NEWS: Emergency Response for Bangladesh Disability Community Following Cyclone Sidr

Posted on 18 December 2008. Filed under: Disaster Planning & Mitigation, News, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

SSDP’s Program Achievement Nov’07 – Oct’08
The Southern Socio-economic Development Program (SSDP) is a non profitable NGOs working for underprivileged rural community especially for people with disabilities (PWDs) in southern coastal area of Bangladesh. We are very proud of to extend our service to Cyclone SIDR affected people by the support of various donor.

A snapshot of our achievement of Emergency Response activities against SIDR 2007.

1 st phase:
1. Distributed survival package among 3750 household those who are with SIDR affected vulnerable people including PWDs in the area of Barguna District
2. Distributed 400 tents among the household those who were living under the open sky.
3. Distributed Food and hygiene kinds among 500 women.
4. Distributed milk (DANO) among 200 babies & Mother

Phase -2
1. Supported 2000 household through providing 20 kg rice by food for work
2. Supported 2000 household through providing 10kg paddy seeds.& 25gm vegetables seeds
3. Supported 4000 household through providing seeds for agricultural production.
4. Distributed 55000 plants among 5500 household
5. Providing boat, net and others materials to 300 nos fisherman for restoring live and livelihood
6. Installation of 45 nos Deep Tube well for 910 household.
7. Installation of 2184 nos sanitary latrine for the 2184 household.
8. Reconstruction of 75 nos DHTW platforms
9. Construction of 24 nos School sanitary latrine.
10. Distributed hygienic kits among 6000 household

Also:
• Disbursed a total amount of Tk.14,50,000/= among 250 PWDs HH for goat purchase
• Disbursed a total of Tk.11,50,000/= among 1000 PWDs HH in cash
• Distributed survival package among 1000 PWDs HH 3 rd phase:
• Provided 10 accessible house to PWDs and income generation support.
• Installation of 280 tin shed pacca sanitary latrine to 280 HHs
• Education support for 176 CWDs (children with disabilities)
• Facilitating IGA (Income Generating Activities) supports to 230 PWD HHs

During addressing emergency response activities SSDP also have some visitors from National and International donors.
1. Mr. Roger Bodary, National Director, Habitat for Humanity International Bangladesh
2. Mr. Oliver Broua, Rapid response Coordinator, Regional Support Office-South Asia from European Commission.
3. Mr. Norbert Nicoup, Mission chief , handicap International from France
4. Country Director-save the children –USA
5. Farrah Kabir, Country Director, Action aid Bangladesh
6. Dr. Malay Chandra Mirdha , ICCDDRB
7. Abdur Rashid, Executive Director NGO Forum for WSS
8. Mr.Jahid Hasan with MJF team and more

Core programmatic achievement of SSDP
With a view to sustainable development of underprivileged community especially people with disabilities (PWDs) SSDP is working since 1990 and supported the PWDs through inclusive education, IGAs for self-employment, assistive devise, medical support, PTR Self-help group (SHGs) formation, skill training, social mobilization advocacy and lobbing etc. With a view of capacity building also provide/ facilitate awareness raising program, different training like leadership, decision making, involvement in various social activities and curricular activities.

Some case of remarkable successful as well as achievement of SSDP can be present in following manner.
Case -1. Sarmin, a physically WWD girl passed her 16 years of life within a room with attached bath room. She never comes outside her room. SSDP discover her and provide an assistive device. It was a joyful day in her life when she sees the open sky and the socio-culture environment first during her 16 years life. She moved whole the Barguna District town by her wheel chair. She looked every thing with her surprising eyes every moment. Every body also enjoys this scenario.

Case -2. Jamal, a physically disabled person beneficiary is running a grocery shop taken support from SSDP through its IGA support program. He started the business with the capital of Tk.4000.00 and at present he is running with the capital of Tk20000.00. Now he is happy with his family with a monthly income of Tk.4000.00 – 5000.00 per month..

Present scope of work at the SSDP working area rehabilitation and sustainable development.
a. Accessible housing support for changing life’s of the PWDs families with sanitation facilities.
b. Livelihood support for Income generating.
c. School based forestation
d. Inclusive Educational for CWDs.
e. Self help Group promotional activities for social inclusion
f. Medical and Assistive Devise support for the PWDs
g. Primary health care support, and medical support for the PWDs
h. Psycho-social care support program
i. Home based gardening.
j. Long term agriculture rehabilitation program for food security. k. Climate change protection and disaster management program support.

Present supporters & Donors :
a. Action aid Bangladesh. ECHO.
b. Manusher Junnay Foundation ( MJF)
c. Stings Lillian Fonds through DRRA
d. Cristfel Blind Mission (CBM), GARMANY -Centre for Disability and Development ( CDD)
e. Nari Pakha.
f. Steps towards Development, Gender & Development Alliance
g. Bureau of Non-formal Education (BNFE), GOB and DAM
h Action on Disability and Development (ADD)
i. Health Link UK through SARPV-Bangladesh
j. Dark and Light Netherlands through CDD
k. Habitat for Humanity International – Bangladesh Country Office.
l. ADDIN Welfare Centre- HASAB Consortium

Additional cooperation requirement:
a. Program support for livelihood and food security for the fishermen community along with PWDs.
b. Disaster Risk reduction and management program.
c. Training center cum cyclone shelter establish organizational sustainability
d. Program support for the self-help group promotional activities for social inclusion for PWDs

If you have any queries please communicate with SSDP and /or visit their program area.
Md. Habibur Rahman
Executive Director
Southern Socio-economic Development Program (SSDP)
Amtali Natun Bazar
Amtali Barguna , Bangladesh
Phone: 04452-56136, Mobile: 01712-163604
E-mail: ssdp_2004@yahoo.com, habibssdp@gmail.com



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for circulating this report from the SSDP.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Impact of Nanoscale Science on Disability

Posted on 29 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, Health, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Opportunities, Poverty, technology, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for papers On the impact of nanoscale science and technology on disability, community and rehabilitation.
[NOTE from We Can Do editor: The deadline for abstracts is October 30, 2008; full articles can be submitted later, for authors whose abstracts are selected. We Can Do readers will note that the areas of suggested possible focus may include the impact of nanotechnology on people with disabilities in low-income countries; on international development; and on relevant topics such as water and sanitation, the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, and others. Inquiries and abstracts should be directed to the journal, NOT We Can Do.]

For a special issue of the International Journal on Disability, Community & Rehabilitation (IJDCR) (http://www.ijdcr.ca/copyright.shtml)

Guest Editor: Gregor Wolbring, Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies Program, Dept of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary. <gwolbrin@ucalgary.ca>

Invitation
Nanoscale science and technology, while still in its infancy, describes a rapidly growing sphere of enquiry, with many and varied implications for the disability field. To establish a ‘benchmark’ of the current state of knowledge and conceptual understanding, the Editors of IJDCR decided a special issue should be devoted to the topic. Background information and potential topics are presented below.

We invite potential contributors, regardless of fields of study (discipline), to submit 250-word Abstracts that articulate the conceptual arguments and knowledge base to be covered in a critical analysis on some aspect of the impact of nanoscale science and technology on disability, community and/or rehabilitation. Please submit abstracts to the Guest Editor via e-mail by 30 October, 2008.

From selected abstracts, we will request full articles of 3000-5000 words (excluding figures and tables) of original research and scholarship on a range of topics. Note that an invitation to submit an article does not guarantee its publication. Every submitted article will be subject to blind peer review and recommendations arising.

Background
Nanotechnology in all its meanings allows for, among other things, the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale and enables a new paradigm of science and technology that sees different technologies converging at the nanoscale namely:

  • nanoscience and nanotechnology,
  • biotechnology and biomedicine, including genetic engineering,
  • information technology, including advanced computing and communications,
  • cognitive science (neuro-engineering),
  • synthetic biology;

hence, the designation “NBICS” (nano-bio-info-cogno-synbio).

Many lists of anticipated nanoproducts exist (Institute of Nanotechnology 2005;Kostoff et al. 2006). Applications for NBICS products are envisioned in areas such as the environment, energy, water, weapons and other military applications, globalization, agriculture, and health (e.g., more efficient diagnostics and genetic testing, cognitive enhancement; life extension and enhancing human performance in general) (M.Roco 2003). Many believe that advances in NBICS hold the key for extreme life extension to the level of immortality and the achievement of morphological (Anders Sandberg 2001) and genomic freedom(Wolbring 2003). NBICS-medicine is envisioned by some to have the answer to global problems of disease and ill medical and social health. Others argue for the pursuit of ‘morphological freedom’ (Anders Sandberg 2001)–allowing the human body to move beyond typical functioning of the species. Disabled people are often highlighted as the beneficiaries of NBICS-medicine products. NBICS applications and the selling of NBICS health products focuses mostly on offering disabled people medical solutions (prevention or cure/normative adaptation) and might move towards transhumanist solutions (augmentation, enhancement of the human body) but rarely offers social solutions (adaptation of the environment, acceptance, societal cures of equal rights and respect). Many NBICS applications/products for disabled people are envisioned and are under development(Wolbring 2005).

We chose this topic for an issue of IJDCR because of how the discourses around these new and emerging nanoscale science and technologies are emerging and their potential impact on people with disabilities, the communities linked to them and/or practitioners as well as others. Consumers and researchers linked to the disability discourse are involved will shape the positive or negative consequences for everyone involved.

Nanotechnology and NBICS have an impact on disabled people in at least four main ways.

Impact of NBICS on disabled people (Wolbring 2006)

NBICS may develop tools to adapt the environment in which disabled people live and to give disabled people tools that would allow them to deal with environmental challenges. This side of S&T would make the life of disabled people more liveable without changing the identity and biological reality of the disabled person

NBICS may develop tools that would diagnose the part of disabled people’s biological reality seen by others as deficient, defect, impaired and ‘disabled’ thus allowing for preventative measures

NBICS may develop tools that would eliminate that portion of disabled people’s biological reality seen by others as deficient, defect, impaired and ‘disabled’.

NBICS may be a target for – and an influence upon – the discourses, concepts, trends and areas of action that impact disabled persons.

Discourses:

  • The discourse around the term human security
  • The religious discourse
  • The politics of biodiversity
  • The politics of inequity
  • The politics of the ethics discourse.
  • The politics of law:
  • The politics of raising the acceptance level for a given technology
  • The politics of setting goals and priorities
  • The politics of language
  • The politics of self perception and identity (Body politics)
  • The politics of red herrings
  • The politics of interpreting International treaties
  • The politics of governance
  • The Politics of evaluation, measuring, analysis, and outcome tools

Concepts:

  • Self identity security
  • Ability security
  • Cultural identity/diversity
  • Morphological freedom and morphological judgement(Anders Sandberg 2001)
  • Freedom of choice and tyranny of choice
  • Duty to fix oneself
  • Duty to know
  • Parental responsibility
  • Societal responsibility

Trends:

  • Change in the concepts of health, disease and ‘disability’/’impairment’
  • The appearance of enhancement medicine and the acceptance of beyond species-typical functioning
  • Moving from curative to enhancement medicine; decrease in curative medicine and the appearance of the transhumanist/enhancement burden of disease
  • Moving from human rights to sentient rights
  • Moving from morphological freedom to morphological judgement
  • The appearance of the techno poor disabled and impaired
  • Moving from freedom of choice to tyranny of choice judgement

Areas of Action:

  • Nanotechnology/NBIC for development
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and the UN Millennium Development Goals
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and global medical and social health
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and accessibility
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and law
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and water and sanitation
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and disaster management
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and weapons/war
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and ethics/philosophy
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and social science/anthropology
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and community
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and networking

All of the above discourses, concepts, trends and areas of actions impact on disabled people[1] and others.

Potential contributors to this Special Issue might consider areas from the above table or one of the following topics:

1. What are the potential positive and negative impacts of envisioned nanoscale science and technology products and research and development on:

  • disabled people,
  • the community around them
  • practitioners, consumers and researchers linked to the disability discourse
  • community rehabilitation and the rehabilitation field in general
  • inclusive education and the education of disabled people in general
  • employability of disabled people
  • citizenship of disabled people
  • body image of disabled people
  • medical and social health policies and their impact on disabled people
  • health care for disabled people
  • the elderly
  • disabled people in low income countries
  • laws related to disabled people such as the UN Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
  • the concept of personhood
  • concept of health and health care
  • the measure of disability adjusted life years and other measurements used to guide health care dollar allocation
  • quality of life assessment

2. What are the potential positive and negative impacts of the new social philosophy of transhumanism that is seen as being enabled by nanoscale science and technology products and research and development?
3. What impacts of potential nanoscale science and technology products and research and development onto disabled people will impact other marginalized groups?

For more information about the International Journal of Disability, Community & Rehabilitation (IJDCR) please go to http://www.ijdcr.ca.

References
Anders Sandberg. Morphological Freedom — Why We not just Want it, but Need it. 2001. <http://www.nada.kth.se/~asa/Texts/MorphologicalFreedom.htm>

Institute of Nanotechnology (2005). Research Applications And Markets In Nanotechnology In Europe 2005 <http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reportinfo.asp?report_id=302091&t=t&cat_id=4>

Kostoff, Ronald et al. “The seminal literature of nanotechnology research.” Journal of Nanoparticle Research (2006): 1-21. <http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.1007/s11051-005-9034-9>

M.Roco, W. Bainbridge eds. Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance: Nanotechnology, Biotechnology, Information Technology and Cognitive Science. 2003. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht Hardbound. <http://www.wtec.org/ConvergingTechnologies/Report/NBIC_report.pdf> [PDF format]

Wolbring, G. “SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AND THE TRIPLE D (DISEASE, DISABILITY, DEFECT).” Ed. William Sims Bainbridge Mihail C.Roco National. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic, 2003. 232-43<http://www.wtec.org/ConvergingTechnologies/> <http://www.bioethicsanddisability.org/nbic.html>

Wolbring, G (2005). HTA Initiative #23 The triangle of enhancement medicine, disabled people, and the concept of health: a new challenge for HTA, health research, and health policy Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, Health Technology Assessment Unit, Edmonton, Alberta Canada <http://www.ihe.ca/documents/hta/HTA-FR23.pdf> [PDF format]

Wolbring, G (2006). Scoping paper on Nanotechnology and disabled people. Center for Nanotechnology in Society Arizona State University [On-line]. <http://cns.asu.edu/cns-library/documents/wolbring-scoping%20CD%20final%20edit.doc> [Word format]

——————————————————————————–
[1] The term ‘disabled people’, as used here, reflects the way in which environmental factors impact on the ability of individuals with sensory, motor, cognitive or other variations to participate in society, consistent with its usage by Disabled Peoples’ International.



Thank you to Gregor Wolbring for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 26 April 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Education, Employment, Health, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies

Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

 
The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

What is the relationship between disability and poverty?

How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?

What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?

What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?

What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1, 2008.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



Daniel Mont recently circulated this announcement on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

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RESOURCE: Handbook for Making Water and Sanitation Accessible to Disabled People

Posted on 26 January 2008. Filed under: Health, Inclusion, Mobility Impariments, Poverty, Resources, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A book is available that can help water specialists, disabled advocates, and family members learn how to make water supply and sanitation services more accessible for people with disabilities and other vulnerable populations.

According to the World Bank, more than one billion poor people lack access to clean drinking water, and more than two billion people lack access to clean sanitation facilities such as toilets. Dirty water and lack of a clean place to defecate can make poor people sick. And sick people may die more easily, or become even poorer than they were before.

People with disabilities, particularly mobility impairments, may face even more barriers in accessing clean water or sanitation. Water pumps might be poorly designed for people who have difficulty using one or both hands, or toilets may not be appropriately designed for people who have difficulty squatting. Many other individuals who are not ordinarly thought of as “disabled” may also face similar barriers, including frail elderly people; pregnant women; people carrying or taking care of babies and young children; and other individuals.

The book, Water and Sanitation for Disabled People and Other Vulnerable Groups, was written particularly for planners and service providers in the water supply and sanitation sector. Disabled people’s organizations, and service organizations targeted at disabled people and their familieis, may also find some of the information useful to their work. It provides practical information, ideas, and guidance about how to meet the needs of people in “real communities”–meaning, places where people “come with a wide range of shapes, sizes, abilities, and needs.”

This book is written so that users can skip over the chapters they don’t need and focus on the chapters they want. The first, introductory chapter may be useful for all readers. The second chapter answers the question, “Why should the water and sanitation sector consider disabled people”: it is written primarily for people who have little contact with disability issues but might also be helpful for some advocates. For example, the pictures on page 10 could be useful in educating others about the multiple types of barriers that disabled people face in society–not only in water and sanitation.

Chapter 3 helps explain the water and sanitation sector to disabled people, disability service providers, and advocates. Chapter 4 helps explain disability issues to water and sanitation professionals, engineers, public health workers, and community development workers.

Chapters 5, 6, and 7 provide practical ideas for how to make physical facilities more inclusive: these can be useful both for professionals and also for disabled people and their families.

Chapter 8 offers ideas for planning and implementing services with disabled people in mind. Section 8.2 is particularly meant for water and sanitation service providers, while section 8.3 is mainly meant for the disability sector.

Chapter 9 presents case studies that illustrate how disabled people and their families have benefitted from improved access to water and sanitation facilities. Case studies are shared from Bangladesh, Cambodia, Uganda, and Tibet.

The appendices point readers to further resources that can help them learn more about either water and sanitation issues or disability issues.

A print version of the book can be purchased from the Water, Engingeering, and Development Centre (WEDC) of Loughborough University; or a PDF version can be downloaded for free. For more information about the book and how to obtain it, go to

http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk/publications/details.php?book=1%2084380%20079%209.

People with visual impairments should note that, in order to download the PDF file, you would need to enter a visual image “captcha.” I did not see any clear instructions for alternate means for people with visual impairments to download the file. (If they exist and I missed them, please alert me in the comments area below.) You can contact WEDC by email to either share your concerns/feedback or to request assistance at: WEDC@lboro.ac.uk. I would be interested in knowing about the experiences of anyone with a visual impairment who tries to obtain this (or any other) book from WEDC.

When I downloaded my own copy, I left a comment encouraging WEDC to offer auditory captcha in addition to visual captcha and to also give people the means of contacting them to ask for assistance in downloading or receiving PDF files. I haven’t heard back from them yet. If I do, I’ll try to remember to come back here and share what they say.



We Can Do learned about this resource by browsing the Siyanda on-line database of gender and development materials. Try entering key words such as “disabilities” into the Siyanda search engine.



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