JOB POST: Research Assistant for AFrican Policy on Disability and Development

Posted on 10 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Vacancy – Research Assistant Position for African Policy on Disability and Development (A-PODD)

Application Deadline: 13 March , 2009

A-PODD has a Research Assistantship position for 1 Year, and the candidate has to be from Sierra Leone. We seek a person with experience in researching disability issues for the above position. The project is housed at the Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and the Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin and The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disability, being other partners.

The Research Assistant should have a degree in a relevant social or health science, or evidence of operating at an equivalent level. The Research Assistant will be considered for fully-funded registration for a Masters in Research at Stellenbsoch University. Limited travel to South Africa will be required, with the Research Assistant based in Sierra Leone.

This is a re-advertisement as only two applicants with the relevant qualifications have been shorted listed. We need 3 interviewees so that we have a wide selection. The teleconferencing interview will take place on the 19th April 2009. People with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Project Description
A-PODD is a three year project funded by the (Irish) Health Research Board and Irish Aid. A-PODD is led by Prof Mac MacLachlan, Centre for Global Health and School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin; Ms Gubela Mji, Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and Mr A.K. Dube, The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disability.

This research investigates how disability can be put on the agenda of national and international development initiatives. It focuses on how research evidence can be utilised to inform the policy environment (such as PRSPs and SWAps), development institutions (such as the IMF, World Bank and WHO), as well as less formal local, community and grass-roots decision making and inclusion efforts.

A-PODD will undertake four country case studies: in Sierra Leone, a country emerging from conflict that resulted in many people being disabled; Malawi and Uganda, the only two African countries that have Ministries for people with disabilities; and Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Africa, with significant geographical barriers and a highly dispersed population, presenting significant challenges to the inclusion of people with disability.

Our comparative analysis will inform disability policy and implementation within the region. Barriers and facilitators will be identified along implementation pathways, and so too will local means and mechanisms of addressing these. Country reports will be discussed at a concluding workshop to which governments, civil society, donors, researchers and others will be invited. A code of best practice will be drawn up for Moving Evidence to Action on African Disability Policy.

Other collaborating partners on this project are:

International Partners:
Department of Psychology at Stellenbosch University
Southern African Federation of the Disabled
Ministry of Persons with Disabilities and the Elderly, Government of Malawi
Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa
South African Medical Research Council’s Cochrane Centre
SINTEF Health Research (Norway)
World Bank

Irish Partners:
Institute for Nursing Research, University of Ulster Law & Policy Research Unit, NUI Galway.
National Institute for Intellectual Disability, Trinity College Dublin
Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin.

Bursary
Research Assistants will be appointed in the range EUR8,000-10,000 (Euro)

Applications
Interested applicants should send
1) A statement of interest – 1 page
2) A Curriculum Vitae –
3) Contact details for at least two referees (at least one of which should be an academic).

For any quiries, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Please forward your application to:

Dr Tsitsi Chataika (Post doctoral Research Fellow)
E-mail: tchataika@sun.ac.za

Dr Tsitsi Chataika – Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Stellenbosch University
Tygerberg Campus
Faculty of Health Science
Centre for Rehabilitation Studies
African Policy On Disability and Development (A-PODD) Project
P.O Box 7505
Tygerberg, 7505
South Africa
Tel: +27 219389816 (office)
+27 7764085148 (Cell/Mobile)
Fax:+27 219146875



I received this job post announcement via the Disability-Research listserv.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24, 2009

Posted on 9 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I am re-posting the following announcement, partly as a reminder for people who wish to register but also to correct and clarify the instructions for registration:

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24

Posted on 4 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, accessibility, Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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NEWS: Disability Inclusion in Poverty Reduction Strategy in Mozambique

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Case Studies, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note from We Can Do editor: Many developing countries are required to develop a “Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper” (PRSP) as a condition for receiving debt relief from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). This strategy paper is meant to describe how the country will reduce poverty among its citizens. A country’s PRSP can have a profound impact on the policies and programs it implements to fight poverty. But not all PRSPs are fully inclusive of people with disabilities. This can mean they are left behind while others are gaining new opportunities to lift themselves out of poverty. Rosangela Berman Bieler, at the Inter-American Institute on Disability recently circulated the following email on the mailing list for the Global Partnership on Disability and Development describing how people with disabilities were included in the process of developing the PRSP in Mozambique.]

by Rosangela Berman Bieler

Dear Colleagues:

This message is to share a brief report on the Inclusive Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper project in Mozambique, launched in January in Maputo. Our civil society counterparts in Mozambique are FAMOD (Forum of Disability Organizations) and Handicap International. Maria Reina and Deepti Samant of the Global Partnership on Disability and Development Secretariat also joint us for part of the mission.

During the mission, we could establish many alliances with local and international agencies and government officials. Among the various activities that we were involved, we had a very good and participatory DPO training with 25 leaders of FAMOD. Following the meeting, FAMOD is constituting a working group, composed by civil society organizations, to follow up on country Projects like the FTI on Education for All, the Mozambique Tourism Anchor Program (IFC), School Health (MoE), HIV-AIDS and other possible entry points.

We also had a presentation meeting for general stakeholders, held at the World Bank Office in MZ. The activity was a success – full house and many potential partners from all sectors, very interested in working with inclusive approaches for the next cycle of the Country’s poverty reduction plan that may follow the current PARPA, finishing in 2009.

Besides other Inclusive PRSP training and activities to be held in MZ during 2009, we are also planning with GPDD, an International Seminar on Accessibility and Inclusive Tourism in Maputo, in June, and we are looking forward to be able to work in alliance with all the agencies working in the field as well. Inclusive approaches in Tourism can generate local accessibility and development for those who live in the country. Mozambique can really benefit from such an initiative.

In the field of Education, we are very excited with the possibility of having the local NGOs and Networks – such as the Education for All Network that accompanied us during the events – to interact and influence the school construction that will happen now, for the FTI, to make sure they are built accessible.

We are also working in synchrony with the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities, that will go on until 2019. It is possible that MZ hosts the launching of the African Campaign on HIV-AIDS and Disability in October. There are two major FAMOD projects going on in the field and hopefully this can also generate good mainstreaming opportunities.

Our plan is to involve other Portuguese Speaking Countries in most of these activities, as language is on other important cause of exclusion from participation. Hopefully Development Agencies working in other Lusophone countries in Africa (Angola, Cape Verde, Guiné Bissau, Sao Tomé and Prince), and also in East Timor, will be able to partner with this initiative and facilitate this process as well.

All the best,

Rosangela Berman Bieler
Inclusive Development Specialist

Inter-American Institute on Disability & Inclusive Development
– Doing our part on the construction of a society for all –

Rosangela Berman Bieler
Executive Director
Inter-American Institute on Disability & Inclusive Development
Website: www.iidi.org

[Another Note from We Can Do editor: People who wish to learn more about the PRSP process, and how it can be more inclusive of people with disabilities, are encouraged to consult the on-line manual, “Making PRSP Inclusive” at http://www.making-prsp-inclusive.org/]



I received Rosangela Berman Bieler’s note via the GPDD mailing list.

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JOB Post: Education Specialist, Fast Track Initiative, World Bank

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Education, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ob # 090252
Job Title Education Spec.
Job Family Education
Location: Washington, DC
Appointment International Hire
Job Posted 17-Feb-2009
Closing Date 03-Mar-2009
Language Requirements
English [Essential]
Appointment Type Term (Duration: 2 yrs)
Background / General description
THIS IS A 2 YEAR TERM POSITION WITH POSSIBLE EXTENSION TO 3 YEARS.
To apply go to http://extjobs.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64273552&piPK=64273556&theSitePK=1058433&JobNo=090252&order=descending&sortBy=job-req-num&location=ALL&menuPK=64262364

The Fast Track Initiative (FTI) is a global partnership launched in 2002 to accelerate progress toward the Millennium Development Goal of universal quality primary education by 2015. All low-income countries which demonstrate serious commitment to achieving universal primary completion can receive support from FTI. The FTI is a high visibility and politically sensitive aid platform which currently provides technical and financial support to over 50 countries, with the majority in Africa. The FTI provides direct financial support to countries with endorsed education sector plans through a multi-donor Catalytic Fund which currently has over $1,400 million in commitments through 2009, making it the second largest source of financing for basic education in low income countries. It will also provide support to conflict-affected and other fragile states through the recently created Education Transition Fund managed by UNICEF. The FTI Partnership is supported by a Secretariat housed in the World Bank in Washington, DC.

Duties and Accountabilities
The Education Specialist will provide support to countries developing education sector plans and programs to reach the most vulnerable populations who constitute the majority of out-of-school children. S/he will also work with FTI Secretariat Staff, FTI partners, country donors, civil society organizations and the World Bank to provide substantive input and technical support on a range of education and development topics such as improving quality/learning outcomes; fragile states; strengthening in-country processes; donor harmonization; improving gaps in policy, financing, data, and capacity development; and FTI’s response to HIV/AIDS, gender, and disability issues. S/he will report to the Head of the FTI Secretariat and support and collaborate with the FTI Secretariats’ Senior Education Specialists who lead FTI’s work on learning outcomes and country level processes. Specific responsibilities will include:
1. Out of School/Vulnerable Children Coordinate partnership planning and processes to address key constraints for vulnerable populations to achieving the education MDG.
• Assist in designing, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating a targeted outreach program to reach the populations most at risk of not benefiting from EFA/FTI programs.
• Develop a results framework for working with vulnerable populations. Develop and monitor indicators and activities linked to specific marginalized populations (gender, poverty, rural/urban, disability, and child labor).
• Provide background research on education and development policies as appropriate.
• Strengthen the policy dialogue within the FTI partnership by researching the donor partners’ statements on policy (user fees, language of instruction, disability, gender, etc.) and identifying common principles and shared understandings.
• Liaise with the Interagency Task Team on HIV/AIDS and education and strengthen mechanisms to ensure that this collaboration between education and HIV/AIDS is brought down to the country level.
• Represent the FTI Secretariat on the INEE Working Group on Education and Fragility

2. Country Focal Point Serve as focal point for a select number of FTI endorsed and potential countries.
• Act as first line of contact for all FTI communications with coordinating agency.
• Provide and seek information on ESP development and implementation, including FTI trust fund issues, application procedures, and key events such as joint annual reviews.
• Ensure tools such as the capacity development, inclusion/equity, HIV/AIDs, School Health are utilized when LDGs are developing their ESPs.
• Conduct the FTI Secretariat’s support and advice on ‘Light Touch’ review of ESPs prior to endorsement.
• Monitor and provide guidance to fragile states as they progress through the single entry process.

3. Learning Outcomes Support the FTI Secretariat and Partnership’s work to develop its work plan and activities on learning outcomes within the FTI partnership.
• Provide research and other support for the FTI task team on education quality.
• Provide support for the coordination of partnership planning and processes for measuring learning outcomes in FTI countries.
• Assist in communicating with country Local Education Groups/Coordinating agencies (CA) to gauge interest in their participating in international assessments of learning/quality.

Selection Criteria
• Education: An advanced degree in education or related fields.

• A minimum of 5 years of relevant experience working in the education sector.

• Strong knowledge of and commitment to the principles and procedures of the FTI.

• Knowledge of fragile states policies and financing mechanisms.

• Demonstrated knowledge of and experience in the use of education data, and social and institutional research analytical tools.

• Knowledge of education operations in the World Bank or other major donor or UN agencies.

• Experience with dialogue with government and other partners, including bilateral donors, multilateral organizations, and NGOs.

• Proven ability to work with peers, managers, and a diverse range of partners including donors, civil society groups, governments, and academic institutions.

• Ability to work well in a small team, operate under pressure, deliver high quality work within deadlines, and meet team objectives.

The World Bank Group is committed to achieving diversity in terms of gender, nationality, culture and educational background. Individuals with disabilities are equally encouraged to apply. All applications will be treated in the strictest confidence.

To apply go to http://extjobs.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64273552&piPK=64273556&theSitePK=1058433&JobNo=090252&order=descending&sortBy=job-req-num&location=ALL&menuPK=64262364



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD) mailing list. For other jobs at the World Bank, consult the World Bank Employment page. Most jobs at the World Bank are not disability related, but a few are.

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Conference on Accessible Transportation and Tourism, March 24-25, 2009, New Delhi, India

Posted on 5 February 2009. Filed under: accessibility, Announcements, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Opportunities, South Asian Region, universal design, Urban Development | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Svayam — an initiative of SJ Charitable Trust, has the pleasure of inviting you to a Conference on Accessible Transportation and Tourism scheduled on the 24th & 25th March 2009 at New Delhi, where in besides Indian speakers & participants, renowned international experts on BRT and Accessibility issues like Mr. Tom Rickert, Mr. Jamie Osborne and Prof. Lalita Sen will share their expertise. [Note: Application deadline March 15, 2009.]

While Mr. Tom Rickert will shed light on International Trends and BRT Guidelines of the World Bank, Prof Lalita Sen takes you on Travel Chain, Pedestrian Infrastructure and Tourist Market. Jamie Osborne an engineer, transit planner and accessibility specialist by profession will take the participants through Obstacles as seen by a Tourist followed by case study of How San Francisco Provides Accessible Transit to Tourists. His keen interest in inclusion and structural inequality processes in transportation and urban planning in the developing world will be of great importance to the urban and transit planners.

Date & Venue:

24 & 25th March 2009 from 09.30 – 05.30 on both days

Casuarina Hall, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road, New Delhi, India

Intended participants:

The conference would be of special interest to Students of Architecture and Design, Town Planners, Key Officials from the Ministry of Transport and Tourism, Urban Development, Academic & Research Institutions/Organisations in Transport, Design & Tourism, DPOs from the Ageing and Disability Sector, Stake holders from private sectors like Transport Manufactures, Hotel Industry, Travel trade etc.

This would enable them to gain the right perspective of inclusive and universal design and incorporate it in their current & future projects/studies/ research and plan access strategies and advocacy initiatives.

Register Now
Participation is by invitation only, therefore; interested participants may register themselves at the earliest and latest by 15th March 2009 by filling the Registration Form, and sending a mail to subhash.vashishth@jindalsaw.com or kavita.agrawal@jindalsaw.com with a copy to svayam.jsw@gmail.com to get their confirmation. For any further inquiries, please contact: 9811125521 (Mr. Subhash C. Vashishth) or 9811736115 (Ms. Kavita Agrawal).

Registration Fee:
Rs. 100/- per participant, payable at the venue

Accommodation and Travel Arrangements: Participants will have to make their own arrangements.

Warm regards

Subhash Chandra Vashishth

Program Coordinator – Svayam
Jindal Centre, 12 Bhikaiji Cama Place, New Delhi – 110066
Board Numbers: +91 (11) 26188360-74, Direct: 41462323
Mobile: 9811125521, Fax: (+91 (11) 26161271, 26170691

email: subhash.vashishth@jindalsaw.com, subhashvashishth@gmail.com

Web: www.svayam.com



I received this announcement via the Asia Pacific Disability email discussion group, in which participants exchange information related to disability issues in the Asia Pacific region.

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World Bank International Essay Competition 2009: Climate Change (with Photo and Video Competitions)

Posted on 19 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Nominations or Applications, Call for Papers, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Events and Conferences, Fellowships & Scholarships, Funding, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The World Bank International Essay Competition 2009: Climate Change
[Also video competition and photo competition, with smaller prizes.]

[Note to We Can do readers: although this competition is not targeted specifically at disability issues per se, it could be an opportunity for talented young people with disabilities to consider competing. It also could be an opportunity for any young person with an interest in disability issues to consider how people with disabilities might be impacted differently from other people by climate change and how these challenges can be addressed.]

Open to youth ages of 18 and 25, from all countries of the world. Prizes range from US$200-US$3,000 for winning entries. Deadline to enter: February 22, 2009.

WANTED: The Next Generation of ‘Green’ Entrepreneurs

Climate change has been identified as one of the biggest global threats of our time. Scientists agree that global warming and extreme climate phenomena can be increasingly attributed to human activity – in particular, heavy emission of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, resulting from industrial processes.

Solutions to those pressing problems could lie in the rapidly growing ‘green economy’: environmentally sustainable enterprises, technological innovations (new sources of clean, renewable energy), energy efficiency measures, economic incentives for low-carbon choices, etc. How can youth contribute?

The Essay Competition 2009 invites youth to share ideas on:

How does climate change affect you?
How can you tackle climate change through youth-led solutions?

Please answer both questions:

1. How does climate change affect you, your country, town or local community? How do you think it will affect you in the future? Think about the consequences for employment, health, security and other areas of your life.

2. What can you do, working together with your peers, to address the problem of climate change in your country, town or local community? Think specifically about the role of youth-led initiatives in the ‘green economy’.

The International Essay Competition is open to all young people, students and non-students alike, between the ages of 18 and 25, from all countries of the world.

If you are older than 18 and younger than 25 on June 15, 2009, you are eligible to participate.

This year for the first time the Essay Competition also invites the submission of short videos and photos!

SUBMIT your entry.

February 22 – Deadline for submissions

Awards:

1. Essay
Eight finalists will participate in the Final Jury in Seoul, South Korea, in June 2009, and attend the Annual Bank Conference on Development Economics (ABCDE).
Money awards:
1st prize: 3,000 USD
2nd prize: 2,000 USD
3rd prize: 1,000 USD

2. Video
Author of the winning video will be invited for a screening at the occasion of the Annual Bank Conference on Development Economics (ABCDE), held in Seoul, South Korea, in June 2009.
Money awards:
1st prize: 2,000 USD
2nd prize: 1,000 USD
3rd prize: 500 USD

3. Photo

Money awards:
1st prize: 500 USD
2nd prize: 300 USD
3rd prize: 200 USD
Winners of the photo competition do not travel to the ABCDE Conference in South Korea, but will have their photos featured in the Essay Competition Summary Report, on the website of the Essay Competition and partner organizations’.

More details, including how to submit essays, at the official web site for the World Bank 2009 Essay Competition at http://www.essaycompetition.org/



I received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email news distribution list.

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Call for Papers, World Bank Conference on Employment and Development, Bonn, Germany, May 4-5, 2009

Posted on 18 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Employment, Events and Conferences, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This conference is not specifically focused on disability issues, but it could be an opportunity for presenters to submit proposals that introduce a disability dimension to the issue of Employment and Development. People interested in attending may wish to monitor the conference website to see how many sessions focus on disability issues. People who would need disability-related accommodations should contact the conference organizers directly to inquire.

Call for Papers – Fourth IZA/World Bank Conference on ‘Employment and Development’
Bonn, Germany
— May 4-5, 2009

Dear Colleagues,

In many developing countries, the number of workers facing unemployment, low pay and poor working conditions is high and often growing. Policy makers everywhere are searching for answers, yet significant knowledge gaps persist in our understanding of the functioning of labor markets in low and middle income countries.

The World Bank has put forward a strategy that aims at assisting the international research community to address priority areas in the field of labor markets and development. In 2006, the World Bank and the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) have launched a new IZA research area on “Employment and Development.” At the core of this partnership are the series of international annual conferences to provide a platform to bring together researchers and policy makers from around the world to discuss and present their work in these priority areas.

IZA and the World Bank will organize a two-day conference in Bonn, Germany on 4-5 May 2009. Parallel sessions will be organized. Conference organizers invite you to submit your contribution by December 15, 2008. Decisions will be made by the end of January 2009.

We invite submission of papers on labor markets, job creation and labor market policies in developing countries. We will consider detailed abstracts, but will favor full papers – particularly empirical ones – that focus on one of the 7 topics of research listed at: http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/research/ra7/index#topics
Papers dealing with developed countries and transitions economies are welcome if they prove to be relevant for the purpose of the conference and our understanding of labor market mechanism for the developing world.

The keynote speakers and panel sessions will focus on the topic of “Causes and Consequences of Formality and Informality”.

Keynote Speakers:
Gary Fields, Professor of Labor Economics, Cornell University
Santiago Levy, Vice President for Sector and Knowledge at the Inter-American Development Bank

For more information on this event, please refer to the conference website at:
http://www.iza.org/conference_files/worldb2009

The online application form is available at:
http://www.iza.org/conference_files/formApplication?conf_id=1642

Previous IZA/World Bank conferences have attracted prestigious researchers and policymakers from a wide variety of developed and developing countries (see the above link for details).

Organizers: Markus Frölich (University of Mannheim and IZA), Randall Akee (IZA), Jean Fares (World Bank) and Stefano Scarpetta (OECD and IZA)

Please do not hesitate to contact the organizers at development@iza.org for any questions regarding this event



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list

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Are Development Programs Achieving Disability Inclusion? If Not, What Next?

Posted on 4 September 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Reports, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

We cannot put all the world’s children into school, or eradicate global poverty and hunger, or stop the spread of HIV/AIDS, until and unless mainstream international development programs proactively include people with disabilities. The good news is that a slowly growing number of international agencies and organizations have written policies declaring their support for disability inclusion, otherwise known as disability mainstreaming. These include, as a few examples, the US Agency of International Development (USAID); the World Bank; The Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD); and the UK Department for International Development (DFID).

But, how well do these nice-sounding policies translate into practice? Do these programs actually reach poor people with disabilities in developing countries, or improve the quality of their lives, any better than before they wrote these policies? One DisabilityKar publication explores this question: Has Disability Been Mainstreamed into Development Cooperation? (Word format, 921 Kb)

One of the conclusions of this report is that the question is harder to answer than you might think: even the definition of what makes a “policy” a “policy” is apparently not always as obvious as it might seem. Then there are even trickier concepts to define, such as “inclusion,” “mainstreaming,” and “disability.” But ultimately the answer is mostly disappointing. Apart from some limited progress, many policies fail to go beyond pretty words on a page into pragmatic action in the field. If they are implemented, it is more or less haphazardly.

This conclusion in itself will probably not be especially new to close observers of the development field. What makes this study interesting, however, is that it is one of the few attempts to formally document what it terms a “disconnect between promise and results.” More importantly, it makes an attempt to answer why this disconnect happens, and what committed organizations can do to ensure that disability-friendly policies are carried out in practice. The study was published in July 2005, so some information has changed since then. But many of the underlying challenges are likely still similar today. Organizations and agencies that are serious about disability inclusion may wish to review this study with their own policies and practices in mind and consider ways they can help close the gap.

Has Disability Been Mainstreamed into Development Cooperation? (Word format, 921 Kb) analyzes policies and practice at USAID, the World Bank, NORAD, and DFID. The most common reason why disability inclusion policies fail include: lack of institutional support; failure to communicate policies; failure to break down traditional attitudes toward disability; failure to provide practical guidance in how to implement the policies; and inadequate resources.

Download the full 107-page report in Word format (921 Kb) at:

http://handicap-international.fr/bibliographie-handicap/4PolitiqueHandicap/mainstreaming/MainstreamDevCoop.doc

People interested in the DisabilityKar report may also be interested in reading a study of US-based organizations with an international focus on the extent to which they proactively include the concerns of women and girls with disabilities in their programs. This study, entitled Gender And Disability: A Survey of InterAction Member Agencies: Findings And Recommendations on Inclusion of Women and Men with Disabilities in International Development Programs (PDF format, 286 Kb), explores both policies and practice in dozens of relief and international development agencies and organizations. It also includes recommendations for how mainstream organizations can move forward in promoting genuine disability inclusion. Published by Mobility International USA, it is a few years older than DisabilityKar’s study, but covers more organizations and includes a gender focus as well as a disability focus. It can be downloaded in PDF format (286 Kb) at:

http://www.miusa.org/publications/freeresources/media/genderdisabilityreport.PDF



I discovered DisabilityKar’s study by exploring Handicap International’s new, on-line, free CD on Disability Rights and Policies. I encourage readers to explore the on-line CD on their own to find more publications and resources of interest. I first learned of MIUSA’s publication when I took my first course in international development and disability a few years ago at Gallaudet University.

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News from Kyrgyzstan: Projects, Laws, Funding Opportunities

Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Families, Funding, Human Rights, News, Policy & Legislation, Uncategorized, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following newsletter was sent to We Can Do from Kyrgyzstan–thanks to Azat Israilov for passing this on. This contains news about projects for people with disabilities in Kyrgyzstan; a new law protecting the rights of people with disabilities; the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and announcements for a couple of funding opportunities. Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

We are for equal possibilities and better future!
INFORMATIONAL BULLETIN

The newsletter is published under the Health Prom project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund

July 2008
Content:
Letter from A.Israilov, national in-country project manager
Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Brief information about participants of the project
HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Young people: new horizons!
President signed the Decree “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The new law about social order accepted
Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for
people with disabilities

Projects on employment for disabled people
The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Grants

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Dear readers, colleagues and partners,

We welcome you on the pages of the first issue of the Informational bulletin which is published under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund. The important aims of the bulletin will be providing news that are related to children with special needs and their families, and also updating on the progress of the project. The bulletin will be published and distributed once a quarter. At the same time neither the project, nor the bulletin will be involved in political processes in the country. In the first issue you will find some information on the project, its participants and also learn about
some latest events in social sphere of Kyrgyzstan.

It is hoped that the bulletin as a specialist publication will continue its existence beyond the project, and will become a useful source of information for parents and concerned organizations and people. And to become so we will be delighted to publish your interesting news and helpful information which you would like to share with.
Sincerely,
A.Israilov, national in-country project manager

“Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”
Contacts: Bishkek, m/r Kok-Zhar, h. 1, p/p 4, Tel./fax (0312) 517634, aisrail@gmail.com

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Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Charitable organisation HealthProm, located in London, UK, together with the Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI) and Public Association “Shoola Kol” has started a project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in the Kyrgyz Republic” funded by the Big Lottery Fund. The project is for three years and will help to establish two rehabilitation and resource centres in two pilot localities – Bishkek and Issyk-Kul oblast with Bokonbaevo v. as a centre. The project aims to improve on improving health and well-being of young children with disabilities and their parents through rehabilitation services, informational support and consultations. The project will not be involved in politics.

Prior to the project beginning there were study visits and research done during which the distress of people with disabilities, especially children, was revealed, whose families belong to the group with the lowest incomes in the country. According to the Ministry of Labour and Social Development, there are about 117 thousand people with disabilities in the republic now, out of them more than nineteen thousand are younger than 18, and 66% out of general number live in rural areas. The number of the disabled makes up 2,1% of the whole population while in the developed countries this figure varies approximately from 10 up to 20% (for example, in
the UK it is about 15%, in Russia up to 10%).

The project will fill the gap in knowledge and information resources in the Republic about prevention of disability, alternative approaches to child disability. Various trainings based on current needs will improve knowledge and skills of people with disabilities as well as of medical and social professionals. There will be developed or translated and published a number of necessary materials, and a specialised web site on disability issues will be created. A specialised microbus for each centre will connect experts and volunteers with disabled children and their families in the remote areas.

“The project focuses on sustainable development of our partners and the centres, and also on cooperation with local communities, non-governmental organisations and relevant local government agencies.” – underlines Tatyana Buynovskaja, the project manager. – “It includes programs on early intervention and providing advisory and practical support to new families with disabled children.” Tamara Dyikanbaeva, ARDI chairwoman, adds: “The project was developed taking into account the needs and wishes of parents and disabled children, considering provision of complex and versatile support to children and their parents. The project activity is based on social model of disability which recognises, that disability is not an illness (and in the developed countries it was recognised and accepted), and disabled people do not need pity and constant
guardianship, but need possibilities to study, work and communicate to become useful members of society”.

As a result of project activities it is planned to reach out about one and a half thousand parents of disabled children, and these children can participate in joint social events together with other children. It is expected in the end of the project the rehabilitation and resource centres in cooperation with local communities and government agencies will become vital for work with disabled children and their parents, and that this experience can be replicated in other regions.

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Brief information about participants of the project
Partner organisations responsible for implementing the project:

HealthProm – a charitable non-commercial organisation, based in London, works since 1984 with local communities for improving health and social support for vulnerable women and children in the countries of the former Soviet Union (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Russia, Uzbekistan, Ukraine, Tajikistan and recently in Kyrgyzstan). The primary activities of the organisation are social and medical projects. Recently HealthProm has successfully finished similar (to Kyrgyzstan) a 3-year project in Altay region of Russia. Local authorities immediately supported the initiative and provided premises and financing for two centres.

The Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI), Bishkek, established in 1995, gives advisory support to parents of disabled children, and also aspires to realise capabilities of disabled children and youth by their development and integration into society.

Public Association Shoola Kol, Bokonbaevo v. in Issyk-Kul region, is the human rights organisation and engaged in educational activity and raise public awareness. Shoola Kol also advises and educates people with disabilities and helps them establish NGOs for advancement of interests and rights of disabled people.

People who are involved in the project:
* Tatyana Buynovskaya – HealthProm manager, as well as the project manager “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund.
* Jonathan Watkins – senior project expert, social worker, consultant.
* Mark Hunter – child disability consultant, paediatrician.
* Azat Israilov – in-country project manager in Kyrgyzstan.
* Tamara Dyikanbaeva – Association of Parents of Disabled Children chair, project officer in Bishkek.
* Antonina Lee – Shoola Kol chair, project coordinator in Issyk-Kul region, Bokonbaevo.

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HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Under the project funded by the Big Lottery Fund HealthProm delegation of three people (see list above) have visited Kyrgyzstan for meetings with the representatives of government agencies and international and local non-governmental organisations. Between 11 and 23d May, 33 meetings took place in Bishkek and Bokonbaevo, one of them was an interview to the newspaper “Vechernij Bishkek”. In addition HealthProm representatives visited homes of families with disabled children. The results of these meetings will help partners to define the area of specialization for new rehabilitation centres. These centres will work in close interaction with local authorities and government agencies. Currently through consultations with local authorities and additional meetings there is a search for premises for the future centres as one of overall
project objectives is sustainability of the centres.

Young people: new horizons!
The youth of the Association of Parents of Disabled Children is becoming more active in public life of the country, and has also achieved some successes in education. In June this year Seinep Dyikanbaeva, project and PR manager of ARDI, has been named one of the first New Heroes of Kyrgyzstan for the positive contribution to the development of our society, a nomination organised by NGO “Atool” (Karakol). More detailed information can be found at: http://www.atuul.kg/?pid=19&hid=3. In addition, recently Seinep, a first year student of the American University in the Central Asia, has passed through a rigid competitive selection for a year training in Japan, sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA).

Ukei Muratalieva, another active young volunteer of ARDI, a student of the Kyrgyz Technical University, has been chosen together with other two Kyrgyz citizens for another training program on leadership and building networks, also sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA). She leaves for a month for Tokyo to learn how to train and at the same time to learn how local disabled people live and the organisations of disabled people work. After returning home she will conduct a series of trainings and seminars.
Best wishes to them!

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President signed the Law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
President of the Kyrgyz Republic has signed the law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”.

This law aims to improve social protection of persons with disabilities, provide them with equal with other citizens of the Kyrgyz Republic possibilities to practice their rights and freedoms, avoid restrictions in their lives.
Source: 24.kg, 12 April 2008

UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The General Assembly of the United Nations in the beginning of June, 2008 approved the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. It became the first universal international legal document aiming to protect the rights of persons with various kinds of permanent physical, mental, intellectual or sensor limitations. The convention contains 50 articles that protect and encourage the rights of the disabled, decrease discrimination towards them, provide them with rights to work, health services, education and full participation in society life, and also access to justice, inviolability of person, freedom from exploitation and abuse, and freedom of movement.
Source: 24.kg, 16 June 2008

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The new law about social order accepted
The law accepted in the second reading on 5th June this year intends to involve non-commercial organisations in realisation of government social programs through placing on a competitive basis and implementation the government social orders. This will also allow the government to essentially increase the efficiency of implementation of social programs and to involve in social sphere additional human, material and financial resources from non-government sources and it will partially reduce dependence of the non-governmental organisations on foreign funding.

The Minister of labour and social development of the Kyrgyz Republic Uktomkhan Abdullaeva supporting the law, underlined that “now in Kyrgyzstan, some social establishments, children’s homes, boarding schools, houses for aged people opened by the donor funding and the international organisations are on the verge of closing because of the termination of their financing by the foreign organisations. So why can’t we support the efforts of non-governmental organisations and public associations which will render social services to the
population and care for certain number of the aged, homeless children or the disabled who cannot be accommodated in the formal establishments now since there are no places or shortage of funds?”.

Similar laws has been successfully working for a long time in the countries of Europe, in Kazakhstan and 6 federal areas of Russia. Source:
Source: “The third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for people with disabilities
“The Japanese agency for international cooperation (JICA) plans to open in Kyrgyzstan a centre for people with disabilities”, – informed today at a press conference Uktomkhan Abdullaeva, the Minister of labour and social development of KR. According to her, there is the Asian-Pacific centre on problems of the disabled located in Japan. It is going to expand its activities in Central Asia. “After a working visit by Kyrgyz delegation to Japan it decided to open a head office in Kyrgyzstan for the countries of CA. It will bring to the republic additional investments. After the discussion of details of opening of the centre in October 2008 an international conference will take place in which well-known people with disabilities will take part”, – says Uktomkhan Abdullaeva.

As Minister of labour and social development KP emphasizes, such decision was affected by the new law “About the rights and guarantees of people with disabilities” recently passed by the government. “We have excluded articles from it that this category of people cannot work. Their number in workforce should make not less than 5 percent”, – said Uktomhan Abdullaeva.
Source: 24.kg, 22.05.08

Projects on employment for disabled people
We have to break the stereotype that disabled people are defective, said Edward Vinter, the executive director of Eurasia Foundation in Central Asia (EFCA). According to his words, disabled people in Kyrgyzstan are especially vulnerable group of population as being full members of society they simply cannot get a job. Many businessmen, in his opinion, are just confident that the disabled cannot work properly. In this regard, there are now some projects in Kyrgyzstan aiming to render assistance to disabled people in work search. In particular, the Eurasia Foundation in CA together with the Republican independent association of disabled women has
started cooperation with businesses of Bishkek and their management in granting workplaces for disabled people. There will also be a vacancy fair in Bishkek for people with disabilities.

Besides that, today the World Bank and EFCA declared winners of the Program of small grants of 2008 in Kyrgyzstan. “It is intended for the local organisations of a civil society. For 1996-2007 we have given out 121 small grants for a total sum of $315 thousand”, – said the chief executive of Fund Eurasia in the Central Asia Edward Vinter. Thirteen organisations have become winners.
Source: 24.kg

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The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
The Minister of Education and Science Ishenkul Boldzhurova presented a law providing such a grant recently at a committee meeting on international affairs and inter-parliamentary communications of the parliament of KR. She said, that in 2005 the ministry of education and science requested the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to support children with disabilities. “This project is supported by the Japanese Fund on reduction of poverty which will allocate $1 million, $50 thousands are provided by our government”, – added Ishenkul Boldzhurova.

The minister informed, that in the republic there are now about 19 thousand disabled children of which 250 children study at comprehensive schools in KR, in addition three thousand children study at the special boarding schools.

Ishenkul Boldzhurova noted that grant money will go on preparation of methodical manuals for schools and future teachers for training children with disabilities. According to her, for implementing the future project 35 comprehensive schools all over the country have already been selected – 5 in each region of the country, and also four boarding schools (internats) and two kindergartens.
Source: 24.kg, 15.04.2008

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Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Thanks to allocated 50 holiday vouchers by the Kyrgyzstan Federation of Trade unions the Association of Parents of Disabled Children organised on 4 – 25 July holiday for members of the Association, including 50 children ith special needs. Children’s recreational centre “Ulan” located near Balykchy accommodated them, and under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund transportation expenses for all children have been covered.

The recreational centre can accommodate about 250 people. Besides swimming on lake, there were joint cultural events organised for children, which promoted integration of disabled children with other children, and also promoted tolerance among their peers.

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Grants
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) (Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan) on behalf of the Canadian Foundation announces call for applications for small grants program for Central Asia.

The main areas: poverty reduction, sustainable development, increase participation of women, protection the children’s rights, capacity building for organisations, environment.

The maximum size of a grant is $20,000. The general grant pool is $50,000.

Projects should be short-term ending and presenting a financial report until 1st March 2009. For additional information please write to Anna Zhugan on: Anna. Zhugan@international.gc.ca

Bradley Foundation contests
Bradley Foundation supports: conducting annual events, holding conferences and seminars, purchasing equipment, general support, training, investments related to a project, publications, researches, stipends, development of educational programs.

Applications accepted: 1 March, 1 July, 1 September, 1 December each year.

The size of a grant: from $100 up to $550,000.

Priority areas of support: development of civic sense – projects can be aimed at any sphere of public life (economy, politics, culture, civil society), but they should advance citizenship to the bottom idea of elections and vote. For example, these can be projects showing increased public participation, political or academic research, media projects and others. Building projects and individuals are not financed.

Application procedure can be found at the Fund’s site. Results of selection appear in February, May-June, September and November, depending on application submission. More information can be found at: http://www.bradleyfdn.org/
Source: “the Third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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This newsletter sent to We Can Do by Azat Israilov. People who wish to receive future issues of this newsletter, in PDF format, via email should inquire by email at aisrail@gmail.com (NOT with We Can Do)

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JOB POST: Consultant, Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Posted on 19 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, signed languages | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Please note that this post gives information on two potential consulting positions: one for an international-level consultant for 15 days, the other for a national-level consultant for 30 days. Both consultants will work together for part of the project, but are being recruited separately. Please read all the information below carefully to ensure that you understand the nature of the project and the qualifications desired for each of the two positions so you can decide which of the two is best suited to your background. Please also note that all inquiries and applications should please be sent to the World Bank, NOT to We Can Do.

Deadline: September 12, 2008

Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project
INVIDIDUAL CONSULTING SERVICES
TF No. TF092635
Expressions of interest

The World Bank has received a “seed fund” from the Japan Social Development Fund toward the cost of preparing a Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project (“the Project”), and intends to apply part of the proceeds for consultant services. The services involve a short assignment to: (i) conduct community-based stakeholder consultations, and (ii) in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in the future Project proposal.

(The Project itself will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community. The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf. The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.)

The World Bank now invites eligible consultants to indicate their interest in providing the services. Interested consultants should provide information showing that they are qualified in the field of assignment and provide information on their technical and organizational capabilities.

A consultant will be selected in accordance with the procedures set out in the World Bank’s Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants by World Bank Borrowers (current edition).

Interested consultants may obtain further information at the address below during office hours (0900 to 1700 hours).

Expressions of interest must be e-mailed to jwaite@worldbank.org by September 12, 2008.

Deaf candidates are encouraged to express their interest in this assignment.

World Bank
Attn: Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist
63 Ly Thai To Street
Hanoi, VIETNAM
Tel: +84-4-9346600
Fax: +84-4-9346597
E-mail: jwaite@worldbank.org

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Vietnam: Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Stakeholder Consultation and Project Design: Terms of Reference
International Consultant Services

August 2008

Introduction
The World Bank has received a Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) “seed fund grant” to carry out stakeholder consultations, with a view to developing the detailed design of an Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project in Vietnam (hereafter “the Project”). This detailed design will form the basis of a proposal for a substantive JSDF Grant to finance the Project.

The World Bank intends to apply part of this seed fund to the hire of an international expert, who, in association with a national expert, will conduct the stakeholder consultations and, in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in a future Project proposal.

Background: deaf children’s development
Early childhood is the time of life when access to language models is crucial to the development of language and therefore to future learning. Deaf children rely on the sense of vision as their main channel of learning and communication. Only when young children who are deaf and their family members can use a shared language together will the child’s cognitive and social development proceed normally. The challenge is breaking through the communication gap with a visually supported language. Yet, worldwide, families with deaf infants and toddlers rarely have access to early education support. As a result, the deaf child’s development often suffers, leaving them at a major disadvantage in school and life.

Background: deaf education in Vietnam
In Vietnam, some 40,000 school-age children (i.e. aged 5 to 17) – or 18 out of every 10,000 – find it “very difficult to hear” (i.e. are severely deaf) or “impossible to hear” (i.e. are profoundly deaf). Almost all deaf children are born to hearing parents; for the most part, hearing parents (like hearing adults in general) have little awareness of the Deaf community, its language and its culture. As a result, young deaf children seldom come into contact with deaf adults (or even, until they start school, older deaf children).

In Vietnam, the provision of formal education to deaf youth began over 125 years ago, with an approach that used a sign language as the language of instruction. Despite this long and rich history, many deaf children still never go to school and those deaf children who do attend school often drop out before completing even Grade 5, with very few deaf youth receiving a secondary or tertiary education. Deaf children may attend special schools or mainstream schools. While special school classroom teachers are more likely than mainstream school classroom teachers to supplement their teaching with the use of signs (but generally not in a natural sign language mode), the dominant teaching approach is an “oralist” one that uses Vietnamese as the primary language of instruction.

IDEO Project concept
The Project will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf.

The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.

Consultant activities, outputs and timeline

Under this assignment, the Consultant will:

1. Produce an initial brief concept note to describe: (a) a range of options for Project activities to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) a range of options for Project implementation “civil society organizations” to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) describe the plan for stakeholder consultation under Activity 3. (Output: Brief concept note) [Timeline: Days 1 – 2]

2. Discuss and agree on this concept note with the World Bank supervisor. [Timeline: Day 3]

3. On the basis of the agreed concept note, consult with stakeholders (deaf associations, parents of deaf children, managers/teachers in schools catering specifically for deaf students, specialists addressing deaf education policy/practice/curriculum, NGOs involved with deaf education or disability support more generally) – in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and, if the schedule permits, Haiphong – to (a) determine appropriateness and feasibility of different Project activities, (b) establish appropriate beneficiary/geographical scope of the Project, and (c) identify appropriate civil society organizations (e.g. deaf associations, NGOs or a combination) to implement Project activities. [Timeline: Days 4 – 10]

4. On the basis of Activity 3 consultation, produce a concise report containing specific recommendations (for inclusion in the proposal for the Project) that describe inter alia (a) the range of Project activities, (b) the scope of the Project, especially in terms of target beneficiary age, target beneficiary numbers and target geographical areas, (c) the selection of civil society organizations to be invited to implement the Project, (d) the specifications of the on-going monitoring and evaluation framework (objectives, indicators, information collection, responsible entities, etc.) to assess Project performance throughout its various phases, and (e) the estimated costs of the Project (disaggregated by phase and expenditure category). (Output: Final report) [Timeline: Days 11 – 14]

5. Brief the World Bank supervisor on the findings of the consultation process and other relevant information, the contents of the report and the specific recommendations. (Output: Briefing) [Timeline: Day 15]

Consultant qualifications and experience

The Consultant will have:
 An advanced university degree in Deaf studies, education, social sciences or a related discipline, with expertise in Deaf education (preferably early child education);
 Substantial international experience in Deaf education, preferably in developing countries;
 Substantial international involvement with Deaf communities, preferably in developing countries;
 An understanding of natural sign language modalities, and preferably some knowledge of a natural sign language (especially a Vietnamese or historically related sign language [e.g. a Thai/Lao sign language, French sign language, American sign language]);
 Demonstrated capacity to organize and manage community-based consultation processes (e.g. workshops, focus groups, town-hall meetings, etc.);
 Demonstrated capacity to work effectively in a team, to manage a range of tasks, to work pro-actively and with diligence, and to manage resources effectively while meeting deadlines;
 Excellent report writing skills in English; and
 Strong computer skills in word processing and communication.

Assignment modalities and duration
The International Consultant will carry out this assignment in association with a National Consultant (who will be hired separately by the World Bank). The International Consultant will be the senior member of the team and will have overall responsibility for: (i) the conduct of the consultation events, (ii) the delivery of the initial note and the final report, and (iii) the briefings for the World Bank team.

It is expected that the International Consultant will work approximately 15 days (half of this time spent in Vietnam for the consultation sessions). (The National Consultant will work approximately 30 days, spending the additional days in preparation tasks: contacting stakeholders, conducting pre-meetings with stakeholders, setting up consultation events, organizing stakeholder consultation logistics, facilitating communication at stakeholder consultation events, and liaising with the World Bank supervisor on organizational matters.)

The two members of the team will be selected to ensure that they are able to communicate effectively with each other, as well as – in some working combination – with stakeholders (in Vietnamese or a Vietnamese sign language, as appropriate) and with the World Bank supervisor (in English).

The Consultant will be responsible for: (i) arranging his/her own travel and accommodation; (ii) managing the stakeholder consultation sessions; and (iii) arranging for the production of the initial note and final report. (The World Bank team will be responsible for making all payments associated with stakeholder consultation events [space rental, food, participants’ per-diems, etc.]).

Administration
The work in this contract is supervised by Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank in Hanoi. The Japan Social Development Fund “seed fund grant” that finances this study ends on August 31, 2009.

Annex 1: Partial list of stakeholders

Haiphong Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hải Phòng)
Hanoi Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hà Nội) [http://www.deafhanoi.com & http://360.yahoo.com/clbnnkh/%5D [Contact: Trần Ngọc Tuần]
HCMC Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc TP.HCM)
See also: Asia Pacific Development Center on Disability: List of disability NGOs in Vietnam: http://www.apcdproject.org/Countryprofile/vietnam/nongov.html

Hoa Sua School, Hanoi (Trường Trung học Tư thục Kinh tế Du lịch Hoa Sữa) [http://www.hoasuaschool.com/]
Nhan Chinh School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Dân lập Dạy Trẻ điếc Nhân Chính)
Thanh Tri School, Hanoi (Trương Nuôi dạy Trẻ Khuyết tật Thanh Trì)
Xa Dan School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Xã Đàn)

Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers College, Dong Nai (Dự án Giáo dục Đại học cho Người điếc Việt Nam, Cao đẳng Sư phạm Đồng Nai, TP. Đồng Nai) [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Hoa]
Hy Vong I School, HCMC (Trường Khuyết tật Thính giác Hy Vọng I)
Hy Vong Binh Thanh School, HCMC (Trường Hy Vọng Bình Thạnh)
Thuan An Education Center, Lai Thieu, Binh Duong (Trung tâm Giáo dục Trẻ Khiếm thính Thuận An) [formerly known as École des sourds-muets de Lái-Thiêu] [http://www.thuongvevietnam.org/webseiten/thuanan/html/thuanan_en.html]

Hanoi Pedagogy University Dại học Sư phạm Hà Nội, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt)
HCMC Pedagogy University (Dại học Sư phạm TP.HCM, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt) [Contact: Cao Thị Xuân Mỹ]
Vietnam Institute for Educational Sciences (Bộ Giáo dục và Đào Tạo, Viện Khoa học Giáo dục, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Giáo dục Trẻ Khuyết tật) [Contact: Lê Văn Tạc]

Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi [Contact: Phạm Minh Hằng]
Save the Children UK, Hanoi [http://www.savethechildren.net/vietnam/] [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Bịch]

Annex 2: Partial list of resources

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2002). Ký hiệu Củ chỉ Điệu bộ của Người điếc Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2004). Ký hiệu của Người điếc Việt Nam / Signs of the Deaf in Vietnam. (3 volumes). Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (n.d.). Tài liệu Ngôn ngữ Ký hiệu cho Trẻ Khiếm thính Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Student Handbooks 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Companion Dictionaries 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Locker-McKee, R. (2005). “As one Deaf person to another”: Deaf paraprofessionals in mainstream schools. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 1-48.

Reilly, C. & Nguyen Cong Khanh. (2004). Final Evaluation Report for Inclusive Education For Hearing-Impaired and Deaf Children in Vietnam. Pearl S. Buck International-Vietnam, U.S. Agency for International Development (Grant No. 492-G-0098-00040-00), Hanoi, Vietnam.
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/humanitarian_assistance/the_funds/pubs/reportlst.html)

Reilly, C. (2004-08). “Outside the Dream” Project (Thailand). UNESCO Programme for the Education of Children in Need / Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education and Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. (http://research.gallaudet.edu/sl/)

Woodward, J. (2000). Sign languages and sign language families in Thailand and Viet Nam. In K. Emmorey & H. Lane (eds.), The Signs of Language Revisited: An Anthology in Honor of Ursuala Bellugi and Edward Klima. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 23-47.

Woodward, J. (2003). Sign languages and Deaf identities in Thailand and Viet Nam. In L. Monaghan et al. (eds.), Many Ways to be Deaf. Washington, D.C., USA: Gallaudet University Press, pp. 283-301.

Woodward, J. et al. (2004). Providing higher educational opportunities to Deaf adults in Viet Nam through Vietnamese sign languages. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 232-263.

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Vietnam: Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Stakeholder Consultation and Project Design: Terms of Reference
National Consultant Services

August 2008

Introduction
The World Bank has received a Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) “seed fund grant” to carry out stakeholder consultations, with a view to developing the detailed design of an Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project in Vietnam (hereafter “the Project”). This detailed design will form the basis of a proposal for a substantive JSDF Grant to finance the Project.

The World Bank intends to apply part of this seed fund to the hire of an national expert, who will support an international expert to conduct the stakeholder consultations and, in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in a future Project proposal.

Background: deaf children’s development
Early childhood is the time of life when access to language models is crucial to the development of language and therefore to future learning. Deaf children rely on the sense of vision as their main channel of learning and communication. Only when young children who are deaf and their family members can use a shared language together will the child’s cognitive and social development proceed normally. The challenge is breaking through the communication gap with a visually supported language. Yet, worldwide, families with deaf infants and toddlers rarely have access to early education support. As a result, the deaf child’s development often suffers, leaving them at a major disadvantage in school and life.

Background: deaf education in Vietnam
In Vietnam, some 40,000 school-age children (i.e. aged 5 to 17) – or 18 out of every 10,000 – find it “very difficult to hear” (i.e. are severely deaf) or “impossible to hear” (i.e. are profoundly deaf). Almost all deaf children are born to hearing parents; for the most part, hearing parents (like hearing adults in general) have little awareness of the Deaf community, its language and its culture. As a result, young deaf children seldom come into contact with deaf adults (or even, until they start school, older deaf children).

In Vietnam, the provision of formal education to deaf youth began over 125 years ago, with an approach that used a sign language as the language of instruction. Despite this long and rich history, many deaf children still never go to school and those deaf children who do attend school often drop out before completing even Grade 5, with very few deaf youth receiving a secondary or tertiary education. Deaf children may attend special schools or mainstream schools. While special school classroom teachers are more likely than mainstream school classroom teachers to supplement their teaching with the use of signs (but generally not in a natural sign language mode), the dominant teaching approach is an “oralist” one that uses Vietnamese as the primary language of instruction.

IDEO Project concept
The Project will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf.

The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.

Consultant activities and timeline

Under this assignment, the Consultant will:

1. In advance of the International Consultant’s arrival in Vietnam, contact stakeholders, conduct pre-meetings with stakeholders, set up consultation events, organize stakeholder consultation logistics, and liaise with the World Bank supervisor on organizational matters. [Timeline: Days 1 – 10]

2. Support the International Consultant in producing an initial brief concept note to describe: (a) a range of options for Project activities to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) a range of options for Project implementation “civil society organizations” to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) describe the plan for stakeholder consultation under Activity 3. [Timeline: Days 11 – 12]

3. Participate in the discussion on this concept note with the World Bank supervisor. [Timeline: Day 13]

4. Support the International Consultant in conducting stakeholders consultation events – in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and, if the schedule permits, Haiphong – with particular responsibility for facilitating communication at these events. [Timeline: Days 14 – 20]

5. Support the International Consultant in producing a concise report containing specific recommendations for inclusion in the proposal for the Project. [Timeline: Days 21 – 24]

6. Participate in the briefing with the World Bank supervisor on the findings of the consultation process and other relevant information, the contents of the report and the specific recommendations. [Timeline: Day 25]

7. After the departure of the International Consultant, liaise with the World Bank supervisor on any follow-up tasks related to the assignment. [Timeline: Days 26 – 30]

Consultant qualifications and experience

The national consultant will have:
 At least an upper secondary education qualification (i.e. having completed Grade 12);
 Experience in Deaf education in Vietnam;
 Involvement with Deaf communities in Vietnam;
 Native or near-native proficiency in a Vietnamese sign language;
 Ability to communicate effectively in Vietnamese, and preferably with at least a basic ability to communicate through written English;
 Demonstrated capacity to organize and manage community-based consultation processes (e.g. workshops, focus groups, townhall meetings, etc.); and
 Demonstrated capacity to work effectively in a team, to manage a range of tasks, to work pro-actively and with diligence, and to manage resources effectively while meeting deadlines.

Assignment modalities and duration
The National Consultant will carry out this assignment in association with an International Consultant (who will be hired separately by the World Bank). The National Consultant will be the junior member of the team; as such, he/she will support the International Consultant in all aspects of the carrying out of the assignment and contribute to the content of the assignment outputs. (The International Consultant, as the senior member, will have overall responsibility for: (i) the conduct of the consultation events, (ii) the delivery of the initial note and the final report, and (iii) the briefings for the World Bank team.)

The National Consultant will work approximately 30 days, including 10 days before the arrival of the International Consultant in Vietnam. (It is expected that the International Consultant will work approximately 15 days [half of this time spent in Vietnam for the consultation sessions].)

The two members of the team will be selected to ensure that they are able to communicate effectively with each other, as well as – in some working combination – with stakeholders (in Vietnamese or a Vietnamese sign language, as appropriate) and with the World Bank supervisor (in English).

The Consultant will be responsible for: (i) arranging his/her own travel and accommodation; (ii) managing the stakeholder consultation sessions; and (iii) arranging for the production of the initial note and final report. (The World Bank team will be responsible for making all payments associated with stakeholder consultation events [space rental, food, participants’ per-diems, etc.]).

Administration
The work in this contract is supervised by Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank in Hanoi. The Japan Social Development Fund “seed fund grant” that finances this study ends on August 31, 2009.

Annex 1: Partial list of stakeholders

Haiphong Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hải Phòng)
Hanoi Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hà Nội) [http://www.deafhanoi.com & http://360.yahoo.com/clbnnkh/] [Contact: Trần Ngọc Tuần]
HCMC Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc TP.HCM)
See also: Asia Pacific Development Center on Disability: List of disability NGOs in Vietnam: http://www.apcdproject.org/Countryprofile/vietnam/nongov.html

Hoa Sua School, Hanoi (Trường Trung học Tư thục Kinh tế Du lịch Hoa Sữa) [http://www.hoasuaschool.com/]
Nhan Chinh School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Dân lập Dạy Trẻ điếc Nhân Chính)
Thanh Tri School, Hanoi (Trương Nuôi dạy Trẻ Khuyết tật Thanh Trì)
Xa Dan School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Xã Đàn)

Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers College, Dong Nai (Dự án Giáo dục Đại học cho Người điếc Việt Nam, Cao đẳng Sư phạm Đồng Nai, TP. Đồng Nai) [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Hoa]
Hy Vong I School, HCMC (Trường Khuyết tật Thính giác Hy Vọng I)
Hy Vong Binh Thanh School, HCMC (Trường Hy Vọng Bình Thạnh)
Thuan An Education Center, Lai Thieu, Binh Duong (Trung tâm Giáo dục Trẻ Khiếm thính Thuận An) [formerly known as École des sourds-muets de Lái-Thiêu] [http://www.thuongvevietnam.org/webseiten/thuanan/html/thuanan_en.html]

Hanoi Pedagogy University Dại học Sư phạm Hà Nội, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt)
HCMC Pedagogy University (Dại học Sư phạm TP.HCM, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt) [Contact: Cao Thị Xuân Mỹ]
Vietnam Institute for Educational Sciences (Bộ Giáo dục và Đào Tạo, Viện Khoa học Giáo dục, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Giáo dục Trẻ Khuyết tật) [Contact: Lê Văn Tạc]

Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi [Contact: Phạm Minh Hằng]
Save the Children UK, Hanoi [http://www.savethechildren.net/vietnam/] [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Bịch]

Annex 2: Partial list of resources

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2002). Ký hiệu Củ chỉ Điệu bộ của Người điếc Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2004). Ký hiệu của Người điếc Việt Nam / Signs of the Deaf in Vietnam. (3 volumes). Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (n.d.). Tài liệu Ngôn ngữ Ký hiệu cho Trẻ Khiếm thính Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Student Handbooks 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Companion Dictionaries 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Locker-McKee, R. (2005). “As one Deaf person to another”: Deaf paraprofessionals in mainstream schools. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 1-48.

Reilly, C. & Nguyen Cong Khanh. (2004). Final Evaluation Report for Inclusive Education For Hearing-Impaired and Deaf Children in Vietnam. Pearl S. Buck International-Vietnam, U.S. Agency for International Development (Grant No. 492-G-0098-00040-00), Hanoi, Vietnam.
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/humanitarian_assistance/the_funds/pubs/reportlst.html)

Reilly, C. (2004-08). “Outside the Dream” Project (Thailand). UNESCO Programme for the Education of Children in Need / Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education and Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. (http://research.gallaudet.edu/sl/)

Woodward, J. (2000). Sign languages and sign language families in Thailand and Viet Nam. In K. Emmorey & H. Lane (eds.), The Signs of Language Revisited: An Anthology in Honor of Ursuala Bellugi and Edward Klima. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 23-47.

Woodward, J. (2003). Sign languages and Deaf identities in Thailand and Viet Nam. In L. Monaghan et al. (eds.), Many Ways to be Deaf. Washington, D.C., USA: Gallaudet University Press, pp. 283-301.

Woodward, J. et al. (2004). Providing higher educational opportunities to Deaf adults in Viet Nam through Vietnamese sign languages. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 232-263.

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page



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CONFERENCE: 3rd LAC Technical Meeting on STD, HIV-AIDS and Disability

Posted on 30 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

3rd Latin American/Caribbean (LAC) Technical Meeting on STD, HIV-AIDS & Disability
August 1st and 2nd, 2008
City of Mexico
Organized by the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI) and the World Bank With support from the National Council to Prevent Discrimination (CONAPRED, Mexico), the Central American Social Integration System (SISCA), the National Program of STI and AIDS (Brazil) and the Pan American Health Organization

XVII International Conference on AIDS (Mexico August 3rd to 8th 2008)
http://www.aids2008.org

Introduction
People with disability have often been and remained excluded from HIV prevention as well as AIDS care efforts as a result of an aggregation of various taboos and coordination miss opportunities. On one hand, it is often presumed that people with disability are not sexually active and at no risk of infection. Simultaneously, the fact that they have less access to education and social opportunities prevents them from being in touch with preventive information and resources. On the other hand, the organizations of people with disability are generally unknown and themselves unaware of the health and prevention policy making and programming opportunities.

The result of all this is that the exposure of men and women with disabilities to the main risk factors of HIV-AIDS are higher compared to non-disabled population. At the same time, while people living with AIDS have a higher survival rate due to medical advances, a frequent consequence is that there are an increasing number of disabilities (mainly physical and sensorial limitations) secondary to the disease itself or its pharmacologic treatment, indicating emerging needs and services to respond and coordinate.

Over the past two years, sponsored by the World Bank, the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI), in collaboration with several international organizations working in the HIV-AIDS and Disability areas has organized two Technical Meetings (Chile 2006 and Argentina 2007) on STDs, HIV-AIDS and Disability. The main purpose of these meetings has been to facilitate knowledge shearing amongst specialists and encourage policy development to address the increasing interrelation amongst AIDS and Disability.

The main axes of this work have been on

a. Documenting the interface between aids and disability and compiling evidence of emerging needs and responses

b. Identifying opportunities for active collaboration between organizations working in the AIDS and the inclusion fields, to optimise use of existing resources and promote inter-institutional approaches to inclusive aids prevention and rehabilitation services delivery to people living with AIDS.

In 2008, with the support of CONAPRED (in Spanish Consejo Nacional para Prevenir la Discriminación, México), the World Bank and PAHO-WHO the 3rd Technical Meeting will be held in Mexico, on August 1-2, to coincide with the AIDS International Conference (August 3-8, 2008). It will continue working on recommendations for crosscutting and inclusive approaches HIV-AIDS Prevention and Care.

Objectives
The 3rd Experts Meeting on STDs, HIV-AIDS and Disability, seeks to advance the discussion on “Evidence-based Research on the inter connections between AIDS and Disability” and on “Care for people living with AIDS and Disabilities: effective approaches and services”.

Expected Outcomes
The expected outcomes of the meeting are:

o Review of new developments in LAC National AIDS Programs;
o Update bibliographical and research review on the topic;
o Review of new materials and initiatives of international agencies, Civil Society and Academia;
o Review of new content and tools for the LAC HIV-AIDS site on the issue;
o Development of a new set of recommendations for a cross-cutting and inclusive approaches in the area of STD, HIV-AIDS Prevention and Care, with special focus in “Monitoring & Evaluation and Evidence-based Research and on Care Attention for people living with AIDS and Disabilities, as a consequence of the treatment;
o Establishment of a LAC Permanent Working Group, with interagency involvement, south-to-south knowledge sharing and a joint research and implementation agenda;

Participants: Program Managers, Researchers, Practitioner and AIDS and Disability specialists from Latin American and the Caribbean

Venue: National Council to Prevent Discrimination (CONAPRED, Mexico), Dante 14 – 8o piso, Colonia Anzures, Ciudad de México

PROGRAM
Friday August 1st
08.30 Registration
09.00 Opening
09.30 Challenges on AIDS Prevention and Care and Disability
10. 00 Conclusions from the 1st Brazilian and Central American Forums on AIDS and Disability – Discussion
11.00 Coffee
11.30 Services for people living with HIV AIDS and Disabilities
12.30 Lunch
14.00 Working groups
16.30 Plenary
17.00 Closure

Saturday August 2nd
09.00 AIDS and Disability: from taboo to collaboration
09.30 Implementation experiences / Questions and answers
10.30 Coffee
11.00 Emerging topics
o Services development (diagnosis, care, prevention)
o Research and evidences: people living with aids and disabilities secondary to the disease itself or its pharmacological treatment
o Vulnerability of PWD to STI and AIDS
o Discussion
12.30 Lunch and meeting with Ministries of Health and Education*

14.00 Approaches and future strategies
o Research
o Monitoring and Evaluation
o Regional Collaboration
o Dissemination
16.00 Plenary – Strategic collaboration
17.00 Closure
* To be confirmed

Other related activities in Mexico

o “Satellite Session on AIDS and Disability”, organized by Disabled People International (DPI). August 5th 7:00 to 8.30 am (in English)
o “AIDS and Disability: a relationship to be taken into account”, organized by the Inter American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI) August 5th 6:30 to 8:30pm (in Spanish)
o “AIDS and Disability: a relationship to be taken into account”, Poster session, (daily, August 3-8) between 12:00-14:00h

Unfortunately, we have not resources to cover flight or other expenses for participants. We hope that participants can gather support from their organizations to travel to Mexico. Please confirm ASAP your willingness to participate. Your participation is extremely important to us and to ensure the inclusion of disability issues amongst the STD and HIV-AIDS agenda in the Latin American and Caribbean Region.



We Can Do received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) email discussion group.

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that, although abstracts are due by August 1, 2008, completed papers will not be due until 2009. This same announcement was posted at We Can Do in April, but the editors are circulating this notice again in an attempt to collect more abstracts for them to choose among.

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies
Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

  • What is the relationship between disability and poverty?
  • How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?
  • What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?
  • What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?
  • What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1st.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



This announcement was circulated by Daniel Mont via email. Any inquiries and abstracts should please be directed to Daniel Mont or to Rosangela Berman Bieler as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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RESOURCE: HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey

Posted on 14 July 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Learn about HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities and find resources that can help at the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

A few years ago, the World Bank and Yale University worked together to conduct a global survey on HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities. The findings from this global survey are available in PDF format (about 500 Kb each) in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. People who are serious about learning all that is known about HIV/AIDS among disabled people will also want to browse the many other research articles available on the topic within the “Research” section of the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

People who are more interested in the pragmatic side of how to address the challenge of HIV/AIDS may find it helpful to browse through the materials available within Resources section of the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

Start exploring the website at:

http://cira.med.yale.edu/globalsurvey/

People who wish to gather more information or resources related to HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities around the world will also want to explore the reports, training materials, and other resources at the AskSource.info listing of resources on HIV/AIDS and disability.

You may also wish to browse through previous We Can Do posts on HIV/AIDS for more leads to follow.



I have been familiar with this resource since the World Bank and Yale University released its global survey in 2004. I’ve mentioned the website in passing before at We Can Do, but I thought this resource was important enough to warrant a blog post all to itself.

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RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS on African Policy on Disability and Development

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Research Positions for African Policy on Disability & Development (A-PODD)

Two Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships for 3 years
Four Research Assistantships for 1 Year,
one in each of Sierra Leone, Uganda, Ethiopia & Malawi

We seek people with experience in researching disability issues for the above positions which will be based at the Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, with associated appointments at the Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin and The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disability.

Post-Doctoral Fellows should have completed, or be completing, a PhD in disability or a closely related area, and be willing to travel between Ireland, South Africa, and two of the project countries.

Research Assistants should have a degree in a relevant social or health science, or evidence of operating at an equivalent level. Research Assistants may be considered for fully-funded registration for a Masters in Research at Stellenbsoch University. Limited travel to South Africa will be required with Research Assistants based in one of the four project countries.
We are particularly keen to encourage applications from persons with disability.

Project Description
A-PODD is a three year project funded by the (Irish) Health Research Board and Irish Aid. A-PODD is led by Prof Mac MacLachlan, Centre for Global Health and School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin; Ms Gubela Mji, Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and Mr A.K. Dube, The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disability.

This research investigates how disability can be put on the agenda of national and international development initiatives. It focuses on how research evidence can be utilised to inform the policy environment (such as PRSPs and SWAps), development institutions (such as the IMF, World Bank and WHO), as well as less formal local, community and grass-roots decision making and inclusion efforts.

A-PODD will undertake four country case studies: in Sierra Leone, a country emerging from conflict that resulted in many people being disabled; Malawi and Uganda, the only two African countries that have Ministries for people with disabilities; and Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Africa, with significant geographical barriers and a highly dispersed population, presenting significant challenges to the inclusion of people with disability.

Our comparative analysis will inform disability policy and implementation within the region. Barriers and facilitators will be identified along implementation pathways, and so too will local means and mechanisms of addressing these. Country reports will be discussed at a concluding workshop to which governments, civil society, donors, researchers and others will be invited. A code of best practice will be drawn up for Moving Evidence to Action on African Disability Policy.

Other collaborating partners on this project are:

International Partners:
Department of Psychology at Stellenbosch University
Southern African Federation of the Disabled
Ministry of Persons with Disabilities and the Elderly, Government of Malawi
Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa
South African Medical Research Council’s Cochrane Centre
SINTEF Health Research (Norway)
World Bank

Irish Partners:
Institute for Nursing Research, University of Ulster
Law & Policy Research Unit, NUI Galway.
National Institute for Intellectual Disability, Trinity College Dublin
Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin.

Salaries
Post-Doctoral Research Fellows will be appointed in the range €25,000-30,000 (Euro)
Research Assistants will be appointed in the range €8,000-10,00 (Euro)

Applications
Interested applicants should send

1) A statement of interest
2) A Curriculum Vitae
3) Contact details for at least two references (at least one of which should be an academic).

To either:

1. Ms Magdalena Szewczyk, Centre for Global Health, Trinity College, Dublin.
E-mail: szewczym@tcd.ie

2. Ms Annette Coetzee, Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Health Science Faculty,
Tygerburg, Cape Town, South Africa. E-mail: annettec@sun.ac.za

3. Mr AK Dube, The Secretariat of the Africa Decade of Persons with Disabilities,
Cape Town, South Africa. E-mail: akdube@africandecade.co.za

The project starts in October 08 and we look forward to making appointmentss as soon as possible.



We Can Do received the above announcement via the Global Parntership for Disability and Development email discussion group.

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Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) Holds First Membership Meeting

Posted on 26 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, News, Opportunities, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Washington DC, 9 May 2008

First Membership Meeting of the GPDD in Eschborn, Germany

World leaders from Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America, and Oceania representing civil society organizations, governments, and multilateral agencies including the World Bank and UNESCO unanimously approved a Charter and elected the First Board of Directors for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD). Meeting at the headquarters and as the guests of the German Technical Corporation (GTZ) in Eschborn, Germany, the assembled agencies and organizations made a core commitment to a world of inclusive communities where individuals with disabilities regardless of age, gender, or type of disability enjoy their rights and have access to opportunities on an equal basis with others.

With a commitment to partnership to combat the social and economic exclusion and impoverishment of people with disabilities and their families in developing countries worldwide, the GPDD represents an unprecedented alliance of agencies, organizations, and resources to accelerate change within and outside of government that targets development activities to include and promote social and economic rights of individuals with disabilities.

Four years of planning by a Coordinating Task Force culminated in the historical formalization of GPDD with the election of the First Board of Directors in Eschborn, Germany, last Wednesday. The 12 members elected to the Board of Directors are:

  • Mr. Khandaker Jahurul Alam, Asia Pacific Disability Forum
  • Ms. Tanya Barron, Leonard Cheshire Disability
  • Mr. A.K. Dube – African Decade Secretariat (Chair of the GPDD Interim Board)
  • Ms. Sangita Gairola, Representative of the Government of India
  • Ms. Celia Siphokazi Gcaza, African CBR Network (CAN)
  • Mr. Kalle Könkkölä, Disabled Peoples’ International
  • Mr. Rudiger Krech, GTZ
  • Ms. Euphrasia Mbewe, World Federation of the Deaf
  • Mr. James Mwandha, Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum
  • Mr. Andreas Pruisken, Christian Blind Mission
  • Ms. Indumathi Rao, CBR Network South Asia
  • Dr. William Rowland, World Blind Union

This unique Global Partnership will bring important world attention to the needs and aspirations of people with disabilities in developing countries. The assembled GPDD members agreed on a beginning plan of action to expand the membership base of GPDD, promote data collection and analysis that identifies more accurately the living conditions of and barriers faced by people with disabilities in developing countries; to facilitate information sharing on effective inclusive development policies and programs; to support the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in cooperation with partners and member organizations; and mobilize resources to build the capacity of the GPDD broad constituency through alliances and networks to become a reliable and effective expert disability and development platform.

With support from the World Bank and the governments of Italy, Finland, and Norway as donors to a Multi Donor Trust Fund, the GPDD will bring much needed attention to reduce poverty and eliminate barriers to full social and and economic participation.

For more information about GPDD and how you may become involved, please contact Maria Reina, Executive Director at mvreina@law.syr.edu

Individuals may also contact Maria Reina (mvreina@law.syr.edu) to inquire about subscribing to the free GPDD listserv.



This announcement is slightly modified from text that Maria Reina recently circulated on the GPDD listserv.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 26 April 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Education, Employment, Health, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies

Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

 
The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

What is the relationship between disability and poverty?

How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?

What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?

What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?

What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1, 2008.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



Daniel Mont recently circulated this announcement on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

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RESOURCE: On-Line Handbook Supports Disabled People in Fighting Poverty

Posted on 8 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Inclusion, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following press release about a helpful resource for people who fight poverty among people with disabilities in developing countries is being circulated by Handicap International, Christian Blind Mission, and GTZ.

Press release – 07 April 2008

In 1999, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) introduced the concept of Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSP). One of its basic ideas is that highly indebted poor countries develop comprehensive strategies how to reduce poverty within the country. Civil society should participate in the formulation, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of the poverty reduction strategy (PRS).

Poverty is a cause and a consequence of disability. Although this is evident, people with disabilities had to realise that PRSPs and the proposed measures did not regard their needs and interests so far. In addition, people with disabilities and their organisations rarely have the possibility to participate in the formulation and implementation of PRSPs.

On behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Handicap International, the Christoffel-Blindenmission (CBM) and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH (German Technical Cooperation) implement pilot projects in Cambodia, Tanzania and Vietnam to address the shortcomings of the PRS processes. These projects are based on the handbook “Making PRSP Inclusive”, published by Handicap International and CBM in 2006, initiated by the World Bank and financed by a German Trust Fund (with financial support of the German government). New experiences made in the projects in 2007 contributed to the revision and update of the handbook.

The key experiences from the projects show that capacity development and networking of local organisations of and for persons with disabilities are crucial for the inclusion of disability in PRS processes. For this reason “Making PRSP Inclusive” introduces subjects around disability and PRSP and at the same time includes basic techniques like project management and lobbying. The handbook also offers a toolbox with participatory methods for the implementation of workshops and projects. In addition it presents case studies from Honduras, Bangladesh, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Vietnam and Cambodia.

The updated version is available as online-handbook at www.making-prsp-inclusive.org. The medium internet offers the opportunity for continuous updating. The website has an accessible design for persons with visual impairments. The handbook is currently available in English; the French translation will be published in a few months.

The organisations:
Handicap International is an international charity working in 60 countries worldwide in the fields of rehabilitation, inclusion of disabled people and in disability prevention. Handicap International stands up for the rights of people with disabilities and is also engaged in the framework of the UN Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities.

Christoffel-Blindenmission (CBM) is an independent, interdenominational Christian relief organization committed to help people with disabilities to live as independently as possible – in more than 1,000 projects in developing countries. Medical help, rehabilitation and integration into society are the main goals, for instance through the support of eye hospitals or hospitals with eye departments, schools for blind persons and special programmes for hearing impaired and physically disabled people.

As an international cooperation enterprise for sustainable development with worldwide operations, the federally owned Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH supports the German Government in achieving its development-policy objectives. It provides viable, forward-looking solutions for political, economic, ecological and social development in a globalised world. Often working under difficult conditions, GTZ promotes complex reforms and change processes. Its corporate objective is to improve people’s living conditions on a sustainable basis.

The three organisations are members of the World Bank imitative “Global Partnership for Disability and Development” (GPDD).

Information:
Ursula Miller, Handicap International, +49 8954 76 06 23, umiller@handicap-international.de
Andreas Pruisken, Christoffel-Blindenmission, +49 6251131 307, andreas.pruisken@cbm.org
Andreas Gude, GTZ, +49 6 196 79 1517, andreas.gude@gtz,de
Dorothea Rischewski, GTZ, +49 6 196 791263, dorothea.rischewski@gtz.de

Handicap International e.V.
Ganghoferstr. 19
80339 München
GERMANY
Tel.: +49 89 54 76 06 0
Fax: +49 89 54 76 06 20
www.handicap-international.de

Christoffel-Blindenmission Deutschland e.V.
Nibelungenstraße 124
64625 Bensheim
GERMANY
Tel.: +49 6251 131-0
Fax: + 49 6251 131-199
www.christoffel-blindenmission.de

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH
Dag-Hammarskjöld-Weg 1-5
65760 Eschborn
GERMANY
Tel.: +49 6196 79-0
Fax: +49 6196 79-1115
www.gtz.de



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PAPER: Disability and Poverty: A Survey of World Bank Poverty Assessments and Implications

Posted on 4 March 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

The World Bank Group has released a new paper entitled “Disability and Poverty: A Survey of World Bank Poverty Assessments and Implications,” by Jeanine Braithwaite and Daniel Mont.

The paper surveys World Bank poverty assessment literature on the relationship between disability and poverty. It finds that it is difficult to accurately assess the link between disability and poverty because household surveys on consumption (used to assess consumption-based poverty) frequently don’t ask about the disability status of household members.

Also, it is difficult to define or measure “disability.” For example, simply asking if people are disabled misses many disabled people because they may wish to avoid the stigma of disability. Or,some people may assume that “disability” necessarily refers only to significant impairments. These people might not bother to report mild or moderate impairments.

Another complication in poverty and disability research is that many existing surveys do not account for the fact that people with disabilities have different consumption needs than other people. For example, they might need to spend income on Braille, wheelchairs, or other items that non-disabled people do not need. The money spent on these items diverts income from other consumption that could raise the living standards of the household. Thus, a disabled person with the same income as a non-disabled person may actually be poorer.

The authors suggest directions for further research into disability and poverty.

The full, 32-page paper can be downloaded in PDF format (250 Kb) at:

http://siteresources.worldbank.org/SOCIALPROTECTION/Resources/SP-Discussion-papers/Disability-DP/0805.pdf



We Can Do learned about this paper via contacts within the World Bank.

Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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PUBLICATION: Feb Issue UN Enable Newsletter

Posted on 28 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The second monthly issue of United Nation’s Enable Newsletter has now been released. The initial launch of this newsletter was announced at We Can Do last month.

A sampling of headlines for the February issue is listed below, except that I have modified them to spell out most acronyms. To read the full stories (usually one or two paragraphs each), consult the February issue of the Enable Newsletter at http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=312

  • UN Commission Renews Mandate for Special Rapporteur and Agrees on Mainstreaming Disability in Development.
  • United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator Makes New Commitment to Disability
  • World Bank and Organizaiton for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Conduct Joint Effort for the Achievement of Millennium Development Goals 2 & 3. [We Can Do note, for those new to international development: the Millennium Development Goals are a set of targets agreed upon by country governments and development agencies for reducing global poverty and improving global health; more information at http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/
  • World Bank Psycho-Social Listserv is Open for Sign-Up at http://go.worldbank.org/SIP5GYWK00
  • International Labour Organization (ILO) to Produce Advocacy Kit on Decent Work for Persons with Disabilities
  • Ratification Talk in Serbia
  • Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Raises Awareness in the Maldives
  • Sharing Experiences on Best Practices in Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Services for Persons with Disabilities
  • Identifying Concrete Actions in Mozambique Towards Implementation of the Convention
  • Atlas: Global Resources for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities (Atlas-ID) (We Can Do note: The launch of this Atlas also was announced at We Can Do).
  • United Nations Information Center (UNIC) Moscow Hosts Discussion on Persons with Disabilities

The February issue of the Enable Newsletter also lists several publications and upcoming events. You can read the January or February issue for free. Or you can sign up for a free subscription to receive each month’s newsletter via email, for free. All available at:

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=312



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Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere else, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people.

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FORUM: Civil Society Organizations at World Bank, International Monetary Fund

Posted on 23 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), including those involved with disability issues, have an opportunity to meet with staff members at the World Bank Group (WBG) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Washington, DC, USA, April 10-13, 2008. Organizations interested in sending a representative must apply for accreditation by March 23, 2008.

Each year, the World Bank Group and the International Monetary Fund hold two major joint meetings. The larger of these, called the “Annual Meetings,” is held in the fall. A similar but smaller set of meetings, called the “Spring Meetings,” is held in the spring. The 2008 Spring Meetings is held over the weekend of April 12-13, 2008.

Also each year, representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) may participate in a Program of Policy Dialogues for Civil Society Organizations (CSOs). The World Bank and International Monetary Fund civil society teams will also be offering an Orientation Session on the World Bank and IMF for interested CSO representatives attending the 2008 Spring Meetings.

The World Bank Group makes loans to the governments of developing countries to support projects to reduce poverty; improve infrastructure; and bring education, clean water, health services, and electricity to more poor people. The International Monetary Fund, among other things, advises country governments on their economic policies and lends money to governments to help them correct balance of payments problems. Thus, the World Bank is focused on fighting poverty, while the IMF is focused more on broader macroeconomic issues.

For more information about the participation of Civil Society Organizations, go to the page on the 2008 Spring Meeting targeted at representatives of Civil Society Organizations

http://go.worldbank.org/PY6ZNKWGH0

Be sure to read all the information at the above link carefully before you decide whether it would be suitable to your interests to attend. For example, this is NOT the forum to attend if you are looking for concrete guidance on how to start a new project for disabled people in your country. This will NOT be an opportunity to ask for funding for your organization. You will NOT receive advice on improving or strengthening your organization.

However, if you represent a larger, more stable organization that is able to take a very long view on your future activities, then this forum might be suitable for you. It may help you learn more about the World Bank and the IMF. (If this interests you, then you will be particularly interested in the April 9 Orientation Session. Please note that regisration for the orientation session is handled separately from registration for the Policy Dialogues for Civil Society Organizations in general.)

Attending this event can also give you the chance to participate in many policy dialogue sessions. These sessions will bring together staff from the Bank and Fund; CSO representatives; government officials; and other individuals. People will use these sessions to discuss important issues that will be addressed during the 2008 Spring Meetings. This could be an opportunity to share your thoughts and learn from the perspectives of other participants.

Also, the IMF/WB Civil Society Team staff can help facilitate contacts between your civil society organization and journalists during the forum. You can also leave print materials about your organization at a table in the Press Room for journalists to pick up.

If you are reading this before March 15, 2008 then you may wish to consider submitting a proposal to host your own, two-hour session as part of the Civil Society Policy Forum. (Perhaps a session on disability inclusion in development?) Proposals should be short and should include the title, topic, and expected outcome of the panel. Also indicate who (if anyone) from the World Bank or the IMF you would like to be a part of the session. Send proposals by 5 p.m. EST, March 15, 2008, via email to civilsociety@worldbank.org.



We Can Do learned about this opportunity for Civil Society Organizations at the World Bank’s CommNet blog at http://commnet.worldbank.org/node/3220.

Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere else, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people.

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ESSAY COMPETITION: Shape the City of Your Dreams

Posted on 20 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Call for Papers, Fellowships & Scholarships, Urban Development, youth | Tags: , , , , |

WANTED: YOUR practical ideas for improving the city you live in.

The International Essay Competition 2008 for young people aged 18 to 25 has been launched. The theme is “Shaping the City of Your Dreams.” Essays can be submitted in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, or Portuguese. The maximum allowed length for each essay is 10 pages (4,000 words). Cash prizes are available for $5000 or $1000.

Participating youth may be either students or non-students. Ph.D. (doctorate) students are NOT eligible.

Essays may be submitted until March 23, 2008.

Finalists will be announced April 30, 2008. Finalists will be invited to attend the ABCDE Conference in Cape Town, South Africa, in June 2008. All travel expenses for finalists will be paid by the World Bank. The final winners will be selected and awarded on June 11, 2008.

This competition could be an opportunity for a young adult with disabilities in a developing country to win recognition for their ideas.

This competition is not specific to disability issues. But perhaps participants could consider focusing their essay on how their city could be made more accessible to disabled people. If this interests you, then you might find it helpful to research the concept of “universal design.” Other We Can do blog posts relevant to universal design include one about New Delhi improving its accessibility and another about a free, on-line book on universal deisgn and visitability.

For ideas on how to find further informational resources on universal design or other topics related to people with disabilities, try consulting Tips and leads on finding academic research, paper, resources, or statistics. Of course, also try searching at http://www.google.com or your preferred search engine.

More information about the essay competition can be found at:

www.essaycompetition.org

Be sure to read the FAQ and rules carefully before submitting your essay. Participants should also carefully read more detail about the three questions that each essay is expected to answer.

It is critical that you write a good-quality abstract (short summary) for your essay. Abstracts will be used to help the judges pre-select essays for the competition. Read all the instructions at www.essaycompetition.org carefully.

Participants can submit your essays on-line at

http://www.essaycompetition.org/content08_38_1

One of the questions on their application form asks where you learned about their competition. When you answer this question, please be sure to click “other” and tell them that you learned about their competition at wecando.wordpress.com.



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nazimani for alerting me (and others) to this competition. I researched most of the detail for this blog post at the essay competition web site.

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NEWS: World Bank, Syracuse U. Join Forces Against Poverty Among Disabled People

Posted on 2 February 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, News, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2008

Contact: Jaime Winne Alvarez
Phone: (315) 443-3784
jlwinne@syr.edu
World Bank: Phillip Hay
Phone: (202) 473-1796
Email:phay@worldbank.org

Global disability and poverty efforts get key boost from agreement between SU’s Burton Blatt Institute and World Bank

A promising new collaboration between the World Bank and Syracuse University could spur global efforts to reduce poverty for an estimated 400 million people with disabilities living in developing countries. The Burton Blatt Institute: Centers of Innovation on Disability at Syracuse University (BBI) and the World Bank have signed an agreement to support activities of the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD), an international disability network initiated by the World Bank and committed to promoting inclusive development as a means to achievement of Millennium Development Goals.

Established in 2006 with assistance from the World Bank and set up by a multi-stakeholder task force, the GPDD brings together organizations, government agencies, multinational lenders and research centers focused on reducing the link between disability and poverty, and promoting inclusive development activities. BBI will receive $350,000 from the World Bank’s Development Grant Facility (DGF)—with another $350,000 likely in 2009—to support the growth and organizational development of the GPDD. In turn, the GPDD will share information, expand knowledge, improve public policies and practices, and foster collaboration to improve education and economic opportunity for individuals with disabilities and their families worldwide.

“This is a great honor and unique opportunity for BBI and Syracuse University,” says Peter Blanck, BBI chairman and SU University Professor. “Both BBI and the GPDD share the same mission of advancing the civic, economic and social participation of people with disabilities worldwide. This collaboration and support system will help further accelerate the inclusion of people with disabilities into the social and economic mainstream.”

“This new collaboration will connect the expertise and resources of our Burton Blatt Institute to the GPDD and the World Bank in ways that will promote inclusive economic and social development across the globe,” says SU Chancellor and President Nancy Cantor.

“Given that people living with disabilities are among the poorest of the poor worldwide, we welcome this agreement with BBI and Syracuse University as another step forward in dismantling the link between poverty and disability,” says Joy Phumaphi, vice president of the World Bank’s Human Development Network. “The social and economic exclusion of people with disabilities in developing countries requires the attention and investment of resources by development institutions, government and nongovernmental organizations.”

Maria Reina has been jointly selected by BBI and GPDD leadership to serve as executive director of the leadership network in an open, international competitive process. Reina, director of international projects at BBI’s Washington, D.C., office since 2006, has diverse experiences working on disability research, advocacy and development work, including an intensive dedication to the United Nations Ad Hoc Committee for the Disability Convention. She previously worked for the Center for International Rehabilitation; the Institute for International Disability Advocacy; the Institute for International Cooperation and Development; the Argentinean Disabled People Organization, Cilsa; and the University Institute San Martin in Rosario, Argentina, where she was an adjunct professor.

“As a person with a disability from Argentina, I have traveled to developing countries and witnessed the physical and attitudinal barriers that diminish full participation and contributions of people with disabilities,” says Reina.

During the next six months, BBI and the GPDD will mobilize disability-led organizations worldwide—in cooperation with governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector—to identify best practice strategies that promote inclusion in economic and social development. Through research, training and community development activities, the GPDD will increase participation of people with disabilities in national poverty reduction efforts in developing countries.

“Improved access to education, health care, technology and transportation are needed to reduce the barriers of stigma and discrimination,” says Kalle Könkkölä, GPDD task force chair.

The World Bank provides critically needed financial and technical assistance to developing countries, and is composed of a number of development institutions owned by 185 member countries, including the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA). The mission of both institutions is to reduce global poverty and to improve living standards of developing countries around the world.

While IBRD focuses on middle income and credit-worthy poor countries, IDA focuses on the poorest countries in the world. The World Bank Group provides loans, interest-free credit and grants to developing countries, and is a knowledge leader in development. For more information, visit http://worldbank.org.

BBI fosters public-private dialogue to advance civic, economic and social participation of persons with disabilities in a global society. BBI takes its name from Burton Blatt (1927–85), a pioneer in humanizing services for people with mental retardation, a staunch advocate of deinstitutionalization, and a national leader in special education. The institute currently has offices in Syracuse, New York City, Washington, D.C., Atlanta and Tel Aviv. For more information, visit http://bbi.syr.edu.

For more information on GPDD, contact Reina at (202) 296-2042 or mvreina@law.syr.edu.



We Can Do received this press release via the mailing list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD). Individuals can sign up for the GPDD email distribution list for free; follow the link for more details.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

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CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: Successful Disabled Women Entrepreneurs

Posted on 8 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Employment, News, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Do you know of a successful disabled woman enterpreneur in a developing country? A World Bank annual publication, Doing Business would like to learn more about her, what has made her business successful, and what legal, regulatory, and practical barriers she has encountered along the way. Doing Business is published by the World Bank Group’s private sector arm, the International Finance Corporation.

The Doing Business project is currently doing research in 178 countries to identify what legal and regulatory barriers make it harder for businesswomen to become successful. As part of this two-year research project, the Doing Business team is collecting stories about women entrepreneurs that describe why they are successful and highlight what obstacles they have needed to overcome. Gathering these case studies will help the team understand what strategies are needed to remove these barriers for all businesswomen. This will help them make better recommendations to country governments that want to encourage more women to start and expand their own businesses. A few of the case studies may be featured in a future Doing Business publication. Nominations need to be submitted by January 22, 2008, in order to be considered.

Each year, Doing Business evaluates 178 countries in terms of how their laws and regulations help, or prevent, enterpreneurs from starting and expanding businesses. Many countries use the Doing Business guide to identify where their strengths and weaknesses are in promoting private sector growth. They make reforms based on its recommendations, which has helped more entrepreneurs start businesses, create jobs, and escape poverty.

Each candidate for nominations should be the founder or owner of a business; active in her community; and have an experience that can offer lessons that can inform reform efforts. When submitting nominations, please send the following information:

  • Full name of Nominee
  • Name and type of business
  • Business address, phone number, and e-mail
  • Month and year business was started
  • A brief biography of the nominated entrepreneur
  • A brief description of the business
  • A brief summary of the obstacles overcome, discoveries made, and outcomes

Read more about the desired criteria and how to nominate business women to be profiled at:

http://www.doingbusiness.org/features/womenentrepreneurs.aspx

Individuals may make inquiries or nominate women entrepreneurs they know in developing countries, with or without disabilities, by sending an email to:

doingbusiness@worldbank.org
snarsiah@worldbank.org

Read more information about this project at: http://blog.doingbusiness.org/2008/01/women-entrepren.html

The Doing Business project will select women from among the nominations, contact them, and prepare profiles on each woman. The chosen profiles will be published in Doing Business 2009.



We Can Do learned about this call for nominations through the World Bank Doing Business blog. Please note that We Can Do is not associated with the Doing Business project. Any inquiries, as requested above, should be directed to doingbusiness@worldbank.org or to snarsiah@worldbank.org.



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THREE JOB POSTS, Luanda, Angola

Posted on 15 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Jobs & Internships, Rehabilitation, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Read carefully. This post contain THREE separate job announcements, all in Luanda, Angola. The first is for a Technical Expert who is experienced in social and health projects. The second is for a Project Coordinator who is a technical expert in severe disability rehabilitaiton. The third is for an expert in the identification of sanitation and hospital services, services of continous support to target group. All job posts are meant to begin in February 2008 and continue for 12 months. The deadline for all three job posts is December 31, 2007.


Technical Expert – Experienced in social and health projects

Country of assignment and location
Angola, Luanda

GTZ International Services in consortium with MundiServiços has been shortlisted for this World Bank-financed project.

The project
In the sequence of the Lwena Memorandum of Understanding complementary to Lusaka Protocol, the Angola Government has prepared the Angolan Program for Demobilization and Reintegration which is being implemented at National level by The Institute of Socio-Professional Reintegration for Ex-combatants (IRSEM). In the scope of this program assistance is been delivered to facilitate economic and social reintegration of 138.000 Ex-combatants. 105.000 are from Ex-FMU (Unita Forces) and 33.000 from FAA (Angolan Armed Forces).
Among the program beneficiaries can be distinguished special groups as follows:
Female Ex-combatants, Widows of Ex-combatants eligible for PGDR (Minors whose parents are Ex-combatants or their guardian, Ex-combatants with disabilities, designated as a “Vulnerable Group” to whom PGDR has designed a specific strategy to assist them.

Estimated are that 1750-2000 of the 28000 disabled who will be demobilised are severely disabled: para-, hemi-, tetraplegic, multiple limb amputees, deaf, blind, mentally disabled,… They are the specific target group of this project.

The objective of the project is to deliver technical assistance to IRSEM to create conditions for social reintegration and physical rehabilitation in order to prevent or minimise the dependency for specialised services for ex-combatants with severe disabilities.

Your tasks
Provide TA, organise and identify specialists for the following activities which will be defined by the results of the needs assessments of each Person with a Disability and of the service provision sector:

1. PREPARATION PHASE

  • Identification of failure in terms of social services, psychological support and human support.
  • Formulating an action plan to improve Angolan service delivery to target group

2. IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION PLAN, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION

  • Contracting out social reintegration of the disabled person taking in the account the actual and future living environment
  • Contracting out vocational trainings for disabled to perform professional activities. Special stock for small lending, creation of adapted micro enterprises and / or work opportunities.
  • Organizing training of Angolan institutions for psychological support to families and availability of resources in order beneficiaries can develop income generation activities taking advantage of existing economic opportunities.
  • Organizing training in occupational activities adapted to the disabled and to avail them of affordable opportunities
  • Orientation of contracted social services to refer family members to the existing projects for the development of economic activities.
  • Assuring access to distribution of tools for those having a viable idea of self employment

  • Providing technical support to create micro and small companies
  • Organizing training of Angolan institutions for economic capacity building to provide income generation/salaries for the People with Disability and/or family / relatives caring for the severe disabled

Your qualification
University degree in Public Health or Social Science or relevant field

  • Minimum of 5 years professional experience, of which 3 years in international projects
  • At least 3 years of experience in the provision of social services for vulnerable groups of population
  • Work experience in technical assistance projects funded by WB or other development agencies advantageous
  • Relevant work experience in the region
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Excellent command of Portuguese and English
  • Excellent degree of stress tolerance and flexibility

Commencement
Expected date of commencement is February 2008. The period of execution will be 12 months.

Contact
For further information please contact
Mrs. Annette Mueller-Roth
Phone: +49 61 96 79-1483
e-mail: Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de

Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de


Project Coordinator – Technical expert in severe disability rehabilitation

Country of assignment and location
Angola, Luanda

GTZ International Services in consortium with MundiServiços has been shortlisted for this World Bank-financed project.

The project
In the sequence of the Lwena Memorandum of Understanding complementary to Lusaka Protocol, the Angola Government has prepared the Angolan Program for Demobilization and Reintegration which is being implemented at National level by The Institute of Socio-Professional Reintegration for Ex-combatants (IRSEM). In the scope of this program assistance is been delivered to facilitate economic and social reintegration of 138.000 Ex-combatants. 105.000 are from Ex-FMU (Unita Forces) and 33.000 from FAA (Angolan Armed Forces).
Among the program beneficiaries can be distinguished special groups as follows:
Female Ex-combatants, Widows of Ex-combatants eligible for PGDR, Minors whose parents are Ex-combatants or their guardian, Ex-combatants with disabilities, designated as a “Vulnerable Group” to whom PGDR has designed a specific strategy to assist them.

Estimated are that 1750-2000 of the 28000 disabled who will be demobilised are severely disabled: para-, hemi-, tetraplegic, multiple limb amputees, deaf, blind, mentally disabled,… They are the specific target group of this project.

The objective of the project is to deliver technical assistance to IRSEM to create conditions for social reintegration and physical rehabilitation of this severely disabled subgroup in order to prevent or minimise the dependency for specialised services for ex-combatants with severe disabilities

Your tasks

Provide TA in order to:

1. PREPARATORY PHASE:

  • organize a needs assessments (from each individual and from the capacity of the service delivery sector),
  • elaborate an individualized action plan and a disability sector plan

2. IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION PLAN, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION

  • the implementation of training to the local service delivery sector
  • assisting IRSEM in contracting out the local service delivery
  • supervision

The following activities have to be organized for the target group

  • Advise to IRSEM on the supply of auxiliary means for physical rehabilitation
  • Elaboration of recommendations for the modalities of collaboration between IRSEM and National and Local agencies involved in long term programs, assisting the reintegration process of severely People with a 100 % Disability
  • Identify and train appropriate partners for the delivery of special services and assistance, necessary to physical rehabilitation and social-economic reintegration of the target group:
  • Medical (surgery, ophtalmology, ENT,…), disability nursing, physiotherapy, prosthetic – orthotic devices and mobility aids,
  • psychosocial support
  • Professional support and economic capacity building (Agriculture activities and creation of micro and small business, Micro finance assistance) to provide income generation
  • Support to communities where disabled live to implement several social initiatives (schools, community centre, irrigation channels, healthcare post etc.) that facilitate the reintegration in shelter communities
  • Your qualification

  • University degree in Social Science or Public Health, with experience in disability
  • Minimum of 10 years professional experience, of which 7 years in international projects
  • At least five years of experience in the provision of social services for vulnerable groups of population
  • Work experience in technical assistance projects funded by WB or other development agencies very advantageous
  • Relevant international work experience in the region highly desirable, intercultural competence required
  • At least five years of experience in monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of projects in the social sector
  • Excellent managerial and communication skills
  • Excellent command of Portuguese (written and spoken) and English
  • Excellent degree of stress tolerance and flexibility
  • Commencement

    Expected date of commencement is February 2008. The period of execution will be 12 months.

    Contact
    For further information please contact
    Mrs. Annette Mueller-Roth
    Phone: +49 61 96 79-1483
    e-mail: Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de

    Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de


    Expert in Identification of sanitation and hospital services, services of continuous support to target group

    Country of assignment and location
    Angola, Luanda

    GTZ International Services in consortium with MundiServiços has been shortlisted for this World Bank-financed project.

    The project
    In the sequence of the Lwena Memorandum of Understanding complementary to Lusaka Protocol, the Angola Government has prepared the Angolan Program for Demobilization and Reintegration which is being implemented at National level by The Institute of Socio-Professional Reintegration for Ex-combatants (IRSEM). In the scope of this program assistance is been delivered to facilitate economic and social reintegration of 138.000 Ex-combatants. 105.000 are from Ex-FMU (Unita Forces) and 33.000 from FAA (Angolan Armed Forces).
    Among the program beneficiaries can be distinguished special groups as follows:
    Female Ex-combatants, Widows of Ex-combatants eligible for PGDR, Minors whose parents are Ex-combatants or their guardian, Ex-combatants with disabilities, designated as a “Vulnerable Group” to whom PGDR has designed a specific strategy to assist them.

    Estimated are that 1750-2000 of the 28000 disabled who will be demobilised are severely disabled: para-, hemi-, tetraplegic, multiple limb amputees, deaf, blind, mentally disabled,… They are the specific target group of this project.

    The objective of the project is to deliver technical assistance to IRSEM to create conditions for social reintegration and physical rehabilitation in order to prevent or minimise the dependency for specialised services for ex-combatants with severe disabilities

    Your tasks
    Provide TA, organise and identify specialists for the following activities which will be reviewed by the results of the needs assessments:

    PREPARATION PHASE

    • Organizing contracted out medical, psychological and social (environmental) assessment of beneficiaries in order to come to an individual screening plan
    • Training of the assessment teams
    • Identification of failure in terms of specialised medical and rehabilitation care, specialised training, psychological support and supply of technical and human support.
    • Formulating an action plan to improve Angolan service delivery to target group

    IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION PLAN, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION

    • Contracting partners to supply of auxiliary means for physical rehabilitation, including prosthesis, crutch/walking-stick, wheelchairs, tricycles, hearing devices, visual aids or others which may be considered necessary
    • Contracting of special services (or to strengthen existing services) such as eye care services, consultants for psychology support, hearing device delivery and consultants, orthopedic and esthetic surgery and neurology services.
    • Development of occupational therapy activities and special tools
    • Contracting supplementary assistance for daily activities
    • Contracting long term medical care (home care and sanitary education of the disabled). Access to specialised consultations, supply of medical and pharmaceutical assistance and/or daily technical support
    • Organizing specialised nursing training (to the disabled person, his/her family or others) by professional Health personnel in: transfers at home, urine and stool evacuation, physiotherapeutic exercises, warning signals, circulation problems, epilepsy crises orientation, orientation for psychological and psychiatrist disorder.
    • Contracting of specific training for persons with lacking sensorial sensitivity, such as sign language for the deaf, improvement of tactile habits and blind orientation and other communication techniques.

    Your qualification

    • University degree in physical or neurological rehab or relevant field
    • Minimum of 7 years professional experience, of which 3 years in international projects
    • At least 3 years of experience in the provision of social services for People with disability
    • Work experience in technical assistance projects funded by WB or other development agencies advantageous
    • Relevant work experience in the region
    • Excellent communication skills
    • Excellent command of Portuguese and English
    • Excellent degree of stress tolerance and flexibility

    Commencement
    Expected date of commencement is February 2008. The period of execution will be 12 months.

    Contact
    For further information please contact
    Mrs. Annette Mueller-Roth
    Phone: +49 61 96 79-1483
    e-mail: Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de



    We Can Do learned about these three job opportunities through the email distribution list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD), which can be subscribed to for free.


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    FUNDING for South Asian Projects on HIV/AIDS Stigma and Discrimination

    Posted on 12 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Funding, Health, HIV/AIDS, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Reach this page at http://tinyurl.com/yv79vu

    South Asia Regional Development Marketplace: Tackling HIV/AIDS Stigma and Discrimination
    For further information please go to:
    http://www.worldbank.org/sardm2008

    On November 26, 2007 the South Asia Development Marketplace on AIDS related stigma and discrimination was launched. Proposals for innovative ideas to tackle stigma can be submitted until January 31, 2008 by community based organizations (CBOs), non-government organizations (NGOs), foundations, private sector groups, universities and schools, local municipal bodies and government institutions – in collaboration with (other) NGOs and CBOs. The 75 candidates who will be selected from India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Sri Lanka, will be invited to the regional Development Marketplace in Mumbai 15 May, 2008, and there 25 winners will be selected and awarded up to US$40,000 each for an 18 month implementation period.

    To know about the South Asia Regional Development Marketplace: Tackling HIV/AIDS Stigma and Discrimination, please visit the website http://www.worldbank.org/sardm2008.


    This annoucement was recently distributed on both the GPDD and the Intl-Dev email distribution lists.


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    PAPER; NEWS: World Bank Report on Disabled in India

    Posted on 1 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, News, Reports, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    New World Bank Report Finds People with Disabilities among the Most Excluded in Indian Society
    Disabled adults have far lower employment rates than others – reduced from 43 % in 1991 to 38% in 2002

    Contact : in New Delhi
    Kiran Negiknegi@worldbank.org

    New Delhi, November 20, 2007: A new World Bank report finds people with disabilities among the most excluded in Indian society Low literacy and employment rates and widespread social stigma are leaving disabled people behind. With better education and more access to jobs, India’s 40 to 90 million disabled people will generate higher growth which will benefit the country as a whole.

    The report entitled People with Disabilities in India: From Commitments to Outcomes, says that as the country makes economic progress, the incidence of communicable disease-induced disabilities such as polio are likely to fall, whereas age and lifestyle-related disabilities and those due to traffic accidents are expected to rise sharply. For example, internationally, the lowest reported disability rates are in sub-Saharan Africa while the highest are in the Organization for Economic Development (OECD) countries. The report therefore highlights the need for a multi-faceted approach so that disabled people realize their full individual potential and maximize their social and economic contribution to society.

    The report finds that people with disabilities are subject to multiple deprivations. Households with disabled members are significantly poorer than average, with lower consumption and fewer assets. Children living with disability are around 4 to 5 times less likely to be in school than Scheduled Tribe and Scheduled Caste children. Disabled adults also have far lower employment rates than the general population – and this fell from 43 % in 1991 to 38% in 2002, even in the midst of economic growth.

    Social attitudes and stigma play an important role in limiting the opportunities of disabled people for full participation in social and economic life, often even within their own families. For example, in surveys carried out for the report, around 50 percent of households saw the cause of disability as a “curse of God”. Women with disabilities face numerous additional challenges.

    “India has an impressive set of policy commitments to its citizens with disabilities”, said Isabel Guerrero, World Bank Country Director for India. “The challenge facing Indian society now is to translate those commitments into better lives for disabled people. This includes identifying disabilities in young children, getting more disabled children into school and preparing them for the workplace and family life, and most importantly working to reduce the social stigma which disabled people face”.

    Despite the many challenges, concerted efforts by the Government, civil society, the private sector, and disabled people themselves, the untapped potential of this large group of citizens can be released for their own benefit as well as for society at large.

    “Increasing the status and social and economic participation of people with disabilities would have positive effects on everyone, not just disabled people” said Philip O’Keefe, Lead Social Protection Specialist and main author of the report. “A simple example is increasing accessibility of public transport and buildings for disabled people – a measure which would benefit a wide range of people including the elderly, pregnant women and children. More broadly, people with disabilities who are better educated and more economically active will generate higher growth in which everyone will share,” he added.

    India’s implementation capacity is generally weak in a number of areas of service delivery which are most critical to improving the situation of disabled people. It is thus not realistic to expect that all the actions needed by many public and non-public actors can be taken all at once. The report highlights the need for prioritization of the most critical interventions to maximize the benefit for people living with disability:

    (i) Preventive care – both for mothers through nutritional interventions, and infants through nutrition and basic immunization coverage
    (ii) Identifying people with disabilities as soon as possible after onset – the system needs major improvements in this most basic function
    (iii) Major improvements in early intervention, which can cost-effectively transform the lives of disabled people, their families, and the communities they live and work in
    (iv) Getting all children with special needs into school and giving them the skills to participate fully in family and economic life
    (v) Expanding the under-developed efforts to improve societal attitudes to people with disabilities, relying on public-private partnerships that build on successful models already operating in India.

    The study points out that it is neither possible nor desirable for the public sector to “do it all”. Instead, partnerships with NGOs, civil society, and the private sector are critical to achieve effective and lasting results. The key step in such partnerships is brining disabled people themselves into the policymaking process along with public and non-governmental institutions.

    Some other findings of the report:

    • There are substantial differences in socio-economic outcomes, social stigma, and access to services by disability type, with those with mental illness and mental retardation in a particularly poor position. There are also major urban/rural differences in outcomes, Gender, class and regional variations are also significant in many cases
    • Estimates vary, there is growing evidence that people with disabilities comprise between 4 and 8 percent of the Indian population (around 40-90 million individuals)
    • Between 1990 and 2020, there is predicted to be a halving of disability due to communicable diseases, a doubling of disability due to injuries/accidents, and a more than 40 percent increase in the share of disability due to non-communicable diseases
    • Disabled people have much lower educational attainment rates, with 52 percent illiteracy against a 35 percent average for the general population.
    • Illiteracy is high among children across all categories, in even the best performing major states, a significant share of out of school children are those with disabilities – Kerala, 27 percent, in Tamil Nadu over 33 percent
    • Private sector employment incentives for hiring disabled people are few and piecemeal. In the late 1990s, employment of People with Disability (PWD) among large private firms was only 0.3 percent of their workforce. Among multinational companies, the situation was far worse, with only 0.05 percent being PWD
    • In early 2006, a National Policy on Persons with Disabilities was approved by Government of India. To date, the only states that have draft disability policies are Chhattisgarh and Karnataka. The Chhattisgarh draft state disability policy can be considered “best practice”, and could provide a model for future national and state-level policy development.

    People can follow this link to learn more about the report, or download individual chapters, at:
    http://go.worldbank.org/48NBTTBRJ0

    Individual chapters include: Socio-Economic Profile of Persons with Disabilities; Attitudes; Health; Education; Employment; Social Protection; Policies and Institutions; and Access

    Or follow this link to download the full report in PDF format (1.8Mb).


    The text for this blog post is taken from a press release from the World Bank.


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    Including the Disabled in Poverty Reduction Strategies

    Posted on 29 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Edited April 8, 2008, to add this paragraph: A new, up-dated version of the handbook described below is now available for free on-line in a format accessible to blind people. It is currently available only in English, but a French translation will be available in a few months from now (April 2008). For more details, go to: https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/04/08/resource-on-line-handbook-supports-disabled-people-in-fighting-poverty/.

    A resource, Making PRSP Inclusive (4 Mb), could help disability advocates in developing countries negotiate with their governments to ensure that disabled people, too, benefit from programs meant to enable them to escape poverty.

    PRSP stands for “Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers” (PRSPs). A PRSP is a paper developed by governments that describe the policy and strategies they need to follow in order to reduce poverty and meet the Millennium Development Goals within their country.

    These four little letters—PRSP—are some of the most powerful letters known in developing countries. These four letters can help fight poverty, disease, starvation, and ignorance among all populations—including the disabled. More precisely, they are meant to help governments figure out exactly what programs and resources they need to solve the biggest challenges that face the poorest citizens of their country. If a PRSP is developed well and wisely, then millions could benefit—and escape poverty. But if it is done poorly, then millions could lose—perhaps most particularly people with disabilities whose needs may often be overlooked.

    PRSPs are never—or at least should never be—developed by government officials in isolation. Donors and development banks usually also participate in the process. They are able to offer advice based on what they have learned about PRSPs developed and implemented in many other developing countries. But the most important partners in the PRSP process are members of civil society. That means people like you—represented through non-governmental organizations (NGOs); trade unions; academic institutions; media outlets; federations of poor people; or, essentially, any organization that is not a government agency. Only the ordinary citizens of a country can best know what their own most urgent needs are. And only poor citizens know what barriers they most need to overcome before they can escape poverty.

    The trouble is: in many countries, (Disabled People’s Organizations) DPOs, and people with disabilities generally, don’t participate in the process of developing their country’s PRSP. In some countries, the disability movement may still be weak and fragmented. Also, people with disabilities continue to be “invisible” in most societies: non-disabled people simply don’t think to include them unless they are asked or reminded.

    The handbook, Making PRSP Inclusive, was written by the German chapter of Handicap International and the Christoffel-Blindenmission Deutschland (German Christian Blind Mission), and was financed by the World Bank and the German government. It is meant for everyone working in the field of disability including NGOs, service providers, professional associations, people with disabilities themselves, DPOs, and parents’ associations, who wants to participate in their national PRSP process. It is for people who want to ensure that the needs and concerns of disabled people are well represented when their government makes important decisions about what projects they should support; what policies they should implement; and what strategies they should follow when fighting poverty.

    The handbook will help readers better understand what the PRSP; who helps develop a country’s PRSP; how the PRSP process works; who finances (funds, pays for) the PRSP; why it is important to include disability issues in your country’s PRSP; and how a DPO can participate in the PRSP. It includes ideas for how you can identify and recruit possible allies so you can help each other become more involved in the PRSP process in your country. It also includes suggestions for how you and the other groups you work with can develop a joint strategy for presenting the needs of disabled people in your country. Later chapters include detailed guidance on how you can work to develop a stronger network or alliance of DPOs and other organizations in your country to advocate or lobby for the needs of disabled people. “Case studies” are presented that describe how the disability movement has already succeeded in including disabled people in the PRSP process in Honduras, Bangladesh, Sierra Leone, Tanzania

    For people new to disability–or for people who are looking for language that could help them explain disability to others–the Making PRSP Inclusive guidebook includes a section that defines disability and explains the medical, charity, and social models of disability and the World Health Organization (WHO) classifications of disability. (For additional explanation of the medical, charity, and social models of disability, and other models, see the paper Disability Movement from Charity to Empowerment by Kishor Bhanushali.)

    The whole handbook, Making PRSP Inclusive, can be downloaded in PDF format; it is 4 megabytes, so people with a slow modem dial-up will need to allow plenty of time. It may also be possible for you to obtain permission to reproduce and distribute the handbook within your country: for instructions, see the page entitled “Imprint” in the handbook. [EDITED TO ADD: As indicated in the first paragraph of this article, a new, updated version of this handbook is now available on-line, without needing to download any PDF files.]

    Handicap International has a full listing of its publications and resources that, like Making PRSP inclusive, can be downloaded for free. Some are targeted at disability advocates who need better tools and resources for educating their country governments about disability and persuading them to be more inclusive. Other publications are targeted at mainstream development organizations who want to find more effective ways of ensuring that people with disabilities are able to fully participate in the programs and projects they offer.

    The information contained in this We Can Do post was gathered from the Handicap International web site; from the World Bank web site; and from the Making PRSP Inclusive guidebook itself.



    Learn about the updated version of this handbook at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/04/08/resource-on-line-handbook-supports-disabled-people-in-fighting-poverty/

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    Finding Development Organizations and Resources

    Posted on 14 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Small, local DPOs (Disabled People Organizations) can be a valuable resource for disabled people in the communities where they work. But they cannot fight poverty and oppression among disabled people (or Deaf people) on their own. No single organization can.

    Because of this, many DPOs may wish to reach out to larger, mainstream organizations. For example, perhaps you want support in persuading a micro-entrepreneural program to do a better job of including disabled would-be business owners in their training programs. Or you want to make sure the new water pump being installed in the village where you live or work is accessible for the many women in the community who have lost one or both arms due to land-mine accidents. How do you find organizations that might help? Or, how do you contact the organizations that are already working in your community or country?

    In some cases, well-intended international organizations may implement projects that inadvertently create barriers for people with disabilities in your country. They may build schools without ramps. Or they offer training programs but fail to obtain sign language interpreters so that deaf people can participate in them. In most cases, this may be due to ignorance. They may lack experience with disabilities and fail to realize that the way in which they implement their programs can create problems for disabled people. Or they may even mistakenly assume that “there are no disabled people in this village” or that “disabled people aren’t interested in participating in this program” or “this program is for everyone, therefore disabled people are already included.” It can sometimes be worth the effort to reach out to these organizations to alert them to potential barriers for people with disabilities in your community and to offer your knowledge and advice in removing these barriers.

    One starting point would be a listing from the World Bank entitled “Related Links, or Who’s Who in Disability and Development” at http://go.worldbank.org/DX34O72HO2.

    Here, you will find a list of multi-lateral donors and bi-laterial donors; civil society organizations; organizations committed to corporate social responsibility (i.e., businesses that try to behave responsibily in the communities and countries where they operate); foundations; bibliographic sources; sources for statistics; and technology (internet accessibility). If you’re looking for disability-related statistics, then you may also wish to see an earlier We Can Do post entitled “Numbers Don’t Feed People” for links to more resources.

    In case you didn’t already know: Multi-lateral donors are development banks like the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, Inter-American Development Bank and so forth. These are generally supported with donations from dozens of country governments. Their budget is used to make loans that support the country governments of developing countries in establishing development projects like roads, water and other infrastructure, schools, training programs for medical personnel, and so forth. Bi-lateral donors are individual country governments, like the United States or Japan, that make their grants or loans directly to the countries they support. Usually multi-lateral and bi-lateral donors do not directly fund smaller, local organizations: if you wish to receive funding from these organizations you may need to work through your country’s government. However, in some cases, these donors have made commitments to ensure that the projects they already support are accessible to people with disabilities. They may welcome your feedback and insights on how to do a better job of including disabled people in their programs.

    DPOs may wish to explore the web sites for mainstream development banks, civil society organizations, and other mainstream organizations. This would allow you to become familiar with the development projects they support in your area. You could then contact the organization to start a dialogue to help ensure that these projects do not ignore or overlook the needs of people with disabilities in your country.

    What about the other side of the equation? What if you’re a large, mainstream development organization that wants to find disabled people in the communities where you work so you can make sure your projects are accessible to them? One of the earliest posts I wrote for We Can Do, entitled “Finding Local Disability Organizations” should be suitable for your needs. You may also want to explore the many links in the We Can Do blogroll, posted at the right hand side and also at the very bottom of every page at We Can Do.

    (Full disclosure alert: Yes, I currently work at the World Bank. However, I do not work directly on disability-related issues there. I maintain the We Can Do blog in my own time. Information posted here cannot be interpreted as speaking in any way for the World Bank or any unit or department within the Bank.)


    If you have been to We Can Do before then you may have noticed that this blog has a new appearance and structure. How do you like it? Do you find it easier, or harder, to navigate and find the information you’re looking for? Any other feedback on how to improve the We Can Do blog in general? Please share your thoughts in the comments area at the post where I describe We Can Do’s new presentation or email me at ashettle at patriot dot net.


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    Sharing University Papers on the World Bank

    Posted on 2 September 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Opportunities, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , |

    Are you now, or have you been, a university student (undergraduate, graduate, or post-graduate)? Have you written a research paper for your university about the World Bank?

    The World Bank is interested in seeing what you have written–and sharing it with other interested parties. And in case you were wondering: their page states that the World Bank “will not reject papers simply because they are critical of the World Bank. At the World Bank, we encourage a free exchange of ideas around all key topics related to development.”

    For more details on how you can participate, see http://www.worldbank.org/sup. This could be an opportunity for you to share your analysis and conclusions with a wider audience. You can also consult the database for papers written by other university students. At present, they only accept papers written in English, Spanish, or French. They may expand to other languages in the future.

    Unfortunately, the search engine only allows for search by title, author, university, or country–not, apparently, by the full body of the paper itself. I tried looking for papers focusing on disability issues and found nothing. It is not clear, however, if there truly is nothing or if this is a limitation of the current search engine.

    If you are looking to write a paper on World Bank activities with disabled people, then one starting point for finding information would be at http://www.worldbank.org/disability. Also try plugging in the word “disability” (or Deaf, blind, etc.) in the search engine from the main page for the World Bank. You can also look up information about some of the projects done by the World Bank around the world: look at the navigation bar at the top of the World Bank web site and click on “Projects & Operations.” Also look around http://www.worldbank.org/sup for more advice to student researchers on the World Bank in general. (If you have a visual impairment and have trouble navigating the World Bank site: I’m limited in what I could do to help, but I’d be interested in hearing from you.)

    Have you written a paper that’s about international development but not primarily focused on the World Bank? The World Bank Student University Paper page recommends that you investigate other on-line communities such as the Development Gateway.

    Full Disclosure Alert: I am employed at the World Bank, though not in the disability unit. However, I do not represent or speak for the World Bank in any way. I maintain the We Can Do blog (and my other blog) entirely in my own free time in my personal capacity as a private citizen. Any opinions expressed in this post, or in anything else written by me in either of my blogs, are wholly my own. My opinions cannot be taken as a reflection on World Bank positions or policies, whether related to people with disabilities or otherwise. This includes positions or policies from the disability unit of the World Bank.


    Guest bloggers are welcome to submit essays, announcements, resources, articles, case studies, and opinion pieces of their own to “We Can Do.” I encourage you to first read the About We Can Do page and also the Why We Can Do page.

    I don’t have a written set of guidelines for guest bloggers–yet. But I’m working on them. In the meantime, if you’re interested, please contact me at ashettle [at] patriot.net. (Replace [at] with the at sign @ and type the email address as one word with no spaces.)



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