Apply for 6th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD)

Posted on 20 January 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, indigenous people, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
Invites women with disabilities around the world to apply for the
6th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD)
August 6 – 27, 2012 (Tentative)

Eugene, Oregon, USA

ABOUT MIUSA:
Mobility International USA (MIUSA) is a U.S.-based, non-profit organization whose mission is to empower people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

ABOUT THE WILD PROGRAM:
MIUSA’s Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD) will bring together approximately 30 women leaders with disabilities from approximately 30 different countries, to strengthen leadership skills, create new visions and build international networks of support for inclusive international development programming.

During the three-week program, participants will take part in workshops, seminars and discussions, conduct on-site visits, and participate in team-building activities, to explore challenges and exchange strategies for increasing leadership opportunities and participation of women and girls with disabilities in international development programs.

WHO CAN APPLY: ELIGIBILITY
Women with disabilities who are from:

  • South Pacific
  • Middle East
  • Latin America
  • Caribbean
  • Eurasia
  • Asia
  • Africa

Women with disabilities who are:

  • Established leaders and/or professionals
  • Emerging young leaders, ages 21 and above

Women with disabilities who speak or use at least ONE of the following languages:

  • Conversational English (minimum)
  • Spanish
  • Arabic
  • Sign Language; preferably familiar with American Sign Language (ASL)

•    MIUSA uses ASL sign language interpreters who are experienced and skilled at providing interpretation for individuals who use different sign languages.
•    Spoken and sign language interpretation will be provided during formal program activities, workshops, discussions and site visits only.

WHO CAN APPLY: QUALIFICATIONS
Women leaders with disabilities who demonstrate:

  • Personal experience with disability, an understanding of issues, and a commitment to working for the rights of women and girls with disabilities
  • Membership in an organization led by and for people with disabilities, or by and for women, with particular attention to issues of women and girls with disabilities; or civil society organization committed to the inclusion of women and girls with disabilities
  • Commitment to and capacity for increasing leadership opportunities of women with disabilities in the community and/or country
  • Commitment to and capacity for increasing the participation of women and girls with disabilities in international development programs

MIUSA will strive for diversity of geographic region, age, ethnic background, and types of disability in final selection of qualified participants. MIUSA will give priority to qualified women with disabilities who:

  • Are from rural communities
  • Are members of indigenous groups
  • Have not participated in a MIUSA exchange program
  • Have not visited the United States

PROGRAM OVERVIEW:
The WILD program will include interactive workshops, site visits and practical activities on priority issues for women with disabilities, including:

•    National and International Policies and Legislation, including the UN Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Disability Policy
•    Educational rights and opportunities including specialized and inclusive schools, policy and legal rights, services and accommodations for accessibility
•    Leadership for economic empowerment, including higher education, training models, supported employment, microenterprise, private sector partnerships, career mentorship, skill-building, employment policy, and career development.
•    Health and family issues including parenting, health care, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health and violence prevention
•    Using the media
•    Coalition building
•    Organizational development and sustainability, including funding resources and strategies, and fostering partnerships with community organizations and businesses
•    Goals and action plans to promote collaborative relationships with other organizations for the inclusion of women and girls with disabilities in international development programs.
•    Inclusive international development, including exchanging strategies for inclusion with representatives from U.S-based international development organizations and/or human rights organizations
•    Cultural and team-building experiences
•    Mentorship and networking

LODGING AND TRANSPORTATION:

•    Simple but comfortable lodging with a local host family will be provided. During one-week of the program, shared lodging will be provided at a simple outdoor retreat center.
•    Breakfast, lunch and dinner will be provided each day. All supplemental meals, snacks, or personal incidentals (including laundry) will be at the expense of each delegate.
•    Accessible public transportation will be provided.
Note: Please do not expect “luxury” accommodations, meals, or transportation.

PROGRAM COST:
Accepted participants will be responsible for:
1.    $250 USD program fee.  Limited scholarships may be available based on applicant’s demonstrated financial need. Applications for a scholarship will be provided upon acceptance to the WILD program.
2.    Obtaining a current, valid passport and U.S. visa, including all related costs such as travel to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in the home country

MIUSA will provide:
1.    Roundtrip airplane tickets for participants to travel from home countries to Eugene, Oregon, USA
2.    Travel health insurance during the WILD program
3.    Food, lodging, program activities and accessible public transportation during the WILD program
4.    Disability-related accommodations, including sign language interpreters, funding for personal assistants, etc.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 1, 2012

APPLY EARLY!
We receive a large number of applications for a limited number of openings.
Send your application by e-mail (preferred), or fax:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) / 2012 WILD
Email: womenleaders@miusa.org
Fax:  +1-541-343-6812 / Website: www.miusa.org

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Disabled women activists change the world through YouTube music video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)

Posted on 6 January 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, News, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mobility International USA
Website: www.miusa.org

Disabled women activists change the world through YouTube music video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)

January 6, 2011 – Signing and singing with passion in Arabic, Spanish and English, 54 disabled women activists from 43 countries celebrate the achievements, pride and solidarity of women with disabilities around the world. These leaders are revolutionizing the status of women and girls worldwide. Filmed during MIUSA’s 5th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD), the Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)  music video release marks the beginning of MIUSA’s 30th Anniversary year-long celebration.

Please share the YouTube link to Music Video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxxomUVsSik

Our goal is to reach 2,500 views and to raise funds through donations for the next WILD program empowering women and girls with disabilities. Every donation large or small brings us closer to that goal! To donate, visit http://www.miusa.org/donate/wild.

WILD delegates in the video come from Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Bangladesh, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria, Palestinian Territories, Peru, Philippines, South Africa, Sri Lanka, St. Lucia, Syria, Turkey, Uganda, United States of America, Vietnam, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The video is captioned. For the text video description in English click here.

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to empower people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development. For more information visit www.miusa.org.

###

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Report: Pacific Sisters with Disabilities at the Intersection of Discrimination

Posted on 4 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Employment, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Policy & Legislation, Rehabilitation, Reports, Resources, signed languages, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , |

Both people with disabilities and also women experience discrimination in countries around the world, including within the Pacific region. Women with disabilities experience a double dose of discrimination. A newly released report, entitled Pacific Sisters with Disabilities: at the Intersection of Discrimination (PDF format, 981 Kb), reviews the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. It includes discussion on the challenges of discrimination against women with disabilities; laws among Pacific Island governments; and policies and programs within disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), women’s organizations, and mainstream international development partners. The report concludes with recommendations for improving the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. This April 2009 report, by authors Daniel Stubbs and Sainimili Tawake, covers the situation of 22 Pacific countries and territories. It was published by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Pacific Center.

The research leading to this report found that a few helpful laws, policies, and systems of practice do exist in some countries. However, disabled women do still tend to fare more poorly compared to disabled men or compared to non-disabled women. Specifically, they are often less educated, experience more unemployment, face more violence and abuse, encounter more poverty, are more isolated, have less access to health care, and have lower social status. Women with disabilities also have less access to information about education, health care, their reproductive rights, recreation, politics, or even the weather.

Unfortunately, very limited documentation on the situation of women with disabilities exist in any region, including the Pacific. This report relies partly on extrapolation from what is known about women with disabilities in other regions. This information is supplemented, where possible, with local data, statistics, anecdotes, and other information specific to disabled women in the Pacific.

The full 90-page report can be downloaded for free, in PDF format (981 Kb) at: http://www.undppc.org.fj/_resources/article/files/Final%20PSWD%20BOOKLET.pdf.



I learned about this report via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development email discussion list.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24, 2009

Posted on 9 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I am re-posting the following announcement, partly as a reminder for people who wish to register but also to correct and clarify the instructions for registration:

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24

Posted on 4 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, accessibility, Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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Recursos Españoles: Women’s Health Handbook; and Helping Deaf Children (en ingles y español)

Posted on 10 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Deaf, Health, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Texto español

Hesperian announces two new titles in Spanish and a spiffy new Spanish Web Site:
Un Manual de salud para mujeres con dispacidad, the Spanish version of A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities, arrived to our offices today and we are very excited to have this wonderful material now available in Spanish. Un manual de salud para mujeres con discapacidad, will help women with disabilities overcome these barriers and improve their general health, self-esteem, and abilities to care for themselves and participate in their communities.

We also released the Spanish version of Helping Children Who are Deaf, Ayudar a los niños sordos. Packed with simple activities, this book is a great resource for parents, caregivers, health promoters, and others in teaching children who do not hear well how to communicate to the best of his or her ability.

Both titles can be downloaded http://espanol.hesperian.org/Bienvenidos_de_Hesperian.php and purchased from our brand new Spanish website. This user-friendly, easy-to-navigate web site offers all of the features of our website in English – current health news, information on upcoming publications, and free down-loadable versions of most of our titles. Plus a complete bookstore, all in Spanish, ready to ship anywhere in the world. At http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php


Hesperian anuncia dos nuevos libros en español y nuestra nueva página web

Con el libro Un manual de salud para mujeres con discapacidad, Hesperian les ofrece a las mujeres con discapacidad una manera práctica de conocer sus derechos para gozar de buena salud. Combinando las experiencias y consejos de mujeres con discapacidad de 42 países, con información sobre la salud, profesional y al corriente, este manual es fácil de entender, esta plenamente ilustrado y tiene mucha información útil.

También nos complace presentar el libro Ayudar a los niños sordos, el título más reciente de la Serie de asistencia temprana. Este libro está lleno de actividades sencillas y será un gran recurso para las personas que cuidan a niños sordos, ya sean padres, otros cuidadores y/o promotores de salud, ya que ofrece herramientas para enseñarle a la niña o niño a comunicarse lo mejor que pueda.

Estos libros, además de todos los títulos de Hesperian, pueden ser descargados http://espanol.hesperian.org/Bienvenidos_de_Hesperian.php o adquiridos desde nuestra ¡NUEVA PÁGINA WEB EN ESPAÑOL,! Ahora puede descargar nuestros libros, buscar traducciones en otros idiomas, ver nuestros proyectos actuales y comprar libros en nuestra tienda virtual, listos para ser enviados a cualquier parte del mundo — ¡Todo esto y más ahora en español! A http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php



Thank you to the Hesperian Foundation for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do. The Hesperian Foundation first became famous for their publication, Where There is No Doctor (Donde No Hay Doctor). This book has been used to save lives in hundreds of rural communities throughout developing countries around the world—precisely in places where there is no doctor. Since then, the Hesperian Foundation has produced a growing collection of publications targeted at people with developing countries who may have few other resources that they can use to treat their health or to learn how their community can become a happier place for children with disabilities. Anyone who lives or works in a rural community with few local resources is strongly urged to explore their web site. (http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php en español, http://www.hesperian.org in English).

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JOB POST: External Consultant, Gender and Disabilities, Afghanistan

Posted on 30 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

TERMS OF REFERENCE

To identify best practices on how to include women with disabilities in the design of projects on disability

1. Introduction:

In 2005 and 2006 Handicap International has conducted a national survey on disability (NDSA, National Disability Survey in Afghanistan). In this study the number of persons with disability (PwD) in Afghanistan was estimated between 747,500 and 867,100, considering 2.7% as a prevalence rate of Afghan with disabilities. An average of 1 out of 5 households has at least one person with disability. More than half of persons with disabilities in Afghanistan are living in Central, Western and Southern regions of Afghanistan. The number of PwDs in Herat, Kabul and Kandahar Provinces are among the highest in the country. Many years of war, landmines, but also impairments acquired from birth, inadequate healthcare, congenital disabilities, accidents or malnutrition and preventable diseases such as polio or tuberculosis made hundred of thousands of Afghans disabled.

Considering Afghanistan contest Women with Disabilities (WWDs) suffer double vulnerability: first they are Women and second they are disabled

The government has limited programme interventions in addressing issues related with Disability and for the PwDs. For the last few years, a number of organizations in the non government sector have come up with programs and projects to the benefits of the PwDs. Little is know about Women with Disability and the constraints they face in their daily lives and the quality of life they enjoy in Afghanistan. That can be reliably need for designing understand projects.

2. Background

Handicap International is an international organization specialized in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, offering them assistance and supporting them in their efforts to become self-reliant. Since its creation, the organization has set up programs in approximately 60 countries and intervened in many emergency situations. It has a network of eight national associations (Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and USA) which provide human and financial resources, manage projects and raise awareness of Handicap International’s actions and campaigns.

Handicap International has been working for Afghan people since the mid-1980’s when it started its activities for the Afghan refugees in Pakistan. The Belgium branch of Handicap International started implementing projects in Afghanistan in the early 1990’s while the French one started in the beginning of 2002. In April 2006, the two programs merged under the leadership of HI France.

Today, in response to the pressing needs of persons with disabilities, Handicap International Afghanistan works in the Southern (Kandahar), Western (Herat) and Central (Kabul) regions of Afghanistan, which covers more than half of the people with disabilities in the country. Handicap International in Afghanistan currently operates 8 development projects managed by more than 200 national staff and 7 expatriates. Hl works in four main sectors:

• Disability advocacy and awareness
• Physical rehabilitation and physiotherapy
• Socio-economic inclusion
• Mine risk education

At the advocacy level, HI coordinates its activities with the major international organizations working on disability issues in Afghanistan: Swedish Committee for Afghanistan (SCA), SERVE, and International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). At the local level, HI provides technical assistance to CCD (Community Center for Disabled), is a member of the advocacy committee of the Afghan Civil Society Forum, and supports local DPOs in Herat by providing them technical support and materials, and conducting joint projects on disability awareness.

For the past three years, Handicap International provided rehabilitation services (physiotherapy and orthopedic devices) to an average of 20 000 individuals per year in the Southern region and Herat Province. Our inclusion programs in Herat and Kabul directly provided working opportunities, trainings and referral to other relevant services to an average of more than 3000 persons with disabilities per year. Our teams in Helmand and Kandahar provinces delivered awareness sessions on mine and UXOs related risks to over 200 000 persons at community level, in IDP camps, encashment centers and to Kochies populations (nomads). HI conducted awareness campaigns all over the country to raise awareness on the situation of people with disabilities through photo exhibitions, radio programs and TV spots broadcasted on the main national Medias.

3. Justification of support

Due to lack of expertise in HI Afghanistan and the time needed to complete this work an expert in Gender and Disability is needed to identify best practices on how to include women in the design and implementations of projects on disability”.

4. Ideal candidate

The ideal candidate
• An expert in Gender and Disability. Due to cultural sensitivities, the consultant must be female.
• Teaching, production of guideline and Capacity building supervision experience with DPOs/PwDs,
• Working experience in developing country (preferable)

5. Objectives:

5.1 General objective
To provide a guidelines on best practices on how to include women in the design and implementations of projects on disability

5.2 Activities:
• Review documentations on the situation of women with disabilities (WWDs) in Afghanistan
• Review HI Afghanistan projects documents
• To meet different stakeholders relevant to this study
• To visit Hi projects according to security.
• Assess the attitude and perception of the WWDs by Women with Disabilities themselves, their relatives, Communities and local authorities
• Identify the opportunities and barriers WWD face when accessing services.

6. Expected result:

• Guidelines on best practices on how to include women in the design and implementations of projects on disability
• An example of leaflet and booklet on best practices designed in English.

7. Preparation for the Mission
From HI-Afghanistan
1. To sign and send the contract to the resource person
2. To provide the consultancy fee
3. To provide HI projects
4. To organise all logistic and administrative arrangements for the resource person
5. To provide accommodation in the HI guesthouse in Kabul and Herat
6. To provide an HI support letter for the visa
7. To pay for the travel costs
8. To pay for the visa costs

From the consultant
1. To fulfil requirements of the TOR
2. To secure the visa for Afghanistan with the support of the HI letter
3. To provide insurance for herself
4. To sign the contract.

8. Background documentation required

1. All documents to be supplied upon request.

9. Duration of the mission

6 weeks consultancy excluding travel time, 3rd week of February 2009 in agreement with the HI Gender and Disability Consultant

10. Budget
TITLE LOCAL CURRENCY EURO CODE PCAS CODE PCAF
Consultancy fee 125 USD per day of consultancy plus 2 days of travel plus 3 days preparation prior arrival
International Transport HI
Local Transport HI
Accommodation HI
TOTAL

Signature DP Signature Consultant

Sami ul Haq Sami
Advocacy and Awareness Coordinator
Handicap International
Mobile No.: 00 93 (0)799 30 61 32
Add: House # 548, Street # 5th, Qala-e-Fatullah, Kabul, Afghanistan
Email: samiulhaq@hiafgha.org
samiulhaq_sami@hotmail.com
Web: www.handicap-international.org



Thank you to Sami ul Haq Sami for passing along this job post announcement.

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Training Course: Women in Politics, Governance, Decision Making–March; July; November 2009

Posted on 24 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Democratic Participation, East Asia Pacific Region, Education and Training Opportunities, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note to We Can Do readers: This opportunity is not specifically focused on women with disabilities. But readers who wish to encourage more women with disabilities in their country to become involved with politics may wish to consider the following course. I am not familiar with the extent to which the Center for Asia Pacific Women in Politics has had experience in accommodating the needs of students with disabilities. Disabled people interested in this course will wish to communicate with them carefully about their needs.]

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

The Center for Asia Pacific Women in Politics (CAPWIP)
http://www.capwip.org/
is a non-partisan, non-profit and
non-governmental regional organization dedicated to promoting equal participation of women in politics, governance and decision-making. CAPWIP is happy to announce the 2009 training schedule for the course on “Making Governance Gender Responsive” (MGGR): 20-27 March, 23-30 July, and 20-27 November 2009. The courses will be held at the Asian Institute of Management Conference Center (ACCM) http://www.accm.aim.edu.ph/ in the Philippines.

This course is targeted at Parliamentarians, legislators (national and local) political parties, local governments (city/municipality)
and the government bureaucracy, training institutes, international and local agencies/organizations human rights and other civil society organizations.

Making Governance Gender Responsive (MGGR)
is a generic course that can be adapted and modified to suit the needs of the different countries. Specifically, the participants are expected to:

§ Enhance their understanding of Gender and Development (GAD), and
governance concepts.
§ Gain appreciation of gender-related and governance issues, and concerns.
§ Identify gender biases in governance.
§ Acquire skills in identifying and analyzing gender biases and
concerns through case examples of strategies and practices to address gender biases.
§ Identify gender biases in the participant’s sphere of influence – A
Change Management Approach.
§ Formulate Action Plans: Institutional and Individual.

Join the hundreds of MGGR graduates ….during the last 9 years…from all over the world who have found this course most effective!

Sincerely yours,

(signed)
Sylvia Munoz-Ordonez
Executive Director
CAPWIP

You may also download a more extensive information sheet in Word format from the CAPWIP website:
http://www.capwip.org/training/mggr.htm

CENTER FOR ASIA-PACIFIC WOMEN IN POLITICS (CAPWIP)
4227-4229 Tomas Claudio Street, Baclaran, 1700 Parañaque City, Metro Manila, Philippines
Telephones: (632)8514954; 8522112;
TeleFax: (632)8522112;
Mobile Phone: +63 9189403711
e-mail: capwip@capwip.org; mggr09@gmail.com; mggrtraining09@capwip.org

http://www.capwip.org/
http://www.onlinewomeninpolitics.org/



I received this announcement via the email-based Network of Women with Disabilities, a free listserv targeted at women with disabilities from around the world.

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Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan

Posted on 19 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Pakistan Disabled People’s Organization

Subject: Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan

Respected All,

Greetings from Pakistan Disabled Peoples’ Organization (PDPO/DPI – Pakistan),

The issue of disability is gaining more and more importance all over the world as well as in Pakistan due the disability movement for a “rights based society” initiated by organizations of PWDs themselves since almost two decades. World Bank, World Health Organization and other donor and development agencies have included this issue in their mandates. Governments have framed various policies for PWDs including reservation of jobs, concession facilities in travelling, special training institutions etc. The Government of Pakistan has made efforts to support the rights of Persons with Disabilities in the view of BMF and National Policy on disability and now Alhamdurillah Pakistan has signed the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

However, despite these efforts, the sad fact is that most people with disabilities especially women with disabilities and their families remain completely un-served by government, NGOs and even DPOs.

Women with disabilities are disadvantaged in several key areas when compared with other women, men with disabilities, and the society as a whole. These women face a triple handicap and discrimination due to their disability, gender and developing world status. At the same time, Stigma remains in society at large, within communities, and even, in many cases of uneducated segments of society, within families who see disabled women as a loss of productive potential and a drain on family resources. So, while on the one hand, the strong cultural family network ensures their financial security, on the other, the stigma often results in their remaining invisible members of society.

The major barrier to employment and other socio-economic benefits for Women with Disabilities in our society continues to be attitudinal barriers; stereotypical thinking and assumption about what women with disabilities can and can’t do.

The truth is that, the range of abilities of persons within any disabilities group is enormous, we have a large number of women with disabilities in Pakistan who are taking part in the activities of daily life with courage, there is dire need to involve that women as a role model or highlight their efforts to understand the social and economic realities and possibilities with regards to disability.

We need to get rid of our stereotypical images and view each “individual” as just that “an individual”. Access to and sharing of information resources can build the capacity of local and national disability organizations, promote advocacy by and for people with disability and improve the quality of life experienced by women with disabilities.

The fist humble step of this forum is to bridge the information and communication gap between all the leading women with disabilities in Pakistan.

On behalf of PDPO/DPI – Pakistan, I would like to request you all to share your short profile with us by the end of this week, after the completion of selection process of forum members, we will decide the date for Coordination Meeting.

Your feedback and coordination will assist us to make it successful

Looking forward to hear from you,

Regards,

Abia Akram,
Women Coordinator – PDPO/DPI, Pakistan
Abia.m.ilc@gmail.com
92-321-5278021



This email from Abia Akram came to me via Ghulam Nabi Nizamani. People or organizations who wish to network with the Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan should communicate directly with Abia Akram, NOT We Can Do.

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Call for Papers, Women with Disabilities

Posted on 17 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Journal for Disability and International Development – Call for Contributions
Issue 01-2009
Deadline: 31.01.2009 (January 31, 2009)
Topic: Women with Disabilities: Identification and Participation in the Women’s and Disability Movement
Since the early 1990s, women with disabilities have increasingly been calling for the recognition and inclusion of the gender dimension to disability, both in disability politics and in the women’s movement.

The women’s movement as such has been emphasising on the multiple dimensions that make up the diverse situations of women around the world. While it therefore could have been key to addressing the specific concerns of women with disabilities, it has fallen short of acknowledging disability as an added liability in the past. As such, disability has long been ignored by the mainstream women’s movement both in theory and practice.

At the same time, the disability movement has, in its beginnings, conveyed disability as a homogeneous aspect: In its efforts to bring disability to the public’s attention, individual diversities in impairments and other dimensions to disability such as the gender dimension, were largely neglected which finally led to limited agendas, excluding women with disabilities over long periods.

Where do we stand now and how has the situation for women with disabilities changed?

Since recent years the international legal framework for women with disabilities has changed positively. Global and regional networks of disabled women have been formed and are now actively promoting their agenda in both the women’s as well as the disability movement. Stakeholders of both movements are increasingly engaging in dialogue or are openly recognising and even including the perspective of women with disabilities.

This issue 01-2009 of the Journal of Disability and International Development intends to look at how these changes have been translated into practice and how these developments have impacted on the identification and participation of women with disabilities in both movements.

Suggestions for contributions:

We welcome contributions especially with a regional or country-specific perspective on:

 What are lessons learned/success stories in bringing/including women with disabilities onto the agenda of both movements?
 How does culture influence the promotion and perception of the rights of women with disabilities in these movements?
 What are barriers for women with disabilities in becoming active participants/actors in the disability and/or women’s movement? Which developments have the disability and/or women’s rights movement undergone with regards to women with disabilities?
 What are ways and means for ensuring the integration of the rights of disabled women and participation of disabled women in these movements?
 What is the impact of these developments on identity and self-perception of women with disabilities as individuals as well as in organisations?
 What are the developments with regard to women with disabilities in these movements in the academic field/research and teaching?
 What has been the influence of including a gender dimension in disability and development on the policy and programming work of international development organisations, especially those working in the field of disability in development of women in development?

Contact: Dr. Christiane Noe: Noe.Christiane@web.de , Susanne Wilm: Susanne_Wilm@yahoo.de

About us
The Journal for Disability and International Development is published by the forum ‘Disability and International Development’. Since 1990, it is published three times a year. The target group of the journal are scientists, activists, professionals and interested people from all over the world.
It aims to be a forum for international exchange about the disability. Beside this, it promotes professional discussions on educational, social, developmental and intercultural issues in the context of disability and development. Each issue of the journal has a leading topic that brings together different articles and views.

The journal team and the advisory board try to win experts from all continents to contribute to the journal. The journal is published in German and English and available online at: http://www.zbdw.de.



Thank you to Joan Durocher for circulating this call to papers. Authors should please submit their papers directly to the journal as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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NEWS: Bangladesh Women with Disabilities Hold National Dialogue

Posted on 16 December 2008. Filed under: News, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Press Release on “National Dialogue on the Rights of Women with Disabilities”
A “National Dialogue on the Rights of Women with Disabilities” was held at the Dhaka Press Club VIP Lounge in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 27 November 2008 between 10.00 am to 01.00 pm. The conference was well attended, with over 120 participants, from a wide range of backgrounds— individuals living with disabilities and their families, political leaders, foreign mission/high commission representatives, National/International NGO representatives, providers of disability and social support services. A Number of important government officials and media personnel were also present. The conference opened with a welcoming address from Mr. Abdus Sattar Dulal, the founder and Executive Director of BPKS, the sponsoring agency for the event. Ashrafun Nahar, Coordinator of the Women with Disabilities Network at BPKS presented the key note paper for the program. Also addressing the participants were Mr. Bill Winkley, Executive Director, One Family International and Charles Whitley, First Secretary of the European Commission to Bangladesh, Kamar Munir, Joint Secretary and Alimusshan, Additional Secretary, NGO affairs Buroue. The program was organized by BPKS, with support from the European Union. Mr Rezul Karim, Secretary for Forest and Environment Ministry of Bangladesh spoke as chief guest that we should do our duty properly concerning WWDs right and they should included in mainstream development process strongly. They are the part of our society and nation also.

Information was also provided about the situation for Women with Disabilities, their needs and their rights. The objective of the dialogue was to provide an opportunity for participants to learn about the complex issues facing WWDs at the individual, social and national levels.

The Dialogue resulted in the generation of a number of key recommendations in relation to Women with disabilities and;
• Women’s Development policy
• Women Rights
• Accessible environment
• Education
• Employment and Economic independence
• Political empowerment
• Economical participation
• Justice in relation to violence against women

Established in 1985, BPKS works all over the country. Nationally and internationally, BPKS provides information, guidance and support in forming representative disabled people’s organizations and promoting the self confidence and capacity building of individuals and groups at the grassroots level. It is replicating its own approach, called PSID (Persons with Disability Self Initiative to Development) to build the self-reliance and strength of persons with disabilities. BPKS networks with a variety of other agencies to motivate persons with disabilities so that maximum development impact can be achieved. With the support of its donors, BPKS works improve the quality of life of persons with disabilities throughout the country. To find out more about the work of BPKS and how you can get involved, please visit www.bpksbd.org or call 880-2-2892 3915.

Recommendations on the Rights of Girls and Women with Disabilities

For girls and women with disabilities in Bangladesh to live life with dignity, the following recommendations for action are made;
1. Barriers should be removed so that women with disabilities can access the justice system when crimes or incidents of discrimination are committed against them.
2. Perpetrators of crimes against women should be appropriately trialed and punished and where a crime results in disability, the victim should have access to rehabilitation services and due compensation.
3. Women with disabilities should have access to vocational training programs that take into account their skills and abilities as well as their support needs.
4. Girls and women with disabilities should have access to affordable education. They should also be provided with assistive devices to assist in their social integration and their learning. More scholarships should also be available to support girls with disabilities from poor family backgrounds.
5. Girls and women with disabilities should be actively encouraged to participate in cultural, artistic and sporting activities.
6. Vocational skills training should be provided to women with disabilities so that they may participate more competitively in the labor market.
7. Women with disabilities should have access to appropriate employment that matches their skill and education level. Further job opportunities should be created and current employment quotas should be preserved and adhered to.
8. Based on assessment of need, girls and women with disabilities should be provided with assistive devices to assist them in activities of daily living.
9. Women holding positions of leadership in political parties or other organizations should be supported to maintain their roles in the event that they should become disabled.
10. Quota systems prioritizing employment of women with disabilities should be more widely applied to the labor market.
11. All girls and women with disabilities should have access to affordable and appropriate health care services.
12. All new built environments, including cyclone shelters should be accessible to women with disabilities and those that are not should be modified to accommodate them.
13. Women’s participation in agriculture, fisheries, livestock and forestation sectors should be actively encouraged and likewise, those sectors should also be encouraged to involve women.
14. Publicity in the media that portrays women in an undignified or disempowering manner should be stopped. The media should be encouraged to portray women in ways that demonstrate their contribution to society, their abilities, their power and their agency.
15. Women with disabilities should have equal access to skills training in the mass communication sector so that they can participate more widely in television, radio and print media.
16. Women with disabilities should be actively encouraged and supported to participate in the Women’s Development Implementation and Evaluation Committee.
17. Women with disabilities should be actively encouraged and supported to participate in district and Upazila level committees.
18. Women with disabilities should be actively encouraged and supported to participate in grassroots organizations.
19. The needs and rights of women with disabilities should be incorporated into the work plans and schedules of Government Ministries, National planning bodies, as well as International and National NGOs.

TODAYS RECOMMENDATION

20. All women throughout the country should have access to quality pre and post natal maternal care and additional support should be available for families where there is a child with a disability. Maternity leave should also be more widely available and extended to six months.
21. WWDs should have greater access to public transport. This should be guaranteed in law, but also addressed through a public awareness raising campaign for the general public.
22. Awareness raising campaigns are also needed to help address the widespread discrimination faced by WWDs. This should also focus on changing attitudes amongst men.
23. Awareness raising campaigns are also needed to encourage families to support their girls with disabilities to attend school.
24. A national survey is needed on the situation of people with disabilities throughout the country. This is essential to assist in district and National level planning processes.
25. A new act is needed for WWD’s and PWDs.
26. Fruitful counseling needed for PWDs and WWDs.
27. Role of media in raising awareness and educating the community should be strengthened.
28. Independent hospital for acid burned women is needed.
29. Day long consultation meeting for Govt. And NGO institute about PWDS rights and needs.



The press release and set of recommendations was recently circulated by Bangladesh Protibandhi Kallyan Somity (BPKS).

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Filipino Women with Disabilities Wishes to Network

Posted on 30 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Poverty, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Hello,
I’m sharing the website of WOWLEAP- Women With Disabilities Leap to Social and Economic Progress- an organization organized by Filipino Women with disabilities and working towards the empowerment of women with disabilities since 2000. We are slowly getting the participation of women with disability leaders in creating our voice to be heard and be a part of the national advocacy movement for persons with disabilities. Please visit our page http://wowleap2000.tripod.com/index.html and we will be happy to establish network with organizations who are willing to help us in achieving our vision.
Thank you,
Carmen Zubiaga



Carmen Zubiaga recently circulated the above email on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion list.

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New Global Email Network of Women with Disabilities Launches

Posted on 30 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear friends,

As you may know, a group of over 50 participants from 20 countries and various sectors (civil society, governments, academia, international organizations and private sector) met in Quebec, Canada on August 26-27 for a Global Summit on the Rights of Women with Disabilities. All Interational Disability Alliance organizations were invited to send a representative, and were actively engaged in the discussions.

The Summit was a great opportunity to talk about the key challenges facing women with disabilities worldwide, network, exchange ideas and take actions for us to “claim our rights”. Together, the Summit participants decided to form a new global network of women with disabilities and allies, charged with raising awareness and carrying out advocacy.. Attached and below is the Call for Action presented at the close of the Summit.
As the Call to Action say, this network aims to be inclusive of women of all ages from all parts of the world with ALL types of disabilities.

In order to move forward, an email list for the “International Network of Women With Disabilities” (INWWD) has been set up, and interested individuals are invited to join the email list by sending a message to: inwwd-subscribe@yahoogroups.com In this email, please include your name, affiliation and whether you agree to following principles:

Provisional guidelines for membership in the INWWD email list:
– Members accept the principle that this is a network OF women with all types of disabilities from all over the world, led by women with disabilities.
– Members of this email list are committed to the philosophy of women with disabilities advocating for themselves and identifying the issues of women with disabilities.
– Members support the principles in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
– Members of this email list support the goals of this network, which include sharing our knowledge and experiences, speaking up for our rights, bringing about change and inclusion in our communities, and empowering women with disabilities to be leaders of today and tomorrow.
– Members agree that the work of the network should be equally relevant to all women with disabilities irrespective of the type of disability or geographical location.
– Members agree to be respectful and constructive.

If you’d like to join an allied group of men with disabilities, please email mszporluk@disabilityrightsfund.org

The Summit participants also created a Working Group to develop the terms of reference for our network – to be finalized by the network over email by the end of the year. We are now reaching out to other networks, interested women and allies, and look forward to this partnership to promote the rights of women with disabilities around the world!

Best,
Shantha (a member of the INWWD)

GLOBAL SUMMIT on the Rights of Women with Disabilities
A Call for Action: Claiming Our Rights

Women with disabilities have been the world’s forgotten sisters. There are over 300 million women with disabilities around the world, representing a huge and important part of society. We face multiple forms of discrimination.

We, the participants in a global Summit on the Rights of Women with Disabilities, held in Quebec, Canada, in August 2008, have come together to claim our rights, through the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the human rights framework. Today, we take the first, historic step by creating a global network of women with disabilities, which must include women with ALL types of disabilities from ALL over the world.

We will use this network to share our knowledge and experiences, speak up for our rights, bring about change and inclusion in our communities, and empower women with disabilities to be leaders of today and tomorrow. We invite ALL women with disabilities to join us and we will achieve these goals TOGETHER.

Adopted on August 27, 2008, Quebec, Canada



This announcement was circulated by Shanta Rau of Rehabilitation International via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) email list. Queries about the new email network of women with disabilities, and allied men, should please be directed to inwwd-subscribe@yahoogroups.com or to mszporluk@disabilityrightsfund.org, NOT to We Can Do.

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NEWS: Women with Disabilities in Pakistan Hold Empowerment Seminar

Posted on 20 August 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, News, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for circulating the following report.

Seminar on empowerment of women with disabilities, Karachi – Pakistan
Held on 2nd August 2008.

A joint seminar organized by Social Welfare Department Government of Sindh and Association of Physically Handicapped Adults (APHA) member organization of Sindh Disability Forum (SDF) and Pakistan Disabled Peoples’ Organization (PDPO) DPI Pakistan.

Centuries ago, as you all know, in most societies of the world women occupied a secondary position to their male counterparts. It was a common feature that women got very little opportunity to voice their opinion even in matters, which concerned their own lives. They were considered to have no opinions of their own but merely adhere to the decisions made first by their fathers, then their husbands and at a later stage of their lives by their sons. But society has progressed from the discriminating attitude towards women. This is not to say that even today women stand equal with men. Discrimination against women persists even till date, the only change being that in some situations take place at a more subtle level.

Women’s movements have been instrumental in bringing about this change. These movements attempt to empower and equip women to fight for equality and stand equal with men.

But this is not the case when we turn our attention to women with disabilities. The mainstream women’s movements have remained completely oblivious to the needs of this group. The disability movements too have not paid much attention to the particular needs of disabled women. Hence these women remain at the periphery of all rights movements. Being a neglected segment they lack in self-esteem and self-confidence. They are conceived as not having part to play in society they are role-less people. Thus arises the imperative need to develop the image they have of themselves. Empowerment of disabled women therefore becomes the need of the hour.

SPEAKERS
1. Ms. Shagufta Shehzadi Chairperson Special Education Department, University of Karachi

2. Ms. Nasreen Aslam Shah Chairperson Women Study Centre University of Karachi

3. Ms. Musarrat Jabeen Women Development Department,Govt. of Sindh

4. Keynote Presentation By M. Zeeshan Taqi Finance Secretary A.P.H.A

5. Mr. S.M Nishat General Secretary A.P.H.A

6. Ms. Shama Dosa Active Social Worker

7. Mr. Shariful Muzaffar President A.P.H.A

8. Mrs. Riaz Fatima.Social Welfare Training Institute

9. Ms. Farzana WWD member of APHA

10. Ghulam Nabi Nizamani DPI Pakistan/Asia Pacific

Speakers highlighted issues related to women with disabilities specially WWDs based in rural areas. They discussed about:

1. Position in the family,

2. Access to education and health care facilities,

3. Opportunities to find employment,

4. Knowledge regarding existing legislation and facilities for disabled people and Women with disabilities.

5. Fulfilling the role generally ascribed to women including mainstreaming of WWDs.

6. Reproductive health of Women with Disabilities.

7. Violence against Women with Disabilities.

Delegates of the seminar recommended that:

  • Self-help groups of disabled women need to be organized. These women are to be made aware of the rights through training in self-advocacy.
  • Media campaign for spreading awareness regarding the rights of the disabled in general and disable women in particular.
  • Creation of Awareness on the Rights of Women with Disabilities according to Article 6 of UN Convention on the Rights of Person with Disabilities (CRPD).
  • Government to frame policies specifically catering to the interest of women with disabilities.
  • Training for women with disabilities needs to be geared towards developing a positive self-concept and self-image. They are to be empowered to recognize that they too are contributing and responsible members of society.
  • To fill the gape between WWDs of Urban and Rural area.
  • Job quota for WWDs be raised by Government from 2% to 15% because for women without disabilities have 10% quota in Government’s Jobs



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RESOURCE: Disabled Women’s Organizations in Pacific-Asia

Posted on 7 April 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following list of Disabled Women’s Organizations, Groups, and Committees in the Asia/Pacific Region (plus a few in Africa) was developed at the International Labour Organisation in Bangkok in December 2007. We Can Do readers should note that contact information can change quickly. If you try contacting an organization and cannot seem to reach them with the contact information given here, try googling the name of the contact person, or the name of the organization, or both. You can also consult other resources that can help you find more disability-oriented organizations around the world.

List of Disabled Women’ Organizations/Groups/Committee
Date: 19-12-2007

Annie Parkinson
President of Women with Disabilities Australia (WWDA)
Post Office Box 605 Rosny Park, Tasmania 7018 Australia
Tel: + 61 3 62448288
Fax: + 61 3 62448255
E-mail: wwda@wwda.org.au
Web: http://www.wwda.org.au

Sabina Hossain Kochi
Chair Person of
Women with Disabilities Development Foundation BPKS complex, Dhakkhinkhan, Uttara, Dhaka 1230. Bangladesh
Tel: + 880-8923915,8960077
E-mail: bpks@citechco.net

Ashrafun Nahar Misti
Deputy coordinator of Women with Disabilities Development Network
BPKS complex, Dhakkhinkhan, Uttara, Dhaka 1230, Bangladesh
Tel: +880-8923915,8960077
E-mail: cotoed@bpksbd.org
Champa Dash
Chairperson of
Disabled Women’ Development Committee
PSID center Narail
Moheshkhola Narail PSID Center
Post: Narail, Upzilla & dist: Narail, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Mob: +880-8901713196017

Shucithra Rani Shaha
Chairperson of Disabled Women ‘s Development Committee,
Nagarpur Disabled Peoples Organizations Tangail Bangladesh
Vill & Post : Mamud Nagar
Upazilla: Nagarpur, District: Tangail
Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01711`512295, 01712078249

Mah,uda Khatun
Chairperson of Disabled Women Committee Narshindi
Narshindi Disabled People Organization to Development
Vill: Ashrafpur (Near Sub registry Office )
Upazilla: Shibpur, District : Narshingdi
Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01712078247, 01713196024

Hafsa Akter
Chairperson of
Disabled Women Development Committee
Chandpur
Chandpur Disabled People Organizations to Development
Vill: Charbashanto, Upazilla: Faridgonj
District Chandpur, Bangladesh
Mob: +8801712o78245

Soyada Shahina
Disabled Women’s Development Committee
NDDS Protibandhi Kallayan Society (PKS)
24, R K Mission Road, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Mob:+880-01712069686
e-mail: pks-bd@agnionline.com

Naznin Nahar
Coordinator of
Disabled Women’s Development Committee, Meherpur
SPD Complex, Post: Mujibnagar
Dist: Meherpur-7100
Bangladesh
Tel:+880-2-07923-74011
Fax: +880-2-8332924
e-mail:spd@bdonline.com

Nasima khatun
Chairperson of Disabled Women’s Development Committee, Disabled People Organizations to Development Moulovibazar, Bangladesh
Vill: natissar, Post: Giash Nagar ,
Upazilla & Dist: Moulovibazar , Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01712078248

Lovely akter Shapla
Chairperson of Disabled Women’s Development Committee, Monmanshingh Disabled Peoples Organizations to Development
Vill: Voradoba Klab bazaar, Upazilla: Valuka
Dist: Moimanshingh, Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01713196029

Women with Disabilities Project Centre for Services and Information on Disability (CSID)
House # 715, Road # 10,
Baitul Aman Housing Society
Adabor
Dhaka- 1207 Bangladesh
Tel: 9129727, 8143882
Fax: 8125669
E-mail: csid@bdonline.com, csid@bdmail.net
Web: www.csidnetwork.org

Disabled Women’s Committee
Fiji Disabled People Association 355 Waimanu Road, Suva G.P.O. Box 15178, Suva, Fiji
Phone: +679- 331-1203
Fax: +679- 330-1161.

Association of Women with Disabilities Hong Kong
Room 11-12, G/F, Wang Cho House
Wang Tau Hom Estate Kowloon,
Hong Kong, China
Fax: +852-2337-1549
Email: women@awdhk_conf.org
For all disabilities.

Miss Berhane Daba
President of Ethiopian Women with Disabilities National Association (EWDNA)
P.o. Box 43128
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Tel: + 252-1-0911-451717
Email address berhanedaba@yahoo.com

Regina
Secretary of Sadhana Women with Disabilities Association Tamil Nadu
ADD India
Kallukadai Steet, Sathyamoorthy Nagar
Keeranur Pudukottai District
Tamil Nadu, India
Email: addindiatn@rediffmail.com
All disabilities

Kuhu Das,
Director of Association of Women with Disabilities 6/J, Surah 2nd Lane, Phoolbagan, Kolkata-700010, India
Tel: +91-64535802
Fax: +91-23639115
Mobile: +91-9830226718
E-mail: sawwd@vsnl.net

Shampa Sengupta
Representative of Women with Disability, Sruti Disability Rights Centre
Sruti disAbility Rights centre
5A R.K. Ghosal Road
Kolkata 700 042, India
Tel: +91- 9433174978

Sobhagya Goyal
Vice President of National Forum for Visually Impaired Women
All India Confederation of the Blind Ghasety Bazar Ajmer
Rajasthan, India
Tel. : +91- 0145-2621185
Mob. : +91 – 9414708018

Ms. Lidya Miranita
Indonesian Association of Women with Disabilities (HWPCI)
Jl. Cempaka Putih raya No. 1, Jakarta – Pusat
Jakarta – 10510 – Indonesia
Tel/Fax : +62-21-42879844
E-mail : ariani_0704@yahoo.com
website : www.hwpci.org

Indonesian Blind Women Union (PERTUNI)
Gedung Inkoppol, Gd II, lt. 2
Jl. Tambak No. 2, Jakarta – Pusat
Jakarta – 10320, Indonesia
Tel/fax : +62-21-31931704
email : pertuni_dpp@yahoo.co.id

Ms. Kimie Nagumo
President of DPI Women with Disabilities Network Japan
Japan
nagumo-kimie@mwe.biglobe.ne.jp

Kim, Mi Joo
Representative of Women with Disabilities Arts and Culture and Network
Seoul Women’s Plaza 3F NGO Center 345-1
Daebang-dong Dongjak-gu Seoul 156-808 Korea
Tel: +82-02-823-8360
Cell: 011-746-2196
Email: kim_mijoo@yahoo.com
Web: http://www.kkipan.com

Koo Gwi Hoi
Coordinator of Organizing Committee for the Global Summit of Women with Disabilities
Swon Bdg, IF, 877-13, Shinjeong5-dong, Yangcheon-gu,
Seoul, Korea
Tel: +82-2-2692-2293
Mobile: +82-19-285-5447
Email: koohj19@hanmail.net

Lee Ye-ja
Korean Differently Abled Women United Organization
Rm 811, Chritian Building
136-46 Yonci-dong, Chongno-Ku, Seoul
Korea (110-736)
Tel: +82-2-3675-9935
Email: kdawu@hanmail.com
leeyeja@shinburo.com
Web: http://www.kdawu.org

Catherine Mwayoga
Women’s Committee
United Disabled Persons of Kenya (UDPK) Waiyaki Way; P.O. box 13488; Nairobi, Kenya
Tel.: +254-2-443915
Fax: +254-2-446065,
E-mail: disability@wananchi.com

Ms. Daloonny Souvannavong
Director of Lao Disabled Women Development Center
Ban Dongphosy, Hatsayfong District Vientiane
PO Box 6751, Thadeua Rd, Hatsayfong District
Vientiane Capital, Lao
Tel : +21 812282
Fax : +21 812282
Email : ldwdc@laotel.com

Shusila Poudel
President of Nepal Disabled Women Society (NDWS)
Pulchowk, Lalitpur:3; PO Box 5445, Nepal
Tel: +997-1- 535770, 531324
Fax: +997-1- 535770, 535142
E-Mail: sushila@coho.wlink.np
ndws@coho.wlink.com.np

Indira Chapagain
President of Nepal Disabled Women Association (NDWA)
NPC 8973,00560
Kathmandu, Putalisadak, Nepal
Tel: +977-1-6635926
Email: ndwa_ndwa@hotmail.com
Nara Kumari Karki
President of National Association for Disabled Women-Nepal (NADW-Nepal)
P.O. Box 7268 Koteshwor
Kathmandu Nepal
Tel: +977-14496664
E-mail: nadw@hotmail.com

Shrijana Singh
President of Deaf Women Development Committee (DWDC)
P.O. Box 4601 Putalisadak Kathmandu
Tel: +977-1-415-568
Fax: +977-1-416-200 Deaf and hard of hearing

Ola Abu Alghaib
Stars Of Hope Center ‘Empowerment of women with Disabilities’ Palestine
Palestine-Mamalloh-Al Elsal-Bazar Commercial Center-4th Floor
Tel: +972-2-2972345
Mobile: +972-599-026260
Email: starofhope2007@gmail.com

Miss N.G. Kamalawathie,
President of Association of Women with Disabilities (AKASA)
Pahalagama Road , Kongollewa,
Talawa, Sri Lanka
Tel: +94 25 5670329
Fax : +94 25 2275022
Mobile :+94 773121062
E-mail : akasa7@sltnet.lk

Savina Nongebatu
Member of Disabled Women’s Committee Solomon
Disabled People Organization Solomon DPASI(DPO) Solomon
Tel: +677- 24863, 677- 36062
savina_nongebatu@yahoo.com.au
cbr@moh.gov.sb

Association of Blind Women Thailand 94/4 Moo 13 Sihaburanukit Road
Minburi, Bangkok, 10510, Thailand
Tel: +66-2-233-6079
Email: abwt@tab.or.th

Ms. Supattraporn Tanatikom
Disabled Peoples’ International Asia Pacific Regional Office
92 Phaholyothin 5 Road, Samsennai, Phayathai Bangkok 10400 THAILAND
Telephone numbers: (662) 271 2123
Fax : (662) 2712124
E-mail: sarahmaithai@gmail.com,
supattraporn@dpiap.org
Website: www.dpiap.org

Ms. Hellen Asamo
African Women with Disabilities
P.O. Box 8567, Kampala, Uganda
Tel.: +256-41-540179
Fax: +256-41-540178
E-Mail: nudipu@starcom.co.ug

Ms. Duong Thi Van
Women’s Committee of Bright Future Group for People with Disabilities
124 A Dai La Street, Hanoi, Vietnam
Tel: +844 628-0527
E-mail: van@netnam.com

Ms. Nguyen Hong Oanh
Director of Hanoi Women with Disabilities Club 112B5, 46B Pham Ngoc Thach alley, Hanoi (the front gate), Vietnam
Tel: +84-4-8522 778
Email: phunuthudo@nguoikhuyettat.org
lananhdf@gmail.com



Thank you to Bishnu Maya Dhungana for passing along this list.

Do YOU have a list of disability-oriented organizations in developing nations or regions? Please share with We Can Do readers by submitting it to me at ashettle [at] patriot.net.

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PUBLICATION: Promoting the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Posted on 26 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, Policy & Legislation, Rehabilitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Rehabilitation International’s publication, International Rehabilitation Review, has published a special edition focused on promoting the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). People with disabilities, advocates, disability experts, and human rights experts, all contributed 20 articles to the December 2007, 48-page edition.

The CRPD is the first comprehensive international legislation to focus on protecting the human rights of people with disabilities. It needs to be ratified by 20 countries before it will take full legal force; it has now been ratified by 17 countries.

Several of these articles celebrate the heavy involvement of the disability community and various disability and human rights organizations in promoting the CRPD. Other articles discuss the relevance of the CRPD to themes such as promoting inclusive education; including people with disabilities in programs to prevent HIV/AIDS; the importance of habilitation and rehabilitation to empowerment; and how the CRPD may help countries bring more people with disabilities into the work force.

Some more examples of articles included in the December 2007 issue of the International Rehabilitation Review include the following:

An article entitled “A Unified Disability Community: The Key to Effective Implementation of the Convention” by Maria Veronica Reina and Stefan Tromel highlights the importance of people with disabilities themselves being actively involved in ensuring that the CRPD actively protects the human rights of disabled people around the world.

Author Ann M. Veneman discusses the importance of children with disabilities in the CRPD in her article, “The UN Disability Rights Convention: Moving Children with Disabilities Center Stage.”

Of particular relevance to We Can Do readers in the international development field is the article “Toward Inclusive Development: The Implementation Challenge,” by Charlotte McClain-Nhlapo. This article calls for country governments and development organizations to incorporate the principles of the CRPD into their plans, programs, and policies, including those that fight poverty.

Anne Hawker and Sebenzile Matsebula discuss the importance of mobilizing women with disabilities to successfully implementing the CRPD in “Women with Disabilities: A Call to Action.”

In some countries, people with certain disabilities are denied the right to open their own bank account, or to say “no” to medical treatment that they don’t want. Article 12 of the CRPD can help, says Tina Minkowitz in her article, “Legal Capacity: Fundamental to the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.”

Once the CRPD takes legal force, then what? Governments will need people with disabilities themselves to monitor how well the CRPD is implemented in their countries. The article “Interational Monitoring: The Right to Inclusion, The Obligation to Participate” by Kirsten Young and Shantha Rau, discusses how.

This special issue of Rehabiliation International’s International Rehabilitation Review can be downloaded in PDF format (1.8 Mb) at
http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_web.pdf

Or you can downlaod it in Word format (233 Kb) at
http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_WORDversion.doc



We Can Do learned about this special issue through RatifyNow.org‘s email discussion list. This article is cross-posted at the RatifyNow.org web site with permission of author. See the RatifyNow website for more information on the CRPD and the global movement to ratify and implement it.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere else, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people.

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CASE STUDY: Strengthening Disabled Women Organizations in Nicaragua

Posted on 26 January 2008. Filed under: Capacity Building and Leadership, Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Latin America & Caribbean, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A publication entitled “Learning from experience: strengthening organisations of women with disabilities” (PDF format, 1.3 Mb) shares lessons learned about organizing, personal empowerment, awareness raising, and incorporating a gender perspective. The publication focuses on work done by a Nicaraguan non-governmental organization (NGO), Solidez, that works to strengthen the capacity of local disabled women’s organizations and integrate women with disabilities into society. Solidez aims to help independent organizations improve their ability to manage their own decisions and self development.

In particular, this profile about Solidez is meant to analyze the lessons they have learned in organizational work and projects, empowerment and personal growth, awareness raising, and advocacy. It describes some of the barriers that Solidez has encountered in its work, for example in overcoming negative, religion-based attitudes toward gender or disabilities. Solidez also explains some of the strategies they used and their results: for example, they attribute part of their success to the use of home visits and meetings in women’s homes. The publication offers frank discussion of some of the challenges Solidez has confronted, such as finding ways to support groups in resolving sometimes very emotional inter-personal conflicts. It concludes with recommendations for how Solidez could further improve upon its efforts.

The publication is available from One World Action, an NGO based in the United Kingdom that works to create opportunities for the world’s poorest people.

You can download “Learning from experience: strengthening organisations of women with disabilities” in PDF format (1.3 Mb) at

http://www.oneworldaction.org/Resources/One%20World%20Action/Documents/Disability%20Rights/solidezreport6.pdf



We Can Do learned about this case study through contacts at Mobility International USA and from the Siyanda database of resources on gender and development.



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RESOURCE: How to Include Disabled Women in Your Organizations

Posted on 23 January 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/yv5ouo]

Certain resources can help women’s organizations and international development agencies better include disabled women in their program activities. Skip to the resource list.

Women with disabilities confront many of the same challenges that other women in developing countries face, such as gender-based discrimination. But they also face some additional challenges, such as discrimination based on their disability. Some women’s organizations would like to advocate for the needs of disabled women in the same way that they advocate for all women. And international development agencies also want to ensure that they meet the needs of disabled women in the same way that they strive to meet the needs of all the poor people in the countries where they work.

But sometimes mainstream organizations aren’t sure how to begin. What barriers might they unknowingly create that make it harder for disabled women to participate in their programs’ activities or to make their needs known to their organization? What further barriers exist in society that may need to be overcome before an organization can more effectively serve women with disabilities? How can women’s organizations and international development agencies remove these barriers?

Several resources, listed below, can help. Mainstream organizations may wish to use these as guides to make their programs more accessible. Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) may wish to use these when communicating with mainstream organizations to persuade them to make change.

MIUSA’s “Checklist for Inclusion”
Mobility International USA (MIUSA) has a free checklist available (PDF format, 10 Mb). This 19-page self-assessment guide is written for mainstream international development agencies. It provides a series of questions that women’s organizations and international development agencies can use to help them identify what they’re already doing right and what things could be improved upon. For example: when you choose a meeting location, do you make sure that it is wheelchair accessible (ground-floor location with doors wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs, etc.)? Does your organization make its print materials available in non-print (Braille; diskette) and also large-print versions? Does your organization make qualified sign language interpreters available for its training, conference, and other program activities?

MIUSA’s International Development and Disability (IDD) Program
MIUSA’s International Development and Disability (IDD) program strives to bridge the disability community and the international development community in promoting the inclusion of people with disabilities as leaders and participants in development. It provides technical assistance and advice to both disabled people’s organizations and development agencies on gender and disability inclusion. In addition to their Checklist for Inclusion, organizations may wish to learn more about MIUSA activities, publications, videos, and other resources at MIUSA’s IDD web site:

http://www.miusa.org/idd/index_html

In particular, note that the checklist on inclusion was originally written as part of a more comprehensive guidebook on disability inclusion entitled Building an Inclusive Development Community: A Manual on Including People with Disabilities in International Development Programs.

Can’t afford the book? Or want to supplement it with free resources? Consult MIUSA’s page of links to free resources:

http://www.miusa.org/idd/keyresources

Also, read some “best practice” stories (case studies) of other organizations that have successfully promoted disability inclusion in their activities:

http://www.miusa.org/publications/freeresources/mti

Another item that might be of interest is an article written by Sarah Rosenhek at the Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID) about her experience learning about gender and disability through participating in MIUSA’s August 2006 Gender Disability and Development Institute (GDDI). Her article, entitled “Strengthening Women’s Rights Organizations through Inclusion: Lessons Learned from the Gender, Disability and Development Institute,” includes pragmatic advice for other women’s organizations that Rosenhek learned at the institute.

VSO’s Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability
Volunteer Service Overseas has a publication available on-line for free entitled A Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability (PDF format, 2 Mb). This handbook guides mainstream international development organizations in finding ways to overcome the stigma that can be associated with disability; how to actively integrate more disabled workers in the workplace; how to integrate more disabled participants in program activities; and how to integrate disability into organizational policy. Each chapter has case studies that describe how other organizations have implemented the advice given in this handbook. Download the handbook itself at

http://www.asksource.info/pdf/33903_vsomainstreamingdisability_2006.pdf (PDF format, 2 Mb)

The VSO’s Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability was previously featured at We Can Do, with an overview of its contents.

Siyanda On-line Database of Gender and Development Materials
Siyanda is targeted at development specialists who want to integrate gender equality issues into their work,whether or not they specialize in gender issues. This database makes iteasy to search for, and locate, full-length materials, that can bedownloaded for free. Its library of documents includes items in multiple languages including English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, and others. Try a key word search for “disabilities.”



We Can Do learned about the MIUSA resources and the Siyanda on-line database through contacts at MIUSA.



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TRAINING: 4th Int’l Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability

Posted on 13 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Fellowships & Scholarships, Funding, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Mobility International USA’s (MIUSA)
4th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD)

August 12 – September 2, 2008
Eugene, Oregon, U.S.A.

APPLY NOW!
Application deadline: FRIDAY APRIL 4, 2008
Generous scholarships available.

American Sign Language interpretation*

MIUSA is currently accepting applications from emerging and established
women leaders with disabilities who are:

  • From Africa, Asia, Eurasia, Latin America, the Middle East, and
    Oceania/Pacific
  • First time visitors to the USA and have NOT participated in a MIUSA WILD
    program
  • From an organization led by and for people with disabilities, or by and for women, with particular attention to issues of women and girls with disabilities; or employed in a business or program committed to inclusion of women and girls with disabilities
  • **Women with disabilities who are from rural areas and/or indigenous backgrounds are especially encouraged to apply**
  • Generous scholarships are available for this program.

The WILD program will include workshops, site visits and practical activities on priority issues for women with disabilities, including:

  • Leadership for economic empowerment, including employment policy, legislation, private sector partnerships and coalition building
  • Educational rights and opportunities including specialized and inclusive schools, policy and legal rights, services and accommodations for accessibility
  • Career planning and higher education, including policies and support systems for women and girls with disabilities
  • Employment strategies for women with disabilities including training models, supported employment, microenterprise, private sector partnerships, career mentorship and skill-building
  • Health and family issues including parenting, health care and violence prevention
  • Accessible transportation and communities including policy and implementation, public advocacy, model transport systems, solutions for accessibility
  • Using the media and coalition building
  • Organizational development and sustainability, including funding resources and strategies, and fostering partnerships with community organizations and businesses
  • Cultural, team-building and community service experiences
  • Goals and action plans to strengthen collaborative relationships with other organizations and/or businesses and to implement plans for the employment of women with disabilities locally, regionally or internationally

The official languages of WILD are English and American Sign Language (ASL). However, some language translation may be provided during formal program workshops and activities only. Specific languages (e.g. Arabic, French, Russian, and/or Spanish) will be determined based on need and availability of resources.

Materials in alternative formats will be provided. Other disability-related accessibility arrangements will be negotiated to ensure full participation of all program participants.

APPLY EARLY! Limited space available!

Application deadline is April 4, 2008. Late applications will be accepted as space permits. Application materials are available in alternative formats upon request.

Applications can be downloaded at http://www.miusa.org/miusa-exchange-programs/WILD2008/index_html or requested via e-mail at: womenleaders@miusa.org

Application forms are currently available in English, Spanish, or Arabic. Translations into French and Russian are forthcoming.

Since 1981, MIUSA has been pioneering short-term international exchange programs for people with and without disabilities from over 90 countries. As a non-profit organization, MIUSA is dedicated to empowering people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

Contact information:
Mobility International USA
WILD 2008
E-mail: womenleaders@miusa.org
Website: www.miusa.org



We Can Do learned about this opportunity from MIUSA.

I was fortunate enough to have been able to participate in the 2nd International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability in 2003. I had a great time getting to know a group of 30 brilliant, ambitious, hard working women with different disabilities from nearly 30 developing countries around the world. It was a good reminder to me, as someone in a developed country, how much talent, energy, and creativity there is among disabled people in some of the poorest countries in the world.

To any Deaf (or deaf) people reading this: When I participated in 2003, there were six of us women who were Deaf/deaf. One besides me was fluent in ASL and used the ASL interpreter; another did not know ASL but could lipread in English and used an interpreter who signed in English word order while mouthing the words in English; another came with someone bilingual in Spanish and Panama Sign Language who listened to the Spanish interpreters and translated to Panama signs for her; another lipread one of the Spanish interpreters who was assigned to her for this purpose; another did not know any of the primary languages used in the workshop, so a deaf interpreter was assigned to her to translate from ASL to their own pidgeon mixture of international signs.

If you are deaf, then you will probably get the most of the workshops if you either know ASL or are able to lipread well in one of the primary languages used during the training program. But if you have other communication needs, then please do talk with the people with MIUSA and see what can be arranged. Contact MIUSA directly at the website or email addresses provided above. We Can Do is NOT responsible for WILD and cannot assist with your inquiries.



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CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: Successful Disabled Women Entrepreneurs

Posted on 8 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Employment, News, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Do you know of a successful disabled woman enterpreneur in a developing country? A World Bank annual publication, Doing Business would like to learn more about her, what has made her business successful, and what legal, regulatory, and practical barriers she has encountered along the way. Doing Business is published by the World Bank Group’s private sector arm, the International Finance Corporation.

The Doing Business project is currently doing research in 178 countries to identify what legal and regulatory barriers make it harder for businesswomen to become successful. As part of this two-year research project, the Doing Business team is collecting stories about women entrepreneurs that describe why they are successful and highlight what obstacles they have needed to overcome. Gathering these case studies will help the team understand what strategies are needed to remove these barriers for all businesswomen. This will help them make better recommendations to country governments that want to encourage more women to start and expand their own businesses. A few of the case studies may be featured in a future Doing Business publication. Nominations need to be submitted by January 22, 2008, in order to be considered.

Each year, Doing Business evaluates 178 countries in terms of how their laws and regulations help, or prevent, enterpreneurs from starting and expanding businesses. Many countries use the Doing Business guide to identify where their strengths and weaknesses are in promoting private sector growth. They make reforms based on its recommendations, which has helped more entrepreneurs start businesses, create jobs, and escape poverty.

Each candidate for nominations should be the founder or owner of a business; active in her community; and have an experience that can offer lessons that can inform reform efforts. When submitting nominations, please send the following information:

  • Full name of Nominee
  • Name and type of business
  • Business address, phone number, and e-mail
  • Month and year business was started
  • A brief biography of the nominated entrepreneur
  • A brief description of the business
  • A brief summary of the obstacles overcome, discoveries made, and outcomes

Read more about the desired criteria and how to nominate business women to be profiled at:

http://www.doingbusiness.org/features/womenentrepreneurs.aspx

Individuals may make inquiries or nominate women entrepreneurs they know in developing countries, with or without disabilities, by sending an email to:

doingbusiness@worldbank.org
snarsiah@worldbank.org

Read more information about this project at: http://blog.doingbusiness.org/2008/01/women-entrepren.html

The Doing Business project will select women from among the nominations, contact them, and prepare profiles on each woman. The chosen profiles will be published in Doing Business 2009.



We Can Do learned about this call for nominations through the World Bank Doing Business blog. Please note that We Can Do is not associated with the Doing Business project. Any inquiries, as requested above, should be directed to doingbusiness@worldbank.org or to snarsiah@worldbank.org.



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TRAINING for Women with Disabilities in South Asia

Posted on 13 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Education and Training Opportunities, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Project: Creating Space for Women With Disabilities to Communicate & Advocate for their Rights
Project Partners: AWWD (India), SARPV (Bangladesh), AKASA (Sri Lanka), HLWW (UK), Supported by: DFID, UK

REGIONAL LEADERSHIP TRAINING FOR WOMEN WITH DISABILITIES

“Currently our rights are not understood or heard. We need to mobilize our girls and women to take the challenge and responsibility to make our presence felt. A new generation of leaders is essential to make change happen”
Kuhu Das, Director, Association of Women with Disabilities – India

OBJECTIVE
The initial ‘master’ training will facilitate a group of 25 Women with Disabilities (WWD) from the South Asia region including India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan, Afghanistan and the Maldives in leadership & advocacy skills within a rights based framework. Those attending will in turn be supported to organize and run national level leadership and advocacy trainings when they return home. They will also develop country strategic advocacy plans, and be offered small seed grants to enable the implementation.

The participants will engage in a 7 day training process which will enable them to:

  • Share their country level situations
  • Deepen their understanding of a rights based approach to issues affecting WWD
  • Design & plan their adapted leadership and advocacy training at national level based on the initial ‘master’ training
  • Form a regional network of WWDs
  • Design & plan national advocacy and communication strategies for the rights of WWDs
  • Develop WWD leadership training modules including a resource base of materials

PARTICIPANTS (Criteria for selection):
The training is open to WWDs and organizations, who will be able to carry out the national level trainings in their respective countries after this initial workshop. They should be well networked and able to mobilize people and resources. They will need some experience of leadership and an ability to motivate others. A working knowledge of English is required, as is the ability to organize and host training events.

Priority will be given to WWD themselves and organizations working to further the rights of WWD

CONTENT OF TRAINING:

Regional Leadership Training: (TOT): 7 days.

  1. Sharing of project and training objectives, finalizing draft schedule and participatory agenda setting
  2. Leadership
    • Meaning, Necessity
    • Quality of a leader
  3. Communication – Advocacy – Lobbying
    • Meaning/Importance/Necessity
    • Good / effective communication
    • Communication tools
    • Development of Advocacy frameworks
    • Advocacy & lobbying – what, why & how
  4. Social Mobilisation
    • Understanding rights, including human rights, rights of women, rights of disabled
    • Significance of human rights instruments (national & international) – CEDAW, UNCRPD, BMF etc.
    • Use and limitations of these instruments
    • Social mobilization to achieve rights
    • Analysis of legislation and policies
  5. Group Mobilisation
    • Meaning/Importance/Necessity
    • Organizing people in groups
    • Mobilizing and managing groups
    • Strengthening group dynamics
    • Setting targets for group
  6. Networking
    • Why? The benefits and challenges
    • Making it effective & sustainable
    • Setting vision and target activities
  7. Planning & designing training
    • Adapting ‘master’ training to national level
    • Content development / modification
    • Quality assurance – M&E
  8. Facilitation skills
    • Participatory approaches
    • Skills development
  9. Working with the Media
    • How to engage with media
    • How to promote issues
    • Media literacy
  10. Action planning for national level training and advocacy activities
    • Strategy development
    • Integrating into existing national and local initiatives
    • Monitoring and Evaluation

TRAINING STYLE
The training will be highly participatory, drawing on the experience of the participants to develop and improve our collective knowledge base. Trainers will be from a variety of backgrounds and specialisms including advocacy expertise, network strengthening, media, project planning and management and leadership skills development.

COSTS
25 places will be fully supported including travel, food, accommodation and a small allowance.

Workshop Venue – Kolkota (to be confirmed)
Dates – mid February 2008 (to be confirmed)

APPLICATION PROCEDURE:
If you are interested to attend this workshop please email a one page letter outlining:
your interest in this field of work
your experience in disability activism and rights based approaches
your experience and capacity to take the work forward at national level
to:
Ms Kuhu Das: info@awwdindia.org (Regional coordinator – AWWD India)
and Mr David Curtis: curtis.d@healthlink.org.uk (Head of Programme and Capacity Development, Healthlink Worldwide, UK)

Closing date for applications: January 5th 2008.

A selection committee comprising members from the four lead organizations will assess each application. Please remember that after the initial ‘master’ training, there will be national level trainings in each of the countries in the region so there will be further opportunities to engage at national level.

This workshop is part of the ‘Creating Spaces – for women with disabilities (WWD) to communicate and advocate for their rights’ project – a collaborative initiative from Association of Women with Disabilities (AWWD) – India, Association for Women with Disabilities (Akasa), Sri Lanka, Social Assistance for the Rehabilitation of the Physically Vulnerable (SARPV) Bangladesh and Healthlink Worldwide, UK

The project is funded by UK Department for International Development (DfID)


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PAPER: Violence Against Women with Disabilities in South Africa

Posted on 18 November 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Some studies suggest that nearly one in three women are the targets of violence from their intimate partners. Women with disabilities are no exception. In fact, some studies suggest that violence against disabled women may happen even more frequently than does violence against non-disabled women. Yet, violence against women with disabilities is rarely studied at all even in rich countries–and studied even less often in developing countries.

One exception is a small-scale exploratory research project on gender-based violence and disabled women conducted by the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) in South Africa entitled “On the Margins: Violence Against Women with Disabilities,” (PDF format, 341 Kb) written by Ereshnee Naidu, Sadiyya Haffejee, Lisa Vetten, and Samantha Hargreaves.

Although this research project was small, it helps highlight what has often been an ignored problem perpetuated against an ignored population:

“This exploratory research study on violence against women with disabilities strongly indicates that women with disabilities are extremely vulnerable to gender-based violence, that the violence and abuse they confront is shaped by the nature and form of their particular disability, and that they are especially disadvantaged in their access to the criminal justice system and gender-based violence support services, as compared to women without disabilities.”

Yet, when the researchers asked what services are available to women with disabilities who are the target of violence, the result, although not surprising, was nevertheless worrying:

“While many of the informants from service organisations reached through this survey were aware of and concerned about violence against women with disabilities, their organisations were, in the main, failing to address the needs of this specific, and very neglected, constituency.”

Interested We Can Do visitors can follow the link to download “On the Margins” (PDF format, 341 Kb) for themselves. The paper offers a more detailed discussion of how and why women with disabilities in South Africa are vulnerable to violence. It also describes the barriers they experience both in finding help to escape violence and in seeking justice in the legal system. Finally, the authors make recommendations for what action should be taken in South Africa to address the problem including advocacy and awareness; networking and collaboration; promoting accessible services; and policy, monitoring, and research.

The paper is available in PDF format (341 Kb) at: http://www.csvr.org.za/docs/gender/onthemargins.pdf

For more We Can Do articles related to violence, click on the word “violence” under “categories” in the right hand navigation bar.



[Edit 17 June 2008: Edited to update the link to the paper, which had moved. Apologies for the inconvenience to people who had clicked on the old, incorrect link.]

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