. At the same time, Stigma remains in society at large, within communities, and even, in many cases of uneducated segments of society, within families who see disabled women as a loss of productive potential and a drain on family resources. So, while on the one hand, the strong cultural family network ensures their financial security, on the other, the stigma often results in their remaining invisible members of society.

The major barrier to employment and other socio-economic benefits for Women with Disabilities in our society continues to be attitudinal barriers; stereotypical thinking and assumption about what women with disabilities can and can’t do.

The truth is that, the range of abilities of persons within any disabilities group is enormous, we have a large number of women with disabilities in Pakistan who are taking part in the activities of daily life with courage, there is dire need to involve that women as a role model or highlight their efforts to understand the social and economic realities and possibilities with regards to disability.

We need to get rid of our stereotypical images and view each “individual” as just that “an individual”. Access to and sharing of information resources can build the capacity of local and national disability organizations, promote advocacy by and for people with disability and improve the quality of life experienced by women with disabilities.

The fist humble step of this forum is to bridge the information and communication gap between all the leading women with disabilities in Pakistan.

On behalf of PDPO/DPI – Pakistan, I would like to request you all to share your short profile with us by the end of this week, after the completion of selection process of forum members, we will decide the date for Coordination Meeting.

Your feedback and coordination will assist us to make it successful

Looking forward to hear from you,

Regards,

Abia Akram,
Women Coordinator – PDPO/DPI, Pakistan
Abia.m.ilc@gmail.com
92-321-5278021



This email from Abia Akram came to me via Ghulam Nabi Nizamani. People or organizations who wish to network with the Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan should communicate directly with Abia Akram, NOT We Can Do.

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Disability Conferences in 2009

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

One common reason why many We Can Do readers come to this blog is because they want to learn about upcoming conferences related to disability issues in developing countries. The single most popular page at this blog carries the quite inelegant but pragmatic title of Conferences, Events, Call for Papers, Training Opportunities (which also includes the very few job listings posted here and other things that didn’t fit in the title).

But, there is another page that We Can Do readers can consult to learn about upcoming disability and rehabilitation related conferences for the year 2009:

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/conference.php

This page, maintained by the Center for International Rehabilitation, Research, Information, and Exchange (CIRRIE), has listings that go as far out as December 2009. People who monitor We Can Do regularly will find a few of these announcements are familiar. But many have never been announced at We Can Do.

In some cases, this may be because they don’t quite fit my parameters. Before I publish a conference announcement, I try to determine whether it would be of genuine interest or use to people living or working in developing countries. This is not to say that I do this perfectly. But I strive to do this. Some conferences may carry the word “international” in their title, but on closer examination, “international” may often mean “North America and Europe.” I often skip over such conference announcements.

But in other cases, I simply had not heard of these conferences. For example, there is Neurorehabilitation 2009, held by the Southern African Rehabilitation Association in Johannesburg, South Africa, August 26-28, 2009. Or a conference being held by World Association for Psychosocial Rehabilitation, One World: Quest for Integration, November 12-15, 2009, in Bangalore, India. And some others.

It is worth exploring the list of conferences on your own at
http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/conference.php
Those who know how to use RSS Feeds can also subscribe to the CIRRIE listing to learn of new conference announcements as they are posted.



I discovered this listing of conferences by browsing the CIRRIE web site.

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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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Disability in Non-Western Societies: A Bibliography of Bibliographies

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Middle East and North Africa, Poverty, Resources, signed languages, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Researchers who need to locate journal articles and other publications about people with disabilities throughout history in developing countries face significant barriers. People with disabilities outside of North America and Europe tend to be invisible in much of the published literature and throughout history.

Researchers can consult a list of annotated bibliographies at the Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange (CIRRIE) as a starting point in seeking out thousands of articles that may meet their needs.

These bibliographies do not directly link to the articles in question. In many cases, I suspect these articles may not exist on-line. But the bibliographies could be used to help researchers know what publications they should seek out through the inter-library loan program at their university library.

A few examples of annotated bibliographies include: Disability in the Middle East; Disability and Social Responses in Some Southern African Nations; Disability and Social Response in Afghanistan and Pakistan; Disability & Deafness in North East Africa; Disability and Deafness in East Asia: Social and Educational Responses, from Antiquity to Recent Times; Sign, Gesture, and Deafness in South Asia and South-West Asian Histories; Social Responses to Disability & Poverty in Economically Weaker Countries: Research, Trends, Critique, and Lessons Usually Not Learnt; and more.

Researchers may begin exploring the various bibliographies (by author M. Miles) at

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/bibliography/index.php



I found the page listing M. Miles’ various bibliographies by browsing the CIRRIE web site.

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This page also accessible via http://tinyurl.com/atp4tn

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Disability in the Middle East, a bibliography

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Middle East and North Africa | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

by M. Miles

The partly annotated open online “Disability in the Middle East, a
bibliography”, first web published in 2002, was much revised, extended and updated to June 2008, and now lists about 1,750 items, at:

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/bibliography/mideast/index.html (also .pdf)

It aims to record the cumulative formal knowledge base in the disability field in countries of the Middle East, especially Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, and some smaller neighbours.

Around 45% of the items in the bibliography, listed in the last two sections with a brief introduction, comprise historical materials of the Middle East from 1751 to 1970 and from Antiquity to 1750, as an essential part of the cultural background. This earlier material has more annotation (and so takes about 60% of the total word-count), to enable potential readers to find the disability-related parts that are sometimes hidden in odd corners or footnotes, and also to indicate some cultural features that might be less easily understood nowadays.

No sensible explanation exists for how I [M. Miles] came to put this stuff together. There was already far too much material when it went online in 2002. Planning to spend a few weeks on a short update, I had a swing at disability and deafness in Egyptology, Assyriology, and the Hittite Kingdom in Anatolia,
which actually took six months. Of course, the material is utterly fascinating.

The past 30 years of “disability studies” in North America and Western Europe can look like a few buckets of water compared with the rolling 5000-year ocean of Middle Eastern disability. But just because of that contrast, I guess the majority of western students of disability won’t dip a toe into this ocean. The bibliog and annotations give a basic map for the adventurous minority… Also, of course, for the millions of non-western people who
might be happy to know something about disability before The West was invented.

best, miles

[Note to We Can Do readers: people interested in researching people with disabilities in the Middle East, African, East Asian, South Asian, and South-West Asian regions regions may find it helpful to begin with M. Miles’ collection of annotated bibliographies, of which this is only one.



This email was circulated by the author, M. Miles, on the Disability-Research email discussion list.

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4th Annual International Shafallah Forum, April 20-22, 2009, in Doha, Qatar

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that the deadline to submit abstracts is January 23, 2009, at 5 pm EST.

On behalf of the Shafallah Center for Children with Special Needs, I would like to extend a warm invitation for you to submit abstracts for the 4th Annual International Shafallah Forum in Doha, Qatar from April 20th – April 22nd , 2009. For the past three years our Center has been delighted to welcome more than 250 experts in the field and Wives of Heads of State from all over the world to our Forum and we anticipate that this year’s Forum will be no exception.

The 4th Annual International Forum will bring together advocates, family members, scholars, members of government, and professionals from a variety of perspectives to explore the theme of /Achieving Independence/. Together we will explore how to overcome factors that perpetuate disability marginalization, including widespread poverty due to lack of access to education, opportunity, and unfair labor practices. We look to our work, cutting-edge research and programs, to promote independence through universal access to education, inclusive societies, innovative technologies, and poverty-reduction strategies – including micro-enterprise and encouragement of the corporate sector to value and include the disabled in the workforce.

The Forum will feature keynote addresses by global leaders, roundtable discussions, symposia, paper presentations, and exhibits. We welcome the submission of such presentations and have included more detailed information on the following pages.

An accepted presentation to the Shafallah Forum includes complimentary airfare, meals, and accommodation. We hope that you will join us this April in Doha and participate in international dialogue among your peers. Please visit our website at www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org

Abstracts are *due by 5pm EST January 23rd, 2009. *

Sincerely,

*I. Modes of Presentation*

Delegates can present their programs and research in several different formats:

*Symposia *(1 hour – 3 x 15 minute presentations, plus 15 minutes discussion)

A collection of 3 papers presenting the results of different programs/studies/experiences relating to a common research theme. Each should be presented by a different person. The symposium coordinator should provide details for the three papers following the instructions below.

*Individual Papers *(15 minute presentation, plus 5 minutes discussion)

A paper presenting the results of a program/study/experience on a particular topic. Papers will be grouped into symposia according to an identified theme. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each paper offered following the instructions below.

* *

*Posters*

Individuals may present their research on the form of a poster. Posters allow for more extended discussion with delegates interested in the content area of the poster. Posters should be attended by at least one author/director who can address questions related to the poster’s content. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each poster presentation offered following the instructions below. Submission of poster collectives (related research) is encouraged.

* *

*Roundtable Discussions or Debates *

(1 hour)

Discussion about the interpretation of existing research, the state of knowledge in a particular area or the need for more or different kinds of research/programming/policies, can be as important as presenting the results of new studies. Individuals wishing to organize such roundtable discussions or debates should identify three or four speakers, who can each present a point of view. Where discussion and audience participation is the purpose, speakers’ presentations might be limited to 5 minutes. Where debate between the speakers is the purpose, presentations may be longer (10 minutes). Organizers should submit the details of the discussion or debate following the instructions below.

*Exhibit *

Individuals or groups that have a demonstration, specialized equipment, and/or materials that they would like to exhibit are invited to submit a proposal. Exhibits will be given a table with specific presentation time, where they will be asked to be present and are encouraged to leave materials/equipment out for attendees to peruse throughout the Forum.

*II. Abstracts*

Abstracts must be in English. Abstracts longer than permissible will be abridged at the discretion of the program planning committee.

*Theme & Topic:* The conference is to be organized into themes and include general and break-out sessions. Please specify which theme that best fits your session. All abstracts should be prepared using the following headings:

*Instructions for Submitting Paper/Poster Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of authors. Give the email address of person(s) presenting the paper

*Contact details:* Type an asterisk after the presenter’s name and give the affiliation address of the presenting author only

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Preferred mode: *State whether: (a) individual paper or (b) poster

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

*Instructions for Submitting Symposia Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*List:* Authors, affiliations, e-mail addresses and titles of papers to be included in the symposium.

*Moderator: *Give the name and affiliation of the person who has agreed to moderate the symposium. Give the contact details for moderator (email, phone & address).

*Abstract:* Each paper should submit an abstract. This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Roundtable Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of each participant noting the moderator with an asterisk.

*Contact details:* Give the full contact information (email, phone, & address) of all participants

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 400 words and describe the background behind the issue to be discussed or debated and the views to be put forth by each speaker.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Exhibits*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Host: *Give the name, affiliation, e-mail, and phone of the person hosting the exhibit.

*Abstract:* Submit a description of the demonstration/exhibit, its intent, and space requirements

*III. Submission Deadline: 5pm EST, January 23, 2009*

Kindly submit abstracts to: Valerie Karr @ valeriek@brownlloydjames.com

Please label the subject line: _Shafallah Forum Abstract_. Failure to do so may result in abstract not being viewed.

Information about the Shafallah Center and Previous International Forums please visit:

http://www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org



We Can Do received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email news list. All queries and applications should be emailed to Valerie Karr at the Shafallah Center, NOT to We Can Do.

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MIUSA International Leadership Employment and Disability Professional exchange program, March 15-April 5, 2009 (English and Espanol)

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Employment, Events and Conferences, Latin America & Caribbean, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

YES, late applications are being accepted after the application deadline. , se puede presentar su solicitud despues 16 de enero, 2009.

En español

In English
MIUSA is currently accepting applications from professionals with disabilities from Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, and Guatemala for MIUSA’s International Leadership, Employment, and Disability (I-LEAD) Professional exchange program in Eugene, Oregon USA, March 15 – April 5, 2009.

MIUSA strongly encourages professionals with all types of disabilities to apply, including people who have hearing, visual, psychiatric, learning and health related disabilities.

Applications and two references are due by January 16, 2009. However, late applications will be accepted.

The 2009 I-LEAD Professional exchange program will bring together influential leaders in government, business, education, community development, and disability rights organizations who demonstrate the capacity and commitment to expand employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Latin America.

Spanish-English translation and American Sign Language interpretation will be provided during formal program activities.

Partial scholarships are available for this program.

Completed applications should be submitted to apply@miusa.org, or via fax at +1-541-343-6812.

Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact lshula@miusa.org or sygall@miusa.org.

Thank you so much, and we look forward to collaborating with you and your team, to increase employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Latin America.

Warmly,

Lydia Shula
Executive Project Specialist / Executive Assistant to the CEO
Mobility International USA
132 East Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Tel/TTY: +1 (541) 343-1284
Fax: +1 (541) 343-6812
Email: lshula@miusa.org
Web: http://www.miusa.org

Empowering people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

En español
PARA DISTRIBUCIÓN INMEDIATA
Diciembre 2008

EMAIL: apply@miusa.org
SITIO WEB: www.miusa.org
Programa de Intercambio sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad I-LEAD Profesional: Eugene, Oregón, EE.UU.

Diciembre 10, 2008 — Mobility International USA (MIUSA) se encuentra aceptando solicitudes de profesionales con discapacidad de Argentina, Brasil, Costa Rica, y Guatemala para el Programa de Intercambio Profesional de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD por sus siglas en inglés) en Eugene, Oregón, EE.UU., del 15 de marzo al 5 de abril, 2009.

MIUSA alienta a los profesionales con todo tipo de discapacidad a presentar su solicitud, incluyendo personas con discapacidad auditiva, visual, psiquiátrica, de aprendizaje y relacionada con la salud.

Las solicitudes junto con dos referencias deben entregarse hasta el 16 de enero, 2009. Por favor ver solicitud adjunta.

El programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009 congregará a líderes influyentes de organizaciones gubernamentales, educativas, de desarrollo comunitario, negocios y de organizaciones que trabajan por los derechos de las personas con discapacidad que hayan demostrado capacidad y compromiso en la expansión de las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

Los líderes seleccionados para este programa intensivo participarán en talleres interactivos, seminarios, visitas a instalaciones, y paneles de discusión para examinar temas críticos que enfrentan las personas con discapacidad en el área laboral. Como resultado del programa, los líderes desarrollarán estrategias prácticas y crearan planes de acción conjuntos para impulsar sus esfuerzos y compromiso por incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad a nivel local, nacional, y/o regional.

Únicamente las actividades formales del programa contarán con traducción español-inglés y al lenguaje de señas estadounidense. Se facilitará materiales en formatos alternativos y podrán negociarse otras adecuaciones de accesibilidad que aseguren una completa participación.

MIUSA, una organización sin fines de lucro, se dedica a empoderar a las personas con discapacidad alrededor del mundo a alcanzar sus derechos humanos mediante los intercambios internacionales y el desarrollo internacional. Desde 1981 MIUSA ha liderado programas intercambio internacional para personas con y sin discapacidad en más de 90 países, incluyendo Australia, Azerbaiyán, China, Costa Rica, Inglaterra, Alemania, Japón, México, Rusia y Uzbekistán.

Los co-patrocinadores del programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009 incluyen a Wal-Mart y el Fondo de Becas Lisa y Mike Sygall. Habrá disponibles becas parciales para este programa.

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)

Programa de Intercambio Profesional sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad
(I-LEAD por sus siglas en inglés)

Marzo 15 a Abril 5, 2009 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

En el programa de Intercambio I-LEAD Profesional de MIUSA, tanto mujeres como hombres con y sin discapacidad de seis distintos países de América Latina que son líderes en el gobierno, en empresas, en el sector educativo, y en organizaciones de desarrollo comunitario y de defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, edificarán redes de contactos, desarrollarán estrategias prácticas, y generarán planes de acción conjuntos que incrementen las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

QUIÉN PUEDE PRESENTAR SU SOLICITUD:
Mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad provenientes de Argentina, Brasil, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala y México.

MIUSA seleccionará individuos que demuestren capacidad y compromiso en la realización de cambios que expandan las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad a nivel local o regional o a nivel nacional. Por ejemplo:

• Líderes de coaliciones de Organizaciones de Personas con Discapacidad (OPDs), a nivel municipal o nacional, u OPDs que incluyan diversas discapacidades que sean influyentes.

• Líderes del gobierno, incluyendo alcaldes o ministros u otros funcionarios clave en agencias de Servicios Sociales, Ministerios de Educación o Transporte, u otros.

• Educadores influyentes, tales como directores de escuelas, programas vocacionales, o universidades.

• Empresarios líderes que empleen o faciliten capacitación a personas con discapacidad, o que estén interesados en expandir su inclusión de personas con discapacidad como parte de su fuerza laboral.

• Profesionales y líderes de organizaciones comunitarias que promuevan la microempresa y el empleo, incluyendo adiestradores empresariales, formadores vocacionales, micro-prestamistas.

LENGUAJE:
Los lenguajes oficiales de I-LEAD Profesional son el español, el inglés y el lenguaje de señas estadounidense.

Se facilitará traducción español-inglés e interpretación en lenguaje de señas únicamente durante los talleres formales del programa, los seminarios y las visitas a instalaciones.

DETALLES GENERALES DEL PROGRAMA:
El programa I-LEAD incluirá talleres, visitas a instalaciones y actividades prácticas sobre temas que incluyan:

• Estrategias de empleo para mujeres y hombres con discapacidad incluyendo educación, capacitación, empleo asistido, rehabilitación vocacional.
• Políticas y legislación para oportunidades de trabajo.
• Oportunidades igualitarias en la educación, incluyendo escuelas inclusivas y escuelas específicas para discapacidad, legislación y servicios y adecuaciones de accesibilidad.
• Planificación profesional y educación superior incluyendo políticas y sistemas de apoyo para personas con discapacidad.
• Transporte y comunidades accesibles: políticas y modelos de sistemas de transporte accesibles y acceso público.
• Asociaciones entre microempresa y sector privado.
• Estrategias de liderazgo para empleo, incluyendo formulación de proyectos, uso de medios de comunicación, generación de coaliciones.
• Experiencias multiculturales y de formación de grupos de trabajo.
• Metas y planes de acción para el empleo de las mujeres y los hombres con discapacidad.
ALOJAMIENTO Y TRANSPORTE:
• Se proveerá alojamiento simple pero cómodo con habitaciones y baños compartidos.
• Se ofrecerán el desayuno, el almuerzo y una cena ligera al día. Todas las comidas adicionales, aperitivos, o gastos varios (incluyendo lavandería) serán responsabilidad de cada delegado.
• Se proveerá transporte público accesible.

COSTO DEL PROGRAMA:
• El costo total del programa es USD $250. Es posible que hayan becas limitadas en base a la necesidad que haya demostrado el solicitante.

• MIUSA proporcionará: los boletos de avión ida y vuelta para que los participantes viajen desde sus países hasta Eugene, Oregón, EEUU; comida, alojamiento y transporte local para todas las actividades del programa I-LEAD Profesional.

• Los participantes del programa serán responsables por obtener sus pasaportes y visas estadounidenses vigentes y todos costos relacionados.

PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN CONTACTARSE CON:
Mobility International USA
Programa de Intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) es una organización cuya misión es empoderar a las personas con discapacidad alrededor del mundo para que alcancen sus derechos humanos mediante los intercambios internacionales y el desarrollo internacional.

Mobility International USA
Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional
Marzo 15 a Abril 5 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

SOLICITUD e INSTRUCCIONES

1. Por favor llene TODAS LAS SECCIONES de esta solicitud, incluyendo:
_____ Formulario de Información de Solicitud (Sección 1 a 3)
_____ Preguntas de Redacción (usar hojas adicionales para sus respuestas)
_____ Dos Formularios de Recomendación Completos

IMPORTANTE: LAS SOLICITUDES NO SERÁN REVISADAS HASTA QUE ESTÉN COMLETAS.

2. Se aceptarán solicitudes en inglés y en español. ¡NO se tendrá en cuenta la ortografía, el vocabulario o la gramática en inglés de lo solicitantes!

3. Dos Formularios de Recomendación: DEBEN completarse por dos personas familiarizadas con su trabajo y cualidades de líder. Miembros de la familia no pueden completar sus recomendaciones.
• Al menos una referencia debería venir de la organización, institución o empresa a la que usted representará en I-LEAD Profesional.
• Las personas de referencia deberían completar y firmar el Formulario de Recomendación y enviarlo a MIUSA vía e-mail (de preferencia) o vía fax. (E-mail a: apply@miusa.org, Fax: +1-541-343-6812.)

4. ¡ENVÍE SU SOLICITUD PRONTO! Esperamos revisar un gran número de solicitudes para un número limitado de cupos.

Fecha límite de solicitud: enero 16, 2009.

Envíe su solicitud vía e-mail (de preferencia), vía fax o por correo postal a:

Mobility International USA
I-LEAD Professional 2009
apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Website: www.miusa.org

FORMULARIO DE INFORMACIÓN DE SOLICITUD:

SECCIÓN 1: Información del Solicitante

Apellido del solicitante: _________________________________________________________
Nombre del solicitante: _________________________________________________________

Fecha de nacimiento: Mes: ________ Día: ________ Año: ____________

Dirección de e-mail 1: _________________________________________________________
Dirección de e-mail 2: _________________________________________________________

Dirección residencial: _________________________________________________________
Ciudad: Provincia/Estado:
País: Código postal:

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

¿Tiene un pasaporte vigente? NO SÍ País del pasaporte ___________________

Número de pasaporte: _________________________________________________________

Fecha de expiración de pasaporte: Mes: ________ Día: ________ Año: ____________

Idioma materno (hablado o de señas):_______________________________________________

Nivel de Idioma Inglés: Principiante _______ Lento ________ Rápido ________ Fluido ________

Nivel de Idioma Español: Principiante _______ Lento ________ Rápido _______ Fluido _______

Nivel de Lenguaje de Señas (EEUU): Principiante _____ Lento _____ Rápido _____ Fluido _____

Otros idiomas (hablados o de señas): _______________________________________________

¿Cuál es su ocupación?: _________________________________________________________

Por favor liste una persona que podría contactarse con usted si nosotros no logramos contactarnos con usted:
Nombre:___________________________________ Relación con usted:__________________

Direcciones de e-mail:__________________________________________________________

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

SECCIÓN 2:

Organización/ONG/Negocio que usted representará: __________________________________

Su Posición/Título de su Cargo en esta Organización/Institución/Empresa:
____________________________________________________________________________

Persona de Contacto en la Organización: ___________________________________________
E-mail:_______________________________________________________________________

Dirección residencial: _________________________________________________________
Ciudad: Provincia/Estado:
País: Código postal:

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

SECCIÓN 3:

INFORMACIÓN DE DISCAPACIDAD
El programa de intercambio de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional tendrá un equilibrio de mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad. MIUSA realizará los arreglos adecuados para asegurar que cada delegado con discapacidad pueda participar de forma completa e igualitaria. Para ayudarnos a cumplir esta meta, por favor complete la siguiente información:

¿Tiene usted una discapacidad? NO SÍ

De ser así, por favor describa su discapacidad: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mobility International USA

1. Organización/ONG/Empresa a la que representará:
a) ¿Cuál es el nombre de la organización, ONG o empresa al cuál usted representará?

b) ¿Cuál es su posición en la organización, ONG o empresa? Por favor resuma sus responsabilidades.

c) ¿Cuál es el propósito, misión u objetivo de la organización, institución o empresa? (Límite 100 palabras)

d) ¿En qué forma están involucradas, incluidas o beneficiadas las personas con discapacidad a través de su organización, institución o empresa?

2. Participación Comunitaria:
a) Por favor liste otras organizaciones a las cuales pertenece, y las actividades de servicio comunitario en las que esté involucrado a nivel local o nacional.

3. Empleo para personas con discapacidad:
a) Por favor liste los tres problemas más críticos (en su opinión) que limiten las oportunidades de trabajo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad.

b) ¿Qué ha hecho usted o su organización para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad?

c) Por favor liste otras organizaciones o individuos con quienes su organización haya colaborado para promover las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad.

4. Ideas de proyectos o acciones
a) Por favor describa un proyecto, una iniciativa o acción(es) que usted o su organización podrían implementar para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las mujeres y hombres con discapacidad en su comunidad.

b) ¿Cuál sería el resultado del proyecto, iniciativa o acción(es)? ¿Cuántas personas con discapacidad se beneficiarían?

c) Liste cinco socios comunitarios y describa cómo estarían involucrados en este proyecto, iniciativa o acción(es).

5. ¿Por qué y en qué forma su participación en I-LEAD Profesional 2009 resultaría en la expansión de las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad? Por favor sea específico/a.

6. Por favor liste:
a.) Cualquier experiencia previa en programas de intercambio o conferencias internacionales (dónde, por qué y cuándo).

b.) Cualquier viaje previo a los EEUU (dónde, por qué y cuándo).

7. Por favor añada cualquier otro comentario relevante respecto a su participación en este intercambio.

Fecha límite de solicitud: enero 16, 2009. (O depues)

Envíe su solicitud vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal mail a:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
I-LEAD Professional 2009
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Página Web: www.miusa.org

Mobility International USA
Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional
Marzo 15 a Abril 5, 2009 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

Apellido del Solicitante: _________________________________________________________
Nombre del Solicitante: _________________________________________________________

Dirección(es) de e-mail: ____________________________________ País:

FORMULARIO DE RECOMENDACIÓN

Nota para la Persona de Referencia: La persona mencionada a continuación está solicitando participar en el programa de intercambio de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional, en el que mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad que son líderes en el gobierno, en empresas, en el sector de la educación, en organizaciones de desarrollo comunitario y de defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, desarrollarán estrategias prácticas y planes de acción conjuntos para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

Por favor envíe el formulario completo vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal a MIUSA (ver abajo) o devuélvaselo al solicitante para que lo entregue conjuntamente con su solicitud TAN PRONTO COMO SEA POSIBLE. (Use hojas de papel adicionales si es necesario). Gracias.

Por favor escriba a máquina o claramente en letra imprenta. Use papel adicional si es necesario.

Nombre de la persona que facilita la referencia: _____________________________________
Organización: _________________________________________________________________
E-mail:_______________________________________________________________________

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

1.) ¿Por qué recomienda al/la solicitante para el Programa de Intercambio de MIUSA I-LEAD Profesional?

2.) Por favor mencione brevemente las metas u objetivos de su organización (100 palabras o menos).

3.) ¿Qué rol(es) tiene el/la solicitante en su organización?

4.) De ser seleccionado/a, ¿en qué forma ayudaría la participación del/la solicitante en el programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional para que su organización incremente las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad?

5.) Por favor describa el apoyo que su organización puede ofrecer a proyectos y actividades para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad.

Firma de la Persona de Referencia: ___________________________ Fecha: ____________

Por favor devolver al solicitante o enviar vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal a:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
I-LEAD Professional
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Página Web: www.miusa.org



I received this announcement via Joan Durocher and also via the Intl-Dev email news distribution list.

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Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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JOB POST: QuickBooks Training for Sub Grantees, Kenya, Handicap International, Dec 15-19, 2008

Posted on 5 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, autism, Blind, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This short-term consultancy position requires someone to provide a five-day training workshop in the use of QuickBooks from December 15 to 19, 2008. Profiles and proposals must be submitted by December 10, 2008.

TERMS OF REFERENCE: QUICKBOOKS TRAINING FOR THE SUB GRANTEES

BACKGROUND

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL (HI) is an international NGO engaged in the field of disability and development. A strong emphasis, however, is placed on empowering people with disabilities through their integration into mainstream development activities and the provision of appropriate health and rehabilitation services to ensure equal opportunities for all.

Currently, HI is working with 6 partner organizations in the USAID/AED funded projects in the field of Disability and HIV & AIDS. The group represents a cross section of disabilities including the deaf, blind and low vision, physically and intellectually disabled.

The main thematic areas of the project activities include;
• Policy and advocacy
• Behavior change communication
• Appropriate IEC materials for the PWD
• Stigma reduction

One focus of the project is to provide technical support, build the capacities of the partner organization and provide funding to enable them implement HIV& AIDS activities.

JUSTIFICATION

Good financial management practice helps an organization to attain effective and efficient use of resources and be more accountable to donors and other stakeholders. Hence, HI would wish to commission training in QuickBooks for her partners as a requisite to ensuring quality and accurate financial record keeping and reporting on usage of donor funding. HI further wishes to install QuickBooks accounting packages for all the partner organizations that are not yet compliant to the package and final set up a cut-off period for compliance by all the organization.

BACKGROUND OF PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

We have detailed as underneath a brief profile of each of the organizations that we are currently collaborating with as a basis of your understanding the scope of each partner. However, it may be worth noting that the proposed training may also include other partners we are yet to bring on board.

DDSHG (DANDORA DEAF SELF HELP GROUP)

Dandora is an organisation of deaf people that was formed over 10 years ago; Structural formation was very minimal in the initial years. Thus, Handicap international organized governance training which has since increased cohesiveness among the group membership. This is expressed through an increase of paid membership, while several board members who were also employees of the organization resigned as employees to pave for a clear segregation of interests. The organization is situated in Dandora area of Nairobi province.

On overall, the organization has sound and consistent financial management and reporting systems. In the period under review the organization was funded to a tune of Ksh. 1,996,453.00 (one million nine hundred ninety six thousand four hundred fifty three only)

BLINK (Blind and Low Vision Network)

Blink’s beneficiaries are primarily blind and/or persons with very low vision. A key issue for this organisation is that their beneficiaries are in different geographical locations. However, they have focal persons in each district that they meet weekly to discuss the needs of the communities. The board members are also representatives of different Community Based Organizations. They function as resource persons and may have their expenses reimbursed and allowances for services provided.

The organisation refers to itself as a Community Based Organization network that helps the individual Community Based Organisations provide support and care to their communities through awareness creation activities on HIV/AIDS. The discussions in the communities are generally broader than the HIV/AIDS, so the meetings are used as an opportunity to discuss other issues.

Blink has received training in project design and management including M&E frameworks, resource mobilisation, programme reporting, financial management, and managing special needs projects (e.g. reproductive health, HIV/AIDS counselling for disabled people, VCT testing). The counsellors are now better equipped to inform visually impaired people about their test results. Their reporting has also improved.

As regards the governance function, both board members and staff members now understand their roles and what is expected of them thanks to the capacity building initiatives by HI. The board members are also informed about the organisation’s activities by the Director on a regular basis.

The backbone of the spending in the organization is mainly logistical, thus the need for well tailored internal checks and balances mechanism that ensures prudence in the commitment of expenditure. In the current grant period the organisation was obligated to spend Ksh.2,728,962.00(two million seven hundred twenty eight thousand nine hundred sixty two only).

KEDAN (Kenya Disabled Action Network)

KEDAN is a youth organisation which is only 4 years old and covers several types of disability, contrary to most of the other disabled people’s organisations that target a particular category of disability (blind, deaf, physically impaired, and albinos – for capacity reasons they are currently unable to include mentally handicapped. The organisation started out with mobilisation, awareness creation and experience sharing and has only actively implemented programme activities since 2005. . They have developed an action plan for the next couple of years which they intend to implement, despite their limited resources, with the help of their motivated supporters.

As regards the needs of the organisation, KEDAN’s staff feels that they need to strengthen their competencies in the area of resource mobilisation, in particular proposal writing. They also need help to manage their existing resources better. Finally, they wish to develop their staff competencies in areas such as leadership and management, IT, and income generating activities.

In the current grant period the group is obligated to spend Ksh. 2,388,811.00 (two million three hundred eighty eight thousand eight hundred and eleven only).

NFSS (Nairobi Family Support Services)

NFSS was started in 1982 by Actionaid and registered as a local NGO in 1996. The Programme Coordinator has been the leader ever since. The organisation receives funding from HI France and from the AED-programme and is also supported by Sense International and the Liliane Foundation.

The mission of the organisation is to raise awareness on HIV-AIDS and disability through their work with community groups and attempt to change the stigma of disabled people in the community and their low-self esteem. The peer educators meet twice a month to exchange experiences.

NFSS has strong networking capacity. The organisation partners with different institutions, especially through referrals: the Liliane foundation (support for disabled people’s surgery), specialised schools (educational assessment), the Ministry of Health, government hospitals, networks of therapists. This gives the organisation high credibility in the communities.

NFSS would like to support “merry-go-rounds” (revolving credit systems), but as most of their beneficiaries are not working, it is difficult to collect the funds.

Until 2005, Action Aid funded a microfinance programme for the parents of disabled children. These loans were considered by some as grants. After having received several loans, and hence being allowed to loan greater sums, gradually, some of the beneficiaries disappeared with their funds. Only about 50% of these parents are able to continue repaying their microloans.

NFSS has an internal control manual but it has not enhanced its usage. There is therefore need to educate the staff on the importance of these procedures and its implementation. In the current grant period the organization is obligated to spend Ksh. 2,211,847.00 (two million two and eleven thousand eight hundred forty seven only).

DIGROT (Disabled Group of Trans Nzoia)

DIGROT was started in 1990 as a self help group of 50 members on the concept of a merry go round. Since 1998, the group has operated a bank account with Kenya Commercial Bank, Kitale Branch. The group started a micro finance lending system; Members were given loans of ksh.500 to Ksh 2,000 at an interest rate of 10% p.a.

In 2000, they received a grant from District Social Development Officer (Poverty Eradication Programme) which they used to loan their members. 14 members were successfully loaned through this programme and 7 defaulted to repay back. DIGROT was trained by HI in 2004 on micro-credit management.

In the year 2001-2003 they approached HI on HIV/AIDS awareness and in 2004 they wrote a proposal to HI on HIV and AIDS and Disability which was funded in May 2006.

DIGROT has representatives from different locations in Trans Nzoia district and was registered as a Community based Organization (CBO) in 2007. DIGROT is a network of DPOs (Disabled Persons Organizations) in Trans Nzoia district and usually conducts quarterly meetings with representatives from these DPOs.

It currently has 224 registered members and each member pays 524 shillings registration fee with a renewal fee of 200 shillings annually. Not all members are fully registered and the money is kept in a savings account.

The organization lacked well defined operational systems and procedures but has been subjected to vigorous capacity building initiatives, the organizations has also just finalized a recruitment exercise where competent and qualified staff have been brought on board.

In the current partnership agreement the organization is obligated to spend Ksh. 1,131,139.00 (one million one thirty one thousand one hundred thirty nine only)

UDPK (United Disabled Persons of Kenya)

United Disabled Persons of Kenya (UDPK) is an umbrella network of persons with disability in Kenya and was established in 1989 with a membership of the following organizations – Kenya Union of the Blind (KUB), Kenya National Association of the Deaf (KNAD) and Kenya Society of the Physically Handicapped (KSPH), Kenya Society for the Mentally Handicapped (KSMH). Kenya Autism Society joined later to champion issues of parents of mentally challenged Albinos and autism.

Currently UDPK has about 200 member organizations. UDPK was formed so that disabled persons could be united and speak with one voice, advocacy and lobbying remains the core objective.

Membership is both by organizations of and for disabled person. UDPK has five full time staff and 13 Field Officers working in different regions and is headquartered in Westlands, along Waiyaki Way. The mission of UDPK is to unite all persons, groups of Persons with Disabilities (PWDs) to advocate for disability issues on a united front. The vision for the organization is a barrier free society where Persons with Disabilities (PWDS) enjoy access to services in all spheres of life.

In the current grant agreement the organization is mandated to spend Ksh.2, 542,345.00 (two million five forty two thousand three hundred forty five only).

GENERAL OBJECTIVE

The general objective of this consultancy is to conduct an application based QuickBooks Training for management and finance staff of Handicap International partners so as to reflect through proper recording keeping and accurate financial reporting an accountable and effective use of donor funds as outlined in the individual budgets of the funded organizations and based on properly defined internal control systems, proper administrative and logistical management.

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE
• To design and develop a training programme that will equip the trainees with relevant skills and knowledge in Quickbooks

PROPOSED METHODOLOGY

HI proposes to hold a five day residential application based training for management and financial staff from each of the partnering organizations.

HI also proposes that the consulting firm shall at all times seek clarifications and/or guidelines from HI on all issues that are not clear and/or appear ambiguous in their opinion. For the purposes of this Training, the contact person for HI is Mr. Erick Karani, the Project Finance Officer.

TASKS OF THE CONSULTANT

1. Development of a training curriculum that shall conform to the afore-mentioned specific and general objectives and/or all other related aspects of QuickBooks financial package.

2. Carry out an evaluation of the training and produce a training report.

EXPECTED RESULTS

At the end of the training, the trainees will be able to:-
• Explain the essence and challenges of QuickBooks.
• Understand the usage and benefits of QuickBooks in financial management.
• Establish the relationship between QuickBooks reports and external reporting.
• Outline the QuickBooks main menu.
• Set up Accounts in the Quickbooks software
• Key in data and prepare accounting documents.
• Record General Journals.
• Prepare Bank Reconciliations.
• Develop Internal and Donor Reporting formats.
• Prepare monthly/annually reports.
• Correct Errors.

TIME FRAME

The training is expected to commence on 15th and end on 19th December, 2008 close of business.

QUALIFICATIONS

The consultant should have :-
• Relevant educational back ground and experience in teaching QuickBooks in a reputable institution.
• Relevant experience in working as a consultant/ lecturer is added advantage.
• Excellent analytical, writing and communication/facilitation skills.

APPLICATION PROCESS

All interested applicants must submit their profiles and proposals on or before 10th December, 2008 5.00 pm by email to the Project Finance Officer at: ekarani@handicap-international.or.ke

The email subject line should be marked: “QuickBooks training for the Sub grantees”



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) mailing list. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to Handicap International as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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JOB POST: Project Manager Inclusive Education Bac Kan province, Vietnam, Handicap International

Posted on 21 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Handicap International IS LOOKING FOR Project Manager Inclusive Education in Bac Kan province, Vietnam.
Posting date: 1st February 2009 Length of the assignment : 2 years
Closing date for application : 21/12/2008 (December 21, 2008)

Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit-making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, in response to humanitarian crises and the effects of extreme poverty. Handicap International implements programmes of assistance to persons and local organisations, inclusion programmes and programmes focusing on the fight against the main causes of disability. It runs projects in almost 60 countries, with the support of a network of 8 national associations ( Germany, Belgium, Canada, United-States, Luxembourg, United Kingdom and Switzerland)

The organisation employs almost 3300 people worldwide, 330 of whom work in France and in its European and North American sections.

For more details on the association: http://www.handicap-international.fr/en/s/index.html

JOB CONTEXT :

Unified from 1975 after 40 years of conflict, Vietnam entered into the Doi Moi process on economy and politics in the mid 80’s to open the country to liberalism. With economic growth rate of more than 8% in 2007, the country is now becoming one of the new Asian Dragons. This development creates a gap between rich areas mainly located in the lowlands and urban areas and remote mountainous regions where people remain poor, despite a 50% fall in poverty over the last 10 years.

The country is very stable with a government ruled by one legal political party. All institutional levels have People Committee representatives from the State to the villages. With around 85 millions inhabitants, Vietnam is highly populated for a territory of 331,000 km2. 54 ethnic groups co-exist in this area; the Kinh (Vietnamese themselves) constitute a majority of 85% and are dispersed nationwide. All other population groups are ethnic minorities mainly located in mountainous provinces.

JOB DESCRIPTION :

The objective aims to implement the Inclusive Education National Plan in Bac Kan province. The project has been designed and submitted as a consortium between Handicap international France and Save the Children Sweden. The project will be implementing with others external partners specialized or working in education domain.

Challenges and goals:

The Project Manager will ensure the effective implementation of the project “Rights-Based Inclusive Education Access for Children with Disability in Bac Kan province, Vietnam” in line with programme and project requirements. The post holder must support and promote the core values and interests of HI. The Project Manager will work under the supervision of the Programme Director based in Hanoi and will manage one to two project assistants, and up to two field staff (to be recruited).

_Activities_ :

/_Manage the project_/:

– To manage the following project areas: implementation of activities, human resources (field staff), finance and communications. To coordinate with partners strategies on Inclusive Education;

– Determine the methodology to be used in the project appropriate to the Vietnamese understanding of inclusion of disabled children in education

– Support the implementation of activities by partners and consultants, to implement an education policy which takes into account disabled children,

– Write the project narrative reports and participate in financial reports,

– Co-ordinate between all the project’s internal and external stakeholders;

– Prepare and participate in the evaluation phases and implement any pertinent recommendations;

– Provide initiatives to develop the project in the relation to the HI Vietnam’s pluri-annual strategy and participate technically in fundraising.

/_Manage the project and site team:_/

– Draw-up job profiles, validate recruitments an individual action plans for each team member

– Train the team in methods, approaches (participative methods, partnership…) or technical aspects (Inclusive Education, Specialized Education, identification and assessment of disabled children); Ensure effective communication within the HI team in Hanoi and other sites.

/_ Assure the project’s technical framework and its representation_/:

– Ensure that the project is implemented in line with Handicap International’s Inclusive Education policy and the Vietnamese education sector plan. /__/

/_Contribute towards the capitalization of experience:_/

– Identify with the Technical Adviser, which issues or subject areas should be capitalized,

– Define a method for collecting good practice with the Technical Adviser

CANDIDATE PROFILE:

_Mandatory:_

– Degree in a relevant discipline ; Education, development or disability (equal to BAC + 4 in France)

– Strong management skills. At least 5 years experiences in his/her field or in project management.

– Sound knowledge of Monitoring and Evaluation techniques and methodology

– Ability to work in partnership with national and local actors

– Experience of working within a multi-cultural environment

– English is essential as all project documentation and reporting systems are in English

_Qualities required_: Group leadership, initiative, creativity, diplomacy, interpersonal skills. Written and oral expression, decision making, good team work skills, strong autonomy.

_Complementary_:

– _Field of studies:_ special Education (Inclusive education, social work…)

– Experience of working in remote area, experience in INGO, experience in Asian context.

REQUIRED LANGUAGE SKILLS: English mandatory both written and oral, French would be an asset.

JOB ENVIRONMENT : The Project Manager will travel to Hanoi once a month to attend a monthly internal HI meeting in order to monitor and share his project with the Hanoi office and the Quang Tri site (HIV/AIDS project).//

EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS :

_Volunteer :_ 750 or 850 Euros monthly indemnity + living allowance paid on the field + accommodation + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance

_Salary :_ 2000 to 2300 + 457 Euros expatriation allowance + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance « + family policy »

Please send resume and covering letter with the above reference to : FPINSERCPEducVietnam1108

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL – 14, avenue Berthelot – 69361 LYON CEDEX 07

Or by Email : recrut11@handicap-international.org

Please do not telephone

Candidates from Canada or the United States, and nationals of these countries, should send their application to the following address :

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL CANADA
1819 Boulevard René Lévesque, bureau 401 – MONTRÉAL, QUÉBEC – H3H 2P5

Or by email : jobs@handicap-international.ca
or fax : 514-937-6685

Please do not telephone



This announcement was previously circulated via the Intl-Dev mailing list; the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list; and other sources.

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Marketing and Communications Internship (paid), Global Partnership for Disability and Development, Washington DC

Posted on 18 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS INTERNSHIP
Location: Washington, District of Columbia, 20006, United States
Organization: Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD)

Area of Focus: Disability Issues, International Cooperation
Skill(s): editing, special events planning, Writing
End date: July 9, 2009
Language(s): English
Start date: January 9, 2009
Last day to apply: December 6, 2008
Paid or unpaid: Paid

Description:
The Marketing and Communications Intern will provide critical support in raising awareness about the GPDD and its programs, disseminating information and outcomes, and providing outreach to a large number of diverse stakeholders. The duties of the GPDD Communication Intern include:
* Identifying key constituencies and stakeholders for the organization
* Assisting with the development of communications and marketing strategies to effectively engage them
* Assisting with the development and maintenance of communities of practice and work groups, comprised of individuals and institutions, in order to facilitate the GPDD programmatic and development goals
* Assisting with the development of informational materials about the GPDD, including website content, newsletters, annual reports, videos and other organizational materials
* Assisting with the development of press releases and management of media relations
* Assisting with the coordination of organizational mailings
* Coordinating special events
* Assisting with the maintenance of the organization’s contact and membership databases
* Staying abreast of local events, seminars and publications of interest to the organization and facilitating the organizations participation as necessary
* Management of special projects related to the communications strategy of the organization

Qualifications:
Required Skills: A minimum of 3 years of under-graduate education.
Experience in communications field, disability issues, international relations, or development. Knowledge of information gathering and data building. Fluency in written and oral English; communication skills and ability to draft, edit and proofread. Computer proficiency.

Desired Skills: Experience or knowledge of communications and development. Master’s degree, or working towards a degree, in relevant field. Work experience in non-profit organizations.

Required Attributes: Proactive attitude and ability to work independently. Attention to detail and strong organizational skills. Creative and thorough approach to research. Interest in disability issues.

Application instructions:
To apply, please submit your resume/CV and cover letter to
kmhamel@law.syr.edu.
Please include “Marketing and Communication Internship” in the subject line.
Qualified candidates will be contacted by phone and/or email.



This announcement was disseminated on the GPDD mailing list.

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Uganda Disability Activist to America: Thank you for Obama!

Posted on 11 November 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

International disability activist Ambrose Murangira sent the following email

This email was sent to my friends on 4th November 2hours after Obama’s acceptance Speech. Read it NOW. YES WE CAN make disability history!

Dear Friends (especially Americans with or without disabilities),

Today, i am tempted to write on Sen. Obama’s victory and its implication to Americans with Disabilities in particular and PWDs in general (world-wide). Many scholars and some politicians have been questioning why the international community was fondly behind Obama’s presidency. They argued that nothing different will happen outside America but when i tasked some of them to distinguish between Obama’s and McCain’s foreign policies they could not. Now, its a defining moment and the world is watching America. Early this morning at his victory celebration in Chicago, Obama was quoted as saying;

“If there is anyone out there who doubts that America is a place where anything is possible, who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time, who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer,”

“Young and old, rich and poor, Democrat and Republican, black, white, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, gay, straight, disabled and not disabled, Americans have sent a message to the world that we have never been just a collection of red states and blue states,” he said. “We have been and always will be the United States of America”.

Therefore, my attention has been paid to the second quotation – Its a hope for a reason and a reason for hope -Its about us – we, individuals with disabilities. When i read it, i cried tears of joy. It is not a secret, America is superpower… Its like a heart of the world. Meaning that a better America is a better world. A month ago, i was paid by Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington DC for their failure to fix TTY (phone for hearing impaired people) in my hotel room. This partly explains that a better America is a better place for everyone. Sen. Obama’s own foreign policies tells us all. You are also reminded that disability is one of the Obama’s top priorities – focusing on early intervention! You will also recall that Sen. Obama played a key role in the formulating and approval of various regulations relating to disability…

So what? Since Sen. (now President-Elect) Obama promised change which is already in America… Let AWDs tell him to change whatever disable them because they are Americans first – so that America can send a message to the World as he has stated it early today. Tell him that all his support nationally and internationally should be inclusive… Your voices counted in this historical elections so let us demand for change in our lives too. The most important thing is to watch closely to any changes and ensure that all the changes made are inclusive – No Person is to be Left Behind! The International community (beneficiaries of US government support) will also demand for change wherever its necessary and that change must not only be necessary but it must be sufficient to the needs of PWDs…

Just few points for today! Americans: THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU A BILLION TIMES, THANK YOU for choosing Obama.

My best regards,

Ambrose Murangira,
International Disability Activist,
Kampala,
UGANDA



Thank you to Ambrose Murangira for granting permission to post his letter at this blog. A global campaign is under way to urge people with disabilities, our loved ones, colleagues, and other allies to send emails to Obama. These emails are an opportunity in part to thank him for mentioning people with disabilities in his election-night speech. They also are an opportunity to increase the visibility of people with disabilities around the world within Obama’s administration. People are writing emails from across the United States and around the world. Learn more about the international Call To Action and how YOU can participate at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/11/07/disabilities-email-obama/

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Impact of Nanoscale Science on Disability

Posted on 29 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, Health, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Opportunities, Poverty, technology, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for papers On the impact of nanoscale science and technology on disability, community and rehabilitation.
[NOTE from We Can Do editor: The deadline for abstracts is October 30, 2008; full articles can be submitted later, for authors whose abstracts are selected. We Can Do readers will note that the areas of suggested possible focus may include the impact of nanotechnology on people with disabilities in low-income countries; on international development; and on relevant topics such as water and sanitation, the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, and others. Inquiries and abstracts should be directed to the journal, NOT We Can Do.]

For a special issue of the International Journal on Disability, Community & Rehabilitation (IJDCR) (http://www.ijdcr.ca/copyright.shtml)

Guest Editor: Gregor Wolbring, Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies Program, Dept of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary. <gwolbrin@ucalgary.ca>

Invitation
Nanoscale science and technology, while still in its infancy, describes a rapidly growing sphere of enquiry, with many and varied implications for the disability field. To establish a ‘benchmark’ of the current state of knowledge and conceptual understanding, the Editors of IJDCR decided a special issue should be devoted to the topic. Background information and potential topics are presented below.

We invite potential contributors, regardless of fields of study (discipline), to submit 250-word Abstracts that articulate the conceptual arguments and knowledge base to be covered in a critical analysis on some aspect of the impact of nanoscale science and technology on disability, community and/or rehabilitation. Please submit abstracts to the Guest Editor via e-mail by 30 October, 2008.

From selected abstracts, we will request full articles of 3000-5000 words (excluding figures and tables) of original research and scholarship on a range of topics. Note that an invitation to submit an article does not guarantee its publication. Every submitted article will be subject to blind peer review and recommendations arising.

Background
Nanotechnology in all its meanings allows for, among other things, the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale and enables a new paradigm of science and technology that sees different technologies converging at the nanoscale namely:

  • nanoscience and nanotechnology,
  • biotechnology and biomedicine, including genetic engineering,
  • information technology, including advanced computing and communications,
  • cognitive science (neuro-engineering),
  • synthetic biology;

hence, the designation “NBICS” (nano-bio-info-cogno-synbio).

Many lists of anticipated nanoproducts exist (Institute of Nanotechnology 2005;Kostoff et al. 2006). Applications for NBICS products are envisioned in areas such as the environment, energy, water, weapons and other military applications, globalization, agriculture, and health (e.g., more efficient diagnostics and genetic testing, cognitive enhancement; life extension and enhancing human performance in general) (M.Roco 2003). Many believe that advances in NBICS hold the key for extreme life extension to the level of immortality and the achievement of morphological (Anders Sandberg 2001) and genomic freedom(Wolbring 2003). NBICS-medicine is envisioned by some to have the answer to global problems of disease and ill medical and social health. Others argue for the pursuit of ‘morphological freedom’ (Anders Sandberg 2001)–allowing the human body to move beyond typical functioning of the species. Disabled people are often highlighted as the beneficiaries of NBICS-medicine products. NBICS applications and the selling of NBICS health products focuses mostly on offering disabled people medical solutions (prevention or cure/normative adaptation) and might move towards transhumanist solutions (augmentation, enhancement of the human body) but rarely offers social solutions (adaptation of the environment, acceptance, societal cures of equal rights and respect). Many NBICS applications/products for disabled people are envisioned and are under development(Wolbring 2005).

We chose this topic for an issue of IJDCR because of how the discourses around these new and emerging nanoscale science and technologies are emerging and their potential impact on people with disabilities, the communities linked to them and/or practitioners as well as others. Consumers and researchers linked to the disability discourse are involved will shape the positive or negative consequences for everyone involved.

Nanotechnology and NBICS have an impact on disabled people in at least four main ways.

Impact of NBICS on disabled people (Wolbring 2006)

NBICS may develop tools to adapt the environment in which disabled people live and to give disabled people tools that would allow them to deal with environmental challenges. This side of S&T would make the life of disabled people more liveable without changing the identity and biological reality of the disabled person

NBICS may develop tools that would diagnose the part of disabled people’s biological reality seen by others as deficient, defect, impaired and ‘disabled’ thus allowing for preventative measures

NBICS may develop tools that would eliminate that portion of disabled people’s biological reality seen by others as deficient, defect, impaired and ‘disabled’.

NBICS may be a target for – and an influence upon – the discourses, concepts, trends and areas of action that impact disabled persons.

Discourses:

  • The discourse around the term human security
  • The religious discourse
  • The politics of biodiversity
  • The politics of inequity
  • The politics of the ethics discourse.
  • The politics of law:
  • The politics of raising the acceptance level for a given technology
  • The politics of setting goals and priorities
  • The politics of language
  • The politics of self perception and identity (Body politics)
  • The politics of red herrings
  • The politics of interpreting International treaties
  • The politics of governance
  • The Politics of evaluation, measuring, analysis, and outcome tools

Concepts:

  • Self identity security
  • Ability security
  • Cultural identity/diversity
  • Morphological freedom and morphological judgement(Anders Sandberg 2001)
  • Freedom of choice and tyranny of choice
  • Duty to fix oneself
  • Duty to know
  • Parental responsibility
  • Societal responsibility

Trends:

  • Change in the concepts of health, disease and ‘disability’/’impairment’
  • The appearance of enhancement medicine and the acceptance of beyond species-typical functioning
  • Moving from curative to enhancement medicine; decrease in curative medicine and the appearance of the transhumanist/enhancement burden of disease
  • Moving from human rights to sentient rights
  • Moving from morphological freedom to morphological judgement
  • The appearance of the techno poor disabled and impaired
  • Moving from freedom of choice to tyranny of choice judgement

Areas of Action:

  • Nanotechnology/NBIC for development
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and the UN Millennium Development Goals
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and global medical and social health
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and accessibility
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and law
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and water and sanitation
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and disaster management
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and weapons/war
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and ethics/philosophy
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and social science/anthropology
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and community
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and networking

All of the above discourses, concepts, trends and areas of actions impact on disabled people[1] and others.

Potential contributors to this Special Issue might consider areas from the above table or one of the following topics:

1. What are the potential positive and negative impacts of envisioned nanoscale science and technology products and research and development on:

  • disabled people,
  • the community around them
  • practitioners, consumers and researchers linked to the disability discourse
  • community rehabilitation and the rehabilitation field in general
  • inclusive education and the education of disabled people in general
  • employability of disabled people
  • citizenship of disabled people
  • body image of disabled people
  • medical and social health policies and their impact on disabled people
  • health care for disabled people
  • the elderly
  • disabled people in low income countries
  • laws related to disabled people such as the UN Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
  • the concept of personhood
  • concept of health and health care
  • the measure of disability adjusted life years and other measurements used to guide health care dollar allocation
  • quality of life assessment

2. What are the potential positive and negative impacts of the new social philosophy of transhumanism that is seen as being enabled by nanoscale science and technology products and research and development?
3. What impacts of potential nanoscale science and technology products and research and development onto disabled people will impact other marginalized groups?

For more information about the International Journal of Disability, Community & Rehabilitation (IJDCR) please go to http://www.ijdcr.ca.

References
Anders Sandberg. Morphological Freedom — Why We not just Want it, but Need it. 2001. <http://www.nada.kth.se/~asa/Texts/MorphologicalFreedom.htm>

Institute of Nanotechnology (2005). Research Applications And Markets In Nanotechnology In Europe 2005 <http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reportinfo.asp?report_id=302091&t=t&cat_id=4>

Kostoff, Ronald et al. “The seminal literature of nanotechnology research.” Journal of Nanoparticle Research (2006): 1-21. <http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.1007/s11051-005-9034-9>

M.Roco, W. Bainbridge eds. Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance: Nanotechnology, Biotechnology, Information Technology and Cognitive Science. 2003. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht Hardbound. <http://www.wtec.org/ConvergingTechnologies/Report/NBIC_report.pdf> [PDF format]

Wolbring, G. “SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AND THE TRIPLE D (DISEASE, DISABILITY, DEFECT).” Ed. William Sims Bainbridge Mihail C.Roco National. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic, 2003. 232-43<http://www.wtec.org/ConvergingTechnologies/> <http://www.bioethicsanddisability.org/nbic.html>

Wolbring, G (2005). HTA Initiative #23 The triangle of enhancement medicine, disabled people, and the concept of health: a new challenge for HTA, health research, and health policy Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, Health Technology Assessment Unit, Edmonton, Alberta Canada <http://www.ihe.ca/documents/hta/HTA-FR23.pdf> [PDF format]

Wolbring, G (2006). Scoping paper on Nanotechnology and disabled people. Center for Nanotechnology in Society Arizona State University [On-line]. <http://cns.asu.edu/cns-library/documents/wolbring-scoping%20CD%20final%20edit.doc> [Word format]

——————————————————————————–
[1] The term ‘disabled people’, as used here, reflects the way in which environmental factors impact on the ability of individuals with sensory, motor, cognitive or other variations to participate in society, consistent with its usage by Disabled Peoples’ International.



Thank you to Gregor Wolbring for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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Take Action! Promote the Mainstreaming of Disability in the MDGs

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

MEMORANDUM
TO: GPDD PARTNERS
FROM: GPDD SECRETARIAT
SUBJECT: PROMOTING THE MAINSTREAMING OF DISABILITY IN THE MDGs
DATE:    9/25/2008
 
The General Assembly’s sixty-third session is taking place at the UN headquarters in New York. This session marks a special occasion to highlight the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and a number of consultations and events examining multiple dimensions of MDG activities are taking place throughout the week. This presents a unique opportunity for all concerned stakeholders to advocate for the inclusion of disability in the MDGs.
 
Since the GA Plenary may discuss this issue from October 6 to 8, immediate action is essential. For this reason, the Secretariat of the Global Partnership for Disability and Development is:

1)    Circulating a letter to UN Missions and Foreign Affairs Offices of Member States requesting Member States to make interventions and support a resolution in favor of mainstreaming disabilities in the MDGs.

2)    Encouraging advocates and activists to phone, fax, or e-mail relevant government officials in their countries.

3)    Sending an advisory to relevant media outlets.

We request your support in these actions as well as your suggestions.

Your ideas and participation will make a difference! A sample letter and relevant contact information are attached for your use.

FYI,  a copy of the Secretary-General’s report on mainstreaming disability in monitoring and evaluation of MDGs conducted as part of the Fifth quinquennial  review and appraisal of the World Program of Action concerning Disabled Persons and a short summary are attached, as well.
 
Sincerely,
Maria Verónica Reina
Executive Director
GPDD

Sample Letter
Disability advocates may wish to use this sample letter as inspiration when writing to the UN Mission Office for your country, or when writing to the Foreign Affairs office in your country. Find the full list of UN Mission offices, with the relevant contact information, at http://www.un.org/members/missions.shtml. Search the website for your government to locate the contact information for your country’s equivalent of the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Dear Mr./Ms. Minister of Foreign Affairs (or Head of Delegation):
As members of the Disability and Development community, we want to encourage your government to play a substantive and active role in favor of mainstreaming Disability in the Millennium Development Goals (during the fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action (A/63/183) which will be reviewed by the GA during its 63rd session (6-8 October under Social Development). The report was envisaged as a contribution to reinforcing the disability perspective in reviews of the progress made, and challenges encountered, in implementing the MDGs as requested by GA resolution 62/127.

Mainstreaming disability in the MDGs will help to ensure that no one is excluded from the processes of global development. In view of the enforcement of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, new and concerted efforts should be made in order to accomplish the advancement of persons with disability in the context of development. It is important to note the importance of promoting universal design, the design of products, environments, programmes, and services which are usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. Such increased accessibility benefits all members of society, not only persons with disabilities. Simultaneously, it is also relevant to state that disability specific programs addressing MDG concerns are also needed to guarantee the full inclusion of persons with disabilities on an equal basis with others.

For these reasons, we respectfully urge you to promote a resolution on mainstreaming disability in the MDGs during the fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action at the 63rd Session of the GA.

Sincerely,

Summary Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons (A/63/183)
The full Fifth quinquennial review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons, referred to in Maria Verónica Reina’s letter, was too long to publish here. But someone also disseminated a shorter summary which is provided below.

The fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action (A/63/183) will be reviewed by the General Assembly during its 63rd session(6-8 October under social development)The report was envisaged as a contribution to reinforcing the disability perspective in reviews of progress and challenges encountered in implementing the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as requested by General Assembly resolution 62/127. The resolution also requested the Secretary-General to present proposed updates of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons which were summarized in Annex I to the report. The report also presents Annex II, “Millennium Development Goals: Mainstreaming Disability”, which presents practical guidance on the inclusion of disability in the processes of the MDGs.

The principal issue addressed in the fifth review and appraisal is the emergence of a “new normative and policy architecture” on the advancement of persons with disabilities within the context of development. This architecture comprises the broad policy framework of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons (for policy formulation, planning and development); the tactical guidance for States of the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities; and the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which are legally binding for States parties, and is discussed in the section “International Disability Architecture”.

A second point of importance within the report is the emergence, of regional action plans and programmes on the advancement of persons with disabilities, which reflect needs and priorities of the respective regional actors and their complementary relationship to the international architecture.

A third point addresses the processes of the MDGs and focuses on options suggested in the architecture to ensure that no one is excluded from the processes of global development.

A fourth point within the report discusses the expanded constituencies for the advancement of persons with disabilities. As the median global age is on the rise, disability will have major policy implications because the prevalence of disabilities tends to be higher among older persons. The new constituencies represent important agents in a new and concerted effort as part of a disability-sensitized community to the advancement of persons with disability in the context of development. It is important to note the importance of promoting universal design, the design of products, environments, programmes and services which are usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. Such increased accessibility benefits all members of society, not only persons with disabilities.

The fifth, point, is the need for a single, comprehensive biennial review of progress and obstacles in implementing a global strategy for disability-inclusive development. This unified report on the new disability architecture could facilitate substantive exchange and learning from the findings and recommendations of the CRDP treaty body once established, within the context of development.

Annex I to the Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action – Updates to the World Programme of Action
Annex I discusses the issue of the updating of the World Programme of Action, as requested by General Assembly resolution 62/127.

The report recommends that the General Assembly endorse a plan to develop a Global Strategy toward Disability-Inclusive Development 2010-2015, through regional consultations and contributions from experts. These strategic guidelines could be developed based on the complementarities and synergies of three disability-specific instruments, namely the World Programme of Action, the Standard Rules and the Convention, and could incorporate updates proposed by Member States. There are existing regional guidelines for disability action in the context of development that could provide a basis for the development of a global strategy.
Annex II to the Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action – Millennium Development Goals: Mainstreaming Disability

Annex II provides a selection of examples and guidelines for mainstreaming disability in the MDGs and includes possible indicators to include disability in the monitoring of progress in achieving MDGs.



This call for action, and the associated materials, was recently circulated in several different locations including the IDA_CRPD_Forum and the GPDD mailing list.



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Statement on the Millennium Development Goals and Disability, from the Africa Regional Conference

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

THE STATEMENT OF THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE, HELD AT THE PANAFRIC HOTEL, NAIROBI, KENYA 15TH TO 17TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

We, the 200 delegates of the Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference from the, Central, Eastern, Northern, Western and Southern sub regions of Africa met in Nairobi, Kenya, at the Panafric Hotel on 15th to 17th September 2008, to examine the status of MDGs in respect to the inclusion and mainstreaming of disability;

And further to enhance the capacity of leaders from the disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in African countries;

Noting that MDGs have no specific reference to persons with disabilities and therefore their continued exclusion in the campaign processes, policies, planning, programmes and implementation;

Concerned also that disability has not been mentioned in the midway Millennium Development Goals Report;

Further acknowledging that the convention on the rights of PWDs has recently come into effect, to among other things strengthen the resolve for inclusion of people with disabilities;
We note with dismay the continued categorisation of people with disabilities as vulnerable which further marginalises us and consigns us to invisibility, we state that we wish to be recognised as actors in the development processes;

We Resolve As Delegates That We Shall;
• Communicate the outcome of this conference to our governments to review, prioritise and include issues of disability in their Country Statements during their high level meetings on MDGs in New York, in the September 2008 Summit
• Call on our Governments to move and support a motion during the UN General Assembly, calling for the establishment of a new UN Special Agency on Disability; to provide leadership, coordination, harmonisation and enhanced monitoring and reporting.
• Engage our Governments to ensure that People with Disabilities are protected from adverse effects from rising costs and related vulnerabilities and participate and benefit from existing social protection schemes
• Lobby Governments through the African Development Bank and related partners to establish an African Disability Equity Fund to support economic empowerment, entrepreneurship and business of people with disabilities
• Encourage the use of professional campaigners including goodwill ambassadors in promoting disability inclusion
• Recognise the efforts of parents, friends and guardians of people with disabilities and recognise them as part of the wider disability movement
• Uphold the principle of gender equity in disability
• Promote the use of positive language in reference to people with disabilities
We Urge The UN Through Member States;
• To establish a Specialist Agency on Disability in the league of UNICEF and UNIFEM to provide leadership and global accountability on matters related to the disabled people
• To prioritise include and partner with the disability movement in its entire millennium campaign initiatives and develop the strategies for doing so in the September summit
We Urge The AU And Related Bodies To;
• Set up a Disability Desk within all African regional bodies to monitor the implementation of both the convention and human rights violation of people with disabilities within the respective regions.
• Mainstream disability into their programmes and performance management systems
• Establish peer review mechanism and performance management system for disability in Africa
• Ensure political and social economic representation of people with disabilities in NEPAD and develop terms of reference for their participation.
• Work with DPOs to urgently review the structure and mandate of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)
• Extend the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities for another ten years by means of a proclamation by the meeting of the African Heads of State planned for January 2009
• Facilitate self- representation of PWDs in all commissions, Pan Africa Parliament and other structures

We Call On The Secretariat Of African Decade Of Persons With Disability to;
• Establish a programme to develop human resource capacity for policy analysis to act as a watch dog in monitoring disability inclusion
• Allocate responsibilities, roles and duties to the regional federations and other partners in order to ensure effective, well – monitored follow up and implementation strategies
We urge all Government to;
• Ratify, domesticate and implement the UN convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
• Work with DPOs in nominating the members of the panel of experts in convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
• Recognise DPOs as agents of change and therefore as partners in development planning and programmes
• Include people with disabilities and disability into their poverty reduction and development programmes
• Put into place affirmative action to enhance participation in political social and economic sectors
• Include disability data collection within the general national data collection systems recognising diversity in disability
• Use data to inform planning and service delivery and monitoring and evaluation
• Highlight and include disability in the existing MDG indicators in partnership with the disability movement.

We Call On Development Partners To;
• Prioritise disability as a tool for planning and analysis for development assistance and international cooperation in all their international cooperation and assistance (aid, debt relieve and trade)
• Include and consult people with disabilities and their respective organisations in planning, implementation, monitoring and reporting
• Include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes

We Resolve That As Disabled Peoples Organisations We Shall;
• Advocate to ensure that disability issues are mainstreamed in all government, UN agencies and development partners policies, plans and programmes particularly those related to MDGs
• Endeavour to understand the structures of various government, UN agencies and development partners with a view to engaging with them more effectively for full inclusion of people with disabilities
• Advocate development partners to include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes
• Engage and influence the social development process
• Participate in the Social Protection processes to ensure people with disabilities are included
• Advocate and lobby to be included in national poverty reduction strategies and other national development plans and initiatives
• Explore avenues of partnership with private sector in their economic empowerment programes
• Utilize our individual and collective capacity to cause the implementation of programmes related to the MDGs for the benefit of people with disabilities
• Build our own capacity to engage with our government on their commitments and agreement at national and international levels
• Ensure that whatever is agreed at regional or national workshops cascades downward to people with disabilities at the grassroots and rural areas
• Familiarise ourselves with the disability policies of different development agencies and ensure that they benefit us
• Strengthen our unity and common voice in planning, implementation and monitoring processes whilst at the same time recognising diversity in disability
• Restructure and reform our internal governance structures to adopt modern management and good governance systems and increase transparency and accountability to our members
• Nurture and mentor youth with disabilities into leadership succession plans and support them towards social economic empowerment
• Make a paradigm shift from the charity model to the human rights and social development model
• Strategically engage with media for both awareness and advocacy and built our capacity to engage with media
• Sensitise and capacitate the media to various disability needs and to urge them to be inclusive in their presentation and reporting
• Link with African Universities to promote evidence based disability research and to promote disability inclusive academic programmes
• Review through our Governments the Accra Development Plan of Action and cause its implementation for the benefit of PWDs in Africa

These resolutions are the outcomes of the conference, formulated and spoken by the delegates at this esteemed Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference.



This statement from the Africa Regional Conference was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

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Training Workshop on AIDS and Disability, 19-20 November 2008, Soesterberg, The Netherlands

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The application deadline is October 1, 2008, to attend the training seminar November 19-20, 2008. Inquiries should be directed to Enablement, or to h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT We Can Do.

The number of disabled people worldwide is considerable – the figure of 650 million is often quoted. People with a disability and their families also account for 20% of the world’s poorest people. But so far most HIV-AIDS programmes are not accessible to people with disabilities.
International attention to the rights of people with disabilities is increasing especially since May 2008, when the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities has come into effect. However governments and policy makers have generally yet to include disability issues in their AIDS strategic plans. Even within specific disability programmes it is not yet common to ensure that clients of such programmes do have access to appropriate information and services that are related to HIV-AIDS and reproductive health. Leaving disabled people out of HIV-AIDS prevention and care is shortsighted. Given the rapid growth of the epidemic and the size of the global disabled population (an estimated 10% of the world‘s citizens); the AIDS crisis cannot be addressed successfully unless individuals with disability are routinely included in all HIV-AIDS prevention, treatment and outreach efforts!

Local Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) teams, professionals, people with disabilities and their families share the same fears, misconceptions and risks as the rest of the general public with regard to the virus. They urgently need to receive accessible and appropriate information on HIV-AIDS. The launch of the new United Nations CBR Guidelines December 2008 in Bangkok will mean that information on HIV-AIDS will become more easily available for CBR teams as these guidelines pay specific attention to this subject. The goal of the section focusing on HIV-AIDS is to ensure ‘access for all’ to HIV-AIDS information, services and programmes. This goal involves three key areas: increasing individual knowledge, reducing stigma and discrimination and mitigating the impact HIV-AIDS has on families and communities.

During this 2-day workshop outstanding researchers and practitioners will ensure that participants will become sensitized towards the need for inclusion of disabled people within their mainstream HIV-AIDS programmes. They will also discuss strategies, tools and experiences in HIV/AIDS programmes that include disabled people and in CBR and disability programmes which integrate HIV-AIDS with their other activities.

Prospective participants are
• policy makers & planners as well as project staff working in the field of
development cooperation
• policy makers & planners as well as project staff of mainstream HIV¬AIDS organisations
• AIDS activists
• interested academic staff from various university faculties

Overall goal
Mainstream development and HIV¬AIDS organisations understand the importance of inclusion of disabled people in their HIV-AIDS programmes.

Objectives
Participants have an increased awareness about the vulnerability of persons with disabilities to the risk and impact of HIV and AIDS;
Participants have tools and arguments for how to ensure inclusion of disability in HIV-AIDS policies, strategies and programs; Participants are able to advocate within their own organizations for equal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support services for persons with disabilities.

Content
The following content is being discussed:
• Sexual and Reproductive Health: a right of disabled people
• The situation of HIV-AIDS among disabled people world wide
• Specific risk factors
• Inclusion of disabled people in mainstream HIV-AIDS programmes: why (not)?
• Inclusive HIV-AIDS programming
• Effectiveness of inclusive HIV-AIDS programmes
• Community Based Rehabilitation and HIV-AIDS

Lecturing methods
• Short lectures by experts,
• Discussions
• Small group work
• Case study analysis

Lecturing staff Dr. Nora Groce (USA) is a medical anthropologist, interested in the area of global health and international development with particular emphasis on cross-cultural systems of health care and health as human rights issues. Her research interests include issues of disability in international health and development, violence as a global public health problem and equity in access to health care in ethnic and minority communities. Current Research Projects of Nora Groce are:
• Disability and HIV/AIDS knowledge among Disabled Populations (and the Yale University/World Bank Global Survey on HIV/AIDS and Disability);
• World Bank Health Systems Assessment Project;
• Violence against Disabled Children; and
• HIV/AIDS Education in Indigenous Communities: Rites of Passage

George O. Obuya (Kenya) is project co-coordinator of the Deaf Social Counselling & HIV/AIDS Education Program. He is representing the Dar-es Salaam (Tanzania) based and recently formed African Deaf Union in the African Decade for Persons with Disability HIV/AIDS Steering Committee, as well as a senior board member of the Kenya National Association of the Deaf (KNAD).

Jessica de Ruijter is the advocacy officer at VSO Netherlands. She has much experience in the area of HIV prevention and started advocacy on HIV and disability since January 2008. She is also the co-chair of the DCDD working group HIV and Disability.

Dr Peter Rule is a Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Adult Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. He recently completed a three-country study for the World Bank on HIV & AIDS and Disability. He has experience of working with NGOs in KwaZulu-Natal in the fields of adult literacy, disability, gender, HIV/AIDS and early childhood development.

Geert Vanneste is a health and rehabilitation consultant who worked for Christoffel BlindenMission (CBM) in Rwanda (1987-1994) and Tanzania (1994-2007). His main expertise is in the area of CBR but increasingly he became involved in Health and Hospital Management and HIV-AIDS issues. Currently he is Independent Consultant and living in Belgium.

The workshop will be conducted under the leadership of Roelie Wolting and Huib Cornielje and supported by the HIV-AIDS working group of the Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development.

Dates
19th and 20th of November 2008
(10.00 to 17.00 hours)

Venue
Kontakt der Kontinenten, Soesterberg, The Netherlands

Course fees
€ 500,00 (including tea/coffee, lunches and a course map)

Maximum number of participants
24

Application and Further Information
Interested people should apply well in advance (before the 1st of October 2008) by filling out the attached application form.

Huib Cornielje Enablement Langenhorst 36 2402PX Alphen aan den Rijn
Tel: +31-172-436953
Fax: +31-172-244976 E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl Internet: www.enablement.nl
We gratefully acknowledge the financial support provided by CORDAID.

Interested participants should send the following information to h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT to We Can Do.

Application form for Disability- HIV&AIDS training
19th and 20th of November 2008

This form to be submitted to: Enablement, Langenhorst 36, 2402PX, Alphen aan den Rijn, The Netherlands. E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl

General Information participant

First name
Family Name
Address
Postal code
City
Country
Telephone
Cell Phone
Fax
E-mail address
Employer/organisation
Profession or function within organisation
Organisation name (if different from information above)
Address
Postal Address
Postal Code
City
Telephone
Cell phone
Fax
E-mail address
Website

Dietary requirements?
If any special requirements please specify

Signature of applicant
Date
Place

Again, send application form to h.cornielje@enablement.nl



The above text was taken from an announcement being circulated by Enablement, an organization committed to disability and rehabilitation management, particularly in less developed nations.

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Wheelchair Consensus Symposium, Sept 25-26, 2008, Asia-Pacific Region

Posted on 3 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Assistive Devices, East Asia Pacific Region, Events and Conferences, Mobility Impariments, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Wheelchair Consensus Symposium is being held September 25-26, 2008, to discuss approaches to providing wheelchairs in low-resource settings within the Asian-Pacific region. The conference is being held at the University of South Australia.

For more detail on how to register for the conference, costs, visa applications, etc., please follow the link to the conference website at

http://www.unisa.edu.au/hawkecentre/events/2008events/Wheelchair.asp

Questions about the event can be directed to:

Kylie Mines, Motivation Australia
Telephone: 08 8556 4423
Email: kmines@motivation.org.uk

The following detail is taken from the Wheelchair Consensus Symposium website:

For people with a mobility disability, provision of a wheelchair which meets their physical, lifestyle and environmental needs can enable vastly improved health, social and economic well being.

However, an estimated 20 million people living in low income countries require a wheelchair and do not have one.

Recognising the important role Australian organisations can play in working to address this need, Motivation Australia, the Bob Hawke Prime Ministerial Centre and the National Committee on Rehabilitation Engineering are co-presenting the Wheelchair Consensus Symposium. The Symposium will draw together stakeholders in disability and development in less resourced settings in Australia and the Asia Pacific region, to:

  • Introduce the WHO Guidelines on the Provision of Manual Wheelchairs in Less Resourced Settings
  • Increase awareness of the need for appropriate mobility equipment for people with physical disabilities
  • Share information and programme approaches to the provision of appropriate wheelchairs
  • Increase collaboration between stakeholders in order to increase effectiveness
  • Develop consensus on future approaches to wheelchair provision in the region

This event will be held over two days, with day one as plenary sessions, and day two break-out sessions for stakeholders, to discuss key issues and suggest strategies.

Themes of the Symposium will be:

  • wheelchair design and production
  • wheelchair services
  • training of local staff
  • roles of Australian stakeholders

The Wheelchair Consensus Symposium is supported by AusAID through the International Seminar Support Scheme.

_______________________________________________________
We Can Do readers who are interested in wheelchair provision in low-income countries may also wish to learn more about the organization Whirlwind Wheelchair International, which helps train local people to build, repair and sell their own wheelchairs designed to meet local conditions, with all local materials.



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for circulating a notice about this conference; I gathered additional information and some of the text at the conference website.

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Right to Food for People with Disabilities: Tell FAO What You Know

Posted on 2 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

English; Français; español

Does disability make a difference in who does, and who doesn’t, have access to food in your country? If so, what are the causes of this inequality? This call for information and comments from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations is not specifically targeted at the disability community. However, this would be a good opportunity to share what you know about disability and food. The reports that FAO gathers can be used to help educate people about why people with disabilities may need special attention when protecting the rights of all people to have access to food.

Please read the following text closely then send your inquiries or comments to righttofood@fao.org, NOT We Can Do. Comments may be sent to FAO at any time. Feedback sent by September 10, 2008, might be shared at an upcoming Forum on the Right to Food, but is still equally welcome after that date. Thank you.

English; Français; español

NEW IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS
The Right to Food Unit at FAO is currently working towards the creation of a database where experiences with the implementation of right to food at country level will be recorded. The aim is to gather, compile and make available information on various actions undertaken by governments, other administrative bodies and civil society to implement the Voluntary Guidelines for the progressive realization of the right to adequate food (Right to Food Guidelines, see www.fao.org/righttofood). In so doing, we need your help to assemble experiences and record specific examples of actions.

Your contributions to this exchange of practical experiences and lessons learned will be crucial to promote the implementation of the right to food in the context of national food security. Selected contributions will be compiled into a background document to be discussed at the Right to Food Forum which will be held from 1 to 3 October 2008 in Rome. The Forum’s purpose is to review achievements and draw lessons learned from the experiences of key players in the field of right to food. A number of country experiences will be presented and working groups will focus on five thematic areas: advocacy and capacity development; vulnerability information and assessment; legislation and accountability; strategies and coordination; and benchmarks and monitoring. Authors of the case studies selected will be acknowledged in the above-mentioned document.

In order to write your narrative of the specific case that you will report on, we have attached an outline, with a request to complete it following the guidelines provided below:

Please complete the first part of the outline providing:
– a short title for the case which typifies the lesson(s) that it provides,
– the country concerned,
– the year in which the action took place,
– your full name as the author/ narrator of the story,
– sources used to obtain specific information,
– the name and email of a person we can contact for further information, other than yourself, and
– any website or other internet link you deem relevant for your report.

We are looking for the best practices and good examples in one or more of the aforementioned five thematic areas. For organizational purposes, please check the category box to which your report corresponds. Contextual information about each area is provided below, as well as some examples of concrete experiences that could be shared in the narrative part:

Advocacy and Capacity Development: Actions found in this category are the first steps in the implementation of the Right to Food. Indeed, to be able to meet their obligations, duty-bearers must be informed of their responsibilities and rights-holders should know how to claim their right to food. Activities comprise actions which raise the public’s awareness on the right to food, or which empower individuals to actually claim their rights, capacity development of duty-bearers, awareness raising activities by duty-bearers and civil society organizations, etc.

Vulnerability Information and Assessment: It is important to identify the food insecure, the vulnerable and the marginalized and to understand why they are food insecure. Assessments of existing institutions, laws, policies and programmes will help identify gaps, shortcomings and priorities for action. Activities comprise the critical analysis of underlying and root causes of hunger; undertaking assessments of legal, institutional and policy frameworks for the realization of the right to food; the identification of vulnerable groups; the collection, analysis and availability of disaggregated data; efforts to ensure involvement of the most vulnerable in decisions affecting their lives; actions undertaken to combat discrimination, etc.
Legislation and Accountability: With enforceable justice, trusted institutions and a legal system oriented towards the human right to food, rights-holders will be in a position to hold duty-bearers accountable for guaranteeing food security. The allocation of obligations and responsibilities must be clear. Lessons learned relate to activities in promoting the legal recognition of the right to food; drafting and adopting a specific framework law; revising sectorial laws and harmonizing them with right to food principles and food security goals; improving the implementation of existing laws; the development and implementation of local regulations; training of judges and lawyers; experiences on how recourse mechanisms – judicial, quasi-judicial – have addressed right to food cases; the introduction and use of administrative recourse mechanisms in social programmes (e.g. school feeding); information about roles and responsibilities; initiatives to increase accountability, transparency, as well as the legal empowerment of rights holders, etc.

Strategies and Coordination: Through effective human rights-oriented policies, coherent strategies and coordinated functional programmes, duty-bearers can fulfil their obligations to enable people to feed themselves. Public policies should focus on those whose rights are not fully realized, and on their participation in the formulation, implementation and evaluation of processes. Experiences in this area will refer to the incorporation of the right to food in policies and strategies; the review of other policies and strategies in view of their impact on the realization of the right to food; the inclusion of human rights principles in food security programmes; eligibility criteria to access public services (e.g. social assistance); the improvement of coordination and coherence among different sectors and levels of government; the creation, mandate and legal clarity of institutional arrangements; the political empowerment of the most vulnerable; etc.

Benchmarks and Monitoring: By measuring progress towards achievable goals through ongoing, community-based, national and international evaluation, duty-bearers and rights-holders can contribute to sustainable food security for all. Governments or other relevant bodies should monitor the implementation of laws, strategies, policies, and programmes, to ensure that their implementation is conducive to the realization and protection of the right to food and to take remedial action in case they are not. Lessons learned with implementation of the right to food in this area comprise the definition of benchmarks and targets; the work of institutions mandated with right to food monitoring; the inclusion of human rights-based indicators, targets and benchmarks; the observation of human rights principles of transparency, participation, non-discrimination and empowerment in the monitoring process; the dissemination of right to food monitoring information to rights-holders and duty-bearers; the examination of public expenditure in view of making the best use towards the realization of the right to food; etc.

The last part of the narrative outline is the “Experiences” box where you should write the actual report. This should be analytical on factors of success and failure, rather than a descriptive account of actions. Your report should take a maximum of two pages (any background materials can be attached) and should follow the following structure:

1- Lessons learnt:
Briefly state the relevance of the action you are reporting on for the right to food. In essence, why is the action relevant or helpful to right to food advocates or practitioners, duty-bearers or right- holders?

2- Background:
Provide a brief background for the action in question. What initiated the action or the event you are reporting on? If you talk about a government activity, was this part of a larger programme? If you report on an advocacy or a training event, what triggered it? In general what were the objectives of the action? How should it foster the realization of the right to food? Lastly, explain how the action was put in place and what government bodies or other parties are responsible for its monitoring. Feel free to add anything else you judge relevant.

3- Implementation:
This is the most important section for this exercise. Has the action’s implementation resolved the right to food issues it was created for? Did the implementation process conform to human rights principles? Please also analyse the success or failures of the action. What were the external and internal factors that influenced, positively or negatively, a certain activity? How was success measured, (e.g. by the popularity of an action among the population or by its benefits to the marginalized groups of society)? Factors of failure may be found in the failure to follow human rights principles, failures in the design of the measure or institutional weaknesses. Also, please assess the impact of the action on peoples’ possibility to realize their right to food. Any figures you might have to support your argument should be included here.

4- Recommendations/ conclusion:
Based on the analysis you have presented, conclude with the main lessons learned and recommendations for improving the process and/or outcome of the action. If you refer to a case or recommendations drawn from a study by FAO, other UN bodies, NGOs, institutions or individual authors, please provide these and identify the organisation or author. Alternatively, please name the document from which we can extract the recommendations.

Any additional comments should be included in the “Remarks” box. Additionally, please attach any publications and supporting material that you deem relevant.

We appreciate your cooperation in developing the right to food implementation database and look forward to receiving your contributions. Please use our generic email account: righttofood@fao.org.

Note that in order for your contributions to be reviewed in time for the Forum, they should be sent no later than September, 10th 2008. Reports received at a later stage are equally welcome and will make a valuable contribution to the ongoing work on our database and the continuing exchange on how to promote the implementation of the right to food.

Should you have any questions regarding how to complete the form, please address your message to:
Mr. Frank Mischler, Tel. +39-06-57053919,
fax: +39-06-57053712.

For further information on the Forum, kindly consult our website: http://www.fao.org/righttofood/rtf_forum/index_en.html

Thank you for your time and collaboration.

Right to Food Unit
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

English; Français; español

NOUVEAUX PROCÉDÉS DE MISE EN OEUVRE
L’Unité pour le droit à l’alimentation de la FAO est en train de développer une base de données qui regroupera les différentes expériences des pays dans la mise en œuvre du droit à l’alimentation. Le but est de regrouper, compiler, et de rendre accessible l’information sur les différentes actions entreprises par les gouvernements ou autres entités publiques et la société civile pour mettre en œuvre les Directives volontaires à l’appui de la concrétisation progressive du droit à une alimentation adéquate dans le contexte de la sécurité alimentaire nationale (Directives sur le Droit à l’alimentation, voir www.fao.org/righttofood). Pour ce faire, nous avons besoin de votre aide pour rassembler les expériences et enregistrer des exemples spécifiques d’actions entreprises.

Vos contributions à cet échange d’expériences et de leçons apprises seront cruciales à la promotion de la mise en œuvre du droit à l’alimentation dans le contexte de la sécurité alimentaire nationale. Les contributions choisies, seront compilées dans un document de base qui facilitera la discussion pendant le Forum sur le droit à l’alimentation qui se déroulera du 1 au 3 Octobre 2008 à Rome. Le but du forum est non seulement de réviser les accomplissements des différents pays, mais aussi de tirer des leçons de l’expérience de pays clef dans le domaine du droit à l’alimentation. Un bon nombre d’expériences seront présentés et des groupes de travaille se concentreront sur cinq domaines d’interventions: sensibilisation et formation; information et évaluation; législation et obligation de rendre des comptes; stratégies et coordination; et critères et contrôle. Les auteurs des rapports choisis seront reconnus dans le document de travail mentionné ci-dessus.

Pour faciliter la rédaction de votre narrative sur des cas spécifiques, nous vous proposons de suivre le plan en annexe, que nous vous demandons de compléter en suivant les instructions suivantes:

Veuillez remplir la première partie du plan en donnant:
– un nom assez court à votre rédaction qui résume la leçon que celle-ci contient,
– le nom du pays concerné,
– l’année dans laquelle l’action s’est déroulée,
– votre nom complet en tant qu’auteur de la narration ainsi que votre adresse,
– les sources que vous avez consultées pour obtenir les informations que vous présentez,
– le nom et le courrier électronique d’une personne, autre que vous-même, que nous pourrions contacter pour plus d’informations et,
– un site Internet ou autre lien Internet que vous jugez utile pour votre rapport.

Nous recherchons les meilleures pratiques et de bons exemples dans un ou plusieurs des cinq domaines d’interventions ci-dessous : .

Sensibilisation et formation: les actions que l’on trouve dans cette catégorie représentent les premiers pas vers une mise en œuvre du droit a l’alimentation. En effet, pour pouvoir s’acquitter de leurs obligations dans la lutte contre la faim, les porteurs d’obligations doivent être informés de leurs responsabilités et les titulaires de droits doivent savoir comment faire valoir leur droit à l’alimentation. Les activités comprennent des actions de sensibilisation du public, ou qui renforcent le pouvoir des individus de faire valoir leur droit, le développement des capacités des porteurs d’obligations, des activités de sensibilisation par la société civile.

Information sur la vulnérabilité et évaluation: Il est important d’identifier les titulaires de droits les plus démunis, les plus vulnérables et les plus marginalisés et de comprendre pourquoi ils sont dans une situation alimentaire précaire. L’évaluation des institutions en place, des lois, des politiques et des programmes aidera à identifier les lacunes, les limitations et les priorités pour agir. Les activités comprennent l’analyse critique des raisons et des causes profondes de la malnutrition; l’évaluation de la structure des institutions légales et des politiques institutionnelles pour la réalisation du droit a l’alimentation ; l’identification des groupes vulnérables ; la collection, l’analyse et la disponibilité de données désagrégées ; les efforts pour s’assurer de la participation des plus démunis dans la prise de décisions qui affectent leurs vies ; les actions entreprises pour combattre la discrimination, etc.

Législation et obligation de rendre des compte: A l’aide d’une justice exécutoire, fiable et d’un système juridique axé sur le droit humain à l’alimentation, les titulaires de droits seront a même de tenir les porteurs d’obligations responsables de la garantie de la sécurité alimentaire. La répartition des obligations et des responsabilités doit être claire. Les leçons apprises sont liées aux activités promouvant la reconnaissance légale du droit à l’alimentation; la formulation et l’adoption d’une loi cadre; la révision des lois sectorielles et leur harmonisation avec les principes du droit à l’alimentation et le but de la sécurité alimentaire; l’amélioration de la mise en place des lois existantes; le développement et la mise en place de réglementations locales; la formation de juges et d’avocats; diverses expériences sur la façon dont les mécanismes de recours – judiciaires et quasi-judiciaires – ont adressé des cas lié au droit à l’alimentation ; l’introduction et l’usage de mécanisme de recours administratifs dans les programmes sociaux (ex : alimentation scolaire); l’information sur les rôles et responsabilités de chacun; les initiatives pour améliorer la responsabilité, la transparence ainsi que le renforcement légal des titulaires de droits, etc.

Stratégie et coordination: À travers une politique orientée sur les droits de l’homme, des stratégies cohérentes et des programmes fonctionnels et coordonnés, les porteurs d’obligations peuvent s’acquitter de leurs obligations et permettre aux gens de se nourrir indépendamment. Les politiques publiques doivent se concentrer sur ceux dont les droits ne sont pas entièrement reconnus, et sur la participation de ceux-ci dans la formulation, mise en œuvre et évaluation des procédés de mise en oeuvre. Les expériences dans ce domaine se référèrent à l’incorporation du droit à l’alimentation dans les politiques et stratégies en vue de leur effet sur la réalisation du droit à l’alimentation; l’inclusion des principes des droits de l’homme dans les programmes pour la sécurité alimentaire; les critères d’éligibilité pour pouvoir accéder aux services publiques (ex : assistance sociale); l’amélioration de la coordination et la cohérence entre les différents secteurs et niveaux du gouvernement; la création, le mandat et la clarté légale des arrangements institutionnels; le renforcement du pouvoir politique des plus vulnérable; etc.

Critères et contrôle: Les porteur d’obligations et les titulaires de droits peuvent participer a une sécurité alimentaire durable pour tous, s’ils s’engagent avec des organismes nationaux et internationaux dans une évaluation continue des institutions mises en place et en mesurant les progrès fait vers des objectifs achevables. Les gouvernements et autres entités en rapport avec le droit à l’alimentation doivent contrôler la mise en oeuvre des lois, des stratégies, des politiques et des programmes, pour s’assurer que ces instruments mènent effectivement à la réalisation du droit à l’alimentation et prendre des mesures correctionnelles si ce n’est pas le cas. Les leçons apprises avec la mise en place du droit à l’alimentation dans ce domaine comprennent la définition de critères et objectifs; le travail des institutions responsables du contrôle du droit à l’alimentation; l’inclusion d’indicateurs basés sur les droits de l’homme; l’observation des principes des droits de l’homme de la transparence, la participation, la non-discrimination et l’autonomisation tout au long du processus de contrôle ; la diffusion aux porteurs d’obligations et aux titulaires de droits d’informations sur le contrôle; l’examen des dépenses publiques en vue d’en faire le meilleur usage pour le droit à l’alimentation; etc.

La dernière partie du plan de la narration est la case « Expériences » où vous écrirez votre rapport. Celui-ci devra être une analyse des facteurs de succès et d’échecs, plutôt qu’une description des actions. Votre rapport devra faire un maximum de deux pages (vous pouvez attacher tout document que vous jugez nécessaire) et devra suivre la structure suivante:

1- Leçons apprises:
Indiquez brièvement la pertinence de l’action que vous rapportez pour le droit à l’alimentation. Essentiellement, en quoi l’action que vous rapportez aide-t-elle les militants et pratiquants du droit à l’alimentation, les porteur d’obligations et les titulaire de droits?

2- Contexte:
Veuillez fournir un contexte bref pour l’action dont il est question. Quel a été le facteur initiateur de cette action? Si vous parlez d’une activité gouvernementale, l’action fait-elle partie d’un programme plus important? Si votre rapport porte sur un événement de plaidoyer ou de formation, quel a été le facteur déclencheur? En général quels ont été les objectifs de l’action? Comment peut-elle aider à la réalisation du droit à l’alimentation? En dernier lieu, expliquez comment l’action a été mise en place et quelles entités publiques ou autres parties sont responsables pour son contrôle. Vous pouvez rajouter toute autre information que vous jugez utiles.

3- Mise en place:
Cette partie est la plus importante de cet exercice. La mise en place de l’action en question a-t-elle résolu les problèmes liés au droit à l’alimentation pour lesquelles elle a été entreprise? Le processus de mise en place était-il conforme aux principes des droits de l’homme? Veuillez aussi analyser le succès ou l’échec de l’action. Quels ont été les facteurs internes et externes qui ont influencé positivement ou négativement une certaine action? Comment le succès a-t-il été mesuré, (ex : par la popularité de l’action chez la population ou par les bénéfices de cette action pour les communautés marginalisées)? Les facteurs d’échec peuvent être mesurés par le non suivi des principes des droits de l’homme, les problèmes issus de la conception des mesures ou de la faiblesse des institutions en place. Veuillez aussi évaluer l’effet de l’action sur la capacité de la population à réaliser leur droit à l’alimentation. Si vous disposez de chiffres qui puissent appuyer vos arguments, veuillez les inclure dans cette section.

4- Recommandations/ Conclusions:
Basé sur votre analyse, veuillez conclure en rappelant les leçons apprises les plus importantes et formulez des recommandations pour améliorer le processus de mise en oeuvre et/ou le résultat de l’action. Si vous vous référez à un cas ou à des recommandations documenté dans une étude de la FAO, ou d’une autre organisation des Nations Unies, ONGs, institutions ou auteurs indépendant, veuillez les attacher à ce document et identifier l’organisation ou l’auteur. Sinon, veuillez préciser le nom du document duquel nous pourrons extraire les recommandations.

Tout autre commentaire devrait être inclus dans la case « Remarques ». Aussi, veuillez attacher tout document et matériel de support que vous jugez utile.

Nous apprécions votre coopération dans le développement de la base de données sur la mise en place du droit à l’alimentation et nous réjouissons de recevoir vos contributions, que vous voudrez bien envoyer à notre adresse électronique: righttofood@fao.org.
Notez que pour que vos contributions puissent être retenues pour le Forum, elles doivent être reçues d’ici le 10 septembre 2008. Les rapports reçus plus tard seront également très utiles et constitueront une contribution importante pour base de données et pour l’échange continu en vue de la promotion de la mise en oeuvre du droit à l’alimentation.
Si vous avez besoin de renseignements supplémentaires, veuillez adresser votre message à: Frank Mischler, tel. +39-06-57053919, fax: +39-06-57053712. Pour plus d’information sur le Forum, veuillez consulter notre site Internet: http://www.fao.org/righttofood/rtf_forum/index_en.html

En vous remerciant sincèrement pour votre collaboration.

Unité pour le droit a l’alimentation
Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et l’Agriculture.

English; Français; español

NUEVO PROCESO DE IMPLEMENTACIÓN

La Unidad del Derecho a la Alimentación de la FAO se encuentra actualmente trabajando en una base de datos en la cual se recopilarán las experiencias relacionadas con la implementación del derecho a la alimentación a nivel nacional. El objetivo consiste en reunir, compilar y tener a disposición la información relacionada con las actividades desarrolladas por los gobiernos, la sociedad civil y demás entidades administrativas encaminadas a implementar las Directrices Voluntarias en apoyo de la realización progresiva del derecho a una alimentación adecuada (Directrices del Derecho a la Alimentación, ver www.fao.org/righttofood) . Para cumplir con tal objetivo, necesitamos que nos ayuden a reunir las distintas experiencias para así poder archivar ejemplos específicos de acciones que hayan sido emprendidas a nivel nacional.

Sus contribuciones en el marco de este intercambio de experiencias y lecciones aprendidas serán de gran importancia para promover la implementación del derecho a la alimentación en el contexto de la seguridad nacional alimentaria. Algunas de las contribuciones serán seleccionadas y compiladas en un documento que será discutido en el Foro sobre el Derecho a la Alimentación que tendrá lugar del 1 al 3 de Octubre de 2008 en Roma. El Foro tiene como propósito revisar los logros obtenidos y sacar provecho de las lecciones aprendidas por parte de aquellos actores clave en materia del derecho a la alimentación. Un gran número de experiencias relativas a diversos países serán presentadas y los grupos de trabajo se enfocarán en las siguientes temáticas: promoción y desarrollo de capacidad, evaluación e información, legislación y responsabilidad, estrategias y coordinación e indicadores y seguimiento. Los autores de los estudios de casos que sean seleccionados serán reconocidos y citados en la parte inicial del documento que será discutido en el Foro anteriormente mencionado.

Para redactar el caso específico sobre el cual deseen informarnos, hemos adjuntado un esquema que les pedimos completar, siguiendo las instrucciones siguientes:

Completen por favor la primera parte del esquema indicando:

– un breve título para el estudio del caso específico por medio del cual se ilustre la(s) lección(es) que de éste se ha(n) podido desprender.
– el país respectivo
– el año en el cual la acción u actividad tuvo lugar
– su nombre completo como autor/ narrador de la historia,
– fuentes utilizadas en la obtención de información específica
– el nombre y el correo electrónico de una persona distinta a usted que podamos contactar para mayor información, y
– algún sitio o página de internet que usted considere relevante para nuestro informe.

Estamos en búsqueda de las mejores prácticas y de los mejores ejemplos aplicados en una o en varias de las áreas temáticas anteriormente mencionadas. Por motivos de organización, por favor señale la casilla correspondiente a la categoría a la cual pertenece su informe.

Promoción y Capacitación: Las actividades enmarcadas dentro de esta categoría constituyen los primeros pasos para la implementación del derecho a la alimentación. De hecho, los titulares de obligaciones sólo pueden cumplir éstas mismas si han sido previamente capacitados sobre sus responsabilidades y los titulares de derechos sólo saben cómo reclamar su derecho a la alimentación si han sido previamente informados. Las actividades incluyen acciones destinadas a aumentar la sensibilización del público en materia del derecho a la alimentación, a dotar a los individuos de capacidades para que puedan reclamar sus derechos, incluyen igualmente desarrollo de capacidad por parte de los titulares de obligaciones, actividades de sensibilización destinadas a los titulares de obligaciones y a las organizaciones de la sociedad civil.

Información y evaluación: Es de gran importancia identificar la inseguridad alimentaria, las personas más vulnerables y aquellas que se encuentran en condiciones marginales y así poder entender las razones que generan tal inseguridad. La evaluación de ciertas instituciones, leyes, políticas y programas ayuda a identificar los vacíos, las limitantes y las prioridades al momento de actuar. Las actividades incluyen el análisis de las raíces y las profundas causas del hambre, evaluaciones sobre el aspecto legal, institucional y el marco político de la realización del derecho a la alimentación; la identificación de los grupos más vulnerables; la recolección, análisis y disponibilidad de datos individualizados, esfuerzos para asegurar la participación de las personas más vulnerables en las tomas de decisiones que afectan sus vidas, acciones realizadas para combatir la discriminación, etc.

Legislación y responsabilidad: A través de una justicia efectiva, instituciones fidedignas y un sistema jurídico orientado hacia el derecho humano a la alimentación, los titulares de derechos podrán hacer responder a quienes tienen la obligación de garantizar su seguridad alimentaria. La repartición de obligaciones y responsabilidades debe ser clara. Las lecciones se encuentran en relación con la promoción del reconocimiento legal del derecho a la alimentación, la elaboración y la redacción de un marco legal específico, la revisión de las leyes correspondientes a cada sector y su respectiva armonización con los principios del derecho a la alimentación y con los objetivos de la seguridad alimentaria. Otras actividades se encuentran destinadas a mejorar la implementación de leyes, a desarrollar nuevas regulaciones, a la formación de jueces y abogados, experiencias relativas a la forma mediante la cual los recursos de tipo judicial o cuasi judicial han abordado los casos del derecho a la alimentación, la interposición y el uso de recursos de tipo administrativo al interior de programas sociales (ej. alimentación escolar), información sobre los roles y las responsabilidades, las iniciativas destinadas a incrementar la responsabilidad de quienes son titulares de obligaciones, la transparencia y la capacidad de los titulares respecto de sus propios derechos, etc.

Estrategia y coordinación: Mediante políticas eficaces orientadas hacia los derechos humanos y mediante estrategias coordinadas basadas en el derecho humanitario, los titulares de obligaciones pueden cumplir con su deber de hacer posible que los titulares de derechos se alimenten por sus propios medios. Las políticas públicas deberían enfocarse en la formulación, implementación y evaluación de ciertos procesos. La experiencia hace referencia a la incorporación del derecho a la alimentación en las políticas y estrategias, la revisión de otras políticas y estrategias teniendo en cuenta su impacto para la realización del derecho a la alimentación, la inclusión de principios de derechos humanos en los programas de seguridad alimentaria, criterios de elegibilidad para tener acceso a los servicios públicos (ej. protección social); los avances en materia de coordinación y coherencia dentro de los diferentes sectores y niveles del gobierno, la creación, el mandato y la claridad legal de los acuerdos institucionales; el empoderamiento a nivel político de aquellos que son más vulnerables, etc.

Indicadores y seguimiento: Mediante objetivos realizables y mediante una evaluación de base comunitaria y continua a nivel nacional e internacional, los titulares de derechos y los titulares de obligaciones pueden contribuir para lograr una seguridad alimentaria para todos. Los gobiernos y demás actores que resultan relevantes deberían hacerle seguimiento a las leyes, a las estrategias, a las políticas y a los programas con el objetivo de asegurar que su implementación esté encaminada a la realización y a la protección del derecho a la alimentación y a tomar medidas en caso de que así no sea. Las lecciones que deja la implementación del derecho a la alimentación en esta área comprenden la definición de indicadores y objetivos, el trabajo de instituciones cuyo mandato consiste en hacer seguimiento al derecho a la alimentación; la inclusión de objetivos e indicadores basados en los derechos humanos; el respeto a la transparencia, la participación, la no-discriminación y el empoderamiento como principios de derechos humanos aplicables en la etapa de seguimiento, difusión de información relativa a dicho seguimiento; el análisis del gasto público esperando que éste sea destinado a la realización del derecho a la alimentación, etc.

La última parte del esquema es la casilla de “experiencias” en la cual deberán escribir su informe. Este debe contener un análisis de los factores que han producido éxito y fracaso en vez de ser un informe que contenga una mera descripción de actividades. Sus informes deberán contener un máximo de dos páginas (cualquier material adicional podrá ser adjuntado) y deberán seguir la siguiente estructura.

1- Lecciones aprendidas:
Establecer brevemente la relevancia de las actividades sobre las cuales nos está informando en materia del derecho a la alimentación. ¿Por qué la acción resulta ser relevante o de ayuda para la promoción del derecho a la alimentación en manos de quienes lo defienden así como para quienes son titulares de derechos y titulares de obligaciones?

2- Antecedentes:
Brindar un breve conjunto de antecedentes para el tema en cuestión. ¿Qué suscitó el inicio de la acción o el evento respecto del cual usted nos está informando? En caso de estar haciendo referencia a una actividad gubernamental, ¿se encontraba ésta al interior de un programa de mayor escala? Si nos está informando sobre un evento relativo a promoción o capacitación, ¿qué o quiénes le dieron tal impulso? ¿Cuales eran los objetivos iniciales de tal acción? ¿En qué sentido esta acción resulta ser positiva para el derecho a la alimentación? Finalmente, explique por favor la manera por medio de la cual esta acción fue puesta en práctica así como las responsabilidades que los órganos del gobierno y otros actores tienen en lo relativo a su seguimiento. Por favor adjunte información adicional si considera que ésta puede resultar relevante.

3. Implementación:
Esta es la parte más importante de este ejercicio. ¿La acción llevada a cabo ayudó o no a resolver las problemáticas para las cuales ésta fue creada? ¿El proceso de implementación respetó o no los principios de derechos humanos? Por favor tenga en cuenta y analice el éxito o el fracaso de esta acción. ¿Cuáles pudieron ser los factores externos e internos que influenciaron de manera positiva o negativa una determinada actividad? ¿Con qué criterio fue determinado el carácter exitoso de tal acción (ej: por su popularidad dentro de la opinión pública o por los beneficios que ésta aportó a los grupos más marginados de la sociedad)? Es posible que los factores de fracaso tengan como origen la mala aplicación de los principios de derechos humanos, un diseño no adecuado de la medida como tal o simplemente la fragilidad institucional. Por favor formule una evaluación del impacto que la acción haya tenido sobre la posibilidad de que las personas logren realizar su derecho a la alimentación. Cualquier tipo de elemento que pueda dar sustento a su argumentación deberá ser incluido en esté acápite.

4- Recomendaciones/ conclusiones:
Tomando como base el análisis que usted ha presentado, concluya a partir de las principales lecciones aprendidas y brinde las recomendaciones que considere pertinentes para mejorar el proceso o el resultado de determinada acción o actividad. Si usted hace referencia a un determinado caso o a recomendaciones cuyo origen es un estudio realizado por la FAO, otros organismos de Naciones Unidas, organizaciones no gubernamentales, instituciones o individuos, por favor cítelos e identifique la respectiva organización o el respectivo autor. Podrá igualmente inserir el título del documento a partir de cual se pueden extraer dichas recomendaciones.

Los comentarios adicionales deberán ser incluidos en la casilla “Comentarios”. Adicionalmente, por favor adjunte al informe las publicaciones y el material de base que considere relevante.

Apreciamos su cooperación para desarrollar la implementación de la base de datos del derecho a la alimentación y esperamos recibir sus contribuciones. Por favor diríjase a nuestro correo electrónico general righttofood@fao.org.

Tenga presente que para que podamos revisar sus contribuciones con anterioridad al Foro, éstas deberán ser enviadas a más tardar el 10 de septiembre de 2008. Los informes recibidos con posterioridad a la fecha indicada serán igualmente bienvenidos, constituirán de igual forma una valiosa contribución para el desarrollo de nuestra base de datos y serán de gran importancia para una continua retroalimentación encaminada a la promoción de la implementación del derecho a la alimentación.

Para mayor información relacionada con el diligenciamiento del presente formato, por favor dirigirse al Sr. Frank Mischler. Tel +39-06-57053919, fax: +39-06-57053712.
Para mayor información relacionada con el Foro, tenga la amabilidad de consultar nuestra página web: http://www.fao.org/righttofood/rtf_forum/index_en.html

Gracias por su tiempo y por su atención,

Unidad del Derecho a la Alimentación
Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Agricultura y la Alimentación

English; Français; español



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3rd Intl CONFERENCE on Disability and Rehabilitation: Scientific Research in the Field of Disability

Posted on 2 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Rehabilitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Third International Conference on Disability and Rehabilitation
“Scientific Research in the Field of Disability”

March 22 – 26, 2009

Note: Deadline for abstracts for call for papers is October 15, 2008; deadline for Visa applications is January 31, 2009.

Riyadh – Saudi Arabia

Download the registration form in PDF format (260 Kb) at:
http://www.pscdr.org.sa/Documents/3rd-International-Conference-for-disability-en.pdf

Also learn more at the Conference website:
http://www.pscdr.org.sa/en/news/Pages/InternationalConferenceonDisability1.aspx

Auspices
HRH Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz, Crown Prince, Deputy Premier, Minister of Defence and Aviation, Higher Chairman Sultan Bin Abdulaziz AlSaudi, Charity Foundation and Honorary President, Founders Council, Prince Salman Center for Disability Research.

Organizing Committee
Prince Salman Center for Disability Research, in collaboration with Sultan Bin Abdulaziz AlSaudi, Charity Foundation, Disabled Children Association and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology.

Place and Time:

Place: King Faisal Conference Hall, Riyadh Intercontinental Hotel.
Date: Sunday, 26.3.1430 (22.3.2009) To 30.3.1430 (26.3.2009)

Contributors:
Ministry of Social Affairs
Ministry of Health
Ministry of Education
Ministry of Higher Education
Ministry of Municipality &
Ministry of Planning
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center
Medical Affairs in other establishments
Relevant Local, Regional and International Research Centers

Introduction
This conference comes in line with unlimited support and encouragement for care for special needs and disabled in particular from King Abdullah Bin Abdulaziz, Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques and HRH Crown Prince, Sultan Bin Abdulaziz. This effort has been the major role for Prince Salman Center for Disability Research in utilizing research for prevention of disability and minimizing its effects.

The conference also comes in time where international organizations stepped up its services in prevention, care and rehabilitation, the rights of disabled and equality among community members and establishing rules to achieve these goals.

The scientific community in disability field ¡V as it is also in all other disciplines – needs assessment of the current situation at local, regional and international levels and plan for future utilization of future in disability and disabled favour on scientific basis. This is what the conference is about.

Goals:

  • Revision of the current scientific research in disability field and rehabilitation, locally, regionally and internationally.
  • Looking at paths for future scientific research in the disability and rehabilitation.
  • Encourage and deepen the scientific research culture in disability and rehabilitation.
  • Deepen the understanding of collaboration and coordination at local, regional and international levels.

Major Paths of the Conference

  • Scientific path
  • Education path
  • Social and psychological path
  • Education, training and employment path
  • Awareness and media

Contributors
The conference will attract scientists, researchers, academicians and expertise in relevant scientific research who will give lectures, present their work and findings, deliver scientific papers and/or run workshops.

Beneficiaries

  • Scientists, Research Workers, Specialists in Prevention, Care and Rehabilitation of the disabled.
  • Disabled, their families and those concerned.
  • Service providers.
  • Advocates and supporters of the disabled.

Associated Activities and Exhibitions

  • Workshops and Round Table Discussions
  • Books, Equipment and Technology Products Exhibition
  • Social and Tourist Activities
  • Cooperations and mutual contracts

Third International Conference for Disability and Rehabilitation
26-30 Rabi I, 1430 H (22-26 March 2009 G)

Download the registration form in PDF format (260 Kb) at:
http://www.pscdr.org.sa/Documents/3rd-International-Conference-for-disability-en.pdf

Registration Form

Name:
Nationality:
Qualifications:
University:
Current Job:
Organization:
Phone:
Fax:
Mobile phone:
P.O. Box:
City:
Postal Code:
Email:

I am interested in delivering scientific research paper
I am interested in delivering working paper
I am interested in giving workshop titled “__________________________.”
(Please provide objectives, elements of the workshop and under targeted)
Others (State):

Title of the Paper/Contribution:
_______________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________

Notes:
1. Summary should be within one page (250 words) and to be sent before the deadline, 15.10.2008. Full paper should be sent before 15.1.2009.
2. The full text should not exceed 20 pages including tables, figures and references.

Address for Correspondence:
Third International Conference for Disability and Rehabilitation
26-30 Rabi I, 1430 H (22-26 March 2009 G)

Abstract Form
Name:
Nationality:
Qualifications:
University:
Current Job:
Organization:
Phone:
Fax:
Mobile phone:
P.O. Box:
City:
Postal Code:

Notes:
1. Summary should be within one page (250 words) and to be sent before the deadline, 15.10.2008. Full paper should be sent before 15.1.2009.
2. The full text should not exceed 20 pages including tables, figures and references.
3. The abstracts will be assessed by specialized Referees and the Scientific Committee, based on novelty, scientific merit and relevance to the theme of the conference.

Address for Correspondence:

Third International Conference for Disability and Rehabilitation
26-30 Rabi I, 1430 H (22-26 March 2009 G)

Visa Application Form
Name in Full (as in the Passport):
Date & Place of Birth:
No. of Passport:
Place of Issue:
Date of Issue:
Expiry Date:
Phone:
Fax:
Mobile phone:
P.O. Box:
City:
Postal Code:

Deadline for Visa Application is: 31 January 2009



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Volunteer Opportunities in International Disability Field

Posted on 21 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Jobs & Internships, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Volunteer Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Please note that a wide range of short- and long-term volunteer opportunities are listed below. Some offer a limited salary; some do not, but cover expenses related to volunteering. Posts range from 4 to 18 months. People seeking volunteer opportunities should read carefully to understand the qualifications for each individual position, the relevant deadline, and how to apply. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to the organization sponsoring the opportunity, NOT to We Can Do.

Project Officer, Solomon Islands; Assistant Coordinator, Solomon Islands
Handicap International Positions: Background on Handicap International
Project Manager in Rehabilitation, in Herat, Afghanistan
Disaster Risk Reduction Project Manager, Uzbekistan
Disability Expert–Trainer, Uzbekistan
Physiotherapist Supervisor in Amman, Jordan
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Project Officer (Services for Visually Impaired and Blind Unit) – Ministry of Health and Medical Services – Solomon Islands
An incredible opportunity to develop programs to improve services for people who are blind and visually impaired and promote an inclusive society.

Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) department of the Ministry of Health and Medical Services in Honiara promotes independence, rehabilitation, equalisation of opportunities and inclusion for all people with disabilities.

The Services for Visually Impaired and Blind unit seeks a Project Officer to assess the services being provided by CBR and develop new programs that will improve services for people who are blind and visually impaired.

To be considered for this 18 month assignment starting in January 2009 you will have:

· Qualifications in Social Welfare and/or Education
· Extensive experience in a similar field
· Strong program development skills
· Good management experience

Experience delivering programs and services to people who are vision impaired is highly desirable.

The Ministry Of Health and Medical Services is also seeking a suitably experienced Assistant Coordinator to work with the National Coordinator and to provide technical support to the rurally based Rehabilitation Aides. This will involve the introduction of a reporting system and various training functions that need to be refreshed or created.

The successful applicant will be able to demonstrate significant work experience in this sector along with management and training experience.

You will be supported by Australian Volunteers International with airfares, accommodation, briefing and orientation, health and travel insurance, living allowance and ongoing support throughout the assignment.

For full assignment descriptions or to apply for these positions, please visit www.australianvolunteers.com/work
or contact Erika Drury on +61 3 9279 1729 or e-mail edrury@australianvolunteers.com

Applications close 31st August 2008

Source:  Erika Drury, Recruitment Consultant, Australian Volunteers International

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Handicap International Positions:
Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability.  Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, offering them assistance and supporting them in their efforts to become self-reliant. Since its creation, the organisation has set up programmes in approximately 60 countries and intervened in many emergency situations. It has a network of eight national associations (Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA) which provide human and financial resources, manages projects and raises awareness of Handicap International’s actions and campaigns.

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Project Manager in Rehabilitation, Heart, Afghanistan, 6 months to 1 year
Job context :

Being present in Afghanistan since 1996 with a comprehensive approach to respond to the needs of persons with disability and to participate in the reconstruction of the Afghan Health System, Handicap International holds an important geographic position in Afghanistan, implementing inclusion as well as physical rehabilitation projects in the provinces of Kabul, Herat and Kandahar and
 
Job description  :

At regional level, the expatriate would work mainly in Herat to improve the technical abilities of the physiotherapists in the Herat Regional Hospital and in the outreach program run by HI. The 7 physiotherapists working for health public system have received technical, financial and management support since 2003.  HI currently employes 5 physiotherapists plus one as technical assistant.  In regards to technical skills, the main problem is the gap of skills within the team. Clinical reasoning, assessment-reassessment skills and the range of treatment options have to be generally improved.

The project manager would provide consultation on management aspects for the new physiotherapy Centre recently build together with the burn unit in the hospital which is in the process of being handed over to the head of the physiotherapy centre.

S/he would also consult on technical and management aspects the outreach physiotherapy service. HI has also committed to supporting the government’s plan to mainstream disability services within healthcare through Basic Package of Health Services and as such is working with
several NGOs to provide training, screening or direct physiotherapy in certain districts around Herat province.

Beside, the project manager will have to participate to the development of the handover strategies for both rehabilitation projects.

Post constraints :

Security: Afghanistan remains in a post-conflict situation. Kabul and Herat cities are currently stable but there are security constraints especially for women. Outside of Herat city, security is relatively stable compared to the rest of Afghanistan. Travel to Kandahar is especially subject to review of the security situation because it is less stable.

Housing : the person usually shares a house with the other expatriates from HI

Isolation : reliable Internet access and satellite TV

Profile sought :

3 years practical experience in a variety of areas of physiotherapy; experience in teaching and training of physiotherapists, preferably in a developing country

Comprehensive understanding of capacity building issues

Ability to plan own work and manage conflicting priorities;

Good communication (spoken and written) skills, including the ability to draft/edit a variety of written reports and to articulate ideas in a clear, concise style; Good computer skills (Excel …)  

Extremely flexible

Languages : English essential, French an advantage

 Remuneration : Volunteer or salaried status based on experience

Volunteer : 750 or 850€ + allowance, accommodation, medical coverage and insurance

Salaried : 2000 € to 2300 € monthly gross salary + benefits 

Length of Mission : 6 months to 1 year

Start date : 1/09/08 (September 1, 2008)

Closing date for applications: ASAP

For more information, refer to website : www.handicap-international.org

Please send cover letter and resume preferably by e-mail, with as object the ref. :  HS/READHRTAFG

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A Disaster Risk Reduction Project Manager, Uzbekistan, 15 months
Job context :

The project establishment is based on mainstreaming disability issues in Disaster Risk Reduction planning. Disabled People Organizations (DPOs) are the first key partners to mainstream disability issues to DIPECHO partners further to training and working group organized with HI..

DIPECHO partners are the partners that throught their DRR project will mainstream Disability issues within the community further to training and sensitization provided by the DPOs and material published.

The Location for the implementation of the activities are in Tachkent and in Fergana Valley

Duties :

The Project Manager will have to set up and manage the project called : Mainstreaning of Disability issues into Disaster Risk Reduction Planning funding by ECHO.(DIPECHO).

Under the supmpervidion of the Uzbekistan Coordinator, the Project Manager will be supported and will line manage a Disability expert for a period of 6 months.

He/She will line managed a Project Assistant Translator

The PM is responsible for :

PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION

1/ setting up of a DPOs working group with the support of the Disability Expert

2/ The coordination of the training cycle

3/ In link with the Disability Expert, overall coordination  of a survey on ‘Disability confidence’ among DIPECHO DRR trainers for the purpose to measure the ” impact” of the trainings in DRR plan.implementation

4/ monitoring into the community of disability issues in the DRR plan set up

5/ the setting up by DIPECHO partners in 2 institution for children with disabilities of a comprehensive disaster preparedness plan

6/ ensure efficient and fruitfull collaboration with all project partners, in strong link with the Country coordinator.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

1/ Ensure the respect of the commitments of expenditure as defined by
the Head Office

2/Responsible of the budget for the activities ( Budget follow up, cash
forecast,)

TEAM MANAGEMENT

Management of a Project Assistant Translator and of a Disability Expert
(6 months contract)

REPORTING

1/ Prepare  montly report on project implementation (activities,
indicators, partners elationships,..)

2/ Prepare narrative ECHO report ( intermediary and final)

Profile sought :

Diploma in Occupational Therapy or economic, social or management degree.

Essential competencies :

Strong Project Management skills

Diplomatie, public relation

Experience in working in partnership and to develop network

Knowledge of Disaster Risk reduction and of Disability

Desirable competencies or competencies to be acquired :

Monitoring and evaluation

Budget management

Previous experience in central Asia

Previous experience with HI

Languages : English and Russian

Conditions : Volunteer or salaried status, according to experience
Volunteer status : 750 or 850 euros per month according to experience+
benefits

Salaried status : 2100 to 2400 euros per month according to experience
+ benefits

Length of mission : 15 month

Start date :  01 October 2008

Closing date for application : 15th September 2008

Please send CV and covering letter asap to : Ref. PMDRRUzbek

Handicap International
14, avenue Berthelot
69361 LYON CEDEX 07
Or by email:  recrut11@handicap-international.org

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Disability Expert – Trainer, Uzbekistan, 6 months

Job context :

The project establishment is based on mainstreaming disability issues
in Disaster Risk Reduction planning. Disabled People Organizations
(DPOs) are the first key partners to mainstream disability issues to
DIPECHO partners further to training and working group organized with
HI..

DIPECHO partners are the partners that throught their DRR project will mainstream Disability issues within the community further to training and sensitization provided by the DPOs and material published.

The Location for the implementation of the activities are in Tachkent and in Fergana Valley

Duties :

The stake of this post is to provide the technical expertise and
trainings on disability issues to DPOs and DIPECHO partners in order
that the communities are sensitized and include disability issues in
their Disaster Risk Reduction plan.

The Disability Expert will have to support the DPOs to mainstream
Disability issues into Disaster Risk Reduction plan from DIPECHO
partners

Objectives :

1/ Provide expertise and facilitate within the DPOs working group to

2/ Organize a training for 30 trainers of trainers ( members of DPOs)
on inclusive DRR:

3/ Mentor the Trainers of Trainers  and provide guidance in their first
trainings implementation to DIPECHO partners trainers.

4/Design the framework of a survey to carry out on ‘Disability
confidence’ among DIPECHO DRR trainers for the purpose to measure the ”
impact” of the trainings in DRR plan.implementation:.(Survey carried
out with trained and not trained trainers on Disability issues)

5/ Provide support to the DRR Project Manager whenn needed, notably on
monitoring and evaluation issues.

6/ Other tasks could be added according to the needs of the project and
the program.

Profile sought :

Occupational therapist or physiotherapist, or social degree

Essential competencies :

Strong training skills

Knowledge of Disaster Risk reduction

Wide understanding of Disability issue

Desirable competencies or competencies to be acquired :

Autonomy

Previous experience with HI

Experience in working with partner

Languages : English and Russian

Conditions : Volunteer or salaried status, according to experience

Volunteer status : 750 or 850 euros per month according to experience+
benefits

Salaried status : 1900 to 2200 euros per month according to experience + benefits

Length of mission : 15 month

Start date : 01 November 2008

Closing date for application : 15th September 2008

 Please send CV and covering letter asap to : Ref. DETDRRUzbek

Handicap International
14, avenue Berthelot
69361 LYON CEDEX 07
Or by email:  recrut11@handicap-international.org

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Physiotherapist Supervisor, Amman, Jordan, 4 months

Job context :

A surgery programme has been opened by MSF in August 2006 in Amman, targeting Iraqi war victims in need of reconstructive surgery. In order to strengthen physiotherapy as a crucial aspect of care, HI was requested to set up a proper physiotherapy section.

A physiotherapist advisor has been working since November 2007, acting as a supervisor for the physiotherapy team, made of 3 Jordanian physiotherapists. Some lacks in the skills and the general rehabilitation approach have been identified and now need to be addressed.

The physiotherapist supervisor will act both as a supervisor for the 3 physiotherapists and as an on-the-job trainer.

Duties :

Under the responsibility of the Head of Mission, the physiotherapist
supervisor will be in charge of :

–          providing technical training to  physiotherapy staff

–          improving the referral system for patients

–          reinforcing collaboration with surgeons

–          optimizing data collection

Particularities of the post :

Short-term mission.

Profile sought :

Recognized qualification in Physiotherapy essential ; additional
background in Education, Public Health or other relevant fields
desirable.

An experience in a developing country would be an advantage.

 Essential recruitment criteria :

–          Experience as physiotherapist (at least 3 years)

–          Experience in orthopaedic complex cases management

–          Experience in physiotherapy teaching and on-the-job training

–          networking and communication skills (spoken and written)

Desirable competencies or competencies to be acquired :

–          Experience in a developing country is an advantage;

–          Computer skills (Pack Office, Internet etc…)

Languages :

Excellent written and spoken English, Arabic is a plus

Conditions :

Volunteer or salaried status, according to experience

Volunteer status : 750 or 850€ + allowance, accommodation, medical
coverage and insurance

Salaried status : 1800 to 2200€ monthly gross salary + benefits

Length of mission : 4 months

Start date : September 2008

Closing date for applications : 31st August 2008

Please send CV and covering letter asap to : Ref. NC/READJord

Handicap International
14, avenue Berthelot
69361 LYON CEDEX 07
Or by email:  recrut07@handicap-international.org

 Source:  Marly Revuelta, Assistante GRH Programme, Handicap International

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Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for circulating these listings via email.

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JOB POST: Project Manager, International Development and Disability, MIUSA, Oregon USA

Posted on 19 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

PROJECT MANAGER
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND DISABILITY

Application deadline September 5, 2008.
www.miusa.org

Mobility International USA (MIUSA), a national nonprofit organization founded in 1981 and based in Eugene, Oregon, promotes the human rights of people with disabilities through international exchange and international development. MIUSA seeks a qualified Project Manager with excellent international development, leadership, interpersonal, project management, writing and training skills to manage the USAID-sponsored Building an Inclusive Development Community project. This position reports to the Director of Programs and is the lead position for a team
of staff working on this project. The position is based in Eugene, Oregon USA.

Since 1998, MIUSA has been changing the paradigm of international development by framing the inclusion of people with disabilities as a human rights issue. With funding from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), MIUSA serves as a bridge to promote inclusion and bring together disability and development organizations. MIUSA provides technical assistance, training and resources to disabled peoples’ organizations (DPOs), USAID Missions and development agencies through the Building an Inclusive Development Community project.

Qualifications:
* BS or BA degree required; Master’s degree strongly preferred in international development, international studies or related field
* Minimum two years field-based experience in international development, inclusion of people with disabilities in international development, or related fields, using a human rights framework and/or gender lens
* Five years experience managing complex projects with diverse stakeholders
* Experience managing federal grants and projects
* Experience managing project budgets and following financial procedures
* Excellent presentation and training skills
* Excellent computer skills including Microsoft Office, online research and data tracking
* Excellent writing, editing, and organizational skills
* Excellent interpersonal and communication skills
* Ability to multi-task in a fast paced environment
* Optimistic outlook with the ability to lead by example during difficult or stressful times
* Knowledge of one or more languages other than English strongly preferred
* Ability to travel nationally and internationally
* Passion for empowering people with disabilities in international contexts

For more information regarding the application go to: www.miusa.org

To apply:

Applications are due by September 5, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. for initial consideration and screening. Position open until filled.

Competitive salary commensurate with experience including excellent benefits. Equal Opportunity Employer. People with disabilities and others encouraged to apply.

Send detailed cover letter with “Project Manager” in the subject line, resume and list of references via email to crothvinson@miusa.org.

Or, via postal mail to:

Mobility International USA
*ATTN: CERISE ROTH-VINSON*
Director of Administration
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon USA 97401



Thank you to MIUSA for submitting this job announcement to We Can Do. Interested applicants should please note that ALL applications and queries should be directed to MIUSA at the contact information provided above, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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CONFERENCE: 3rd LAC Technical Meeting on STD, HIV-AIDS and Disability

Posted on 30 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

3rd Latin American/Caribbean (LAC) Technical Meeting on STD, HIV-AIDS & Disability
August 1st and 2nd, 2008
City of Mexico
Organized by the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI) and the World Bank With support from the National Council to Prevent Discrimination (CONAPRED, Mexico), the Central American Social Integration System (SISCA), the National Program of STI and AIDS (Brazil) and the Pan American Health Organization

XVII International Conference on AIDS (Mexico August 3rd to 8th 2008)
http://www.aids2008.org

Introduction
People with disability have often been and remained excluded from HIV prevention as well as AIDS care efforts as a result of an aggregation of various taboos and coordination miss opportunities. On one hand, it is often presumed that people with disability are not sexually active and at no risk of infection. Simultaneously, the fact that they have less access to education and social opportunities prevents them from being in touch with preventive information and resources. On the other hand, the organizations of people with disability are generally unknown and themselves unaware of the health and prevention policy making and programming opportunities.

The result of all this is that the exposure of men and women with disabilities to the main risk factors of HIV-AIDS are higher compared to non-disabled population. At the same time, while people living with AIDS have a higher survival rate due to medical advances, a frequent consequence is that there are an increasing number of disabilities (mainly physical and sensorial limitations) secondary to the disease itself or its pharmacologic treatment, indicating emerging needs and services to respond and coordinate.

Over the past two years, sponsored by the World Bank, the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI), in collaboration with several international organizations working in the HIV-AIDS and Disability areas has organized two Technical Meetings (Chile 2006 and Argentina 2007) on STDs, HIV-AIDS and Disability. The main purpose of these meetings has been to facilitate knowledge shearing amongst specialists and encourage policy development to address the increasing interrelation amongst AIDS and Disability.

The main axes of this work have been on

a. Documenting the interface between aids and disability and compiling evidence of emerging needs and responses

b. Identifying opportunities for active collaboration between organizations working in the AIDS and the inclusion fields, to optimise use of existing resources and promote inter-institutional approaches to inclusive aids prevention and rehabilitation services delivery to people living with AIDS.

In 2008, with the support of CONAPRED (in Spanish Consejo Nacional para Prevenir la Discriminación, México), the World Bank and PAHO-WHO the 3rd Technical Meeting will be held in Mexico, on August 1-2, to coincide with the AIDS International Conference (August 3-8, 2008). It will continue working on recommendations for crosscutting and inclusive approaches HIV-AIDS Prevention and Care.

Objectives
The 3rd Experts Meeting on STDs, HIV-AIDS and Disability, seeks to advance the discussion on “Evidence-based Research on the inter connections between AIDS and Disability” and on “Care for people living with AIDS and Disabilities: effective approaches and services”.

Expected Outcomes
The expected outcomes of the meeting are:

o Review of new developments in LAC National AIDS Programs;
o Update bibliographical and research review on the topic;
o Review of new materials and initiatives of international agencies, Civil Society and Academia;
o Review of new content and tools for the LAC HIV-AIDS site on the issue;
o Development of a new set of recommendations for a cross-cutting and inclusive approaches in the area of STD, HIV-AIDS Prevention and Care, with special focus in “Monitoring & Evaluation and Evidence-based Research and on Care Attention for people living with AIDS and Disabilities, as a consequence of the treatment;
o Establishment of a LAC Permanent Working Group, with interagency involvement, south-to-south knowledge sharing and a joint research and implementation agenda;

Participants: Program Managers, Researchers, Practitioner and AIDS and Disability specialists from Latin American and the Caribbean

Venue: National Council to Prevent Discrimination (CONAPRED, Mexico), Dante 14 – 8o piso, Colonia Anzures, Ciudad de México

PROGRAM
Friday August 1st
08.30 Registration
09.00 Opening
09.30 Challenges on AIDS Prevention and Care and Disability
10. 00 Conclusions from the 1st Brazilian and Central American Forums on AIDS and Disability – Discussion
11.00 Coffee
11.30 Services for people living with HIV AIDS and Disabilities
12.30 Lunch
14.00 Working groups
16.30 Plenary
17.00 Closure

Saturday August 2nd
09.00 AIDS and Disability: from taboo to collaboration
09.30 Implementation experiences / Questions and answers
10.30 Coffee
11.00 Emerging topics
o Services development (diagnosis, care, prevention)
o Research and evidences: people living with aids and disabilities secondary to the disease itself or its pharmacological treatment
o Vulnerability of PWD to STI and AIDS
o Discussion
12.30 Lunch and meeting with Ministries of Health and Education*

14.00 Approaches and future strategies
o Research
o Monitoring and Evaluation
o Regional Collaboration
o Dissemination
16.00 Plenary – Strategic collaboration
17.00 Closure
* To be confirmed

Other related activities in Mexico

o “Satellite Session on AIDS and Disability”, organized by Disabled People International (DPI). August 5th 7:00 to 8.30 am (in English)
o “AIDS and Disability: a relationship to be taken into account”, organized by the Inter American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI) August 5th 6:30 to 8:30pm (in Spanish)
o “AIDS and Disability: a relationship to be taken into account”, Poster session, (daily, August 3-8) between 12:00-14:00h

Unfortunately, we have not resources to cover flight or other expenses for participants. We hope that participants can gather support from their organizations to travel to Mexico. Please confirm ASAP your willingness to participate. Your participation is extremely important to us and to ensure the inclusion of disability issues amongst the STD and HIV-AIDS agenda in the Latin American and Caribbean Region.



We Can Do received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) email discussion group.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Child Injuries, Violence, Disability

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Cross-Disability, Health, Opportunities, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Dear colleagues,

The World Health Organization Bulletin will publish a special issue on
Child Injuries, Violence and Disability in May 2009.

A call has gone out for related articles, see
http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/media/news/whobulletin/en/index.html

Authors are encouraged to submit papers by 1 September 2008.

Please forward this call to groups or individuals that you think may be interested.

Thanks
Alana

Alana OFFICER
Coordinator
Disability and Rehabilitation (DAR)
Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability
World Health Organization

Interested authors should please follow the link to the official webpage on the call the papers in order to obtain all details, including guidelines for authors and instructions on how to submit your papers. We Can Do is unable to answer your inquiries. Thank you.



This announcement was circulated by Alana Officer at the World Health Organization. I found this announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group.

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that, although abstracts are due by August 1, 2008, completed papers will not be due until 2009. This same announcement was posted at We Can Do in April, but the editors are circulating this notice again in an attempt to collect more abstracts for them to choose among.

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies
Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

  • What is the relationship between disability and poverty?
  • How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?
  • What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?
  • What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?
  • What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1st.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



This announcement was circulated by Daniel Mont via email. Any inquiries and abstracts should please be directed to Daniel Mont or to Rosangela Berman Bieler as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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UN Launches Blog-Based Discussion on Inclusion and Development

Posted on 9 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Please direct inquiries to the email addresses provided in the announcement below, not to We Can Do. Dirija por favor las preguntas a los correos electronicos abajo, no a We Can Do. Veuillez diriger les questions vers les email address fournis ci-dessous, pas a We Can Do.

Version française; Versión español

Dear Colleagues and Partners,

The adoption of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities marks a renewed commitment of the United Nations to improving the situation of people with disabilities, wherever they are. A man, a woman, or a child suffering from any kind of disability is much more likely to be poor, unemployed or discriminated against than a person without a disability. The disparity is even starker in developing countries.

More than 50 United Nations Development Program (UNDP) country offices in recent years have implemented programmes to recognize and respect the rights of persons living with disabilities, to provide them with training to help navigate better in life and to stand a better chance to be employed, to improve their participation in decision-making, to address the needs of millions of people who became disabled because of devastating conflicts and disasters. This year, UNDP made a commitment at the highest level to consolidate and strengthen our work to support persons with disabilities. On the other hand we are also looking at UNDP as employer and are decided to make our organization more accessible for employees, partners, and guests living with a disability.

In that context, we invite you to a blog-based discussion on Inclusion and Disability, to be held from 9 June to 9 July 2008. The blog-based discussion departs from traditional discussion methods. It is hosted on an interactive collaborative space hosted by UNDP Bratislava Regional Centre and enables each participant to share their views and resources. The lead
moderators will be:

  • Lance Clark, UNDP Resident Representative and UN Resident Coordinator, UNDP Serbia
  • Milena Isakovic, Programme Officer, UNDP Serbia
  • Marielza Oliveira, Programme Advisor, Regional Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Louise Nylin, Human Rights Advisor, Bratislava Regional Centre
  • Susanne Milcher, Social Inclusion Advisor, Bratislava Regional Centre
  • Ronald Wiman, author of the Manual on Inclusive Planning, Senior Social Development Advisor, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and STAKES, Finland
  • Geraldine Glassman, HR Associate, BOM/OHR/Staff Wellbeing Unit

To enrich the discussion, we encourage you to invite your colleagues and partners from UN agencies, the civil society, governments and media.

The outcomes of this discussion will help develop a UNDP policy and programming guidance document, as well as help formulate a more inclusive human resource strategy of UNDP.

To participate or contribute to the discussion, please notify by sending an e-mail to pr-net@groups.undp.org or to martin.santiago@undp.org

The specific details on how to participate will be shared on Monday 9 June.

We look forward to your participation.

Best regards,

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Director, Poverty Practice
Director, Office of Human Resources

Co-chairs of UNDP’s Task Force on Disability

Version française
Chers Collègues et Partenaires,

L’ adoption de la Convention sur les Droits des Personnes Handicapées marque le renouvellement de l’engagement des Nations Unies à améliorer les conditions de vie des personnes handicapées, où qu’ils soient. Un homme, une femme ou un enfant affecté par une forme d’handicap court plus que d’autres, en pleine possession de leurs moyens, le risque d’être pauvre, sans emploi ou victime de discrimination. La différence est encore plus frappante dans les pays en développement.

Au cours des dernières années, plus de 50 bureaux de pays du PNUD ont mis en œuvre des programmes visant à reconnaître et respecter les droits des personnes handicapées, à leur fournir la formation nécessaire à pouvoir mieux se diriger dans la vie et être plus en mesure d’être recruté pour emploi, à augmenter leur participation dans la prise de décision, à répondre aux besoins de millions de personnes qui sont devenues victimes d’un handicap à la suite de conflits et catastrophes dévastateurs. Cette année, c’est à l’échelon le plus élevé que le PNUD s’est engagé à consolider et renforcer notre travail d’appui aux personnes handicapées. En outre, c’est aussi en tant qu’employeur que nous examinons le rôle du PNUD et nous sommes déterminés à faire en sorte que notre organisation soit plus accessible aux employés, partenaires et hôtes souffrant d’un handicap.

Dans ce contexte, nous vous invitons à une discussion sur le thème de L’Intégration et le Handicap hébergée sur un blog et prévue du 9 Juin au 9 Juillet 2008. Une discussion à partir d’un blog se démarque de méthodes traditionnelles de discussion. Elle sera hébergée sur un espace collaboratif interactif aménagé par le Centre Régional de Bratislava du PNUD et donne à chaque participant l’occasion de partager son point de vue et ses ressources. Les principaux modérateurs seront:

  • Lance Clark, Représentant Résident PNUD et Coordonateur Résident de l’ONU, PNUD Serbie
  • Milena Isakovic, Administrateur de Programme, PNUD Serbie
  • Marielza Oliveira, Conseiller pour les Programmes, Bureau régional d’Amérique Latine et des Caraïbes
  • Louise Nylin, Conseiller pour les Droits de l’Homme, Centre Régional de Bratislava
  • Susanne Milcher, Conseiller en matière d’Intégration Sociale, Centre Régional de Bratislava
  • Ronald Wiman, auteur du Manual on Inclusive Planning, (Manuel de Planification de l’Intégration) Conseiller principal en matière de Développement Social, Ministère des Affaires Etrangères et STAKES, Finlande
  • Geraldine Glassman, Associé RH, BOM/OHR/Staff Wellbeing Unit (cellule de bien-être du personnel)

Nous vous encourageons à enrichir la discussion en invitant vos collègues et partenaires d’agences onusiennes, de la société civile, des gouvernements et des médias.

Les résultats de cette discussion contribueront tant à l’élaboration d’un document d’orientation de politique et de programmation du PNUD, qu’à la formulation d’une stratégie de ressources humaines plus intégrante au sein du PNUD.

Pour participer ou contribuer à la discussion, prière de nous en avertir en envoyant un mail à pr-net@groups.undp.org ou à martin.santiago@undp.org.

Les détails spécifiques sur les modalités de participation seront communiqués le lundi 9 Juin.

Dans l’attente de votre participation.

Meilleures salutations,

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Directeur, Pratique de la Lutte contre la Pauvreté
Directeur, Bureau des Ressources Humaines

Co-présidents de l’équipe spéciale duPNUD œuvrant sur les personnes handicapées

Version Español
Estimados colegas y socios,

La adopción de la Convención sobre los Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad marca un compromiso renovado de las Naciones Unidas a mejorar la situación de las personas con alguna discapacidad, sean de donde sean. Es mucho más probable que un hombre, mujer o niño que padezca cualquiera discapacidad sea pobre, desempleado o discriminando que una persona sin ninguna discapacidad. La disparidad es incluso más dura en los países en vías de desarrollo.

Durante los últimos años más de 50 oficinas de la UNDP en diferentes países han implementado programas para reconocer y respetar los derechos de las personas con alguna discapacidad, para suministrarles la formación necesaria para ayudarles a navegar por la vida con más facilidad y para que tengan más oportunidades de empleo, para su mejor participación en la toma de decisiones, y además los programas tratan de dirigirse a las necesidades de los miles de personas que son discapacitadas por causa de conflictos y desastres devastadores.

Este año la UNDP se está comprometido al nivel más alto, para consolidar y reforzar nuestro trabajo de apoyo a personas discapacitadas. Por otro lado, estamos también viendo a la UNDP como empleador y estamos decididos en hacer que nuestra organización sea más accesible a empleados, socios e invitados con discapacidades.

En este contexto, os invitamos a una discusión basada en un blog sobre Inclusión y Discapacidad, que tendrá lugar desde el 9 de junio hasta el 9 de julio de 2008. La discusión en un blog se desvía de los métodos tradicionales de discusión. Se encuentra en un espacio interactivo colaborativo presentado por el Centro Regional de la UNDP en Bratislava y permite que cada participante pueda compartir sus puntos de vista y sus recursos. Los moderadores clave serán:

  • Lance Clark, UNDP Representante Residente y Coordinador Residente, UNDPSerbia
  • Milena Isakovic, Oficial de Programa, UNDP Serbia
  • Marielza Oliveira, Asesor de Programa, Agencia Regional para América Latina y el Caribe
  • Louise Nylin, Asesor Derechos Humanos, Centro Regional de Bratislava
  • Susanne Milcher, Asesor de Inclusión Social, Centro Regional de Bratislava
  • Ronald Wiman, autor delManual on Inclusive Planning, Asesor Superior de Desarrollo Social, Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores y STAKES, Finlandia
  • Geraldine Glassman, Asociada de Recursos Humanos, BOM/OHR/Unidad del Bienestar de Empleados

Para enriquecer la discusión, os animamos a invitar a vuestros colegas y socios de las agencias de la ONU, la sociedad civil, los gobiernos y la prensa.

Los resultados de esta discusión ayudarán a desarrollar un documento de orientación de política y programación además de ayudar a formular una estrategia de recursos humanos de la UNDP más inclusiva.

Para participar o contribuir a la discusión, por favor, notificarnos con un correo electrónico a pr-net@groups.undp.org o responder a martin.santiago@undp.org.

Los detalles específicos de cómo participar estarán disponibles el lunes 9 de junio.

Esperamos vuestra participación.

Saludos

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Director, Poverty Practice
Director, Office of Human Resources
Co-chairs of UNDP’s Task Force on Disability



We Can Do first learned about the UNDP blog-based discussion on Inclusion and Development via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserv.

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Other Resources at We Can Do
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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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International Conference: Inclusive Education, the Way of the Future

Posted on 2 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Opportunities, Reports, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The International Bureau of Education is holding its 48th session of the International Conference on Education (ICE) this 25 – 28 November 2008 in Geneva, Switzerland. The theme will be “Inclusive Education: the Way of the Future.”

The International Conference on Education is usually predominantly tailored for the needs of Ministers of Education who represent country governments around the world. However, other partners such as researchers, practitioners, representatives of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations also participate in the ICE dialogue.

Debates at the November 2008 session of ICE are expected to focus on the following themes:

(i) approaches, scope and content (to broaden the understanding of the theory and the practice of inclusive education);
(ii) public policies (to demonstrate the role of governments in the development and the implementation of policies on inclusive education);
(iii) systems, links and transitions (to create inclusive education systems which offer opportunities for lifelong learning);
(iv) learners and teachers (to foster a learning environment where teachers are equipped to meet the learners’ diverse expectations and needs).

As of this writing (June 2, 2008), I could not locate registration information at the ICE conference web site. However, even for people unable to attend the November conference, the web site still offers an abundance of materials that may be of interest to people involved in the education field.

If you scroll down the page at the ICE conference site, you will see a listing of past Preparatory Meetings on Inclusive Education. Many of these include links to Executive Summaries or other reports based on the results of these past meetings. Further down the page, you will see links to reports from Working Groups of the International Bureau of Education Council regarding planning for the 48th ICE conference.

For further (or upcoming) details on the November 2008 conference on Inclusive Education, please consult their web site directly at

http://www.ibe.unesco.org/International/ICE48/English/index.html

Let me please amplify that We Can Do is unable to respond to individual inquiries about this or any other event, toolkit, funding source, or other resource publicized at this site. Instead, please follow the above link.



I first learned about this conference by browsing the Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development web site.

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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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TRAINING the Trainer in Community Based Rehabilitation

Posted on 2 April 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

TOT in Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR)
25th of August to the 5th of September 2008
The Netherlands

People interested in applying are urged to apply with Enablement well in advance.

Enabling CBR

General objective
You will acquire the theory, skills and tools to develop and implement effective training programmes.

Specific Objectives
At the end of the ToT you will:

  • be sensitive to issues encountered in the adult learning process;
  • be able to assess training needs and set learning objectives
  • be able to choose and use training methods and materials using the principles of adult learning;
  • have practiced using questions as a learning tool;
  • be able to design, plan and implement participatory training sessions;
  • have practiced training, using your own design;
  • have developed their personal action plan.
  • be able to design and convey important CBR messages to relevant publics
  • be able to integrate new insights about the state of the art of CBR in your training activities.
  • demonstrate an appreciation of diversity in communities, particularly in relation to people that are differently abled.
  • demonstrate effective communication skills.

Target group
The target group consist of CBR enthusiasts, who are motivated to broaden the implementation of CBR programmes in their respective communities. Therefore the course is targeted at the following people:

  • Trainers in CBR
  • Advocates of disability issues
  • Managers of CBR
  • Experienced persons in CBR and interested in becoming a trainer

These people will after the ToT CBR probably train:

  • CBR managers
  • CBR staff
  • Community key persons
  • Policy makers and planners
  • Politicians

Entrance criteria

  • 2 years experience in CBR
  • Attended CBR training (formal or non formal) or additional experience
  • Motivation letter to be send to the course coordinator of no longer than 2 pages A-4 size, double spacing
  • Training Needs Assessment questionnaire to be filled out in detail and returned to the course coordinator
  • Competence in both written and spoken English

Provisional Programme
Consult the Enablement web site at http://www.enablement.nl, or contact h.cornielje@enablement.nl by email, for a copy of the provisional programme.

Teaching staff
The course is conducted under leadership of Mr Huib Cornielje. A number of trainers with a vast amount of experience, both in disability service development as well as training and education, will be responsible for different subjects. The course has been developed by a team of experts who form also the teaching staff; i.e.

  • Henk van Apeldoorn
  • Huib Cornielje
  • Fiona Post
  • Hanneke Verhoeven
  • Roelie Wolting

Course fees and other expenses

  • Fees (including tea and coffee): Euro 1350,00
  • Accommodation (incl. all meals) approximately: Euro 1500,00
  • Pocket money: Euro 20,00 a day is advised: Euro 300,00
  • International travel: variable

Scholarships
At this moment in time no scholarships are available, however, we will do our utmost to ensure that a number of scholarship will be made available for those who are:

  • able to indicate an urgent need for training
  • unable to show that they are unable to pay full course expenses

We must stress however, that at this moment no such guarantees can be given. If scholarships are awarded these do not cover pocket money and travel costs as these costs need to be paid by the participant.

For more information contact:
Huib Cornielje
Enablement
h.cornielje@enablement.nl
www.enablement.nl



We Can Do received copies of this announcement from multiple sources including Ghulam Nabi Nazimani and also the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserv.

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PAPER: Disability and Poverty: A Survey of World Bank Poverty Assessments and Implications

Posted on 4 March 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

The World Bank Group has released a new paper entitled “Disability and Poverty: A Survey of World Bank Poverty Assessments and Implications,” by Jeanine Braithwaite and Daniel Mont.

The paper surveys World Bank poverty assessment literature on the relationship between disability and poverty. It finds that it is difficult to accurately assess the link between disability and poverty because household surveys on consumption (used to assess consumption-based poverty) frequently don’t ask about the disability status of household members.

Also, it is difficult to define or measure “disability.” For example, simply asking if people are disabled misses many disabled people because they may wish to avoid the stigma of disability. Or,some people may assume that “disability” necessarily refers only to significant impairments. These people might not bother to report mild or moderate impairments.

Another complication in poverty and disability research is that many existing surveys do not account for the fact that people with disabilities have different consumption needs than other people. For example, they might need to spend income on Braille, wheelchairs, or other items that non-disabled people do not need. The money spent on these items diverts income from other consumption that could raise the living standards of the household. Thus, a disabled person with the same income as a non-disabled person may actually be poorer.

The authors suggest directions for further research into disability and poverty.

The full, 32-page paper can be downloaded in PDF format (250 Kb) at:

http://siteresources.worldbank.org/SOCIALPROTECTION/Resources/SP-Discussion-papers/Disability-DP/0805.pdf



We Can Do learned about this paper via contacts within the World Bank.

Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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    The Mwanza Computer Literacy Project

    The Tusaidiane Disabilities Resources and Charity Organization of Tanzania (TDRCT) would like to improve computer literacy and self-employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Mwanza, Tanzania, and promote their empowerment.

    This organization is run by people who themselves have disabilities. I have known the man who founded this organization for some years. If his organization can quickly raise $5000 from 40 donors within a few days, then GlobalGiving will feature their organization on its website. This will enable them to attract more prospective funders. I have made a donation to them, I hope others will consider doing the same.
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    Learn why the CRPD matters and how to take action at www.disabilitytreaty.org!

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