Join the Thunder for the “Disability Treaty” (CRPD)!

Posted on 6 June 2014. Filed under: Announcements, CRPD, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[This was first posted two days ago at my other blog, Rambling Justice.]

Help bring attention to the “Disability Treaty” (Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, CRPD)!  We need the U.S. to ratify this important international human rights treaty protecting the civil rights of 1 billion people with disabilities worldwide. Sign up your Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr account NOW to join the next “Thunder Clap It” for the CRPD at http://thndr.it/1ky8p97 !

What’s A “Thunder Clap It”?

A “Thunder Clap It” is when 100 or more people sign on their Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr account to all send out the same message at the same time to all their followers.  To participate, you need to sign up in advance.  The next CRPD “Thunder Clap It” will be at 2pm EST on June 10, 2014 (1pm Central Time, 11am Pacific Time).  Sign up BEFORE this time or you will miss the Thunder Clap.

How Do I Sign Up?

  • Go to this link: http://thndr.it/1ky8p97
  • A message will ask you to share a message to support the #CRPD.
  • You will find three buttons—one each for Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr.  You need to have an account in at least one of these three in order to participate.
  • Click on whichever button is appropriate.  You will have an opportunity to personalize your message to your followers.
  • Hit the “Add My Support” button.
  • If you have successfully signed up, then you should appear at the top of the list of “Recent Supporters” in the right hand side bar.  Refresh the page if needed.

What Else?

Learn more about the CRPD and other ways to help at http://disabilitytreaty.org.  Sign up for the CRPD “action alert” mailing list at the link!  Ask your friends to do the same!

Advertisements
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

Sign On: Ask the White House to Support U.S. Ratification of the CRPD!

Posted on 7 March 2014. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, CRPD, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , |

Please support international disability rights. Support U.S. ratification of the “Disability Treaty”, called the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Please FOLLOW THE LINK to the U.S. White House petition and SIGN THE PETITION!

http://lnkd.in/d3SEGWT

  • Anyone age 13 and older can sign at the link.
  • You don’t have to be a US citizen, you just need a valid email address.
  • You do need to register to create a WhiteHouse.gov account. This is fast, free, and painless. Once you have created the account, you can sign other White House petitions, too.
  • Learn more about this important treaty at http://disabilitytreaty.org.
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

CRPD Final Vote In US Senate Tuesday. Take Action Early And OFTEN.

Posted on 1 December 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , |

CRPD FINAL VOTE  U.S. Senate, TUESDAY at 12 o’clock EST

EMAIL, FAX, and DROP OFF the new CRPD handout in MASSES.  Get it to the PRESS in your town and state.

Link to CRPD Handout:
http://usicd.org//doc/SupportheCRPD%20AD.pdf

Find your Senator’s contact here!
http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

Senate switchboard at (202) 224-3121

Please act quickly and do your part to make this a WIN for the disability community around the world.  Let’s not look back and think of what we should have done but what we DID do!

Time is running out.  This Tuesday, December 4th at 12PM the CRPD with be voted on.

CRPD_Sticker

We have all worked years to come to this point.  Over 300 disability and veterans organizations and thousands of disability advocates have weighed in and worked tirelessly to get a vote on the CRPD in the Senate.  But a small and LOUD opposition led by Rick Santorum and the Tea Party is using their misinformation to take the votes that we have all worked so hard to secure. The Senators opposed to our treaty have agreed to a vote without amendments – because they think the disability community will NOT win.

We are DOWN the votes we need but the disability community SHOULD NOT AND DOES NOT GIVE UP!

Can we count on you? Will your Senators be a “YES” vote? We need 67 VOTES to win and this will be a VERY close vote. WE NEED YOUR STATE!

At this point only an ACTION by you in your STATE will get us a positive REACTION in the Senate.  Make your support known in the press, in the media, in your Senator’s offices.  Call, Tweet with #CRPD, sit in, whatever works for you BUT doing nothing will not get us anything.

We need action all weekend and on Monday, the International Day of People with Disabilities.  Even if you’ve communicated with your senators before, they need to hear from you again as we enter the last 40 hours leading up to the final vote.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

All 50 US States Needed RIGHT NOW to Support International Disability Rights!

Posted on 28 July 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , |

Author’s Note: The following post is slightly adapted from a note I posted in Facebook.

One billion people with disabilities live on Earth–and 54 million of us live in the United States. But throughout history, people with disabilities have often met profound challenges including the high risk of poverty, exclusion from opportunities to access an education or employment, violence, forced confinement in institutions, and more.

Thursday last week, July 26, 2012, was a historic date for those of us who are Americans with disabilities and for the people who are our friends, relatives, colleagues and other peers.  It was the 22nd anniversary that the world’s first disability civil rights legislation was passed–the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  But it also was the day that the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee agreed to pass the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) to the full Senate for a floor vote.  In other words, we are now in a new and exciting phase of the campaign for US ratification of the CRPD.  This means that all 100 US senators will be asked to vote on if the US should ratify the CRPD.  We need a two-thirds majority–67 votes.  It is time for every US citizen who cares about the human rights of people with disabilities all around the world, including fellow Americans, to tell your Senators to support the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)–even if you have already asked them.  Your calls, emails, and visits to your senators are absolutely vital.  Opponents of this important international treaty, which was inspired by our own ADA, have been spreading incorrect information to senators in an attempt to convince them to vote against the CRPD.  Your voices … our voices … are essential to telling senators that those of us who have disabilities, or who care about people who do, want them to support the CRPD.

The Capitol Switchboard number is (202) 224-3121.  Ask to be connected to your Senator’s office and call both Senators!

Or, you can find Senators’ contact information at this link: http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

Please remember to reach out to BOTH of the senators that represent your state.

Want to learn more about the CRPD and why the US should ratify? Visit a FAQ on the CRPD. Also learn the latest news about the campaign for US ratification of the CRPD, or look up which organizations support this treaty.

Sign on to a national letter for individuals and organizations in the US who support the CRPD–visit http://www.usicd.org (scroll a little down the screen to the blurb entitled “Tony Coelho Calls on You to Sign a Letter of Ratification”).  At usicd.org you will find a link to the full letter as well as links for individuals or for organizations to sign the letter.

After talking with your senators and signing the letter, please spread the word as widely as you can! Tell all your friends to do the same! We need as many people as we can talking to their senators!  Use Facebook, twitter, emails, phone calls … whatever works for you.

Thank you all for your help!

Author’s Note: To international friends outside the US: The fate of US ratification of the CRPD is going to be decided by US senators who ultimately represent the people who voted them into office, thus this call to action is meant to reach out to US citizens who care about the CRPD and who also have the power to influence the decisions of the senators who represent their interests in the US federal government.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Why Fight Disablism? A Global Perspective: Blogging against Disablism Day (BADD) 2012

Posted on 1 May 2012. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Why fight disablism?

The short answer takes one paragraph:  Because disablism is more than just an attitude.  Because when people hold disablist attitudes toward people with disabilities, people with disabilities are excluded, isolated, left out, left behind, and pushed to the margins of society.  Disabled people are hurt in physical ways that can leave bruises, rope burns, broken bones, and even dead bodies.  And people with disabilities also are hurt in not so physical ways that, sometimes they say are even worse.

The long answer would have to involve listening to one billion people on the face of the Earth describing the one billion ways that disablism impacts their lives.  Because one billion is the number of people with disabilities living in the world today.  And, chances are, all of them would have a slightly different answer to what disablism means.  And it’s not just disabled people and their loved ones who think that various forms of prejudice that people with disabilities is an important issue.  Two major international organizations—the World Bank and the World Health Organization (WHO)—have this to say about the effects of the social inequities that people with disabilities experience daily:

“Across the world, people with disabilities have poorer health outcomes, lower education achievements, less economic participation and higher rates of poverty than people without disabilities. This is partly because people with disabilities experience barriers in accessing services that many of us have long taken for granted, including health, education, employment, and transport as well as information.”

They cite many inter-related causes for these effects.  And these include negative attitudes that others may sometimes hold toward people with disabilities:

“Beliefs and prejudices constitute barriers to education, employment, health care, and social participation. For example, the attitudes of teachers, school administrators, other children, and even family members affect the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream schools. Misconceptions by employers that people with disabilities are less productive than their non-disabled counterparts, and ignorance about available adjustments to work arrangements limits employment opportunities.”

If you want to read their evidence for yourself, check out the World Report on Disability that the World Bank and WHO released, with a big media splash, in September 2011:   http://www.who.int/disabilities/world_report/2011/report/en/index.html
This publication is available in any of the major United Nations languages, namely, English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Russian, Arabic, and Chinese

I’m fortunate that my passion for international disability rights coincides with my career path: I’m now at an organization based in Washington, DC, called the U.S. International Council on Disability (USICD). When people ask me what the U.S. International Council on Disabilities (USICD) does, there are a few basic answers I could give.  I can say that USICD works to mobilize the U.S. disability community to become more engaged with the international disability rights movement.  It works to promote U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which is the first legally binding international human rights treaty to specifically protect the human rights of people with disabilities.  It promotes disability inclusion in U.S. foreign assistance programs abroad.  And, via the Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL) project, which I manage, we are working to deliver disability rights knowledge to advocates and policy makers in developing countries who have limited Internet connectivity.  No, it’s not an “anti-disablism” organization per se.  But I suspect that its mission would align well with the values of many of the people participating in the 2012 edition of Blogging Against Disablism Day (BADD).

I’ll probably spend a good part of May browsing through the many excellent blog posts I anticipate will be presented as part of this year’s Blogging against Disablism Day (BADD) on May 1, 2012.  For the past several years, this event has been hosted by the disability blogger at “Diary of a Goldfish”, which means her blog is the go-to link for finding all the other BADD posts for 2012.  (And for archived BADD posts from past years also.)  Usually a hundred or more bloggers participate, all with something fresh to say about what disablism means to them.  Many are themselves people with disabilities.  Many other bloggers are friends, families, and allies of disabled people.  I hope you will explore the other BADD contributions, also!  In past years, most participating bloggers have been from developed countries.  But I hope that bloggers from developing countries will also consider making contributions to the event, either this year (it’s not too late!) or in future years.  Enjoy the day!

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 21 so far )

Invitation to Join International Indigenous Network of People with Disabilities

Posted on 3 January 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, indigenous people, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Resources | Tags: , , , |

The International Indigenous Network of People with Disabilities (IINPWD) is an email-based network where participants advocate and mediate for the voice of indigenous/first peoples with disabilities to be heard at all levels of the development and implementation of law and policy in relation to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. IINPWD welcome all respectful communications and posts on indigenous/first peoples and disability issues especially those that directly impact on indigenous/first peoples with disabilities. We hope you become a part of a growing and dynamic movement.

Membership of the IINPWD is open to international, regional, national or local organizations, groups or networks of Indigenous people with disabilities, as well as to individual Indigenous people with disabilities. All who identify, as Indigenous people with a disability are welcome, irrespective of birthplace, disability, sexual identity, sexual orientation, gender identity or presentation, age, ethnicity, religious background, etc. The network also invites Indigenous people without disabilities and non Indigenous People to join in as allies to the IINPWD.

For information about joining the group, send an email to rossackley@bigpond.com.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 11 so far )

Call for Nominations: Good Policies and Practices Promoting Disability Rights

Posted on 11 May 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Human Rights, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Essl Foundation and the World Future Council plan to acknowledge future just policies and exceptional examples of good practice that actively promote and implement the rights of persons with disabilities – both now, and for the future. Together, they aim not only to raise global awareness of exemplary policies and practices, but also to speed up political action “to promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity”, as laid out in Article 1 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

With this announcement, they invite you to put forward your nominations.
The policies and practices can originate from different areas, from respect for inherent dignity, individual autonomy and independence, to full and effective participation and inclusion in society, to equality of opportunity, and accessibility. Nominated practices and, in particular, laws or policies, should be either of a regional or national nature. They should have been in existence long enough to prove their effective implementation and, most importantly, deliver identifiable improvements.

On 22-23 January 2012, there will be a Conference on “Future Just Policies: Persons with Disabilities” in Vienna, to present publicly and commend to, and discuss with, decision makers and parliamentarians, encouraging examples of political responsibility, in order to spread social innovation and development. In addition, we will be establishing a resource of exceptional examples of both good practice and good policy to be readily and easily accessible to all those interested, and who may benefit from it.
The Essl Foundation and the World Future Council would be very grateful if you could provide your nominations by May 31, 2011, to Mr Thomas Butcher, enable@worldfuturecouncil.org.

The present request has been sent to full (national council), associate and observer members of the EDF, members of the UNCRPD Committee, together with major international organizations and individuals working in the field of disability governance. In addition, we should like to encourage you to forward our request for nominations, particularly of good practices, to any other persons, or organizations, you may consider appropriate.

Thanking you in advance for your help,

Yours Sincerely

The Essl Foundation and the World Future Council

The Essl Foundation

The purpose of the Martin and Gerda Essl Social Prize Private Nonprofit Foundation is to support people in need and to promote public awareness about the necessity of support for those in need and to provide the individuals concerned with the appropriate training. Good practice is at the heart of the Essl Foundation’s mission and the foundation believes strongly that social innovation is heavily dependent on entrepreneurs to create change. The present project has grown out of the work the Essl Foundation continues to undertake around the situation of persons with disabilities.

For more information, please visit www.esslfoundation.org

The World Future Council

The World Future Council aims to be a global advocate for the concerns of future generations in international politics. The Council consists of 50 personalities from around the world who have already successfully promoted change in various and diverse fields. Their activities range from advocating human rights and sustaining the planet to promoting political, scientific, cultural and economic justice. The WFC’s mission is to inform decision makers about the challenges facing future generations and to provide them with practical policy solutions. The WFC identifies and promotes successful policies that can be implemented as laws, policy standards, and international agreements. To achieve this, the WFC draws on its networks of parliamentarians, institutions and organisations around the globe.

For more information, please visit our website www.worldfuturecouncil.org

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Fellowship Opportunity: at disability advocacy organization in Washington, DC, USA

Posted on 12 May 2010. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Fellowships & Scholarships, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear Colleagues,

The United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD), in partnership with Atlas Corps, has made available one fellowship position to work with USICD in Washington, DC for one year, beginning in September 2010. This is an exciting opportunity for a mid-career professional from another country, working in the nongovernmental sector, to spend a year working in Washington working and learning with our organization in areas such as advocacy, program development and nonprofit administration. Their experience will be further enriched by the professional development activities that occur throughout their placement, provided by Atlas Corps.

I have attached the candidate qualifications description we have developed with Atlas Corps. Please share this with any international networks with whom you participate. I am particularly enthused to have individuals with first-hand experience in disability in the applicant pool. Applications are now coming in; time is short, so please do not delay to encourage those people you know who may be interested to review the materials and consider applying. You can learn more about Atlas Corps here: http://www.atlascorps.org/ and in the information below; Atlas Corps manages the application process and is the point of contact for all applicants. Further information about USICD is available here: www.usicd.org.

Thank you,
David Morrissey

________________________________________
About Atlas Corps Fellowship

Atlas Corps coordinates the rigorous selection process as well as logistics including living stipend, visa, flight, health insurance, taxes, and end of service award. The Host organization pays a cost share that covers a percent of the expenses.

This is a unique opportunity to receive a talented, mid-career, citizen sector (nonprofit/NGO) leader from overseas who is recruited specifically for your organization. Host applications are accepted year round. The fellowship program runs a fall class from September to August and a spring class from March to February.

Host Benefits:
• The Host organization receives a full-time, yearlong, international Fellow who is a leader in the nonprofit/NGO sector with 3-10 years of relevant experience. The average Atlas Corps Fellow is 28 years old, is fluent in English, and has a bachelor’s or master’s degree. (Volunteers going to Bogota are also fluent in Spanish.)
• Atlas Corps recruits at least two strong candidates for the Host organization based on a job description provided by the Host. The Host interviews candidates and selects their top choice from Atlas’ pool of vetted candidates.
• Atlas Corps provides Fellows with assistance in obtaining a visa, ten days advance orientation and training, health insurance, round trip international travel to host assignment, living stipend, and ongoing monthly training.
• The Host joins an international network of nonprofit organizations and rising nonprofit leaders who work together and share best practices.
Host Responsibilities:
• Host agrees to pay Atlas Corps a cost share for the Fellow over the course of the year, beginning 30-45 days prior to fellow’s start date.. Payments are made quarterly. Host is not responsible for taxes, health insurance, visa, or additional compensation.
• Host interviews candidates and selects their top choice. The Fall Fellows start at Host organization in early September and Spring Fellows start in March.
• Host agrees to provide a workstation (desk, phone, computer).
• Host agrees to provide meaningful work opportunities for the Fellow and will develop a Fellow work plan during the recruitment process.
• Host agrees to embrace the two-way notion of the Atlas Corps program that values the contributions of rising nonprofit leaders from the global south.

Open Position: Atlas Corps Fellow
Job Summary: The United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD) is looking for an Atlas Corps Fellow to serve in the Washington, DC area.
USICD’s mission is to catalyze and help focus the energy, expertise and resources of the US disability community and the US government to optimize their impact on improving the lives and circumstances of people with disabilities worldwide, and to be an active member of the global disability rights movement. The selected fellow will join a groundbreaking organization supporting the rights of people with disabilities in the US and abroad.

As a member of a small team and working under the direction of the Executive Director, the Atlas Corps Fellow will have a working and learning experience with USICD. The Fellow will provide integral support to the administrative and programmatic functions of the organization, to include:

• Assisting the Executive Director with various administrative tasks related to operating a U.S.-based nonprofit organization
• Assisting the program management staff in implementing various USICD initiatives in the areas of CRPD education and global disability rights information dissemination
• Supporting the Board of Directors’ activities through communications and logistic planning
• Respond to the inquiries of USICD members and constituents for information and disseminating announcements via electronic and print mailings
• Uploading content to the USICD website
• And developing their own portfolio of projects, presentations, and global network building unique to their role as an Atlas Corps Fellow with USICD, under the guidance and advice of the Executive Director.

Qualifications Summary:

USICD seeks a dynamic, energetic individual who:
• Understands disability as a human rights issue, beyond the more traditional charity or medical models
• Has at least basic awareness of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities treaty -OR- the universal human rights framework in general
• Has some first-hand experience in the disability community, as a family member, advocate, or self-identified person with a disability
• Has developed skills speaking, presenting/teaching, and writing in English
• Has strong computer and internet use skills; experience with web publishing or content management a plus
• Some experience in nonprofit or civil society/NGO administration
A commitment to the advancement of people with disabilities and knowledge of disability cultures in the United States and internationally are desirable. First-hand experience with disability preferred.



Interested applicants will please note that this blog site, We Can Do, is NOT the appropriate conduit for applying for this fellowship opportunity. Instead, people who wish to apply are requested to contact Atlas Corps directly, as instructed in the announcement above. You may apply via the Atlas Corps website at http://www.atlascorps.org/. At the Atlas Corps website, click on the button that says “Apply here.” Then on the next screen, click “Apply to United States.” Follow the instructions provided on that page. Thank you and good luck in your endeavors.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 7 so far )

JOB POST: Spanish-speaking Grants Consultant, Disability Rights Fund, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Posted on 23 January 2010. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund seeks Spanish-Speaking Grants Consultant

Application Deadline: February 15, 2010

About the consultancy

This consultancy position offers a unique opportunity to collaborate with a groundbreaking grantmaking initiative supporting the rights of persons with disabilities. For an interim period (mid-April – mid-September 2010), on a part-time basis, the Grants Consultant will help the Fund manage relationships with its grantees in Latin America. The main objectives of the position are to support DRF staff with grantee communications and oversight and to review and evaluate Spanish-language grant applications. The Fund is looking for a candidate who is able to work in a fast-paced environment, is flexible, takes initiative, and is independent, but team-oriented.

Astrong>About the Disability Rights Fund
Launched in January of 2008 as a project of the Tides Center, the Disability Rights Fund is a grantmaking collaborative aimed at building community capacity to achieve the rights of all persons with disabilities. The Fund makes modest grants (USD $5000-70,000) to Disabled Persons’ Organizations in the Global South and in Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union for advancing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) at country-level.

About the DRF Grants Process
In 2010, the Fund will launch its second year of grantmaking to organizations in Mexico and its third year of grantmaking to organizations in Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru (as well as in 20 other countries around the world; in Africa, Ghana, Namibia and Uganda; in Asia, Bangladesh and India; and 14 Pacific Island Countries). A request for proposals for Mexico will be posted February 15; the deadline for applications is in April. A request for proposals for Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru will be posted July 8; the deadline for applications is in late August. Grant applications are evaluated in a staged process, with the consultant and DRF staff completing a first and second review and preparing dockets for a third review by the DRF Steering Committee.

Current grantees from Ecuador, Nicaragua, and Peru (who began projects January 1 2010) will be submitting grant mid-term reports in end June 2010. The consultant will aid DRF staff in review of these reports and communications with grantees about their project implementation. The consultant will also aid in communication with current grantees from Mexico (who began projects September 1, 2009).

Consultant Responsibilities

· Interface with DRF staff and current LAC grantees to ensure that projects are progressing smoothly.
· Support DRF staff in LAC grantee mid-term report review and communications with grantees about reports.
· Conduct grants review, evaluation and tracking process for LAC applicants, in conjunction with DRF staff.
· Serve as liaison between DRF and Spanish-speaking prospective grantees to help translate emails, answer questions, complete application paperwork, and build relationships.

Skills and qualifications

The ideal candidate should demonstrate:
· Grantmaking or grantseeking experience preferred
· Professional written and verbal translation skills Spanish to English and English to Spanish
· Strong administrative and organizational skills; the ability to manage time efficiently
· Computer proficiency (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint)
· Demonstrated ability to work well with diverse populations from around the world
· Familiarity with the Latin American community of DPOs and the CRPD preferred
· Bachelors degree, or equivalent with minimum 5 years of relevant experience; advanced degree desired

Compensation
Commensurate with experience.

Time Commitment
Mid-April – Mid-September 2010, 5-40 hours per week (average 15)

How to apply
Disability Rights Fund, a Project of the Tides Center, is an equal opportunity employer. We strongly encourage and seek applications from women, and people of color, including bilingual and bicultural individuals, as well as members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender communities. People with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Please email or mail a cover letter, resume, three references (with contact information and relationship), writing sample (five page maximum) to:

Disability Rights Fund
Diana Samarasan, Director
Third Sector New England’s NonProfit Center
89 South Street, Suite 203
Boston, MA 02111-2670
dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org (please no phone calls)
Fax: (617) 261-1977

Deadline: Applications must be received by February 15, 2010.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

JOB POST: Russian- and Ukrainian-Speaking Grants Consultant, Disability Rights Fund, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Posted on 15 January 2010. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund seeks Russian- and Ukrainian-Speaking Grants Consultant

Application Deadline: February 1, 2010

About the consultancy
This consultancy position offers a unique opportunity to collaborate with a groundbreaking grantmaking initiative supporting the rights of persons with disabilities. The Grants Consultant will help the Fund build relationships with its target grantee community in Ukraine. The main objectives of the position are to support DRF staff with grantee communications and oversight and to review and evaluate Russian- and Ukrainian-language grant applications. The Fund is looking for a candidate who is able to work in a fast-paced environment, is flexible, takes initiative, and is independent, but team-oriented.

About the Disability Rights Fund
Launched in January of 2008 as a project of the Tides Center, the Disability Rights Fund is a grantmaking collaborative aimed at building community capacity to achieve the rights of all persons with disabilities. The Fund makes modest grants (USD $5000-70,000) to Disabled Persons’ Organizations in the Global South and in Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union for advancing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) at country-level.

About the DRF Grants Process
In 2010, the Fund will launch its second year of grantmaking to organizations in Ukraine (as well as in 24 other countries around the world; in Africa, Ghana, Namibia and Uganda; in Latin America, Ecuador, Mexico, Nicaragua and Peru; in Asia, Bangladesh and India; and 14 Pacific Island Countries). A request for proposals will be posted February 15; the deadline for applications is in April. Grant applications will be evaluated in a staged process, with the consultant and DRF staff completing a first and second review in April-May and preparing dockets for a third review by the DRF Steering Committee in their meeting June 12-13.

Current Ukrainian grantees (who began projects September 1 2009) will be submitting grant mid-term reports in March 2010. The consultant will aid DRF staff in review of these reports and communications with grantees about their project implementation.

Consultant Responsibilities

  • Interface with DRF staff and current Ukrainian grantees to ensure that projects are progressing smoothly.
  • Support DRF staff in Ukrainian grantee mid-term report review and communications with grantees about reports.
  • Conduct grants review, evaluation and tracking process for Ukrainian applicants, in conjunction with DRF staff.
  • Serve as liaison between DRF and Russian and Ukrainian-speaking prospective grantees to help translate emails, answer questions, complete application paperwork, and build relationships.

Skills and qualifications
The ideal candidate should demonstrate:

  • Grantmaking or grantseeking experience preferred
  • Professional written and verbal translation skills Russian and Ukrainian to English and English to Russian and Ukrainian
  • Strong administrative and organizational skills; the ability to manage time efficiently
  • Computer proficiency (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint)
  • Demonstrated ability to work well with diverse populations from around the world
  • Familiarity with the Ukrainian community of DPOs and the CRPD preferred
  • Bachelors degree, or equivalent with minimum 5 years of relevant experience; advanced degree desired

Compensation
Commensurate with experience.

Time Commitment
February-December, 5-40 hours per week

How to apply
Disability Rights Fund, a Project of the Tides Center, is an equal opportunity employer. We strongly encourage and seek applications from women, and people of color, including bilingual and bicultural individuals, as well as members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender communities. People with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Please email or mail a cover letter, resume, three references (with contact information and relationship), writing sample (five page maximum) to:

Disability Rights Fund
Diana Samarasan, Director
Third Sector New England’s NonProfit Center
89 South Street, Suite 203
Boston, MA 02111-2670
dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org (please no phone calls)
Fax: (617) 261-1977

Deadline: Applications must be received by February 1, 2010.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY for Human Rights Projects by Disabled People Organizations (DPOs)

Posted on 15 July 2009. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund Releases Second 2009 Request for Proposals, Extending Another Year of Grantmaking to Existing Target Countries and Opening Grantmaking to the Pacific
July 15, 2009
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF)—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced the second round of its 2009 grantmaking, “Raising Our Voice.” The application deadline is September 15, 2009. This round opens another year of possible funding to disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in: Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; and Bangladesh and adds an additional region to the Fund’s reach – the Pacific. In the Pacific, 14 island countries are targeted: Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

The broad objective of the Fund[1]—which was officially launched in March 2008—is to empower DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).

In 2008, the Fund made one-year grants to 33 organizations in 7 countries (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; Bangladesh), totaling USD 800,000. Grants ranged from USD 5000 – 50,000 and supported CRPD awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

In the second round of 2009 grantmaking, applicant organizations may apply within one of two categories: a) single organizations or partnerships and b) national DPO coalitions. Grants to single organizations will range from USD 5,000 to 30,000 and support efforts to build voice and visibility and to develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. Grants to national DPO coalitions will range from USD 30,000 to 70,000 and will support advocacy toward ratification of the CRPD, passage of specific legislation to accord with the CRPD, or the production of shadow reports.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by August 15. The deadline for applications is September 15, 2009.
DRF’s donors include the Aepoch Fund, the American Jewish World Service, an anonymous founding donor, the Australian Government’s International Development Assistance Agency – AusAID, the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development.

####

[1] The Disability Rights Fund is a project of Tides.



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this announcement to We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 43 so far )

JOB POST: Program Officer, Disability Rights Fund

Posted on 5 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund seeks Program Officer

About the position
The Program Officer position offers a unique opportunity to join a groundbreaking grantmaking initiative supporting the rights of persons with disabilities. As a member of a small team, the Program Officer will help shape the Fund as it matures and incorporates the best strategies in funding disability rights in the Global South and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union. The main objective of the position is to work with other Fund staff in the creation of grants strategy and process and the oversight of grantees. To do this work, the Program Officer will build field contacts and partnerships and work with grantees in the field. Other program and administrative responsibilities related to both grantmaking and the general operations of the Fund are also foreseen. The Fund is looking for a candidate who is able to work in a fast-paced environment, is flexible, takes initiative, and is independent, but team-oriented. This position is not necessarily Boston-based.

About the Disability Rights Fund
Launched in March of 2008 as a project of the Tides Center, the Disability Rights Fund is a grantmaking collaborative aimed at building community capacity to achieve the rights of all persons with disabilities. The Fund makes modest grants (USD $5000-70,000) to Disabled Persons’ Organizations in the Global South and in Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union for advancing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) at country-level.

Program Officer responsibilities
· Help design a grants proposal process that is accessible to people with disabilities
· Serve as liaison to grantees and prospective grantees
· Working closely with Tides, administer and manage grants(e.g., grant award and declination letters, disbursements, report tracking, grant files)
· Together with the DRF team, evaluate grant proposals, conduct financial and critical analysis of applicant organizations
· Provide technical aid to grantees during grants application and implementation
· Prepare concise written analyses of grant proposals and funding recommendations for Steering Committee comprised of field advisors and donors
· Arrange and conduct site visits and meetings with grantees
· Provide organizational effectiveness assistance to grantees or recommend helpful resources as appropriate
· Evaluate and monitor the impact of grants; review and analyze grantee reports
· Develop professional relationships within the field of disability rights to inform the grantmaking of the Fund; keep abreast of trends within the field of disability rights
· Collaborate with DRF team, Global Advisory Panel and Steering Committee to develop and refine grantmaking strategies
· Assist with the day-to-day operations of the Fund as needed
Skills and qualifications

The ideal candidate should demonstrate:
· Passion and commitment to advancing the human rights of people with disabilities
· Familiarity with the community of DPOs and the CRPD (particularly in the Asia Pacific region)
· Grantmaking or grantseeking experience (or relevant nonprofit experience)
· Experience supporting capacity development within civil society
· Demonstrated ability to work well with diverse populations from around the world
· Excellent written and verbal communication skills in English. Other language proficiencies a plus
· Strong administrative and organizational skills; the ability to manage time efficiently
· Computer proficiency (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint); willingness to learn additional applications (and accessible technology) as necessary
· Bachelors degree, or equivalent with minimum 5 years of relevant experience; advanced degree desired
· Ability to travel independently in developing countries
· Ability to combine the roles of objective evaluator and empathetic observer

Compensation
Salary and benefits negotiable, based on experience.

How to apply
Disability Rights Fund, a Project of the Tides Center, is an equal opportunity employer. We strongly encourage and seek applications from women, and people of color, including bilingual and bicultural individuals, as well as members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender communities, and people of other (non-U.S.) nationalities. People with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Please email or mail a cover letter, resume, three references (with contact information and relationship), writing sample (five page maximum) to:

Disability Rights Fund
Diana Samarasan, Director
Third Sector New England’s NonProfit Center
89 South Street, Suite 203
Boston, MA 02111-2670
dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org (please no phone calls)
Fax: (215) 261-4593

Deadline: Applications must be received by August 1, 2009.



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this announcement for publication at the We Can Do blog.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

NEWS: Manila Declaration, Asia Pacific Conference on Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 1 June 2009. Filed under: East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights, News, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

IDA – Asia Pacific Regional Conference on the CRPD Implementation and Monitoring

MANILA DECLARATION

February 11-12th, 2009

We, the delegates from The Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Nepal, India, Samoa, Fiji, and Republic of Korea being members of Disabled Peoples’ International, Inclusion International, International Federation of Hard of Hearing People, Rehabilitation International, World Blind Union, World Federation of the Deaf, World Federation of the DeafBlind, World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry, and Asia Pacific Disability Forum, all of which are members of International Disability Alliance (IDA) and participated in Asia Pacific Regional Conference on the CRPD Implementation and Monitoring, held at Manila, The Philippines on February 11-12, 2009,

We acknowledge the support of the Government of The Philippines, Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA), and Katipunan ng Maykapansanan sa Pilipinas, Inc (KAMPI) for this Conference.

After due deliberation and having reached consensus on the implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD) we make the following Declaration which shall be hereby referred to as the Manila Declaration 2009

GOVERNMENT
• We urge National Governments in the Asia and Pacific Region, to set the machinery in motion to ensure the signing, ratification without reservation, implementation and monitoring of the UN CRPD and the Optional Protocol;
• We further demand that the governments enact new legislation or amend existing legislation for Persons with Disabilities and related statutes to be in conformity with UN CRPD;

• We urge Public Authorities to change from a charity-based to a rights–based approach and from medical model to social model on disability as required by the UN CRPD;

• We ask all governments to initiate disability sensitization programs and to mainstream disability issues in all national agendas for the empowerment of persons with disabilities ;

• We recognize the vulnerability of all persons with disabilities with HIV/AIDS and we therefore request National Governments to address this urgent issue;

• We urge the Governments to include Children, Women and Youth with disabilities in all education and training programmes;

• We demand that Persons with Disabilities be represented through their representative organizations in law and policy making at all levels as required by Article 4 of UN CRPD;

• We recognize the positive role of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the lives of Persons with Disabilities. We therefore urge the Governments to facilitate the acquisition of ICT equipments;

• We appeal for the enactment of Disability Anti Discrimination Acts in our respective Countries;

• We seek the full participation of Persons with Disabilities in the Asia-Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons (2003-2012) in order to promote the accession, implementation and monitoring of UN CRPD;

HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION
We urge National Human Rights Institutions to include CRPD in their Plans and Strategies and constitute a Committee or Focal point to address Disability issues.

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES
We urge International Development Funding Agencies to include Disability Dimension in all their policies and programs;

We urge International Development Funding Agencies to modify the requirements in the Agreements so as to enable DPOs to access the technical and financial support;

MASS MEDIA
We urge Mass Media to promote positive images of Rights and Concerns of Persons with Disabilities.

NOTHING ABOUT US WITHOUT US



We Can Do received this declaration via several different sources; among them was the mailing list for the Global Partnership on Disability and Development.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 3 so far )

5th CONFERENCE South Asian CBR Network 5-7 Oct 2009 Kabul, Afghanistan

Posted on 30 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Events and Conferences, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

5th conference South Asian Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) Network

Dear All

Greetings. The South Asian CBR Network cordially invite you to actively participate in its 5th conference. It is organized from 5th-to 7th October 2009, Kabul, Afghanistan.

CBR NETWORK conference in the past has been an active forum to discuss the global trends and local applications of policies, legislation, programme, technology and other issues focusing on grassroots level issues.

Think globally -Act Locally has been main guiding principle for us.In the light of UN convention for persons with Disabilities the relevance of CBR as a strategy and as a principle for developing inclusive society is noted by both civil societies and the governments.

The challenges are multifold. Please join in the conference. Together with networking, sharing and working together we can make an impact .

Kindly see the website (www.cbrnetwork.af) for online registrations.

If you have questions please do write to us.

Email: secretariat@cbrnetwork.af

Or

cbrnet@airtelmail.in



We Can Do received this announcement via the <a href="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AsiaPacificDisability/Asia Pacific Disability email-based discussion group. All inquiries should please be directed to the conference organizers at the email addresses given above, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

HIV and Disability Policy Brief Released

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Health, HIV/AIDS, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability advocates have long known from observation that people with disabilities around the world are often at higher risk for HIV/AIDS. The difficulty has been in persuading mainstream educators and service providers of this fact. A new policy brief on disability and HIV can help advocates educate governments, mainstream organizations, and agencies about the need to include people with disabilities in HIV-related programs and services.

Disabled people are routinely excluded, sometimes by accident and sometimes on purpose, from mainstream education outreach programs on HIV and from health care services meant for people with AIDS. But a growing body of evidence shows that people with disabilities have an active sex life and are as likely as anyone else in engage in risky behaviors. They also are far more likely to be targeted for sexual assault, particularly from men who have HIV. The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS), World Health Organization (WHO), and the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) have jointly released a new, 8-page policy brief on disability and HIV. This policy brief summarizes what is known about disabled people and their high risk level for being infected with HIV. It also summarizes some of the reasons why they have been excluded from mainstream programs meant to prevent HIV transmission. For example, many workers in the field mistakenly assume that people with disabilities don’t have sex or never abuse drugs. Or they may simply neglect to consider the needs of deaf people who need information delivered in sign language or highly visual materials; blind people who need materials in audio or Braille formats; people with intellectual disabilities who need information in plain language; or people with mobility impairments who may need to attend training workshops held in wheelchair accessible buildings.

The Disability and HIV Policy Brief includes a set of recommendations for governments, including suggestions such as ratifying the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); providing HIV information in different formats tailored for different disability groups; providing people with disabilities with the same range of HIV, sexual, and reproductive health services as the rest of the population; ensuring that people with disabilities are trained to provide HIV-related education and care; and more. The policy brief also includes a few recommendations for civil society (for example, Non-Governmental Organizations) as well as for international agencies. The last section of the policy brief describes an example of AIDS-related activities in South Africa.

Learn more about the new policy brief at http://www.unaids.org/en/KnowledgeCentre/Resources/FeatureStories/archive/2009/20090409_Disability_HIV.asp. Or download the 8-page policy brief in PDF format (207 Kb) at http://data.unaids.org/pub/Manual/2009/jc1632_policy_brief_disability_en.pdf.



We Can Do learned about this policy brief via a notice posted to the IDA CRPD Forum email discussion group. I then gathered additional information about the UNAIDS web site and from the policy brief in PDF format (207 Kb).

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 12 so far )

Call for Disabled Role Models in Asian Region for Brochure

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Comments or Information, Call for Nominations or Applications, East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

by Aiko Akiyama

Please note that the deadline to submit pictures and bios is May 31, 2009.

Dear colleagues,

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the
Pacific (ESCAP) is putting together a brochure entitled, “Agents of
Change,” to promote the social model of disability and explain the changes that will need to be made to meet the requirements of Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action, which is the regional policy guideline on disability. As a part of the brochure, we would like to have pictures and messages of mentors with disabilities from the region as they themselves are agents of change.

We would like to ask for your collaboration in this endeavor. We would likes to have active thematic photos of persons with different impairments in the region, who work in certain professions as well as a
caption or a statement about how you see “disability” and a message to
younger generations of persons with impairments in the region.

Thus far, we have a picture and a message of a deaf pharmacist from
Japan, are also waiting for a picture of a blind architect from the
Philippines and another picture from Kyrgyzstan. We are also planning on
shooting a picture of a pizza baker, inT hailand, who is physically
disabled. We would like to have pictures of a person with intellectual
disability, a picture of a person who is a survivor of psychiatry, a
picture of deaf blind person all of whom are working in certain professions which they are proud of. Moreover, we would like to particularly welcome pictures from South Asia and the Pacific.

Time is of the essence and we would appreciate your urgent attention
to this request. We would appreciate if you can e-mail us pictures (sharper images are appreciated) towards the end of this month 31 May 2009. The
brochure is in draft form at the moment and you contributions would help us finalize it. Before the brochure final draft goes out to the printer, a copy will be circulated for those who are interested for peer review. Let me know if you are interested in that process.

Please send us pictures and messages to Mr Osama Rajkhan (rajkhan.unescap@un.org) and Aiko Akiyama (akiyama@un.org).

I look forward to hear from you soon and best regards.

Aiko Akiyama
Social Affairs Officer
Social Development Division (SDD)
UNESCAP
THAILAND
Email: akiyama@un.org
http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/disability/index.asp



I received this announcement from Aiko Akiyama via the AsiaPacificDisability listserver. Please note that all inquiries, pictures, and bios should please be directed to Mr Osama Rajkhan (rajkhan.unescap@un.org) and Aiko Akiyama (akiyama@un.org), NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Challenges Implementing Disability Rights Treaty?

Posted on 17 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Human Rights, Networking Opportunities, Opinion, Psychiatric Disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Abdul-Jeff Maalik Makana, the Executive Director of MindFreedom Kenya, wants to learn more about the challenges that other countries experience in implementing the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Below is his appeal for information. Please respond directly to him at kenya@mindfreedom.org.

Dear All,

Greetings from non sunny Nairobi day today!

We have a challenge here in Kenya advocating for the implementation of the UN CRPD. Are other states experiencing similar challenges? What are the challenges?

I recently on a media appearence to create awareness about the work of MindFreedom Kenya & advocating for the implementation of the UN CRPD… one caller to the show reinforced the general view that persons with psychosocial disabilities have no capacity at any time to make decision (Legal capacity) though the UN CRPD guarantees legal capacity(article 12) or even supported decision making.

To quote Daniel Hazen—Human Rights and Advocacy “cease the practice of exceptionalism when it comes to human rights” meaning we cannot downplay the CRPD which is a very important rallying point for our movement.

Mental Health (MH) policies cannot be written in a vacuum…. State parties and other stakeholders should get direction that adopting certain articles of the CRPD versus the CRPD in its entirety has far reaching consequences more so article 12 (right to legal capacity) a big part of the user/survivor movement advocacy.

Lastly, why was the term psychosocial disabled adopted in the UN CRPD versus the term mentally disabled or mentally ill? Here in Africa many don’t see mental illness as a disability? Can you please help me understand how to advocate better for psychosocial disabled term to be adopted and accepted locally.

What are your views:

I am doing a Survey on supporting signing/ratification and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities by state parties without reservations.

This obligation would require that the States both refrain from actions that undermine the principles and initiate efforts which would promote them. You can also e-mail your comments directly to kenya@mindfreedom.org
Question:

As a user, a survivor. mental health worker, or human rights activist in mental health do you support the position that the CRPD is non negotiable, and that the nature of this commitment obligates state parties to completely review MH policies and legislation which relied on flawed WHO MI Principles? *

http://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=cnR3dTlrTGFGRjFXY3g2YWhvTUJESUE6MA..

A few sampling of responses collected regarding the above question:

This obligation would require that the States both refrain from actions that undermine the principles and initiate efforts which would promote them.(MH Policy, legislation’s, new MH laws, civic education, more access to mental services at the community level, empowering of persons with psychosocial disabilities to participate equally in society without being discriminated based on disabilities).

Absolutely I support it!! Recently there have been reports that they are opening “behavioral” units in nursing homes in New York State–a way to lock us up again quietly so there won’t be too many complaints. Fortunately we noticed and… Read More now there’s a lawsuit. Good thing so many of us “suffer” from hypervigelance!! Anyway, so good to see that we’re coming together internationally. We can and will find our power no matter how hard the system tried to hold us down.

I am not sure that I can ask for the UN treaty to become nationalized, but I do agree with many of the tenets. I think that I can see where some conflicts of interest might be involved. So better person by person, not this group or that. That is what I think….

With kind regards,

Abdul-Jeff Maalik Makana

__________________________________
Abdul Maalik bin Ali formerly,
Jeff Makana

Executive Director,
MindFreedom Kenya(MF-K)
E-mail:kenya@mindfreedom.org
website: http://www.mindfreedomkenya.interconnection.org
Follow me on twitter@ www.twitter.com/Jeffmakana



Thank you to Abdul Maalik bin Ali for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Training Opportunity: Disability and Development Module, November 23 to December 19, 2009, VU University, Netherlands

Posted on 23 April 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Education and Training Opportunities, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Opportunities, Poverty, Rehabilitation, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability and Development Module at the VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Athena Institute, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University (Amsterdam), together with Enablement (Alphen aan den Rijn) and the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT, Amsterdam) are pleased to announce a 4-week module on Disability and Development to be held from November 23th to December 19th 2009 at the VU University. This course, a 4-week elective module, which is part of an academic Master degree programme, is open to external participants also. Students will learn in a highly participatory environment built around a problem-based learning approach. Lecturers have extensive international experience in disability and related fields. An overview of the course content can be found on the VU website: http://studiegids.vu.nl/ (type ‘disability’ as search term). The course was offered for the first time in 2008 and was very positively evaluated by the first batch of students.

The following topics will be covered in Module I:
Disability models and stereotypes, culture and disability, ICF conceptual framework, experience of having a disability, frequencies and distribution of disability, determinants of disability, including stigma and discrimination, poverty, gender and HIV/AIDS, rights of persons with disabilities, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, measurement of disability, disability-relevant research methods, survey methods, examples of disability research and an introduction to community-based rehabilitation.

In 2010, a second elective module will be offered on the subject of Disability & Development. This module will have the same duration as Module I

Module II will cover the following additional topics:
Project planning and management, monitoring and evaluation of community-based rehabilitation (CBR) programmes, management information systems, CBR as a preferred strategy for rehabilitation, organisational and institutional development, Disabled People’s Organisations, educational and economic empowerment of disabled people, the role of specific rehabilitation services, and sports and disability.

Interested candidates should apply well in advance and contact Huib Cornielje as soon as possible.

TARGET GROUP: rehabilitation professionals and professionals with an interest in disability and development.

REQUIREMENTS: good comprehension of the English language; bachelor degree or equivalent (in terms of experience and thinking capacity)

COURSE FEES: Euro 1,000 (excluding board & lodging); students who wish to gain official study credits (ETCS) will have to register as external students at the VU University. This will cost an additional €1,200 for 4 weeks, approximately.

DATES: November 23 to December 18, 2009

FURTHER INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED FROM:

Huib Cornielje
Langenhorst 36
2402PX Alphen aan den Rijn
The Netherlands
Tel: 0031-172-436953
Fax: 0031-172-244976
E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl



Thank you to Huib Cornielje for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do. All inquiries about this training opportunity should please be directed to Huib Cornielje at h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT to We Can Do. Thanks.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 10 so far )

FUNDING for Disability Rights Projects in India, Mexico, Ukraine (Text in English, Español, українською мовою, на русском языке)

Posted on 16 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Democratic Participation, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке

Disability Rights Fund Releases 2009 Request for Proposals: 3 New Countries Targeted in First Round
FEBRUARY16, 2009
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF)—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced its first 2009 grants round, “Raising Our Voice,” targeted at disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in three countries: India, Mexico and Ukraine.

The broad objective of the Fund[1]—which was officially launched in March 2008—is to empower DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).

In 2008, the Fund made one-year grants to 33 organizations in 7 countries (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; Bangladesh), totaling USD 800,000. Grants ranged from USD 5000 – 50,000 and supported CRPD awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

In the first round of 2009 grantmaking, applicant organizations may apply within one of two categories: a) single organizations or partnerships and b) national DPO coalitions. Grants to single organizations will range from USD 5,000 to 30,000 and support efforts to build voice and visibility and to develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. Grants to national DPO coalitions will range from USD 30,000 to 70,000 and will support advocacy toward ratification of the CRPD, passage of specific legislation to accord with the CRPD, or the production of shadow reports.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by March 16. The deadline for applications is April 16, 2009.

As a donor representative on the DRF Steering Committee stated, “The launch of DRF’s 2009 grantmaking process marks an exciting expansion of our grantmaking to DPOs in three new countries and an effort to support both more marginalized sectors of the disability community and national coalitions advancing the rights of persons with disabilities.”

DRF’s donors include the American Jewish World Service, an anonymous founding donor, the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
####


Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad
publica convocatoria a presentar propuestas de proyectos en 2009:
Primera ronda de financiamiento va dirigida a tres nuevos países

16 de febrero de 2009
PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (DRF)—una innovadora iniciativa de colaboración que apoya los derechos humanos de estas personas—anunció hoy su primera ronda de financiamiento de 2009, “Alzando nuestra voz”, dirigida a organizaciones de personas con discapacidad (OPD) en tres países: India, México y Ucrania.

El Fondo[2]—iniciado oficialmente en marzo de 2008—tiene el objetivo amplio de empoderar a las OPD del mundo en desarrollo y Europa Oriental/antigua Unión Soviética con el fin de que participen en la ratificación, aplicación y seguimiento de la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD).

En 2008, el Fondo brindó apoyo financiero durante un año a 33 organizaciones en siete países (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Perú, Ghana, Namibia, Uganda y Bangladés), por un total de USD 800,000. Los subsidios, de USD 5,000 a 50,000, apoyaron la toma de conciencia respecto a la CDPD, el fortalecimiento de coaliciones y redes, así como la promoción y defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad.

En la primera ronda de financiamiento de 2009, las organizaciones solicitantes pueden presentar propuestas en una de las siguientes categorías: a) como OPD que trabajan independientemente o en alianza con otras organizaciones, o b) en calidad de coaliciones nacionales de OPD. Las organizaciones de la primera categoría podrán solicitar subsidios desde USD 5,000 hasta 30,000, los cuales han de utilizarse para esfuerzos encaminados a generar voz y visibilidad, como también a desarrollar promoción, defensa y seguimiento de derechos con base en la CDPD. Los subsidios para las coaliciones nacionales de OPD, que oscilan entre USD 30,000 y 70,000, apoyarán acciones de promoción y defensa a favor de la ratificación de la CDPD, la aprobación de legislación específica armonizada con la CDPD o la elaboración de informes sombra.

Se invita a las organizaciones interesadas a leer todos los criterios de selección y los detalles para solicitud de fondos que se encuentran en http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant_spanish.html. Cualquier pregunta relacionada con el proceso de las propuestas debe dirigirse, a más tardar el 16 de marzo, a info@disabilityrightsfund.org. La fecha límite para presentar propuestas de proyectos es el 16 de abril de 2009.

Tal como aseveró una representante de donantes en el Comité Directivo del DRF, “El lanzamiento del proceso de financiamientos del DRF en 2009 constituye una expansión emocionante de nuestro apoyo financiero a las OPD en tres nuevos países; es también un esfuerzo por apoyar tanto a un mayor número de sectores marginados de la comunidad de personas con discapacidad como a coaliciones nacionales para la promoción de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad”.

Entre los donantes del DRF figuran el Servicio Mundial Judío Americano (AJWS), un donante fundador anónimo, el Instituto de la Sociedad Abierta, el Fondo Sigrid Rausing y el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional (DFID) del Reino Unido.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
####

Фонд прав інвалідів публікує запит на грантові заявки 2009 року: для першого етапу обрано три нові країни
16 лютого 2009 р.

БОСТОН (США) – Фонд прав інвалідів (ФПI) – новаторський спільний проект з надання грантів на підтримку прав людей з інвалідністю – оголосив сьогодні про початок першого етапу виділення грантів на 2009 рік, «Піднесімо свій голос», на допомогу організаціям інвалідів (ОІ) у трьох країнах: Індії, Мексиці й Україні.

Загальним завданням Фонду[3], офіційно відкритого в березні 2008 року, є надання ОІ у країнах, що розвиваються, та Східній Європі/колишньому Радянському Союзі можливостей для участі в ратифікації, реалізації та моніторингу дотримання Конвенції ООН про права інвалідів (КПІ).

У 2008 р. Фонд надав річні гранти 33 організаціям семи країн (Еквадор, Нікараґуа, Перу; Ґана, Намібія, Уганда; Банґладеш) на загальну суму $800 000. Гранти, розміром від $5000 до $50 000, були використані на підвищення обізнаності громадськості про КПІ, зміцнення коаліцій та інших об’єднань організацій інвалідів, захисту їх прав.

Протягом першого етапу надання грантів 2009 р. організації-кандидати можуть подати заявки в одній з двох категорій: a) окремі організації чи партнерства та б) національні коаліції ОІ. Гранти окремим організаціям, розміром від $5000 до $30 000, будуть спрямовані на посилення ролі й авторитету ОІ у суспільстві та розробку системи захисту прав інвалідів і моніторингу дотримання КПІ. Гранти національним коаліціям, розміром від $30 000 до $70 000, уможливлять роботу з прискорення ратифікації КПІ, прийняття конкретного законодавства згідно з КПІ або складання «тіньових» звітів.

Зацікавлені організації можуть вивчити критерії відповідності й відбору і всі подробиці процедури подання заявок на вебсайті Фонду, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Усі запитання з процедури подання заявок слід надсилати на адресу info@disabilityrightsfund.org до 16 березня. Граничний термін прийому заявок – 16 квітня 2009 р.

Як сказав один з представників організацій-донорів у Керівному комітеті ФПІ: «Початок процесу надання грантів 2009 року позначить поширення нашої діяльності на три нових країни і наших зусиль з підтримки як найбільш ізольованих груп інвалідів, так і національних коаліцій в галузі захисту прав усіх людей з інвалідністю».

Серед донорів ФПІ – Американська єврейська всесвітня служба, анонімний донор – засновник Фонду, Інститут «Відкрите Суспільство», Фонд Сіґрид Раусінґ та Британський департамент міжнародного розвитку.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке

ПРЕСС-РЕЛИЗ

Фонд прав инвалидов публикует запрос на грантовые заявки 2009 года: на первом этапе выбраны три новые страны
16 февраля 2009 г.

БОСТОН (США) – Фонд прав инвалидов (ФПИ) – новаторский совместный проект по предоставлению грантов в поддержку прав людей с инвалидностью – объявил сегодня о начале первого этапа выделения грантов на 2009 год, «Возвысим свой голос», направленного на помощь организациям инвалидов (ОИ) в трех странах: Индии, Мексике и Украине.

Общей задачей Фонда[4], официально открытого в марте 2008 года, является предоставление ОИ в развивающихся странах и Восточной Европе / бывшем Советском Союзе возможностей для участия в ратификации, реализации и мониторинге выполнения Конвенции ООН о правах инвалидов (КПИ).

В 2008 г. Фонд предоставил годичные гранты 33 организациям семи стран (Эквадор, Никарагуа, Перу; Гана, Намибия, Уганда; Бангладеш) на общую сумму $800 000. Гранты, в размере от $5000 до $50 000, были использованы для повышения осведомленности общественности о КПИ, укрепления коалиций и объединений организаций инвалидов, защиты их прав.
В ходе первого этапа предоставления грантов в 2009 г. организации-соискатели могут подать заявки в одной из двух категорий: a) отдельные организации или партнерства и б) национальные коалиции ОИ. Гранты отдельным организациям, в размере от $5000 до $30 000, будут нацелены на усиление роли и авторитета ОИ в обществе, выработку системы защиты прав инвалидов и мониторинга выполнения КПИ. Гранты национальным коалициям, в размере $30 000–$70 000, будут использованы на работу по ускорению ратификации КПИ, принятию конкретного законодательства в соответствии с КПИ или созданию «теневых» отчетов.

Заинтересованные организации могут изучить критерии соответствия и отбора и все подробности процедуры подачи заявок на вебсайте Фонда, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Все вопросы по процедуре подачи заявок следует направлять по адресу info@disabilityrightsfund.org до 16 марта. Конечной датой принятия заявок является 16 апреля 2009 г.

Как сказал один из представителей организаций-доноров в Руководящем комитете ФПИ: «Начало процесса предоставления грантов 2009 года знаменует расширение нашей деятельности в трех новых странах и наших усилий по поддержанию как наиболее изолированных групп инвалидов, так и национальных коалиций по защите прав всех людей с инвалидностью».

Среди доноров ФПИ – Американская еврейская всемирная служба, анонимный донор – основатель Фонда, Институт «Открытое Общество», Фонд Сигрид Раусинг и Британский департамент международного развития.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
####

[1] The Disability Rights Fund is a project of Tides. Back to English text
[2] El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad es un proyecto de Tides.Regresar a Español
[3] Фонд прав інвалідів є проектом Тайдз. українською мовою
[4] Фонд прав инвалидов является проектом Тайдз. на русском языке

English; Español; на русском языке; українською мовою



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for sending me this press release for publication at We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 15 so far )

RESOURCE: MindFreedom Kenya Promotes Mental Health Rights

Posted on 18 December 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Psychiatric Disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

MindFreedom Kenya is an affiliate of MindFreedom International, formed in response to identified gaps in mental health rights, lack of adequate information about substance abuse and impact to society and those directly affected. Since its inception, MindFreedom Kenya has endeavored to develop efforts to transform and diversify the marginalized and the most vulnerable-persons with psychosocial disabilities.

It helps users and survivors to be involved in care planning and making informed decisions about their care and upholding of human rights, advocating inhumane treatment and creating awareness about substance abuse and psychosocial disabilities.

For users and survivors of psychiatry, one of the most important things about the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is that it says we have an equal right to legal capacity, which is the right to make our own decisions; and the right to free and informed consent in health care; and that we should not be deprived of liberty based on disability – which means that governments are violating this treaty if they lock us up in psychiatric institutions and do forced treatment. They also have positive obligations, to provide support and services needed to live in the community, and to provide access to support in exercising legal capacity if the person wants this support. Support in exercising legal capacity is the opposite of guardianship, because it means the person is in control of her/his own decisions and chooses the kind of help that she/he wants.

MindFreedom Kenya aim is to influence policy and planning, and to encourage improvements in the management and delivery of mental health services.

Ø Policy makers acknowledging the need and strongly pursuing mental health policies that positively impact their constituents and calling for revision of existing mental policies to match today’s complex and changing mental health care.
Ø Leaders in health profession, professional associations, mental health boards and health care companies to take a leading role in initiatives that increase access, quality and equity. On the same note, they must be able to establish a mental health advisory council independent from government that works collaboratively with policy makers. This mental health advisory council will create a mental health reform blueprints with support and input from both public and private health care sectors. The mental health advisory council along and/with sponsoring policy makers will ensure that such mental health policies are passed, implemented and delivered.
Ø Human Right organizations must recognize equity, access and quality of mental health care is a basic human right and they must take initiatives that will harness just distribution, fair and favorable policies and practically implementable mental health rights processes.
Ø Humanitarian Organizations involved in health care, WHO (World Health Org.) and UN (United Nations) to continue supporting mental health locally made policies and initiatives that are practical to the social realities of the people who need equal representation against abuses within the mental health system.

Regards,
Jeff Makana
kenya@mindfreedom.org
[Addendum, March 23, 2009: MindFreedom Kenya has a new website of its own at http://www.mindfreedomkenya.interconnection.org/

People also can learn about the organization at Jeff Makana’s blog at www.erucall.com.



Thank you to Jeff Makana for permission to post this information at We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

NEWS: Kosovo Disability Community Urges US President-Elect Barack Obama to Support International Disability Rights

Posted on 18 December 2008. Filed under: Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

03 December 2008,
International Day of Persons with Disabilities
Dear Mr. Obama,

Congratulations to US. People and to you personally on your historic win to be 44th President of the United States of America .

Your acceptance speech was so good to hear when many minority groups have been mentioned, specifically persons with disabilities and it shows that you believe in celebrating the diversity present in society.

We are pleased to send you our compliments on your disability platform of four parts:
• Increasing educational opportunities,
• Ending discrimination and promoting equal opportunity,
• Increasing the employment rate of workers with disabilities and
• Supporting independent living of persons with disabilities

We believe those to be the best practices which will lead the world in empowering persons with disabilities to take full advantage of their talents and become independent, integrated members of society.

We, persons with disabilities from Republic of Kosovo congratulate the International Day of Persons with Disabilities as well as the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) to all our friends and colleagues in U.S and to you.

The celebration of 2008 as a significant year in the global disability rights movement, given the entry into force of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities as the first international, legally-binding human rights treaty for persons with disabilities, will give us the opportunities to achieve a vision of a society where all can live with dignity and respect.

Finally, we urge you to use your new position as a world leader for the welfare of persons with disabilities not just in your great country of United States of America , but also in other countries around the world. In short, we want the idea of universal human rights to become a reality to all of us.

Our warmest regards and best wishes from Republic Kosovo

Hiljmnijeta Apuk, Human Rights Defender

On behalf of the membership of Little People of Kosovo, multiethnic NGOs partnership of Voluntary Promotional Program of Disability Mentoring Days – DMD, Monthly magazine “Newspaper to the Rights of Persons with Disabilities of Kosovo” in 6 languages, Hendifer – Ferizaj and Art Coalition of Authentic Culture of Persons with Disabilities.



Thank you to Hiljmnijeta Apuk for granting permission to post this letter at We Can Do. A global campaign is under way to urge people with disabilities, our loved ones, colleagues, and other allies from around the world to send emails to Obama to increase the visibility of disability issues within Obama’s administration. Learn more about the international Call To Action and how you can participate at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/11/07/disabilities-email-obama/. Most of the same text is also in the slide show further below (click on the arrows to move through the show).

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

NEWS: Disability Rights Fund Receives $1.3 Million from DFID

Posted on 4 December 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

PRESS RELEASE: Disability Rights Fund Receives $1.3 Million from DFID

December 3, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – On the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the Disability Rights Fund (DRF) is happy to announce receipt of a grant of £868,000 ($1.3 million) from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID). This grant will support expanded grantmaking in 2009 to disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in the Global South.

“With the present economic downturn, this donation is an incredible message of support,” stated DRF’s Director Diana Samarasan. “It underscores the commitment of the British government to a rights-based approach to disability.”

Utilizing the framework of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD), DRF supports the human rights advocacy of DPOs in the Global South and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union. Through its unique governance structure, the Fund is a partnership between donors and the worldwide disability community. A global advisory panel provides recommendations on grantmaking strategies; and panel representatives also serve on the Fund’s grantmaking decision body together with donors. Panel members come from five continents and reflect a broad cross-section of the disability community,

DFID representatives stated, “it is essential that efforts like the Disability Rights Fund continue their support of communities often unreached by more conventional development efforts. DRF represents a unique model of supporting community-led efforts to institute rights.”

DRF’s first grants decisions, announced in November 2008, resulted in a total of $800,000 in grants to 33 organizations in seven countries. Grantees include a Ugandan organization of lawyers with disabilities, an emergent Peruvian group of people with psycho-social disabilities, and a grassroots network in Bangladesh of women-led disabled persons’ organizations. For a full list of grantees and more information about DRF, see www.disabilityrightsfund.org.

Other donors to DRF include: an anonymous founding donor, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the Open Society Institute, and the American Jewish World Service.

####



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for passing along this press release. Readers who have not already done so may wish to explore see the resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website for an extensive collection of resources related to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); fund raising sources; and toolkits that can help organizations learn how to raise funds more effectively.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

UN Secretary General Acknowledges Disability Rights Treaty, Disability Day

Posted on 30 November 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

SECRETARY-GENERAL, IN MESSAGE FOR INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES, SAYS MUCH TO CELEBRATE WITH ENTRY INTO FORCE OF RIGHTS CONVENTION

Following is United Nations (UN) Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message on the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, observed 3 December:

This year’s International Day of Persons with Disabilities falls just a week before the sixtieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The United Nations is commemorating both under the theme, “Dignity and justice for all of us”.

We have much to celebrate this year. The entry into force of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in May was a turning point. When the first Conference of the Parties convened in October, participants immediately began considering how the Convention can serve as a tool to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. This progress has been made possible thanks to the active participation and leadership of persons with disabilities, by ensuring that they have access to — and are included in — all aspects of our work.

The United Nations remains committed to this approach. The renovation of our Headquarters complex through the Capital Master Plan will bring our facilities up to the latest standards of accessibility. These advances are long overdue.

The General Assembly has stressed that, to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, we must include persons with disabilities in all processes. With 80 per cent of persons with disabilities — more than 400 million people — living in poor countries, we need to do much more to break the cycle of poverty and disability.

The slogan of the International Disability Alliance is: “Nothing about us without us.” A disabled person from Swaziland, who has been fighting for the implementation of a disability policy there, has said: “We need total integration to do away with the evil of stigmatization.”

In that same spirit, I urge Governments and all stakeholders to ensure that persons with disabilities and their organizations are an integral part of all development processes. In this way, we can promote integration and pave the way for a better future for all people in society.



The above comments from the UN Secretary General were recently circulated on several different international disability-oriented email discussion lists, including the one for RatifyNow. RatifyNow is an organization devoted to promoting the ratification and implementation of the CRPD.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Disabled People Must Not Pay for Crisis, Says European Disability Forum

Posted on 27 November 2008. Filed under: News, Employment, Human Rights, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

français

EDF Statement on the Economic Crisis: Disabled People Must Not Pay for the Crisis

Paris, 16 Novembre 2008 – The European Disability Forum, which is the voice of more than 50 million European people with disabilities, calls on the European Council, Commission and Parliament and other European institutions and all the governments of Europe to ensure disabled people and their families do not pay for the worldwide economic crisis by the reduction in their income, benefits, employment opportunities or in cuts in support to our representative organisations.

The crisis was caused by the irresponsible lending and unacceptable negligence by those in charge of the financial institutions and regulatory bodies of the world. Governments’ response to the ‘credit crunch’ has been to create financial resources to bail out the banks. Now as this lack of confidence feeds its way into the general economic system it is vital that poor, elderly and disabled people and their families of Europe do not pay for this crisis. We already in a precarious position prior to the crisis, therefore call for a reflationary approach to spend more on investment in accessible infra structure, on benefits and the provision of tax relief, so that these groups can buy goods and services so improving the economic situation.

The world through the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities has only just recognised the urgent need to extend the international human rights law framework to disabled people. Society cannot afford to dilute its commitment to human rights including the right to employment and family life. Traditionally disabled people have been the ‘reserve army of labour’, ’the last to be hired the first to be fired’, seen as expendable at times of economic crisis. Disabled People, their families, the unemployed and the poor cannot become the scapegoat for a crisis not of their making. Already the worsening economic position has led to attempts to cut benefits in many countries such as Ireland, Hungary, Sweden and Italy.

The lesson of this crisis – the value of investing in people – is far more important than speculative investment and it benefits the whole of society and strengthens its resistance to such crisis driven changes. If the gap between the disadvantaged and the wealthy widens, it will cost society more in the long run. The EDF will ensure the equality and rights of disabled people come to the top of the political agenda in the forthcoming European Elections.

Cutbacks and mass unemployment will develop a fertile ground for violence, hate crime, undermine solidarity and produce dangerous attitudes for democracy. We call on all those with political and economic decision making responsibility to do all they can to ensure that disabled and poor people are treated with equality and their economic well being is assured by the measures they take at this time. Now is the time for strong action so that in 2010-European Anti Poverty Year- disabled people and other disadvantaged groups do not again come to the top of the agenda.

The European Disability Forum (EDF) is the European umbrella organisation representing the interests of 50 million disabled citizens in Europe. EDF membership includes national umbrella organisations of disabled people from all EU/EEA countries, as well as European NGOs representing the different types of disabilities, organisations and individuals committed to disability issues. The mission of the European Disability Forum is to ensure disabled people full access to fundamental and human rights through their active involvement in policy development and implementation in Europe.

Forum européen des personnes handicapées
>>> Communiqué de presse

Déclaration du Forum Européen des personnes handicapées à propos de la crise financière: Les personnes handicapées ne doivent pas payer la crise

Paris, le 16 novembre 2008 – Représentant 50 millions d’européens en situation de handicap, le Forum Européen des Personnes Handicapées appelle le Conseil Europeén la Commission Européenne et le Parlement Européen, les Institutions Européennes et tous les Gouvernements des pays européens à s’assurer que les personnes handicapées et leurs familles n’aient pas à payer les conséquences de la crise financière internationale par une réduction de leurs revenus, de leurs accès à l’emploi, de leurs moyens de compensation ou par une réduction des moyens attribués à leurs organisations représentatives.

La crise financière a été causée par des accords de prêts irresponsables et des négligences inacceptables de la part des responsables d’Institutions financières et de régulation financières. La réponse des Gouvernements à cette déroute bancaire a été la création de ressources financières pour sauver les banques. Maintenant que la perte de confiance gagne l’économie réelle, il est essentiel que les européens exposés à la pauvreté, à la maladie et aux situations handicap n’aient pas à faire les frais de cette crise. Déjà affectée par la précarité avant cette crise, nous pensons au contraire qu’une politique de relance devrait augmenter les allocations, investir dans l’accessibilité et accorder des avantages fiscaux pour que ces groupes puissent consommer des biens et des services et ainsi soutenir le développement économique.

Avec l’adoption par les Nations Unies de la Convention Internationale pour le droit des personnes handicapées le monde vient juste de reconnaître le besoin urgent d’un élargissement du cadre des Droits de l’Homme aux personnes handicapées. La société ne peut pas se permettre maintenant de d’affaiblir son engagement pour les Droits de la Personne et notamment le droit à l’emploi et le droit à fonder une famille.

Il est depuis longtemps d’usage que la réponse aux besoins des personnes handicapées représente une « réserve d’emploi », ce sont les dernières à être engagées et les premières à être licenciées, perçues comme quantité négligeable. La dégradation de la situation économique a déjà conduit plusieurs pays à vouloir supprimer des avantages acquis, comme en Irlande, en Hongrie, en Suède et en Italie.

La leçon de cette crise est que l’investissement sur le développement des personnes est beaucoup plus essentiel que les investissements spéculatifs, qu’il bénéficie à l’ensemble de la collectivité et qu’il renforce les capacités de réponse collective à ce type de crise. Si le fossé entre les riches et les pauvres s’élargit encore la crise coûtera plus cher et durera plus longtemps. Le Forum Européen des Personnes Handicapées veillera à ce que l’égalité et les droits des personnes handicapes devienne une priorité de l’agenda politique européen lors des prochaines élection européennes.

Les restrictions et l’augmentation du chômage vont créer un terrain propice au développement de la violence, d’attitudes dangereuses pour la démocratie et constituent une menace pour la solidarité. Nous appelons les responsables politiques et économiques à faire face à leur responsabilité et à prendre immédiatement les décisions nécessaires pour que les personnes handicapées, leurs familles et les personnes pauvres soient traitées avec équité et leur avenir économique assuré.

Le Forum européen des personnes handicapées (FEPH) est la plateforme européenne qui représente les intérêts de 50 millions de citoyens handicapés au sein de l’Union européenne. Les organisations membres du FEPH incluent les plateformes nationales des personnes handicapées de tous les Etats membres de l’UE et de l’Espace économique européen, ainsi que les ONG européennes représentant les différents types de handicap. La mission du FEPH est de garantir le respect total des droits fondamentaux et humains des personnes handicapées par le biais d’une implication active dans le développement et application des politiques européennes.



This press release was circulated on the AsiaPacificDisability listserver.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 3 so far )

IDA CRPD Forum Recruits Organizations as Participants

Posted on 27 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

IDA CRPD Forum Recruits Organizations as Participants

The Interational Disability Alliance (IDA) is an international network of disability organizations. According to their web site, “The IDA CRPD Forum upholds the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) as the universal standard for the human rights of all persons with disabilities that takes precedence over previous instruments.”

Dear All,

The steering committee of the IDA CRPD Forum decided at its meetings held on October 30th and November 4th 2008 on the process to be followed for organizations wishing to join the IDA CRPD Forum as participants.

We therefore invite any organization desiring to participate in the IDA CRPD Forum to send by email a letter of interest to the IDA (and its CRPD Forum) Secretariat at idacrpdforum@yahoo.com. The letter should include the following information and the attached declaration signed by the main representative of the organization:

– Name of Organization
– Address and Contact Information
– Name of Official Representative
– Website (if available)
– Geographic Coverage
– Main area(s) of work and constituency (if relevant)
– Composition of:
o Membership
o Governing Body
– Indication whether the organization considers itself to be a DPO or not, understanding that a DPO is an organization which is managed and controlled mainly by persons with disabilities as well as accountable to persons with disabilities.

Upon receipt and review of the documentation by the Secretariat, the IDA CRPD Steering Committee will be informed. If no objection is raised within two weeks, the organization will be added to the IDA CRPD Forum participant list and to the IDA CRPD Forum list serve. Participation in the IDA CRPD Forum will ensure access to information on all IDA CRPD Forum activities and will allow participation in any consultation process to be launched by the IDA CRPD Forum, as well as the possibility of participation in the different electronic working groups.

The IDA CRPD Forum looks forward to the valuable contributions of new perspective and expertise your participation will offer as we work together to further our efforts for the rights of persons with disabilities.

Sincerely Yours,
The IDA (and its CRPD Forum) Secretariat

Declaration
By signing below, I agree on behalf of the organization I represent, to accept the DPO leadership in the management of the IDA CRPD Forum as well as the principles of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

I accept that the organization on behalf of which I sign this declaration shall not be allowed to speak on behalf of the IDA CRPD Forum and shall not refer to their participation as membership in the IDA CRPD Forum in its external communication. I hereby accept that non-compliance with these provisions might result in revocation of the right to participate in or exclusion from the IDA CRPD Forum.

Signature: ___________________________ Date: _______________________

Name of person signing: __________________________________________________

Title: __________________________________________________________________

Organization: ___________________________________________________________



The above announcement was circulated on the IDA CRPD Forum listserver. I gathered the background information provided in the first paragraph from the IDA CRPD Forum web page and the IDA web page. Organizations may wish to follow these links to learn more about IDA and the IDA CRPD Forum. All inquiries and applications to join should please be directed to idacrpdforum@yahoo.com, NOT We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 3 so far )

NEWS: First Committee of Disability Rights Convention Experts Elected

Posted on 23 November 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

First Committee of Experts on Disability Rights Convention Elected

(New York, United Nations, November 3, 2008): Today, the first Conference of States Parties on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) elected the new Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities which will be in charge of monitoring the implementation of the CRPD. The Committee comprises seven men and five women, of which nine are persons with disabilities. The twelve Committee members elected are:

Monsur Ahmed Choudhuri (Bangladesh) (4-year term)
Amna Ali Al Suweidi (Qatar) (4-year term)
György Könczei (Hungary) (2-year term)
Ana Peláez Narváez (Spain) (4-year term)
Cveto Uršič (Slovenia) (2-year term)
Jia Yang (China) (4-year term)
Mohamed Al-Tarawneh (Jordan) (4-year term)
Ron McCallum (Australia) (2-year term)
Maria Soledad Cisternas Reyes (Chile) (4-year term)
Germán Xavier Torres Correa (Ecuador) (2-year term)
Lotfi Ben Lallohom (Tunisia) (2-year term)
Edah Wangechi Maina (Kenya) (2-year term)

By drawing lots, six Committee members listed above will serve for a two-year mandate, while the other six members have a four-year mandate.

William Rowland, Chair of the International Disability Alliance CRPD Forum: “We congratulate the members of the Committee for their election and look forward to very close interaction with the Committee. We encourage all Committee members to support Rules of Procedure for the new Committee that will ensure meaningful participation from representative organisations of persons with disabilities (DPOs) in all stages of their work. The Committee should consider the IDA CRPD Forum not only as the network that represents the key stakeholders of the CRPD, but also as a source of expertise.”

The Committee will hold its first one-week meeting in Geneva in February 2009. The Conference of States Parties decided to hold its next meet in 2009, which confirms the substantive nature of the Conference.

For more information on the IDA CRPD Forum, please visit the website:

http://www.internationaldisabilityalliance.org/forum.html

or send an email to: idacrpdforum@yahoo.com.

The IDA CRPD Forum is the network of international and regional organisations of persons with disabilities, which has been established to promote the swift and proper ratification and implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and its Optional Protocol.



This press release was circulated on the AdHoc_IDC mailing list and the IDA CRPD Forum mailing list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Why Obama Matters Globally

Posted on 18 November 2008. Filed under: Call for Comments or Information, Human Rights, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , |

The new US President-elect Barack Obama has said that the United States should “lead the world” in helping people with disabilities “take full advantage of their talents and become independent, integrated members of society.” He also has pledged to sign the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and to urge the US Senate to ratify it. If the United States does indeed ratify the CRPD, disability advocates in other countries would then be able to point to this fact when pressuring their own governments to do the same.

Obama’s election could have important implications for people with disabilities not only across the United States but possibly also in other countries. But we will only reap the full benefits of his presidency if he follows through on all his promises to people with disabilities. Most politicians, at least in democratic countries, are more quick to follow through on their promises when they know that both people in their own country and also people around the world are watching them.

Accordingly, people with disabilities and our loved ones, colleagues, and allies from both across the United States and all countries around the world are being encouraged to send emails to Barack Obama’s team. You can send an email to Kareem Dale, Obama’s National Disability Vote Director (at kdale@barackobama.com), WITH COPIES TO Anne Hayes, a volunteer on the Obama Disability Policy Committee (at ahayesku@hotmail.com). If you wish, you may read other people’s emails to Obama for inspiration.

In your letters to Obama, you may wish to urge him to move quickly to sign the CRPD. Or, you may wish to urge him to remember to ensure that all US foreign assistance and poverty reduction programs are actively inclusive of people with disabilities in their design and implementation. What would it mean to the disability community in YOUR country if the US were to sign and ratify the CRPD? Share your ideas. Have you observed US-funded foreign assistance programs in your country that were not fully inclusive of people with disabilities? Share your stories with Obama’s team.

If you need more detail on the national and global email-writing campaign to Obama, you may wish to view the slide show program below. Or, if you have difficulty with this slide show program, then most of this text is also posted at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/11/07/disabilities-email-obama/

After you write your own email to Obama, please do encourage your friends and colleagues to do the same.



Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 3 so far )

RESOURCE: Global Alliance on Accessible Technologies and Environments

Posted on 10 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Resources, technology | Tags: , , , , , , |

A contact at this organization sent me the following blurb; We Can Do readers are invited to explore their web site at http://www.gaates.org/ for more detail.

Global Alliance on Accessible Technologies and Environments (GAATES) is a leading not-for-profit international organization which brings together experts in accessibility of the Built, Virtual and Social Environments. GAATES has an international presence in 6 Global Regions: Asia-Pacific, Middle East, North America, South America, Europe and Africa. GAATES maintains a database of international experts with extensive and diverse experience in universal design and accessibility of built and virtual environments. Our expert professionals include: architects; engineers; accessible user interface technology specialists; website designers; accessibility auditors/surveyors; and experts in human rights and implementation of the 2006 UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Please visit our site at www.gaates.org for more information on our organization.



Thank you to GAATES for alerting me to their organization. They are now also added to the extensive blogroll listing at the very bottom of every page at We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

NEWS: Disability Rights Fund Makes Grants to 33 Organizations in 7 Countries

Posted on 10 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

PRESS RELEASE
Disability Rights Fund Makes Grants to 33 Organizations in 7 Countries

November 3, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF) – a groundbreaking collaborative to support the human rights of people with disabilities around the world– today announced funding decisions from its first request for proposals. A total of $800,000 will be gifted to 33 organizations in seven countries. The grants will support work to raise awareness about the rights of people with disabilities, build coalitions and networks, and develop advocacy and monitoring activities, in connection with the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

DRF grantees share the goal of advancing the rights of people with disabilities at the country-level. Recipients include:
• A Ugandan organization of lawyers with disabilities.
• An emergent Peruvian group of people with psycho-social disabilities.
• A grassroots network in Bangladesh of women-led disabled persons’ organizations.
The full grantee list is posted on the DRF website, www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grantees.html and is available upon request.

“As the disability rights movement gains new impetus through the UN Convention we are delighted to play our part by placing new funding in the hands of DPOs to enable them to advance rights at country level,” stated DRF Co-Chair, William Rowland. DRF Director, Diana Samarasan, added “It is an auspicious day to put money in the hands of organizations run by people with disabilities. The first Conference of States Parties to the Convention is being held at the UN; the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is being elected. The work of translating the Convention from paper to practice is before us.”

Grantees were selected after a rigorous review process which included review by DRF’s Steering Committee, a committee composed of donor representatives and people with disabilities from the Global South.

DRF’s donors include: an anonymous founding donor, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the Open Society Institute, the UK’s Department for International Development, and the American Jewish World Service.

A grantee list can be requested from DRF by writing to dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org. Or you can consult the Grantee web page at the Disability Rights Fund website.

####

As an addendum from this We Can Do editor, I would like to encourage readers to consult the Disability Rights Fund website to learn about upcoming funding opportunities from their organization for projects to promote the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Readers may also wish to consult their extensive resource listings to find resources that can help them learn how to raise funds, find funding sources, and use the CRPD to promote the human rights of people with disabilities in their country.



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for circulating this press release.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 5 so far )

How Was the CRPD Born? Opportunity to Share Your Story with History

Posted on 30 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

We Can Do readers who were involved with the negotiation process for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) may wish to share their stories with the United Nations Intellectual History Project (UNIHP). This could be an important means of documenting the history of how the CRPD was created. The following text is taken directly from the UNIHP web site at http://www.unhistory.org/ora_his_sol.htm; only information provided at the UNIHP website itself should be considered official or up-to-date.

Do You Have a Story to Tell?

Limited time and resources make it impossible for UNIHP staff to conduct oral history interviews with all those who may have served the United Nations as staff members, consultants, researchers, diplomats or chairs of commissions. However, anyone who has participated in UN development activities over the years, and who has a particular story to contribute about the nexus of development ideas, international public policy, and multilateral institutions, is welcome to send us a short, written contribution.

We have set out below some of the questions, about which it would be most useful to receive your own ideas and experiences.

We ask that you send a brief note, 5 to 10 pages, by email to unhistory@gc.cuny.edu, or by fax or mail to the project’s New York headquarters.

Please note that by sending your contribution to the project you agree to vest copyright with the United Nations Intellectual History Project. This agreement will allow the project to quote directly from your note if it is used in project publications, although it will license you to copy, publish or otherwise use the note for your own purposes.

As the aim of the project is to better understand the UN’s contribution to global economic and social policy and to development discourse and practice, we examine the sources, evolution, and implementation of economic and social ideas generated or promoted by the UN. With this in mind, we ask that your note address the following questions as they relate to your own experience at the UN:

1. Please briefly describe the nature of your affiliation with the UN, positions held, and dates.

2. Could you identify one or two of the most original development ideas that you worked on, or were aware of, during your experience with the UN?

3. Where did this idea originate? Did it come from

a. Intellectual leadership of particular individuals, within or outside UN secretariats?
b. Eminent commissions?
c. Ad hoc global conferences?
d. Expert groups?
e. Academics?
f. NGOs?

4. How did this idea develop? What were the debates about it? Was it promoted, distorted, abandoned, or implemented? Some possible factors to consider that may have impacted on it are:

a. Global or regional events
b. Tensions within and among diplomatic coalitions, i.e. North-South relations within the UN during the Cold War and after; East and West; within “like-minded”; within the least developed.
c. Institutional rivalries or coalitions, including tensions between the UN and the Bretton Woods institutions
d. Quality of the international civil service, including its leadership

5. In your view, did this idea make a difference?

a. Did it change international public policy discourse?
b. Did it provide a guide to national policy and action?
c. Did it alterprospects for forming new coalitions of political or institutional forces?
d. Did it become embedded in institutions?



I became aware of the UNIHP via the AdHoc_IDC email discussion list.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

UN Terms Forced Psychiatric Treatment Torture–Users and Survivors of Psychiatry Welcomes Report

Posted on 3 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Human Rights, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note from We Can Do: The following press release from the Center for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry refers to a recent Interim Report from the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture. For more information on that report, or to download a copy, go to http://www2.ohchr.org/english/issues/disability/torture.htm and also go to http://www2.ohchr.org/english/issues/disability/index.htm.]

Date: September 24, 2008

The Center for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry welcomes the Interim Report by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture

The Center for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (CHRUSP) welcomes the Interim Report by UN Special Rapporteur on Torture Manfred Nowak, which signals an end to impunity for psychiatric torture and ill treatment. The report focuses attention on torture and persons with disabilities, applying the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) to the obligations of states to prevent and punish torture.

The Special Rapporteur names forced psychiatric interventions (such as psychosurgery, electroshock and administration of mind-altering drugs including neuroleptics) among practices that may constitute torture or ill treatment. Other medical practices that may constitute torture or ill treatment are restraint and seclusion, forced abortion or sterilization and involuntary commitment to psychiatric institutions. The medical context itself is one where “serious violations and discrimination against persons with disabilities may be masked as ‘good intentions’ on the part of health care professionals.”

In his conclusions, the Special Rapporteur calls on states to ratify and implement the Convention and its Optional Protocol, to legislate recognition of the legal capacity of persons with disabilities and ensure that support in decision-making is provided where needed, and to issue guidelines on free and informed consent in line with the Convention. He calls for independent human rights monitoring of institutions where persons with disabilities may reside, and for UN and regional human rights mechanisms to take account of the Convention and integrate its standards into their work.

“This development is significant for several reasons,” said Tina Minkowitz, founder of CHRUSP. “It makes explicit what the Convention had left implicit: that forced psychiatric treatment is a serious violation of human rights, even when done with the best intentions. States that do not make the necessary reforms to eliminate forced treatment and institutionalization and to respect the legal capacity of persons with disabilities may run afoul of their obligations to effectively stop torture and ill treatment. The report gives us new tools for legal advocacy and redress of violations, in states that have ratified the CRPD and in those that have not yet ratified.”

**** END ****

About the Center for Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (CHRUSP):

The purpose of the organization is to work for full legal capacity, an end to forced psychiatric treatment, and equality and advancement for users and survivors of psychiatry within a human rights framework.
The aims of the organization are to:
• Advocate for the advancement of the human rights of users and survivors of psychiatry.
• Provide international consultation to influence key decision-makers regarding matters that affect users and survivors.
• Develop model legislation focusing on legal capacity and free and informed consent.
• Facilitate sharing of information and knowledge among user / survivor organizations around the world
• Monitor progress on human rights instruments including the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities with respect to issues affecting users and survivors of psychiatry



This press release was recently circulated on the IDA_CRPD_Forum email discussion group.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 74 so far )

FUNDING: Campaigns to Ratify, Implement Disability Rights Treaty (CRPD)

Posted on 1 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Are you a disability rights advocate working in a developing country? Is your organization trying to persuade your country’s government to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)? Or, has your country already ratified the CRPD–and you are now working on making sure the CRPD is fully implemented, so that all people with disabilities in your country have their rights respected and protected? Do you need funding support?

The grantmaking foundation, Open Society Institute, has now established the Disability Rights Initiative that supports the efforts of disability rights advocates working on ratification and implementation of the CRPD around the world. The initiative gives priority to efforts promoting the rights of people with intellectual and psycho-social disabilities. However, OSI is willing to support a range of programs and projects that advance the CRPD.

Learn more detail about this funding opportunity and how to apply for it at:

http://www.soros.org/initiatives/special/focus/disability/grants

This is an on-going funding opportunity.

Please note that all inquiries and funding applications should be directed to the Open Society Institute, NOT We Can Do.

Advocates working on issues related to implementing the CRPD in developing countries will also want to keep checking the Disability Rights Fund web site for announcements of future, additional funding opportunities there. The application deadline for their first round of grants passed in August 2008, but they will be offering more funding grants to more countries in the future. Also check the resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website for links to more possible funding sources in general.

New to the CRPD? Learn more about this international, legally-binding human rights treaty that protects the human rights of people with disabilities around the world at http://ratifynow.org/ratifynow-faq/



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for alerting me to the OSI funding opportunity.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

RESOURCE: Disability Rights Convention Ratification Campaign Handbook

Posted on 29 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Media & Journalism, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , |

Disability advocates can use the Disability Rights Convention Ratification Campaign Handbook (PDF format, 250 Kb) from the Landmine Survivors Network as one more tool to help them persuade their government to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

The most significant international, legally binding treaty affecting people with disabilities is, of course, the CRPD. The 40 countries that have ratified it so far are now legally obligated to make sure their laws protect a wide range of human rights for people with disabilities, such as the right to life, to privacy, to accessible education and health care services, and many more. In some cases, this may mean creating new legislation; in some cases, this may mean abolishing old laws that discriminate.

But what of the other 160 countries or so that have not yet ratified the CRPD? The good news is that 95 of these have taken the first step toward ratification by signing it. And signing the convention does at least obligate the country to avoid doing anything that would directly violate the treaty. But a few dozen countries still haven’t even signed it. And the countries that have signed it vary widely in the level of progress they are making toward ratification. A country is not obligated to fully obey the CRPD until after they ratify it.

Disability communities around the world–and their families and the service providers who work with them–are working together to persuade their governments to ratify. The global grassroots organization RatifyNow is one example, but there are also many local efforts. Advocates who are new to the process have an increasing number of toolkits they can use to help them figure out how to get started. One of these resources is Disability Rights Convention Ratification Campaign Handbook (PDF format, 250 Kb).

The first part of this handbook explains what a human rights convention is and how the process for creating one works; presents the CRPD and its Optional Protocol in plain (simple) language; and answers some frequently asked questions such as “what rights are included”? and “how will it work?”

The second part explains how a country can ratify the CRPD and shares advice for how people can run an advocacy campaign. Perhaps the most valuable part of this section, at least for advocates who are new to writing letters to politicians or the wider community, are the sample letters they can use to help them figure out how to write letters of their own.

The third part of this handbook explains how advocates can reach out to the media; get media coverage for their campaign; prepare press releases; and prepare press conferences. This section includes a sample press release that advocates can use as a guide for writing their own. A Guide to Portraying People with Disabilities in the Media can be distributed to journalists as a way of encouraging them to write or speak about people with disabilities with repsect and accuracy.

Download the PDF file (250 Kb) at:

http://www.landminesurvivors.org/files/ConvHandbook_4-30.pdf

Advocates who have difficulty understanding legal terminology may be contented with the plain language version of the CRPD presented in this handbook. However, if you’d rather read the original, unaltered CRPD–i.e., the same text that government officials would be reading and deciding whether to ratify–then you can find the full CRPD at http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=12&pid=150. You will need to scroll down the page to choose your preferred language; the CRPD is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Russian, Chinese, Portuguese (Brazilian), Khmer, Croatian, Hungarian (in both the original translation and the easy to read version), Hungarian Sign Language, Persian (Farsi), Maltese, Dutch, Korean, Slovenia, and Turkish. Some translations are in PDF format, some are in Word format.

Want a quick background on the CRPD that you can read in a few minutes? Try the RatifyNow FAQ at http://ratifynow.org/ratifynow-faq/.

Find out if your country has signed or ratified the CRPD at http://www.un.org/disabilities/countries.asp?navid=12&pid=166

Also, a number of other toolkits and resources related to the CRPD have been featured at We Can Do in the past–see a list of links to relevant We Can Do posts at https://wecando.wordpress.com/resources-toolkits-and-funding/#CRPD%20resources. Especially helpful might be the Ratification and Implementation Toolkits from Disabled Peoples International, available in English, Spanish, and French.

Find an even more extensive collection of links to resources on the CRPD and disability rights at the Disability Rights Fund Resource page.



Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Statement on the Millennium Development Goals and Disability, from the Africa Regional Conference

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

THE STATEMENT OF THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE, HELD AT THE PANAFRIC HOTEL, NAIROBI, KENYA 15TH TO 17TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

We, the 200 delegates of the Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference from the, Central, Eastern, Northern, Western and Southern sub regions of Africa met in Nairobi, Kenya, at the Panafric Hotel on 15th to 17th September 2008, to examine the status of MDGs in respect to the inclusion and mainstreaming of disability;

And further to enhance the capacity of leaders from the disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in African countries;

Noting that MDGs have no specific reference to persons with disabilities and therefore their continued exclusion in the campaign processes, policies, planning, programmes and implementation;

Concerned also that disability has not been mentioned in the midway Millennium Development Goals Report;

Further acknowledging that the convention on the rights of PWDs has recently come into effect, to among other things strengthen the resolve for inclusion of people with disabilities;
We note with dismay the continued categorisation of people with disabilities as vulnerable which further marginalises us and consigns us to invisibility, we state that we wish to be recognised as actors in the development processes;

We Resolve As Delegates That We Shall;
• Communicate the outcome of this conference to our governments to review, prioritise and include issues of disability in their Country Statements during their high level meetings on MDGs in New York, in the September 2008 Summit
• Call on our Governments to move and support a motion during the UN General Assembly, calling for the establishment of a new UN Special Agency on Disability; to provide leadership, coordination, harmonisation and enhanced monitoring and reporting.
• Engage our Governments to ensure that People with Disabilities are protected from adverse effects from rising costs and related vulnerabilities and participate and benefit from existing social protection schemes
• Lobby Governments through the African Development Bank and related partners to establish an African Disability Equity Fund to support economic empowerment, entrepreneurship and business of people with disabilities
• Encourage the use of professional campaigners including goodwill ambassadors in promoting disability inclusion
• Recognise the efforts of parents, friends and guardians of people with disabilities and recognise them as part of the wider disability movement
• Uphold the principle of gender equity in disability
• Promote the use of positive language in reference to people with disabilities
We Urge The UN Through Member States;
• To establish a Specialist Agency on Disability in the league of UNICEF and UNIFEM to provide leadership and global accountability on matters related to the disabled people
• To prioritise include and partner with the disability movement in its entire millennium campaign initiatives and develop the strategies for doing so in the September summit
We Urge The AU And Related Bodies To;
• Set up a Disability Desk within all African regional bodies to monitor the implementation of both the convention and human rights violation of people with disabilities within the respective regions.
• Mainstream disability into their programmes and performance management systems
• Establish peer review mechanism and performance management system for disability in Africa
• Ensure political and social economic representation of people with disabilities in NEPAD and develop terms of reference for their participation.
• Work with DPOs to urgently review the structure and mandate of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)
• Extend the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities for another ten years by means of a proclamation by the meeting of the African Heads of State planned for January 2009
• Facilitate self- representation of PWDs in all commissions, Pan Africa Parliament and other structures

We Call On The Secretariat Of African Decade Of Persons With Disability to;
• Establish a programme to develop human resource capacity for policy analysis to act as a watch dog in monitoring disability inclusion
• Allocate responsibilities, roles and duties to the regional federations and other partners in order to ensure effective, well – monitored follow up and implementation strategies
We urge all Government to;
• Ratify, domesticate and implement the UN convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
• Work with DPOs in nominating the members of the panel of experts in convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
• Recognise DPOs as agents of change and therefore as partners in development planning and programmes
• Include people with disabilities and disability into their poverty reduction and development programmes
• Put into place affirmative action to enhance participation in political social and economic sectors
• Include disability data collection within the general national data collection systems recognising diversity in disability
• Use data to inform planning and service delivery and monitoring and evaluation
• Highlight and include disability in the existing MDG indicators in partnership with the disability movement.

We Call On Development Partners To;
• Prioritise disability as a tool for planning and analysis for development assistance and international cooperation in all their international cooperation and assistance (aid, debt relieve and trade)
• Include and consult people with disabilities and their respective organisations in planning, implementation, monitoring and reporting
• Include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes

We Resolve That As Disabled Peoples Organisations We Shall;
• Advocate to ensure that disability issues are mainstreamed in all government, UN agencies and development partners policies, plans and programmes particularly those related to MDGs
• Endeavour to understand the structures of various government, UN agencies and development partners with a view to engaging with them more effectively for full inclusion of people with disabilities
• Advocate development partners to include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes
• Engage and influence the social development process
• Participate in the Social Protection processes to ensure people with disabilities are included
• Advocate and lobby to be included in national poverty reduction strategies and other national development plans and initiatives
• Explore avenues of partnership with private sector in their economic empowerment programes
• Utilize our individual and collective capacity to cause the implementation of programmes related to the MDGs for the benefit of people with disabilities
• Build our own capacity to engage with our government on their commitments and agreement at national and international levels
• Ensure that whatever is agreed at regional or national workshops cascades downward to people with disabilities at the grassroots and rural areas
• Familiarise ourselves with the disability policies of different development agencies and ensure that they benefit us
• Strengthen our unity and common voice in planning, implementation and monitoring processes whilst at the same time recognising diversity in disability
• Restructure and reform our internal governance structures to adopt modern management and good governance systems and increase transparency and accountability to our members
• Nurture and mentor youth with disabilities into leadership succession plans and support them towards social economic empowerment
• Make a paradigm shift from the charity model to the human rights and social development model
• Strategically engage with media for both awareness and advocacy and built our capacity to engage with media
• Sensitise and capacitate the media to various disability needs and to urge them to be inclusive in their presentation and reporting
• Link with African Universities to promote evidence based disability research and to promote disability inclusive academic programmes
• Review through our Governments the Accra Development Plan of Action and cause its implementation for the benefit of PWDs in Africa

These resolutions are the outcomes of the conference, formulated and spoken by the delegates at this esteemed Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference.



This statement from the Africa Regional Conference was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

RESOURCE: International and Comparative Disability Law Bibliographic Web Resource

Posted on 24 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Policy & Legislation, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Until recent years, disability rights advocates, human rights lawyers, and other people who share an interest in comparing national and international laws related to people with disabilities faced challenges in finding the information they needed. But the task of looking up exactly what laws, constitutions, and international treaties say about people with disabilities around the world has become a little easier in the past few years.

One more resource has just been launched: The Syracuse University College of Law Disability Law and Policy Program, in conjunction with the H. Douglas Barclay Law Library, has developed a comprehensive bibliographic web resource on International and Comparative Disability Law. This resource is available at:

http://www.law.syr.edu/lawlibrary/electronic/humanrights.aspx

People interested in issues related to disability, laws, and policies in general can find more relevant resources at the new collection of resource links at the Disability Rights Fund web site:

http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/resources-reports.html#global_laws

Also see an earlier We Can Do blog post on the topic of researching laws, regulations, judicial decisions, and legal case summaries related to people with disabilities around the world: RESOURCES: Finding Disability-Related Laws and Policies.



I learned about the new on-line database at Syracuse University via Joan Durocher, and also via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

NEWS: Disabled People in China Face Discrimination, Says Human Rights Watch

Posted on 12 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

China has made progress in confronting discrimination toward people with disabilities–but significant problems remain, Human Rights Watch recently told the media. Human Rights Watch is a major international organization that monitors the status of human rights around the world.

Sophie Richardson, a representative of Human Rights Watch, praised China for creating laws that protect people with disabilities and for ratifying the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). But the Human Rights Watch website reports her as saying, “So far these protections have meant little to persons with disabilities and their advocates in China who struggle to promote their rights and, in particular, to fairly compete for employment.”

Also according to the Human Rights Watch website, their organization has called upon the Chinese government to ratify the Optional Protocol that accompanies the CRPD. The Optional Protocol can help strengthen the CRPD by giving citizens the option of pursuing justice at the international level if they are unable to address human rights abuses domestically. The Human Rights Watch also has called on China to remove restrictions that make it harder for grassroots organizations to help people with disabilities.

Read the full story on what Human Rights Watch says about the human rights situation for people with disabilities in China at:

http://hrw.org/english/docs/2008/09/04/china19751.htm

Learn more about the CRPD by reading the RatifyNow FAQ; or learn more about the Optional Protocol.



Several people helped alert me to this news story including Diana Samarasan, Joan Durocher, and Catherine Townsend.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

International Day of Persons with Disabilities, December 3, 2008

Posted on 11 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , |

[One of the most common kinds of announcements I post at We Can Do are events and conferences organized by a wide range of organizations and agencies. But this time, this is an event that YOU can help organize for YOUR country or local community.]

International Day of Persons with Disabilities – 3 December
2008 Theme: “Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Dignity and justice for all of us”.

Dignity and justice for all of us is the theme of this year’s International Day for Persons with Disabilities, as well as for the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Dignity and justice for all persons are established universal principles. Since its inception, the United Nations has recognized that the inherent dignity and the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family are the foundations of freedom, justice and peace in the world. These principles, along with equality and non-discrimination, have guided the work of the United Nations for the past 60 years and are enshrined in various instruments such as the UN Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as well as in treaties such as the International Covenants on Human Rights, and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. These instruments are among those which make up the international human rights framework, are complementary and reaffirm that all human rights are universal, indivisible, interrelated, interdependent and mutually reinforcing.

2008 is a significant year in the international human rights movement given the entry into force on 3 May of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol, legally binding instruments which set out the legal obligations of States to promote and protect the rights of persons with disabilities, as well as the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Article 25 of the UDHR provides that each person has “the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age, or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control”. Several articles in the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities expound on this right to security, including article 10 on right to life and article 14 on liberty and security of person. Article 28 is more specific in that it asks that States Parties take steps to safeguard and promote that realization of the right to an adequate standard of living and social protection, including ensuring “access by persons with disabilities and their families living in situations of poverty to assistance from the State with disability-related expenses, including adequate training, counselling, financial assistance and respite care”. These instruments mark a clear reaffirmation that persons with disabilities have the right to full and equal enjoyment of their human rights. They also mark a clear reaffirmation of the principles of ‘dignity and justice for all of us’.

Around 10 per cent of the world’s population, or 650 million people, live with disabilities. The Convention promotes and protects the human rights of persons with disabilities in civil, cultural, economic, political, and social life. However, all over the world, persons with disabilities continue to face barriers to their participation in society and are often forced to live on the margins of society. They are routinely denied basic rights such as to equal recognition before the law and legal capacity, freedom of expression and opinion, and the right to participate in political and public life, such as voting. Many persons with disabilities are forced into institutions, a direct breach of the rights to freedom of movement and to live in the community.
Eighty per cent of persons with disabilities – more than 400 million people – live in poor countries and there is a strong link between disability and poverty. For example, the statistics on employment for persons with disabilities are staggering. In developing countries, 80 per cent to 90 per cent of persons with disabilities of working age unemployed and in industrialized countries it is estimated to be between 50 per cent and 70 per cent. The rights to education and health are also routinely denied. Ninety per cent of children with disabilities in developing countries do not attend school, says UNESCO. Approximately 20 million women acquire disabilities as a result of complications during pregnancy or childbirth. This continued marginalization against persons with disabilities highlights the need for all States to sign, ratify and implement the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol.

The United Nations and the global community must ensure that all its work is inclusive of persons with disabilities. The Millennium Development Goals will not be achieved if persons with disabilities are not included. Efforts to achieve the MDGs and implement the Convention are interdependent and mutually reinforcing.

On this International Day of Persons with Disabilities, as well during the year-long celebration of the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, let us use “dignity and justice for all of us” as a rallying call, as these principles are far from being realized for everyone. Dignity and justice are embodied in the civil, cultural, economic, political, and social rights promoted by the Convention. Therefore, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities is a time to make a renewed commitment to the ratification and full implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol.

One of the fundamental obligations contained in the Convention is that national law should guarantee the enjoyment of the rights enumerated in the Convention. States Parties should thus consider the best ways of giving effect to the rights guaranteed by the Convention in domestic law. Implementing legislation should include the terms of the Convention or a specific reference to them, in order to indicate clearly that the laws should be interpreted in accordance with the letter and spirit of the Convention.

Legislation alone will not ensure that persons with disabilities can enjoy their human rights. States will need to formulate effective policies and programmes that will transform the provisions of the Convention into practices that will have a real impact on the lives of persons with disabilities. For persons with disabilities, as for all persons, the denial of one right can lead to the denial of other rights and opportunities throughout their lives.

Article 33 explains that States must set up national focal points governments in order to monitor implementation of the Convention’s precepts. States must also set up independent monitoring mechanisms, which usually take the form of an independent national human rights institution.

The full participation of civil society, in particular persons with disabilities and their representative organizations, is essential in the national monitoring and implementation process. International monitoring is achieved via the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Conference of States Parties. The first meeting of the Conference of States Parties will be convened by the Secretary-General no later than six months after the entry into force on 3 May 2008 of the Convention.

This International Day for Persons with Disabilities is a time to make a renewed commitment to these principles of dignity and justice and to ensure implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

All human beings are not only entitled to rights, but also have the responsibility of making universal human rights a reality for all of us.

The annual observance of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, 3 December, aims to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights and well-being of persons with disabilities. It also seeks to increase awareness of gains to be derived from the integration of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life. The theme of the Day is based on the goal of full and equal enjoyment of human rights and participation in society by persons with disabilities, established by the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons, adopted by General Assembly in 1982. The official title of the Day was changed from International Day of Disabled Persons to International Day of Persons with Disabilities by General Assembly resolution 62/127 on 18 December 2007.

How the Day may be observed
Involve: Observance of the Day provides opportunities for participation by all interested communities – governmental, non-governmental and the private sector – to focus upon catalytic and innovative measures to further implement international norms and standards related to persons with disabilities. Schools, universities and similar institutions can make particular contributions with regard to promoting greater interest and awareness among interested parties of the social, cultural, economic, civil and political rights of persons with disabilities.

Organize: Hold forums, public discussions and information campaigns in support of the Day focusing on disability issues and trends and ways and means by which persons with disabilities and their families are pursuing independent life styles, sustainable livelihoods and financial security.

Celebrate: Plan and organize performances everywhere to showcase – and celebrate – the contributions by persons with disabilities to the societies in which they live and convene exchanges and dialogues focusing on the rich and varied skills, interests and aspirations of persons with disabilities.

Take Action: A major focus of the Day is practical action to further implement international norms and standards concerning persons with disabilities and to further their participation in social life and development on the basis of equality. The media have especially important contributions to make in support of the observance of the Day – and throughout the year – regarding appropriate presentation of progress and obstacles implementing disability-sensitive policies, programmes and projects and to promote public awareness of the contributions by persons with disabilities.



The text for this announcement is taken from the United Nations Enable website.

In a developing country? Organizing activities for the local disability community? Please send announcements about your event to We Can Do at ashettle [at] patriot.net.

Understand the CRPD better by reading the RatifyNow FAQ on the CRPD.

Read more about past celebrations of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

Disability Awareness Action newsletter, Our Rights, Issue 2, August 2008

Posted on 3 September 2008. Filed under: Children, Cognitive Impairments, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Our Rights – issue 2, August 2008

DAA’s newsletter for Disability Lib.

In the interest of solidarity, this newsletter is sent around by email to disabled people and their organisations across the world, and we invite you to forward it freely. We have provided links to internet sites, web pages and video clips, but understand that not all links are technically accessible to all users. From October Our Rights will be available in electronic format and on our website. For our contact details follow this link http://www.daa.org.uk/

Contents
Welcome Hello from DAA
Disability LIB partners
• Central Office
ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth
Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Mind Politics
Stigma
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
Being an Un-Person
Sceptical about The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
60 years of UN Convention on Human Rights
Inclusion means … being given a £50 token?
International News
Canada says ‘go home’ to disabled child
Sex in the City, and world wide
From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
Sit-in at Nursing Home
And Finally …

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page
******************
Welcome Hello from DAA
Thank you to all of you who took the time to respond to our first issue. We are delighted to be back! We have had replies from around the world.

“I am very happy indeed to get the DAA Newsletter – this is one newsletter that I eagerly look forward to. The articles provided me with new insights and sharpen my understanding.”
“Great newsletter!”
“I access DAA website regularly and will disseminate DAA newsletter to all my contacts.”
“Have just read your first bulletin and I am impressed with its coverage.”
“thanks a lot for your nice news letter. Hope it can help my people in bangladesh.”

Thank you for all your comments. We have improved our technical set-up, so fewer newsletters should land in Junk or Spam email boxes. From October you can access the newsletter on our website. You can request picture supported and word versions. We continue to strive to make our articles interesting, relevant and accessible. Please let us know how we are doing. This edition has two main themes: the body politics of bio-ethics and inclusion. We will also tell you again who we are and what we hope to achieve. Enjoy!
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Disability LIB partners
The project has its own website and central office. www.disabilitylib.org.uk
Disability LIB
6 Market Road
London
N7 9PW
England UK
Telephone: 0844 800 4331
Email: contact@disabilitylib.org.uk

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
The Social Inclusion Campaign Award from the Sheila McKechnie Foundation was given to the director of ALLFIE, Tara Flood. Tara is also chair of DAA. Tara and the Alliance run a campaign ‘We know inclusion works’. This is in response to the negative reporting in the media. You are invited to send your stories about how inclusion works to info@allfie.org.uk

“Inclusion for me is about society, which respects the humanity of its people.” says a disabled young person in Nottinghamshire. “Inclusion happens when everyone feels appreciated and welcome to participate.”
Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education.

Inclusion is going to school with your friends. “I kept asking myself what words a mother would use to explain to her daughter why they did not want her at her school. Except that she was disabled. If my daughter had only been black, and not disabled too, would the school have been able to do the same?”
Preethi Manuel mother of Zahrah.

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth

The media reported that a nine-year-old girl called Lin was moving her lips, but did not actually sing at the opening of the Olympic Games in China. The beautiful voice we all heard was from a different girl, the seven year-old Yang Peiyi. Apparently Yang was not shown on stage nor on television, because she has crooked teeth. Her face and her smile were regarded as not photogenic enough, so she was hidden to avoid damaging China’s international image.

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Often we find disabled people are hidden, out-of-sight and at the margins of society. Society’s underlying cultural preferences in terms of the body and mind is for a particular image of beauty and health: a superficial one.

Our impairment difference is treated like a ‘stigma’, a characteristic that is deeply discredited within one’s society and for which we are rejected. Our difference, it seems, is challenging.

“I experienced a nervous breakdown 20 years ago. Despite recovering from that, then going on to achieve academically and build a good marriage, my family remain wary of me. My sister is bringing up her child to refer to me as “crazy”. She even considers it funny to do so. I have tried to express how hurtful I find this, but my feelings have been overlooked.”
7th August 2008, Guardian ‘Stigmatised by my own family’

In a unique research called ‘Shout’ almost 4,000 mental health service users were involved. The charity Rethink found that 87% of people said they had direct personal experience of stigma and discrimination and reported the negative impact of stigma on their lives.

The damage caused was wide-ranging; the areas affected include employment, family, friendships, neighbours, accessing education, reporting crime, relationships with health professionals, and feeling confident enough to visit the shops, go to the pub or take part in activities in the community, it says.
The Stigma Shout report can be found at http://www.rethink.org/how_we_can_help/campaigning_for_change/moving_people/stigma_shout.html

But this problem goes deeper. If a girl can be excluded for crooked teeth, where does it end? Our society allows science and law to de-select disabled lives.
For impairment reasons they tamper with genetics in an attempt to screen out difference. We have laws that allow late abortion because of so called ‘defects’.We allow bio-ethics to de-select impairment.

In 2004, UKCPD (formerly the British Council of Disabled People) asked “Can human rights apply if we select children or value people’s quality of life on the basis of their genetic make-up or impairment?” http://www.bcodp.org.uk/library/genetics/3disabhr.pdf
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/06/mentalhealth
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/07/mentalhealth.familyandrelationships

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
on last month’s theme: Forced Interventions
Being an Un-Person… (8’47’’)
“This is from a handout I gave while speaking at training for staff who work with people who have developmental disabilities. It is about what it means to be dehumanized and it applies to a far greater group of people than the original audience. It is, to make it clear, something that is done to us by other people, not something intrinsic to who we are.

Being an Un-person means that people talk in front of you as if you aren’t there… It means that your existence seems to fill people with disgust and fear. … If you communicate with behaviour, you will be punished, restrained, drugged or put in a behaviour program.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c5_3wqZ3Lk

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Sceptical
A sceptical view was expressed about the usefulness of the Convention. How does it protect the rights of people with mental health issues?

“My organization are skeptical on the UN Convention re Legal Intervention for people with mental health issues and the sense of disabled people being able to join the armed forces.”

For a discussion of how different Articles in the Convention can work together, go to page 47 in this 2007 publication: http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_WORDversion.doc
The text of Article 12 can be accessed at http://www.mindfreedom.org/kb/mental-health-global/united-nations/article-12-un

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
This year (2008) we celebrate 60 years of the United Nations Convention on Human Rights, the first international commitment on human rights.

A web campaign http://www.everyhumanhasrights.org/ urges us to embrace the values and goals of the Declaration. To protect the rights of our fellow global villagers and to encourage others to do the same in our communities, workplaces and schools. We are asked to affirm these principles:

“Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, lanaguage, relition, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.” Every Human has Rights

However, our rights as disabled people are not spelled out specifically. It makes no specific mention of the meaning of rights as disabled people. Our experience is that we are often invisible, excluded or forgotten. We are not always included into the general phrase of ‘human’ inhuman rights.

That is why we needed a specific convention and why we are campaigning for our countries to ratify the Convention of the Rights of Disabled Persons.

UN Convention text resources:
Details of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People can be found at
http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=12&pid=150
http://www.un.org/disabilities/convention/conventionfull.shtml
Easy Read version of the Convention
http://www.officefordisability.gov.uk/docs/international-agreement-rights-disabled-people.pdf
For Easy Read versions of the Convention’s extra agreements (Optional Protocols) go to
http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/convention/nz.htm
A child-friendly text of the Convention can be accessed at
http://www.unicef.org/Child_friendly_CRPD.pdf

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Inclusion means … being given a £50 gift token?
A grammar school in Lincolnshire, England, did not listen to a boy with Autism when planning and arranging the 11-plus entrance exam. Under the Disability Discrimination Act any barriers to learning have to be removed, for example by making alternative arrangements or providing reasonable adjustments.

His mother said: “We knew he would struggle with the change in surroundings. Our primary school head teacher suggested we ask if he could sit the test there, or at least in a room on his own. But when I went to the school I was told, ‘No, we don’t make any allowances’.”

As the barriers of unfamiliar surroundings, a crowded room full with unfamiliar people were not removed, the boy was extremely distressed and failed the exam.

The ombudsman Anne Seex said the school had not considered its duties under the Disability Discrimination Act.

The boy was admitted to another grammar school on the basis of his exam results at the end of primary school (called SATs) and his junior school’s recommendation.

The school has apologised, has given the boy a £50 gift token and agreed to handle future cases differently.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/lincolnshire/7542948.stm
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/article4460621.ece

International News

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Canada
Paul and Barbara-Anne Chapman had sold their home in Britain and bought a farmhouse in Nova Scotia, Canada. The local authorities supported and welcomed them.

However, when the family arrived at the airport a border guard refused them entry. Several questions were raised about their work permit, clearance for their black Labrador and about their daughter Lucy, who has Angelman syndrome.

The family claim they were told by a border guard that because Lucy is disabled she would never be allowed into the country, and that she had a lifetime ban.

Mrs Chapman said: “My dog was allowed to stay. My dog has a higher status than my daughter in Canada, just because she is disabled.”

Canada’s immigration rules in section 38 do have a clause that states that you are not eligible for immigration if you would make an excessive demand on health and social services. Presently, “excessive demand” is usually defined as exceeding $15,000 of publicly funded health care costs over the next 5 years. However, in certain family applications, children are exempt from this rule of no entry due to health care costs.

The Convention on the Rights of Disabled People places obligations on countries to protect disabled people’s rights and freedoms. This includes the right to free movement and residency.

Entry to one’s own country is specifically mentioned in Article 18 of the Convention: “Are not deprived, arbitrarily or on the basis of disability, of the right to enter their own country.”

Entry into another country is protected in Article 18, where it says that disabled people should “not be deprived, on the basis of disability, of their ability to obtain, possess and utilize … relevant processes such as immigration proceedings, that may be needed to facilitate exercise of the right to liberty of movement.”

Mr and Mrs Chapman hired a Canadian lawyer to fight the decision.

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=278
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/canada/2519496/Canada-refuses-entry-to-disabled-girl.html

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Sex in the City… and world-wide.
Research has shown that disabled people are being denied the choice to full sexual relationships.

“I want to meet a girl I can become friends with, take to the pub and the cinema and then after a couple of months see where it goes,” Joseph Greene, 23.

The national charity Family Planning Association FPA has organised an information and poster campaign about the right to have sex and relationships. FPA gives people information and advice about sexual health. This is particularly important in view of the continuing rise and impact of HIV (see reports below).

Easy Read, posters and campaign info at
http://www.fpa.org.uk/news/campaigns/current%5Fcampaigns/detail.cfm?contentid=1021
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7540103.stm
http://www.fpa.org.uk/products/learning_disabilities_publications/detail.cfm?contentid=1037

‘Let’s talk About Sex’ was launched in June 2008 for young people with life-limiting health conditions, in a bid to open up a taboo subject and to better support these young people to have the opportunity to experience relationships and explore their sexuality, in a safe, supportive and empathetic environment.
http://www.act.org.uk/content/view/153/1/

Our rights and dignity in connection with these personal areas are protected in the Convention. Article 23 of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People specifically refers to forming relationships and accessing age-appropriate information, reproductive and family planning education.

As part of their obligations, countries who have ratified the Convention, have a duty to develop and change customs or practices. This includes working towards a change in attitude towards disabled people and sex.

Article 4 of the Convention asks governments to develop or change customs and practices which contradict the rights. Community norms, customs and practices of what people believe or how professionals deal with disabled people may go against the ideals laid down in the Convention.

“What is acceptable in the community is for a disabled person to marry another disabled person so that together they share their curse”, says a disabled local councillor in Uganda.
http://www.disabilitykar.net/docs/stories_women.doc

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
On August 6th a very important international panel discussion took place. ‘Beyond Barriers: Disability and HIV/AIDS’ gave information about studies from across the world – Brazil, South Africa, Cameroon, and Canada.

Disabled people were found to be consistently more vulnerable to infection. People with learning difficulties and disabled women are often exposed to riskier situations; women in particular experience more unprotected sex than the general population, often as a result of sexual violence.

A researcher in Kwa Zulu-Natal, where there is no disability-specific sex education, encountered a “let sleeping dogs lie” attitude in schools. As a result, she found that disabled children had little access to education or legal protection and were more vulnerable to abuse and infection.

n Cameroon, a study focused on a young deaf population, found that sexual debut was on the whole earlier and riskier than in the general population.
http://eliminateaids.blogspot.com/2008/08/beyond-barriers-disability-and-hivaids.html

The Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV/AIDS is an advocacy tool for all Campaign partners and supporters. We invite you to download this printer-ready version in English, French and Portuguese to disseminate at your various meetings and conferences!
http://www.africacampaign.info/a-nos-lecteurs-francais/index.html
http://www.africacampaign.info/recent-publication/index.html
http://www.dcdd.nl/data/1208782834413_Kampala%20Declaration%20on%20Disability%20and%20HIVAIDS.pdf

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
This article argues that despite national laws and certain improvements towards disability rights, El Salvador has only made nominal progress in implementing disability legislation and awareness.

In the context of El Salvador’s twelve-year armed conflict, 70,000 individuals were killed and another 300,000 people were disabled as a result of war.

However, this estimate conflicts with official statistics released by the Ministry of Economy in August 2008. Jesus Martinez, Director of the Landmine Survivors Network-El Salvador is extremely uncomfortable with the results of this 2008 Census.

“It should include accurate and trustworthy statistics about all of the disabled individuals living in this country.” he says.

Disabled people need to be counted in order to be visible in policy action, planning and prioritisation. Article 31 asks countries to find out about disabled people. State parties need collect appropriate information, including statistical and research data, to enable them to formulate and implement policies, which make a reality of the rights in the Convention.

If the Convention marks “a paradigm shift” in attitudes and approaches, then disabled people are not objects that are being counted, but subjects, who have rights and freedoms. As a result of this shift in thinking, ratification of the Convention should also mark a shift in creating a more inclusive society in El Salvador.
http://upsidedownworld.org/main/content/view/1384/74/

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Sit-in at Nursing Home
Demonstrators organised a sit-in and called for closure of a nursing home in Philadelphia. “There is no justice for someone in a nursing home,” read a sign held by one of the demonstrators.

The group’s goal was to persuade Mayor Nutter to help find homes for 50 or so disabled residents over the next six months, then get out of the nursing-home business. They were successful! Details at:
http://www.adapt.org/ http://www.philly.com/philly/hp/news_update/20080818_Protesters_seek_to_close_Phila__nursing_home.html

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

And Finally …
Discrimination is a putrid shade of yellow
It tastes like stale vomit
It smells like rancid fish
Discrimination reminds me of corruption, anger and despair
And sounds like a hooded coward running scared
Discrimination feels like nobody cares …
Extract from Bipolar works blog, 2007

Thank you for your time.
We are pleased to hear from you.
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

Supported by the National Lottery through the Big Lottery Fund.



Thank you to Disability Awareness Action for giving open permission to disseminate and re-publish their newsletter.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

« Previous Entries

    About

    Ending poverty among and oppression toward disabled people in developing countries.

    RSS

    Subscribe Via RSS

    • Subscribe with Bloglines
    • Add your feed to Newsburst from CNET News.com
    • Subscribe in Google Reader
    • Add to My Yahoo!
    • Subscribe in NewsGator Online
    • The latest comments to all posts in RSS

    Meta

  • The Mwanza Computer Literacy Project

    The Mwanza Computer Literacy Project

    The Tusaidiane Disabilities Resources and Charity Organization of Tanzania (TDRCT) would like to improve computer literacy and self-employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Mwanza, Tanzania, and promote their empowerment.

    This organization is run by people who themselves have disabilities. I have known the man who founded this organization for some years. If his organization can quickly raise $5000 from 40 donors within a few days, then GlobalGiving will feature their organization on its website. This will enable them to attract more prospective funders. I have made a donation to them, I hope others will consider doing the same.
    Give Now


    Site Meter

  • Help the U.S. Ratify the Disability Treaty!

    Image of an hour glass overlaid on image of the Capitol building in DC. Text says, "Time is running out! Now is the time for the Senate to Act! Ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities! www.disabilitytreaty.org #CRPD

    Learn why the CRPD matters and how to take action at www.disabilitytreaty.org!

  • Subscribe!

  • Bookmark and Share
  • Translate!

  • Connect to Andrea Shettle via Linked In

  • Archives

  • Topic Categories

  • Make WeCanDo Your “Favorite”

  • Stumble Upon It!

    Stumble It! Share this blog with other readers via "Stumble Upon"!
  • Follow We Can Do in Facebook!

  • We Can Do is in the GDRL!

  • Blog Stats

    • 716,310 hits
  • Map of Visitors

    Map
  • Meta

  • Facebook Networked Blogs

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: