FUNDING OPPORTUNITY for Human Rights Projects by Disabled People Organizations (DPOs)

Posted on 15 July 2009. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund Releases Second 2009 Request for Proposals, Extending Another Year of Grantmaking to Existing Target Countries and Opening Grantmaking to the Pacific
July 15, 2009
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF)—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced the second round of its 2009 grantmaking, “Raising Our Voice.” The application deadline is September 15, 2009. This round opens another year of possible funding to disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in: Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; and Bangladesh and adds an additional region to the Fund’s reach – the Pacific. In the Pacific, 14 island countries are targeted: Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

The broad objective of the Fund[1]—which was officially launched in March 2008—is to empower DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).

In 2008, the Fund made one-year grants to 33 organizations in 7 countries (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; Bangladesh), totaling USD 800,000. Grants ranged from USD 5000 – 50,000 and supported CRPD awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

In the second round of 2009 grantmaking, applicant organizations may apply within one of two categories: a) single organizations or partnerships and b) national DPO coalitions. Grants to single organizations will range from USD 5,000 to 30,000 and support efforts to build voice and visibility and to develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. Grants to national DPO coalitions will range from USD 30,000 to 70,000 and will support advocacy toward ratification of the CRPD, passage of specific legislation to accord with the CRPD, or the production of shadow reports.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by August 15. The deadline for applications is September 15, 2009.
DRF’s donors include the Aepoch Fund, the American Jewish World Service, an anonymous founding donor, the Australian Government’s International Development Assistance Agency – AusAID, the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development.

####

[1] The Disability Rights Fund is a project of Tides.



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this announcement to We Can Do.

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JOB POST: Program Officer, Disability Rights Fund

Posted on 5 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund seeks Program Officer

About the position
The Program Officer position offers a unique opportunity to join a groundbreaking grantmaking initiative supporting the rights of persons with disabilities. As a member of a small team, the Program Officer will help shape the Fund as it matures and incorporates the best strategies in funding disability rights in the Global South and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union. The main objective of the position is to work with other Fund staff in the creation of grants strategy and process and the oversight of grantees. To do this work, the Program Officer will build field contacts and partnerships and work with grantees in the field. Other program and administrative responsibilities related to both grantmaking and the general operations of the Fund are also foreseen. The Fund is looking for a candidate who is able to work in a fast-paced environment, is flexible, takes initiative, and is independent, but team-oriented. This position is not necessarily Boston-based.

About the Disability Rights Fund
Launched in March of 2008 as a project of the Tides Center, the Disability Rights Fund is a grantmaking collaborative aimed at building community capacity to achieve the rights of all persons with disabilities. The Fund makes modest grants (USD $5000-70,000) to Disabled Persons’ Organizations in the Global South and in Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union for advancing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) at country-level.

Program Officer responsibilities
· Help design a grants proposal process that is accessible to people with disabilities
· Serve as liaison to grantees and prospective grantees
· Working closely with Tides, administer and manage grants(e.g., grant award and declination letters, disbursements, report tracking, grant files)
· Together with the DRF team, evaluate grant proposals, conduct financial and critical analysis of applicant organizations
· Provide technical aid to grantees during grants application and implementation
· Prepare concise written analyses of grant proposals and funding recommendations for Steering Committee comprised of field advisors and donors
· Arrange and conduct site visits and meetings with grantees
· Provide organizational effectiveness assistance to grantees or recommend helpful resources as appropriate
· Evaluate and monitor the impact of grants; review and analyze grantee reports
· Develop professional relationships within the field of disability rights to inform the grantmaking of the Fund; keep abreast of trends within the field of disability rights
· Collaborate with DRF team, Global Advisory Panel and Steering Committee to develop and refine grantmaking strategies
· Assist with the day-to-day operations of the Fund as needed
Skills and qualifications

The ideal candidate should demonstrate:
· Passion and commitment to advancing the human rights of people with disabilities
· Familiarity with the community of DPOs and the CRPD (particularly in the Asia Pacific region)
· Grantmaking or grantseeking experience (or relevant nonprofit experience)
· Experience supporting capacity development within civil society
· Demonstrated ability to work well with diverse populations from around the world
· Excellent written and verbal communication skills in English. Other language proficiencies a plus
· Strong administrative and organizational skills; the ability to manage time efficiently
· Computer proficiency (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint); willingness to learn additional applications (and accessible technology) as necessary
· Bachelors degree, or equivalent with minimum 5 years of relevant experience; advanced degree desired
· Ability to travel independently in developing countries
· Ability to combine the roles of objective evaluator and empathetic observer

Compensation
Salary and benefits negotiable, based on experience.

How to apply
Disability Rights Fund, a Project of the Tides Center, is an equal opportunity employer. We strongly encourage and seek applications from women, and people of color, including bilingual and bicultural individuals, as well as members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender communities, and people of other (non-U.S.) nationalities. People with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Please email or mail a cover letter, resume, three references (with contact information and relationship), writing sample (five page maximum) to:

Disability Rights Fund
Diana Samarasan, Director
Third Sector New England’s NonProfit Center
89 South Street, Suite 203
Boston, MA 02111-2670
dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org (please no phone calls)
Fax: (215) 261-4593

Deadline: Applications must be received by August 1, 2009.



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this announcement for publication at the We Can Do blog.

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NEWS: Manila Declaration, Asia Pacific Conference on Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 1 June 2009. Filed under: East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights, News, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

IDA – Asia Pacific Regional Conference on the CRPD Implementation and Monitoring

MANILA DECLARATION

February 11-12th, 2009

We, the delegates from The Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Nepal, India, Samoa, Fiji, and Republic of Korea being members of Disabled Peoples’ International, Inclusion International, International Federation of Hard of Hearing People, Rehabilitation International, World Blind Union, World Federation of the Deaf, World Federation of the DeafBlind, World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry, and Asia Pacific Disability Forum, all of which are members of International Disability Alliance (IDA) and participated in Asia Pacific Regional Conference on the CRPD Implementation and Monitoring, held at Manila, The Philippines on February 11-12, 2009,

We acknowledge the support of the Government of The Philippines, Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA), and Katipunan ng Maykapansanan sa Pilipinas, Inc (KAMPI) for this Conference.

After due deliberation and having reached consensus on the implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD) we make the following Declaration which shall be hereby referred to as the Manila Declaration 2009

GOVERNMENT
• We urge National Governments in the Asia and Pacific Region, to set the machinery in motion to ensure the signing, ratification without reservation, implementation and monitoring of the UN CRPD and the Optional Protocol;
• We further demand that the governments enact new legislation or amend existing legislation for Persons with Disabilities and related statutes to be in conformity with UN CRPD;

• We urge Public Authorities to change from a charity-based to a rights–based approach and from medical model to social model on disability as required by the UN CRPD;

• We ask all governments to initiate disability sensitization programs and to mainstream disability issues in all national agendas for the empowerment of persons with disabilities ;

• We recognize the vulnerability of all persons with disabilities with HIV/AIDS and we therefore request National Governments to address this urgent issue;

• We urge the Governments to include Children, Women and Youth with disabilities in all education and training programmes;

• We demand that Persons with Disabilities be represented through their representative organizations in law and policy making at all levels as required by Article 4 of UN CRPD;

• We recognize the positive role of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the lives of Persons with Disabilities. We therefore urge the Governments to facilitate the acquisition of ICT equipments;

• We appeal for the enactment of Disability Anti Discrimination Acts in our respective Countries;

• We seek the full participation of Persons with Disabilities in the Asia-Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons (2003-2012) in order to promote the accession, implementation and monitoring of UN CRPD;

HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION
We urge National Human Rights Institutions to include CRPD in their Plans and Strategies and constitute a Committee or Focal point to address Disability issues.

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES
We urge International Development Funding Agencies to include Disability Dimension in all their policies and programs;

We urge International Development Funding Agencies to modify the requirements in the Agreements so as to enable DPOs to access the technical and financial support;

MASS MEDIA
We urge Mass Media to promote positive images of Rights and Concerns of Persons with Disabilities.

NOTHING ABOUT US WITHOUT US



We Can Do received this declaration via several different sources; among them was the mailing list for the Global Partnership on Disability and Development.

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Call for Disabled Role Models in Asian Region for Brochure

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Comments or Information, Call for Nominations or Applications, East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

by Aiko Akiyama

Please note that the deadline to submit pictures and bios is May 31, 2009.

Dear colleagues,

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the
Pacific (ESCAP) is putting together a brochure entitled, “Agents of
Change,” to promote the social model of disability and explain the changes that will need to be made to meet the requirements of Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action, which is the regional policy guideline on disability. As a part of the brochure, we would like to have pictures and messages of mentors with disabilities from the region as they themselves are agents of change.

We would like to ask for your collaboration in this endeavor. We would likes to have active thematic photos of persons with different impairments in the region, who work in certain professions as well as a
caption or a statement about how you see “disability” and a message to
younger generations of persons with impairments in the region.

Thus far, we have a picture and a message of a deaf pharmacist from
Japan, are also waiting for a picture of a blind architect from the
Philippines and another picture from Kyrgyzstan. We are also planning on
shooting a picture of a pizza baker, inT hailand, who is physically
disabled. We would like to have pictures of a person with intellectual
disability, a picture of a person who is a survivor of psychiatry, a
picture of deaf blind person all of whom are working in certain professions which they are proud of. Moreover, we would like to particularly welcome pictures from South Asia and the Pacific.

Time is of the essence and we would appreciate your urgent attention
to this request. We would appreciate if you can e-mail us pictures (sharper images are appreciated) towards the end of this month 31 May 2009. The
brochure is in draft form at the moment and you contributions would help us finalize it. Before the brochure final draft goes out to the printer, a copy will be circulated for those who are interested for peer review. Let me know if you are interested in that process.

Please send us pictures and messages to Mr Osama Rajkhan (rajkhan.unescap@un.org) and Aiko Akiyama (akiyama@un.org).

I look forward to hear from you soon and best regards.

Aiko Akiyama
Social Affairs Officer
Social Development Division (SDD)
UNESCAP
THAILAND
Email: akiyama@un.org
http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/disability/index.asp



I received this announcement from Aiko Akiyama via the AsiaPacificDisability listserver. Please note that all inquiries, pictures, and bios should please be directed to Mr Osama Rajkhan (rajkhan.unescap@un.org) and Aiko Akiyama (akiyama@un.org), NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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Challenges Implementing Disability Rights Treaty?

Posted on 17 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Human Rights, Networking Opportunities, Opinion, Psychiatric Disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Abdul-Jeff Maalik Makana, the Executive Director of MindFreedom Kenya, wants to learn more about the challenges that other countries experience in implementing the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Below is his appeal for information. Please respond directly to him at kenya@mindfreedom.org.

Dear All,

Greetings from non sunny Nairobi day today!

We have a challenge here in Kenya advocating for the implementation of the UN CRPD. Are other states experiencing similar challenges? What are the challenges?

I recently on a media appearence to create awareness about the work of MindFreedom Kenya & advocating for the implementation of the UN CRPD… one caller to the show reinforced the general view that persons with psychosocial disabilities have no capacity at any time to make decision (Legal capacity) though the UN CRPD guarantees legal capacity(article 12) or even supported decision making.

To quote Daniel Hazen—Human Rights and Advocacy “cease the practice of exceptionalism when it comes to human rights” meaning we cannot downplay the CRPD which is a very important rallying point for our movement.

Mental Health (MH) policies cannot be written in a vacuum…. State parties and other stakeholders should get direction that adopting certain articles of the CRPD versus the CRPD in its entirety has far reaching consequences more so article 12 (right to legal capacity) a big part of the user/survivor movement advocacy.

Lastly, why was the term psychosocial disabled adopted in the UN CRPD versus the term mentally disabled or mentally ill? Here in Africa many don’t see mental illness as a disability? Can you please help me understand how to advocate better for psychosocial disabled term to be adopted and accepted locally.

What are your views:

I am doing a Survey on supporting signing/ratification and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities by state parties without reservations.

This obligation would require that the States both refrain from actions that undermine the principles and initiate efforts which would promote them. You can also e-mail your comments directly to kenya@mindfreedom.org
Question:

As a user, a survivor. mental health worker, or human rights activist in mental health do you support the position that the CRPD is non negotiable, and that the nature of this commitment obligates state parties to completely review MH policies and legislation which relied on flawed WHO MI Principles? *

http://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=cnR3dTlrTGFGRjFXY3g2YWhvTUJESUE6MA..

A few sampling of responses collected regarding the above question:

This obligation would require that the States both refrain from actions that undermine the principles and initiate efforts which would promote them.(MH Policy, legislation’s, new MH laws, civic education, more access to mental services at the community level, empowering of persons with psychosocial disabilities to participate equally in society without being discriminated based on disabilities).

Absolutely I support it!! Recently there have been reports that they are opening “behavioral” units in nursing homes in New York State–a way to lock us up again quietly so there won’t be too many complaints. Fortunately we noticed and… Read More now there’s a lawsuit. Good thing so many of us “suffer” from hypervigelance!! Anyway, so good to see that we’re coming together internationally. We can and will find our power no matter how hard the system tried to hold us down.

I am not sure that I can ask for the UN treaty to become nationalized, but I do agree with many of the tenets. I think that I can see where some conflicts of interest might be involved. So better person by person, not this group or that. That is what I think….

With kind regards,

Abdul-Jeff Maalik Makana

__________________________________
Abdul Maalik bin Ali formerly,
Jeff Makana

Executive Director,
MindFreedom Kenya(MF-K)
E-mail:kenya@mindfreedom.org
website: http://www.mindfreedomkenya.interconnection.org
Follow me on twitter@ www.twitter.com/Jeffmakana



Thank you to Abdul Maalik bin Ali for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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FUNDS For Humanitarian Programs Helping People Affected by Slavery

Posted on 23 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Funding, Health, Human Rights, Opportunities, Slavery & Trafficking, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Subject: Call for application: Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery; Appel à candidature: Fonds de contributions volontaires sur les formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

English; French

[Note to We Can Do readers: Organizations serving people with disabilities who have been affected by human trafficking, sexual slavery, child labor, forced marriage, or other forms of contemporary slavery may wish to consider this opportunity to devise an appropriate project targeted at, or incorporating, their needs. This fund is not specifically devised for people with disabilities, but grant seekers could argue for their need.]

Dear colleagues,

The United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery allocates project grants (for a maximum of 15 000 USD), for programmes of humanitarian, legal and financial assistance to individuals whose human rights have been severely violated as a result of contemporary forms of slavery.

Contemporary forms of slavery include trafficking, sexual slavery, child labour and child servitude, debt bondage, serfdom and forced labour, forced marriage and sale of wives ect.

Projects undertaken with previous Trust Fund grants include medical and psychological aid, food, shelter, and vocational training to victims of trafficking for sexual and economic exploitation; support to rehabilitation centres for sexually and physically abused street children and a project to identify and release bonded labourers in the carpet industry and stone quarries. Other projects have provided victims with the means to generate sustainable sources of income, such as sewing machines, hairdressing equipment, or farming tools.

Please consult the official web site to download the application form in English, French, or Spanish. Application forms should be duly completed and submitted by 31 March 2009.

If you need more information on the Fund, you can consult the website of the OHCHR: http://www2.ohchr.org/English/about/funds/slavery/index.htm.
You can also contact the OHCHR at MClerc@ohchr.org.

You are more than welcome to disseminate this message to oganisations working with victims of comtemporary forms of slavery.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French

*********************************************************************************************

Chers collègues,

Le Fond de contributions volontaires des Nations Unies pour la lutte contre les formes contemporaines d’esclavage octroi des subventions (pour un maximum de 15 000 dollars des Etats-Unis) aux projets fournissant une aide humanitaire, juridique et financière aux personnes dont les droits de l’homme ont été gravement violés par des formes contemporaines d’esclavage. Les formes contemporaines d’esclavage sont le trafic d’êtres humains, l’esclavage sexuel, le travail des enfants et la servitude des enfants, la servitude pour dettes, le servage, le travail forcé, les marriages forcés et la vente d’épouses ect.

Veuillez trouver ci-dessous le formulaire de demande de subvention en anglais, francais et espagnol. Les formulaires de demande doivent être complétés et soumis avant le 31 Mars 2009. Les projets financés par le passé grâce aux subventions du Fonds, ont pas exemple, permis aux victimes de la traite des êtres humains à des fins sexuelles et commerciales, d’obtenir de l’aide relative aux soins médicaux et psychologiques, à la nourriture, au logement et à la formation professionnelle. Ils ont permis aux enfants des rues abusés sexuellement et physiquement de bénéficier de soutien dans des centres de réhabilitation. Ils ont également permis d’apporter de l’aide à l’identification et à la libération des travailleurs en servitude pour dettes employés à la fabrication des tapis et dans les carrières de pierre. D’autres projets ont permis aux victimes d’obtenir les moyens de générer des sources de revenus durables comme l’achat de machines à coudre, équipements de coiffure et des outils agricoles.

Si vous avez besoin de plus d’information sur le Fond, vous pouvez consulter le site internet du HCDH: http://www2.ohchr.org/french/about/funds/slavery/index.htm Vous pouvez aussi nous contacter en répondant à MClerc@ohchr.org.

N’hésitez pas à diffuser ce message aux organisations travaillants avec les victimes des formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserver.

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NEWS: Bulgarians with Mental Disabilities Suffer Inhumane Treatment

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Cognitive Impairments, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Geneva, 3 December 2008

On the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT), the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee (BHC) and the Mental Disability Advocacy Center (MDAC) come together to express their serious concern over the situation of persons with mental disabilities, one of the most marginalised and discriminated groups in Bulgarian society.

In a series of letters to members of the Bulgarian Parliament and Government, officials and elected representatives in the European Union, and the United Nations Special Procedures mandate holders, the three organisations underline that persons with mental disabilities in Bulgaria, “frequently face social exclusion and severe human rights violations, including violence and ill-treatment”, and express their concern that, “[i]nadequate legislation together with entrenched institutional policies and practices also compromise their socio-economic well-being, as well as that of their families”.

Regardless of the skills and capabilities which persons with mental disabilities in Bulgaria possess, they are often deemed incompetent, deprived of their legal capacity and placed under guardianship. Bulgaria’s outdated legislation on deprivation of legal capacity removes a person’s right to make their own decisions and denies the exercise of their basic human rights, including the rights to marry, vote, work, take legal action and seek judicial remedies. Deprivation of a person’s legal capacity also impedes their rights to a fair trial, to own property and to respect for their personal and family life. In most cases, persons with mental disabilities who are placed under guardianship in Bulgaria are forced to live in large and remote residential institutions and to remain there for the rest of their lives. Once institutionalised, they are at risk of ill-treatment from staff and subjected to prison-like regimes. Indeed, living conditions in some of these institutions have been deemed to amount to inhuman and degrading treatment.

Please read the rest of this news release from the World Organization Against Torture at their web site by clicking on the following URL: http://www.omct.org/index.php?id=&lang=eng&actualPageNumber=1&articleId=8204&itemAdmin=article

I received this press release via several sources including the IDA_CRPD_Forum listserver; the AdHoc_IDC listserver; the RatifyNow organization’s listserver; and others. Only the first two paragraphs is quoted here. Please follow the link provided above to read the full story.

Note that “mental disabilities” is often used to refer to both people with intellectual disabilities and also people with psychosocial disabilities. Although these are very different disabilities, both populations in many countries are frequently locked up in the same institutions and may experience similar types of human rights violations.

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FUNDING for Disability Rights Projects in India, Mexico, Ukraine (Text in English, Español, українською мовою, на русском языке)

Posted on 16 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Democratic Participation, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке

Disability Rights Fund Releases 2009 Request for Proposals: 3 New Countries Targeted in First Round
FEBRUARY16, 2009
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF)—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced its first 2009 grants round, “Raising Our Voice,” targeted at disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in three countries: India, Mexico and Ukraine.

The broad objective of the Fund[1]—which was officially launched in March 2008—is to empower DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).

In 2008, the Fund made one-year grants to 33 organizations in 7 countries (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; Bangladesh), totaling USD 800,000. Grants ranged from USD 5000 – 50,000 and supported CRPD awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

In the first round of 2009 grantmaking, applicant organizations may apply within one of two categories: a) single organizations or partnerships and b) national DPO coalitions. Grants to single organizations will range from USD 5,000 to 30,000 and support efforts to build voice and visibility and to develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. Grants to national DPO coalitions will range from USD 30,000 to 70,000 and will support advocacy toward ratification of the CRPD, passage of specific legislation to accord with the CRPD, or the production of shadow reports.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by March 16. The deadline for applications is April 16, 2009.

As a donor representative on the DRF Steering Committee stated, “The launch of DRF’s 2009 grantmaking process marks an exciting expansion of our grantmaking to DPOs in three new countries and an effort to support both more marginalized sectors of the disability community and national coalitions advancing the rights of persons with disabilities.”

DRF’s donors include the American Jewish World Service, an anonymous founding donor, the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
####


Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad
publica convocatoria a presentar propuestas de proyectos en 2009:
Primera ronda de financiamiento va dirigida a tres nuevos países

16 de febrero de 2009
PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (DRF)—una innovadora iniciativa de colaboración que apoya los derechos humanos de estas personas—anunció hoy su primera ronda de financiamiento de 2009, “Alzando nuestra voz”, dirigida a organizaciones de personas con discapacidad (OPD) en tres países: India, México y Ucrania.

El Fondo[2]—iniciado oficialmente en marzo de 2008—tiene el objetivo amplio de empoderar a las OPD del mundo en desarrollo y Europa Oriental/antigua Unión Soviética con el fin de que participen en la ratificación, aplicación y seguimiento de la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD).

En 2008, el Fondo brindó apoyo financiero durante un año a 33 organizaciones en siete países (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Perú, Ghana, Namibia, Uganda y Bangladés), por un total de USD 800,000. Los subsidios, de USD 5,000 a 50,000, apoyaron la toma de conciencia respecto a la CDPD, el fortalecimiento de coaliciones y redes, así como la promoción y defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad.

En la primera ronda de financiamiento de 2009, las organizaciones solicitantes pueden presentar propuestas en una de las siguientes categorías: a) como OPD que trabajan independientemente o en alianza con otras organizaciones, o b) en calidad de coaliciones nacionales de OPD. Las organizaciones de la primera categoría podrán solicitar subsidios desde USD 5,000 hasta 30,000, los cuales han de utilizarse para esfuerzos encaminados a generar voz y visibilidad, como también a desarrollar promoción, defensa y seguimiento de derechos con base en la CDPD. Los subsidios para las coaliciones nacionales de OPD, que oscilan entre USD 30,000 y 70,000, apoyarán acciones de promoción y defensa a favor de la ratificación de la CDPD, la aprobación de legislación específica armonizada con la CDPD o la elaboración de informes sombra.

Se invita a las organizaciones interesadas a leer todos los criterios de selección y los detalles para solicitud de fondos que se encuentran en http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant_spanish.html. Cualquier pregunta relacionada con el proceso de las propuestas debe dirigirse, a más tardar el 16 de marzo, a info@disabilityrightsfund.org. La fecha límite para presentar propuestas de proyectos es el 16 de abril de 2009.

Tal como aseveró una representante de donantes en el Comité Directivo del DRF, “El lanzamiento del proceso de financiamientos del DRF en 2009 constituye una expansión emocionante de nuestro apoyo financiero a las OPD en tres nuevos países; es también un esfuerzo por apoyar tanto a un mayor número de sectores marginados de la comunidad de personas con discapacidad como a coaliciones nacionales para la promoción de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad”.

Entre los donantes del DRF figuran el Servicio Mundial Judío Americano (AJWS), un donante fundador anónimo, el Instituto de la Sociedad Abierta, el Fondo Sigrid Rausing y el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional (DFID) del Reino Unido.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
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Фонд прав інвалідів публікує запит на грантові заявки 2009 року: для першого етапу обрано три нові країни
16 лютого 2009 р.

БОСТОН (США) – Фонд прав інвалідів (ФПI) – новаторський спільний проект з надання грантів на підтримку прав людей з інвалідністю – оголосив сьогодні про початок першого етапу виділення грантів на 2009 рік, «Піднесімо свій голос», на допомогу організаціям інвалідів (ОІ) у трьох країнах: Індії, Мексиці й Україні.

Загальним завданням Фонду[3], офіційно відкритого в березні 2008 року, є надання ОІ у країнах, що розвиваються, та Східній Європі/колишньому Радянському Союзі можливостей для участі в ратифікації, реалізації та моніторингу дотримання Конвенції ООН про права інвалідів (КПІ).

У 2008 р. Фонд надав річні гранти 33 організаціям семи країн (Еквадор, Нікараґуа, Перу; Ґана, Намібія, Уганда; Банґладеш) на загальну суму $800 000. Гранти, розміром від $5000 до $50 000, були використані на підвищення обізнаності громадськості про КПІ, зміцнення коаліцій та інших об’єднань організацій інвалідів, захисту їх прав.

Протягом першого етапу надання грантів 2009 р. організації-кандидати можуть подати заявки в одній з двох категорій: a) окремі організації чи партнерства та б) національні коаліції ОІ. Гранти окремим організаціям, розміром від $5000 до $30 000, будуть спрямовані на посилення ролі й авторитету ОІ у суспільстві та розробку системи захисту прав інвалідів і моніторингу дотримання КПІ. Гранти національним коаліціям, розміром від $30 000 до $70 000, уможливлять роботу з прискорення ратифікації КПІ, прийняття конкретного законодавства згідно з КПІ або складання «тіньових» звітів.

Зацікавлені організації можуть вивчити критерії відповідності й відбору і всі подробиці процедури подання заявок на вебсайті Фонду, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Усі запитання з процедури подання заявок слід надсилати на адресу info@disabilityrightsfund.org до 16 березня. Граничний термін прийому заявок – 16 квітня 2009 р.

Як сказав один з представників організацій-донорів у Керівному комітеті ФПІ: «Початок процесу надання грантів 2009 року позначить поширення нашої діяльності на три нових країни і наших зусиль з підтримки як найбільш ізольованих груп інвалідів, так і національних коаліцій в галузі захисту прав усіх людей з інвалідністю».

Серед донорів ФПІ – Американська єврейська всесвітня служба, анонімний донор – засновник Фонду, Інститут «Відкрите Суспільство», Фонд Сіґрид Раусінґ та Британський департамент міжнародного розвитку.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке

ПРЕСС-РЕЛИЗ

Фонд прав инвалидов публикует запрос на грантовые заявки 2009 года: на первом этапе выбраны три новые страны
16 февраля 2009 г.

БОСТОН (США) – Фонд прав инвалидов (ФПИ) – новаторский совместный проект по предоставлению грантов в поддержку прав людей с инвалидностью – объявил сегодня о начале первого этапа выделения грантов на 2009 год, «Возвысим свой голос», направленного на помощь организациям инвалидов (ОИ) в трех странах: Индии, Мексике и Украине.

Общей задачей Фонда[4], официально открытого в марте 2008 года, является предоставление ОИ в развивающихся странах и Восточной Европе / бывшем Советском Союзе возможностей для участия в ратификации, реализации и мониторинге выполнения Конвенции ООН о правах инвалидов (КПИ).

В 2008 г. Фонд предоставил годичные гранты 33 организациям семи стран (Эквадор, Никарагуа, Перу; Гана, Намибия, Уганда; Бангладеш) на общую сумму $800 000. Гранты, в размере от $5000 до $50 000, были использованы для повышения осведомленности общественности о КПИ, укрепления коалиций и объединений организаций инвалидов, защиты их прав.
В ходе первого этапа предоставления грантов в 2009 г. организации-соискатели могут подать заявки в одной из двух категорий: a) отдельные организации или партнерства и б) национальные коалиции ОИ. Гранты отдельным организациям, в размере от $5000 до $30 000, будут нацелены на усиление роли и авторитета ОИ в обществе, выработку системы защиты прав инвалидов и мониторинга выполнения КПИ. Гранты национальным коалициям, в размере $30 000–$70 000, будут использованы на работу по ускорению ратификации КПИ, принятию конкретного законодательства в соответствии с КПИ или созданию «теневых» отчетов.

Заинтересованные организации могут изучить критерии соответствия и отбора и все подробности процедуры подачи заявок на вебсайте Фонда, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Все вопросы по процедуре подачи заявок следует направлять по адресу info@disabilityrightsfund.org до 16 марта. Конечной датой принятия заявок является 16 апреля 2009 г.

Как сказал один из представителей организаций-доноров в Руководящем комитете ФПИ: «Начало процесса предоставления грантов 2009 года знаменует расширение нашей деятельности в трех новых странах и наших усилий по поддержанию как наиболее изолированных групп инвалидов, так и национальных коалиций по защите прав всех людей с инвалидностью».

Среди доноров ФПИ – Американская еврейская всемирная служба, анонимный донор – основатель Фонда, Институт «Открытое Общество», Фонд Сигрид Раусинг и Британский департамент международного развития.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
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[1] The Disability Rights Fund is a project of Tides. Back to English text
[2] El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad es un proyecto de Tides.Regresar a Español
[3] Фонд прав інвалідів є проектом Тайдз. українською мовою
[4] Фонд прав инвалидов является проектом Тайдз. на русском языке

English; Español; на русском языке; українською мовою



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for sending me this press release for publication at We Can Do.

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NEWS: Disability Rights Fund Receives $1.3 Million from DFID

Posted on 4 December 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

PRESS RELEASE: Disability Rights Fund Receives $1.3 Million from DFID

December 3, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – On the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the Disability Rights Fund (DRF) is happy to announce receipt of a grant of £868,000 ($1.3 million) from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID). This grant will support expanded grantmaking in 2009 to disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in the Global South.

“With the present economic downturn, this donation is an incredible message of support,” stated DRF’s Director Diana Samarasan. “It underscores the commitment of the British government to a rights-based approach to disability.”

Utilizing the framework of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD), DRF supports the human rights advocacy of DPOs in the Global South and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union. Through its unique governance structure, the Fund is a partnership between donors and the worldwide disability community. A global advisory panel provides recommendations on grantmaking strategies; and panel representatives also serve on the Fund’s grantmaking decision body together with donors. Panel members come from five continents and reflect a broad cross-section of the disability community,

DFID representatives stated, “it is essential that efforts like the Disability Rights Fund continue their support of communities often unreached by more conventional development efforts. DRF represents a unique model of supporting community-led efforts to institute rights.”

DRF’s first grants decisions, announced in November 2008, resulted in a total of $800,000 in grants to 33 organizations in seven countries. Grantees include a Ugandan organization of lawyers with disabilities, an emergent Peruvian group of people with psycho-social disabilities, and a grassroots network in Bangladesh of women-led disabled persons’ organizations. For a full list of grantees and more information about DRF, see www.disabilityrightsfund.org.

Other donors to DRF include: an anonymous founding donor, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the Open Society Institute, and the American Jewish World Service.

####



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for passing along this press release. Readers who have not already done so may wish to explore see the resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website for an extensive collection of resources related to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); fund raising sources; and toolkits that can help organizations learn how to raise funds more effectively.

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Disabled People Must Not Pay for Crisis, Says European Disability Forum

Posted on 27 November 2008. Filed under: Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Employment, Human Rights, News, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

français

EDF Statement on the Economic Crisis: Disabled People Must Not Pay for the Crisis

Paris, 16 Novembre 2008 – The European Disability Forum, which is the voice of more than 50 million European people with disabilities, calls on the European Council, Commission and Parliament and other European institutions and all the governments of Europe to ensure disabled people and their families do not pay for the worldwide economic crisis by the reduction in their income, benefits, employment opportunities or in cuts in support to our representative organisations.

The crisis was caused by the irresponsible lending and unacceptable negligence by those in charge of the financial institutions and regulatory bodies of the world. Governments’ response to the ‘credit crunch’ has been to create financial resources to bail out the banks. Now as this lack of confidence feeds its way into the general economic system it is vital that poor, elderly and disabled people and their families of Europe do not pay for this crisis. We already in a precarious position prior to the crisis, therefore call for a reflationary approach to spend more on investment in accessible infra structure, on benefits and the provision of tax relief, so that these groups can buy goods and services so improving the economic situation.

The world through the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities has only just recognised the urgent need to extend the international human rights law framework to disabled people. Society cannot afford to dilute its commitment to human rights including the right to employment and family life. Traditionally disabled people have been the ‘reserve army of labour’, ’the last to be hired the first to be fired’, seen as expendable at times of economic crisis. Disabled People, their families, the unemployed and the poor cannot become the scapegoat for a crisis not of their making. Already the worsening economic position has led to attempts to cut benefits in many countries such as Ireland, Hungary, Sweden and Italy.

The lesson of this crisis – the value of investing in people – is far more important than speculative investment and it benefits the whole of society and strengthens its resistance to such crisis driven changes. If the gap between the disadvantaged and the wealthy widens, it will cost society more in the long run. The EDF will ensure the equality and rights of disabled people come to the top of the political agenda in the forthcoming European Elections.

Cutbacks and mass unemployment will develop a fertile ground for violence, hate crime, undermine solidarity and produce dangerous attitudes for democracy. We call on all those with political and economic decision making responsibility to do all they can to ensure that disabled and poor people are treated with equality and their economic well being is assured by the measures they take at this time. Now is the time for strong action so that in 2010-European Anti Poverty Year- disabled people and other disadvantaged groups do not again come to the top of the agenda.

The European Disability Forum (EDF) is the European umbrella organisation representing the interests of 50 million disabled citizens in Europe. EDF membership includes national umbrella organisations of disabled people from all EU/EEA countries, as well as European NGOs representing the different types of disabilities, organisations and individuals committed to disability issues. The mission of the European Disability Forum is to ensure disabled people full access to fundamental and human rights through their active involvement in policy development and implementation in Europe.

Forum européen des personnes handicapées
>>> Communiqué de presse

Déclaration du Forum Européen des personnes handicapées à propos de la crise financière: Les personnes handicapées ne doivent pas payer la crise

Paris, le 16 novembre 2008 – Représentant 50 millions d’européens en situation de handicap, le Forum Européen des Personnes Handicapées appelle le Conseil Europeén la Commission Européenne et le Parlement Européen, les Institutions Européennes et tous les Gouvernements des pays européens à s’assurer que les personnes handicapées et leurs familles n’aient pas à payer les conséquences de la crise financière internationale par une réduction de leurs revenus, de leurs accès à l’emploi, de leurs moyens de compensation ou par une réduction des moyens attribués à leurs organisations représentatives.

La crise financière a été causée par des accords de prêts irresponsables et des négligences inacceptables de la part des responsables d’Institutions financières et de régulation financières. La réponse des Gouvernements à cette déroute bancaire a été la création de ressources financières pour sauver les banques. Maintenant que la perte de confiance gagne l’économie réelle, il est essentiel que les européens exposés à la pauvreté, à la maladie et aux situations handicap n’aient pas à faire les frais de cette crise. Déjà affectée par la précarité avant cette crise, nous pensons au contraire qu’une politique de relance devrait augmenter les allocations, investir dans l’accessibilité et accorder des avantages fiscaux pour que ces groupes puissent consommer des biens et des services et ainsi soutenir le développement économique.

Avec l’adoption par les Nations Unies de la Convention Internationale pour le droit des personnes handicapées le monde vient juste de reconnaître le besoin urgent d’un élargissement du cadre des Droits de l’Homme aux personnes handicapées. La société ne peut pas se permettre maintenant de d’affaiblir son engagement pour les Droits de la Personne et notamment le droit à l’emploi et le droit à fonder une famille.

Il est depuis longtemps d’usage que la réponse aux besoins des personnes handicapées représente une « réserve d’emploi », ce sont les dernières à être engagées et les premières à être licenciées, perçues comme quantité négligeable. La dégradation de la situation économique a déjà conduit plusieurs pays à vouloir supprimer des avantages acquis, comme en Irlande, en Hongrie, en Suède et en Italie.

La leçon de cette crise est que l’investissement sur le développement des personnes est beaucoup plus essentiel que les investissements spéculatifs, qu’il bénéficie à l’ensemble de la collectivité et qu’il renforce les capacités de réponse collective à ce type de crise. Si le fossé entre les riches et les pauvres s’élargit encore la crise coûtera plus cher et durera plus longtemps. Le Forum Européen des Personnes Handicapées veillera à ce que l’égalité et les droits des personnes handicapes devienne une priorité de l’agenda politique européen lors des prochaines élection européennes.

Les restrictions et l’augmentation du chômage vont créer un terrain propice au développement de la violence, d’attitudes dangereuses pour la démocratie et constituent une menace pour la solidarité. Nous appelons les responsables politiques et économiques à faire face à leur responsabilité et à prendre immédiatement les décisions nécessaires pour que les personnes handicapées, leurs familles et les personnes pauvres soient traitées avec équité et leur avenir économique assuré.

Le Forum européen des personnes handicapées (FEPH) est la plateforme européenne qui représente les intérêts de 50 millions de citoyens handicapés au sein de l’Union européenne. Les organisations membres du FEPH incluent les plateformes nationales des personnes handicapées de tous les Etats membres de l’UE et de l’Espace économique européen, ainsi que les ONG européennes représentant les différents types de handicap. La mission du FEPH est de garantir le respect total des droits fondamentaux et humains des personnes handicapées par le biais d’une implication active dans le développement et application des politiques européennes.



This press release was circulated on the AsiaPacificDisability listserver.

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NEWS: First Committee of Disability Rights Convention Experts Elected

Posted on 23 November 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

First Committee of Experts on Disability Rights Convention Elected

(New York, United Nations, November 3, 2008): Today, the first Conference of States Parties on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) elected the new Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities which will be in charge of monitoring the implementation of the CRPD. The Committee comprises seven men and five women, of which nine are persons with disabilities. The twelve Committee members elected are:

Monsur Ahmed Choudhuri (Bangladesh) (4-year term)
Amna Ali Al Suweidi (Qatar) (4-year term)
György Könczei (Hungary) (2-year term)
Ana Peláez Narváez (Spain) (4-year term)
Cveto Uršič (Slovenia) (2-year term)
Jia Yang (China) (4-year term)
Mohamed Al-Tarawneh (Jordan) (4-year term)
Ron McCallum (Australia) (2-year term)
Maria Soledad Cisternas Reyes (Chile) (4-year term)
Germán Xavier Torres Correa (Ecuador) (2-year term)
Lotfi Ben Lallohom (Tunisia) (2-year term)
Edah Wangechi Maina (Kenya) (2-year term)

By drawing lots, six Committee members listed above will serve for a two-year mandate, while the other six members have a four-year mandate.

William Rowland, Chair of the International Disability Alliance CRPD Forum: “We congratulate the members of the Committee for their election and look forward to very close interaction with the Committee. We encourage all Committee members to support Rules of Procedure for the new Committee that will ensure meaningful participation from representative organisations of persons with disabilities (DPOs) in all stages of their work. The Committee should consider the IDA CRPD Forum not only as the network that represents the key stakeholders of the CRPD, but also as a source of expertise.”

The Committee will hold its first one-week meeting in Geneva in February 2009. The Conference of States Parties decided to hold its next meet in 2009, which confirms the substantive nature of the Conference.

For more information on the IDA CRPD Forum, please visit the website:

http://www.internationaldisabilityalliance.org/forum.html

or send an email to: idacrpdforum@yahoo.com.

The IDA CRPD Forum is the network of international and regional organisations of persons with disabilities, which has been established to promote the swift and proper ratification and implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and its Optional Protocol.



This press release was circulated on the AdHoc_IDC mailing list and the IDA CRPD Forum mailing list.

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FUNDING: United Nations Democracy Fund

Posted on 30 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Democratic Participation, Funding, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS – UN DEMOCRACY FUND


http://www.un.org/democracyfund/index.htm

UNDEF Third Round of Funding

The Third Round of Funding for the United Nations Democracy Fund – UNDEF – will be conducted from 10 November to 31 December 2008.

Applications for UNDEF funding can be made online through a link from the UNDEF website that will be open from 10 November 2008. Applications must be written in English or French, the two working languages of the United Nations. Applications can only be made through the UNDEF online facility. Applications sent by E-mail, fax or post will NOT be accepted.

Applicants should be aware that UNDEF funding rounds are highly competitive. In the Second Round there were more than 1800 applications while only 83 projects were funded. Accordingly, the quality of the application will be an important attribute. Applicants are therefore advised to read very carefully the Project Proposal Guidelines (PDF format, 87 Kb) on the UNDEF website. Applications can be saved in the system and should be submitted only when applicants are confident that all the relevant information has been provided.

Finally, UNDEF is a democracy fund, not a development fund or a human rights fund. Project proposals that strengthen the voice of civil society in the various democratic processes will be more likely to gain acceptance than project proposals less directly related to democracy promotion. It is anticipated that the vast majority of applicants and short-listed project proposals will emanate from civil society organisations.

Note to We Can Do Readers: Consult the official website for the United Nations Democracy Fund directly for more information on this organization and their funding opportunities. Queries and applications regarding this funding opportunity should be directed to the United Nations Democracy Fund via the instructions at their web site. Please do NOT post those queries at this page (the UNDEF will not see them here) and please don’t inquire with We Can Do (this blog site is not associated with the UNDEF).

This funding opportunity could be one option for organizations that wish to establish projects that would enable people with disabilities in their countries to participate more actively in the democratic political process. Grants can range from $50,000 to $500,000.

If you miss the 2008 deadline, then consult the UNDEF website for information on similar funding opportunities for subsequent years.



I received most of the text of this announcement via Mobility International USA’s international development and disability email updates. Text after “Note to We Can Do readers” is my own. Only information provided directly by UNDEF should be considered official.

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How Was the CRPD Born? Opportunity to Share Your Story with History

Posted on 30 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

We Can Do readers who were involved with the negotiation process for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) may wish to share their stories with the United Nations Intellectual History Project (UNIHP). This could be an important means of documenting the history of how the CRPD was created. The following text is taken directly from the UNIHP web site at http://www.unhistory.org/ora_his_sol.htm; only information provided at the UNIHP website itself should be considered official or up-to-date.

Do You Have a Story to Tell?

Limited time and resources make it impossible for UNIHP staff to conduct oral history interviews with all those who may have served the United Nations as staff members, consultants, researchers, diplomats or chairs of commissions. However, anyone who has participated in UN development activities over the years, and who has a particular story to contribute about the nexus of development ideas, international public policy, and multilateral institutions, is welcome to send us a short, written contribution.

We have set out below some of the questions, about which it would be most useful to receive your own ideas and experiences.

We ask that you send a brief note, 5 to 10 pages, by email to unhistory@gc.cuny.edu, or by fax or mail to the project’s New York headquarters.

Please note that by sending your contribution to the project you agree to vest copyright with the United Nations Intellectual History Project. This agreement will allow the project to quote directly from your note if it is used in project publications, although it will license you to copy, publish or otherwise use the note for your own purposes.

As the aim of the project is to better understand the UN’s contribution to global economic and social policy and to development discourse and practice, we examine the sources, evolution, and implementation of economic and social ideas generated or promoted by the UN. With this in mind, we ask that your note address the following questions as they relate to your own experience at the UN:

1. Please briefly describe the nature of your affiliation with the UN, positions held, and dates.

2. Could you identify one or two of the most original development ideas that you worked on, or were aware of, during your experience with the UN?

3. Where did this idea originate? Did it come from

a. Intellectual leadership of particular individuals, within or outside UN secretariats?
b. Eminent commissions?
c. Ad hoc global conferences?
d. Expert groups?
e. Academics?
f. NGOs?

4. How did this idea develop? What were the debates about it? Was it promoted, distorted, abandoned, or implemented? Some possible factors to consider that may have impacted on it are:

a. Global or regional events
b. Tensions within and among diplomatic coalitions, i.e. North-South relations within the UN during the Cold War and after; East and West; within “like-minded”; within the least developed.
c. Institutional rivalries or coalitions, including tensions between the UN and the Bretton Woods institutions
d. Quality of the international civil service, including its leadership

5. In your view, did this idea make a difference?

a. Did it change international public policy discourse?
b. Did it provide a guide to national policy and action?
c. Did it alterprospects for forming new coalitions of political or institutional forces?
d. Did it become embedded in institutions?




I became aware of the UNIHP via the AdHoc_IDC email discussion list.

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UN Terms Forced Psychiatric Treatment Torture–Users and Survivors of Psychiatry Welcomes Report

Posted on 3 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Human Rights, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note from We Can Do: The following press release from the Center for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry refers to a recent Interim Report from the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture. For more information on that report, or to download a copy, go to http://www2.ohchr.org/english/issues/disability/torture.htm and also go to http://www2.ohchr.org/english/issues/disability/index.htm.]

Date: September 24, 2008

The Center for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry welcomes the Interim Report by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture

The Center for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (CHRUSP) welcomes the Interim Report by UN Special Rapporteur on Torture Manfred Nowak, which signals an end to impunity for psychiatric torture and ill treatment. The report focuses attention on torture and persons with disabilities, applying the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) to the obligations of states to prevent and punish torture.

The Special Rapporteur names forced psychiatric interventions (such as psychosurgery, electroshock and administration of mind-altering drugs including neuroleptics) among practices that may constitute torture or ill treatment. Other medical practices that may constitute torture or ill treatment are restraint and seclusion, forced abortion or sterilization and involuntary commitment to psychiatric institutions. The medical context itself is one where “serious violations and discrimination against persons with disabilities may be masked as ‘good intentions’ on the part of health care professionals.”

In his conclusions, the Special Rapporteur calls on states to ratify and implement the Convention and its Optional Protocol, to legislate recognition of the legal capacity of persons with disabilities and ensure that support in decision-making is provided where needed, and to issue guidelines on free and informed consent in line with the Convention. He calls for independent human rights monitoring of institutions where persons with disabilities may reside, and for UN and regional human rights mechanisms to take account of the Convention and integrate its standards into their work.

“This development is significant for several reasons,” said Tina Minkowitz, founder of CHRUSP. “It makes explicit what the Convention had left implicit: that forced psychiatric treatment is a serious violation of human rights, even when done with the best intentions. States that do not make the necessary reforms to eliminate forced treatment and institutionalization and to respect the legal capacity of persons with disabilities may run afoul of their obligations to effectively stop torture and ill treatment. The report gives us new tools for legal advocacy and redress of violations, in states that have ratified the CRPD and in those that have not yet ratified.”

**** END ****

About the Center for Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (CHRUSP):

The purpose of the organization is to work for full legal capacity, an end to forced psychiatric treatment, and equality and advancement for users and survivors of psychiatry within a human rights framework.
The aims of the organization are to:
• Advocate for the advancement of the human rights of users and survivors of psychiatry.
• Provide international consultation to influence key decision-makers regarding matters that affect users and survivors.
• Develop model legislation focusing on legal capacity and free and informed consent.
• Facilitate sharing of information and knowledge among user / survivor organizations around the world
• Monitor progress on human rights instruments including the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities with respect to issues affecting users and survivors of psychiatry



This press release was recently circulated on the IDA_CRPD_Forum email discussion group.

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FUNDING: Campaigns to Ratify, Implement Disability Rights Treaty (CRPD)

Posted on 1 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Are you a disability rights advocate working in a developing country? Is your organization trying to persuade your country’s government to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)? Or, has your country already ratified the CRPD–and you are now working on making sure the CRPD is fully implemented, so that all people with disabilities in your country have their rights respected and protected? Do you need funding support?

The grantmaking foundation, Open Society Institute, has now established the Disability Rights Initiative that supports the efforts of disability rights advocates working on ratification and implementation of the CRPD around the world. The initiative gives priority to efforts promoting the rights of people with intellectual and psycho-social disabilities. However, OSI is willing to support a range of programs and projects that advance the CRPD.

Learn more detail about this funding opportunity and how to apply for it at:

http://www.soros.org/initiatives/special/focus/disability/grants

This is an on-going funding opportunity.

Please note that all inquiries and funding applications should be directed to the Open Society Institute, NOT We Can Do.

Advocates working on issues related to implementing the CRPD in developing countries will also want to keep checking the Disability Rights Fund web site for announcements of future, additional funding opportunities there. The application deadline for their first round of grants passed in August 2008, but they will be offering more funding grants to more countries in the future. Also check the resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website for links to more possible funding sources in general.

New to the CRPD? Learn more about this international, legally-binding human rights treaty that protects the human rights of people with disabilities around the world at http://ratifynow.org/ratifynow-faq/



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for alerting me to the OSI funding opportunity.

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RESOURCE: Disability Rights Convention Ratification Campaign Handbook

Posted on 29 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Media & Journalism, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , |

Disability advocates can use the Disability Rights Convention Ratification Campaign Handbook (PDF format, 250 Kb) from the Landmine Survivors Network as one more tool to help them persuade their government to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

The most significant international, legally binding treaty affecting people with disabilities is, of course, the CRPD. The 40 countries that have ratified it so far are now legally obligated to make sure their laws protect a wide range of human rights for people with disabilities, such as the right to life, to privacy, to accessible education and health care services, and many more. In some cases, this may mean creating new legislation; in some cases, this may mean abolishing old laws that discriminate.

But what of the other 160 countries or so that have not yet ratified the CRPD? The good news is that 95 of these have taken the first step toward ratification by signing it. And signing the convention does at least obligate the country to avoid doing anything that would directly violate the treaty. But a few dozen countries still haven’t even signed it. And the countries that have signed it vary widely in the level of progress they are making toward ratification. A country is not obligated to fully obey the CRPD until after they ratify it.

Disability communities around the world–and their families and the service providers who work with them–are working together to persuade their governments to ratify. The global grassroots organization RatifyNow is one example, but there are also many local efforts. Advocates who are new to the process have an increasing number of toolkits they can use to help them figure out how to get started. One of these resources is Disability Rights Convention Ratification Campaign Handbook (PDF format, 250 Kb).

The first part of this handbook explains what a human rights convention is and how the process for creating one works; presents the CRPD and its Optional Protocol in plain (simple) language; and answers some frequently asked questions such as “what rights are included”? and “how will it work?”

The second part explains how a country can ratify the CRPD and shares advice for how people can run an advocacy campaign. Perhaps the most valuable part of this section, at least for advocates who are new to writing letters to politicians or the wider community, are the sample letters they can use to help them figure out how to write letters of their own.

The third part of this handbook explains how advocates can reach out to the media; get media coverage for their campaign; prepare press releases; and prepare press conferences. This section includes a sample press release that advocates can use as a guide for writing their own. A Guide to Portraying People with Disabilities in the Media can be distributed to journalists as a way of encouraging them to write or speak about people with disabilities with repsect and accuracy.

Download the PDF file (250 Kb) at:

http://www.landminesurvivors.org/files/ConvHandbook_4-30.pdf

Advocates who have difficulty understanding legal terminology may be contented with the plain language version of the CRPD presented in this handbook. However, if you’d rather read the original, unaltered CRPD–i.e., the same text that government officials would be reading and deciding whether to ratify–then you can find the full CRPD at http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=12&pid=150. You will need to scroll down the page to choose your preferred language; the CRPD is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Russian, Chinese, Portuguese (Brazilian), Khmer, Croatian, Hungarian (in both the original translation and the easy to read version), Hungarian Sign Language, Persian (Farsi), Maltese, Dutch, Korean, Slovenia, and Turkish. Some translations are in PDF format, some are in Word format.

Want a quick background on the CRPD that you can read in a few minutes? Try the RatifyNow FAQ at http://ratifynow.org/ratifynow-faq/.

Find out if your country has signed or ratified the CRPD at http://www.un.org/disabilities/countries.asp?navid=12&pid=166

Also, a number of other toolkits and resources related to the CRPD have been featured at We Can Do in the past–see a list of links to relevant We Can Do posts at https://wecando.wordpress.com/resources-toolkits-and-funding/#CRPD%20resources. Especially helpful might be the Ratification and Implementation Toolkits from Disabled Peoples International, available in English, Spanish, and French.

Find an even more extensive collection of links to resources on the CRPD and disability rights at the Disability Rights Fund Resource page.



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Take Action! Promote the Mainstreaming of Disability in the MDGs

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

MEMORANDUM
TO: GPDD PARTNERS
FROM: GPDD SECRETARIAT
SUBJECT: PROMOTING THE MAINSTREAMING OF DISABILITY IN THE MDGs
DATE:    9/25/2008
 
The General Assembly’s sixty-third session is taking place at the UN headquarters in New York. This session marks a special occasion to highlight the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and a number of consultations and events examining multiple dimensions of MDG activities are taking place throughout the week. This presents a unique opportunity for all concerned stakeholders to advocate for the inclusion of disability in the MDGs.
 
Since the GA Plenary may discuss this issue from October 6 to 8, immediate action is essential. For this reason, the Secretariat of the Global Partnership for Disability and Development is:

1)    Circulating a letter to UN Missions and Foreign Affairs Offices of Member States requesting Member States to make interventions and support a resolution in favor of mainstreaming disabilities in the MDGs.

2)    Encouraging advocates and activists to phone, fax, or e-mail relevant government officials in their countries.

3)    Sending an advisory to relevant media outlets.

We request your support in these actions as well as your suggestions.

Your ideas and participation will make a difference! A sample letter and relevant contact information are attached for your use.

FYI,  a copy of the Secretary-General’s report on mainstreaming disability in monitoring and evaluation of MDGs conducted as part of the Fifth quinquennial  review and appraisal of the World Program of Action concerning Disabled Persons and a short summary are attached, as well.
 
Sincerely,
Maria Verónica Reina
Executive Director
GPDD

Sample Letter
Disability advocates may wish to use this sample letter as inspiration when writing to the UN Mission Office for your country, or when writing to the Foreign Affairs office in your country. Find the full list of UN Mission offices, with the relevant contact information, at http://www.un.org/members/missions.shtml. Search the website for your government to locate the contact information for your country’s equivalent of the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Dear Mr./Ms. Minister of Foreign Affairs (or Head of Delegation):
As members of the Disability and Development community, we want to encourage your government to play a substantive and active role in favor of mainstreaming Disability in the Millennium Development Goals (during the fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action (A/63/183) which will be reviewed by the GA during its 63rd session (6-8 October under Social Development). The report was envisaged as a contribution to reinforcing the disability perspective in reviews of the progress made, and challenges encountered, in implementing the MDGs as requested by GA resolution 62/127.

Mainstreaming disability in the MDGs will help to ensure that no one is excluded from the processes of global development. In view of the enforcement of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, new and concerted efforts should be made in order to accomplish the advancement of persons with disability in the context of development. It is important to note the importance of promoting universal design, the design of products, environments, programmes, and services which are usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. Such increased accessibility benefits all members of society, not only persons with disabilities. Simultaneously, it is also relevant to state that disability specific programs addressing MDG concerns are also needed to guarantee the full inclusion of persons with disabilities on an equal basis with others.

For these reasons, we respectfully urge you to promote a resolution on mainstreaming disability in the MDGs during the fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action at the 63rd Session of the GA.

Sincerely,

Summary Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons (A/63/183)
The full Fifth quinquennial review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons, referred to in Maria Verónica Reina’s letter, was too long to publish here. But someone also disseminated a shorter summary which is provided below.

The fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action (A/63/183) will be reviewed by the General Assembly during its 63rd session(6-8 October under social development)The report was envisaged as a contribution to reinforcing the disability perspective in reviews of progress and challenges encountered in implementing the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as requested by General Assembly resolution 62/127. The resolution also requested the Secretary-General to present proposed updates of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons which were summarized in Annex I to the report. The report also presents Annex II, “Millennium Development Goals: Mainstreaming Disability”, which presents practical guidance on the inclusion of disability in the processes of the MDGs.

The principal issue addressed in the fifth review and appraisal is the emergence of a “new normative and policy architecture” on the advancement of persons with disabilities within the context of development. This architecture comprises the broad policy framework of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons (for policy formulation, planning and development); the tactical guidance for States of the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities; and the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which are legally binding for States parties, and is discussed in the section “International Disability Architecture”.

A second point of importance within the report is the emergence, of regional action plans and programmes on the advancement of persons with disabilities, which reflect needs and priorities of the respective regional actors and their complementary relationship to the international architecture.

A third point addresses the processes of the MDGs and focuses on options suggested in the architecture to ensure that no one is excluded from the processes of global development.

A fourth point within the report discusses the expanded constituencies for the advancement of persons with disabilities. As the median global age is on the rise, disability will have major policy implications because the prevalence of disabilities tends to be higher among older persons. The new constituencies represent important agents in a new and concerted effort as part of a disability-sensitized community to the advancement of persons with disability in the context of development. It is important to note the importance of promoting universal design, the design of products, environments, programmes and services which are usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. Such increased accessibility benefits all members of society, not only persons with disabilities.

The fifth, point, is the need for a single, comprehensive biennial review of progress and obstacles in implementing a global strategy for disability-inclusive development. This unified report on the new disability architecture could facilitate substantive exchange and learning from the findings and recommendations of the CRDP treaty body once established, within the context of development.

Annex I to the Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action – Updates to the World Programme of Action
Annex I discusses the issue of the updating of the World Programme of Action, as requested by General Assembly resolution 62/127.

The report recommends that the General Assembly endorse a plan to develop a Global Strategy toward Disability-Inclusive Development 2010-2015, through regional consultations and contributions from experts. These strategic guidelines could be developed based on the complementarities and synergies of three disability-specific instruments, namely the World Programme of Action, the Standard Rules and the Convention, and could incorporate updates proposed by Member States. There are existing regional guidelines for disability action in the context of development that could provide a basis for the development of a global strategy.
Annex II to the Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action – Millennium Development Goals: Mainstreaming Disability

Annex II provides a selection of examples and guidelines for mainstreaming disability in the MDGs and includes possible indicators to include disability in the monitoring of progress in achieving MDGs.



This call for action, and the associated materials, was recently circulated in several different locations including the IDA_CRPD_Forum and the GPDD mailing list.




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Training Workshop on AIDS and Disability, 19-20 November 2008, Soesterberg, The Netherlands

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The application deadline is October 1, 2008, to attend the training seminar November 19-20, 2008. Inquiries should be directed to Enablement, or to h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT We Can Do.

The number of disabled people worldwide is considerable – the figure of 650 million is often quoted. People with a disability and their families also account for 20% of the world’s poorest people. But so far most HIV-AIDS programmes are not accessible to people with disabilities.
International attention to the rights of people with disabilities is increasing especially since May 2008, when the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities has come into effect. However governments and policy makers have generally yet to include disability issues in their AIDS strategic plans. Even within specific disability programmes it is not yet common to ensure that clients of such programmes do have access to appropriate information and services that are related to HIV-AIDS and reproductive health. Leaving disabled people out of HIV-AIDS prevention and care is shortsighted. Given the rapid growth of the epidemic and the size of the global disabled population (an estimated 10% of the world‘s citizens); the AIDS crisis cannot be addressed successfully unless individuals with disability are routinely included in all HIV-AIDS prevention, treatment and outreach efforts!

Local Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) teams, professionals, people with disabilities and their families share the same fears, misconceptions and risks as the rest of the general public with regard to the virus. They urgently need to receive accessible and appropriate information on HIV-AIDS. The launch of the new United Nations CBR Guidelines December 2008 in Bangkok will mean that information on HIV-AIDS will become more easily available for CBR teams as these guidelines pay specific attention to this subject. The goal of the section focusing on HIV-AIDS is to ensure ‘access for all’ to HIV-AIDS information, services and programmes. This goal involves three key areas: increasing individual knowledge, reducing stigma and discrimination and mitigating the impact HIV-AIDS has on families and communities.

During this 2-day workshop outstanding researchers and practitioners will ensure that participants will become sensitized towards the need for inclusion of disabled people within their mainstream HIV-AIDS programmes. They will also discuss strategies, tools and experiences in HIV/AIDS programmes that include disabled people and in CBR and disability programmes which integrate HIV-AIDS with their other activities.

Prospective participants are
• policy makers & planners as well as project staff working in the field of
development cooperation
• policy makers & planners as well as project staff of mainstream HIV¬AIDS organisations
• AIDS activists
• interested academic staff from various university faculties

Overall goal
Mainstream development and HIV¬AIDS organisations understand the importance of inclusion of disabled people in their HIV-AIDS programmes.

Objectives
Participants have an increased awareness about the vulnerability of persons with disabilities to the risk and impact of HIV and AIDS;
Participants have tools and arguments for how to ensure inclusion of disability in HIV-AIDS policies, strategies and programs; Participants are able to advocate within their own organizations for equal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support services for persons with disabilities.

Content
The following content is being discussed:
• Sexual and Reproductive Health: a right of disabled people
• The situation of HIV-AIDS among disabled people world wide
• Specific risk factors
• Inclusion of disabled people in mainstream HIV-AIDS programmes: why (not)?
• Inclusive HIV-AIDS programming
• Effectiveness of inclusive HIV-AIDS programmes
• Community Based Rehabilitation and HIV-AIDS

Lecturing methods
• Short lectures by experts,
• Discussions
• Small group work
• Case study analysis

Lecturing staff Dr. Nora Groce (USA) is a medical anthropologist, interested in the area of global health and international development with particular emphasis on cross-cultural systems of health care and health as human rights issues. Her research interests include issues of disability in international health and development, violence as a global public health problem and equity in access to health care in ethnic and minority communities. Current Research Projects of Nora Groce are:
• Disability and HIV/AIDS knowledge among Disabled Populations (and the Yale University/World Bank Global Survey on HIV/AIDS and Disability);
• World Bank Health Systems Assessment Project;
• Violence against Disabled Children; and
• HIV/AIDS Education in Indigenous Communities: Rites of Passage

George O. Obuya (Kenya) is project co-coordinator of the Deaf Social Counselling & HIV/AIDS Education Program. He is representing the Dar-es Salaam (Tanzania) based and recently formed African Deaf Union in the African Decade for Persons with Disability HIV/AIDS Steering Committee, as well as a senior board member of the Kenya National Association of the Deaf (KNAD).

Jessica de Ruijter is the advocacy officer at VSO Netherlands. She has much experience in the area of HIV prevention and started advocacy on HIV and disability since January 2008. She is also the co-chair of the DCDD working group HIV and Disability.

Dr Peter Rule is a Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Adult Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. He recently completed a three-country study for the World Bank on HIV & AIDS and Disability. He has experience of working with NGOs in KwaZulu-Natal in the fields of adult literacy, disability, gender, HIV/AIDS and early childhood development.

Geert Vanneste is a health and rehabilitation consultant who worked for Christoffel BlindenMission (CBM) in Rwanda (1987-1994) and Tanzania (1994-2007). His main expertise is in the area of CBR but increasingly he became involved in Health and Hospital Management and HIV-AIDS issues. Currently he is Independent Consultant and living in Belgium.

The workshop will be conducted under the leadership of Roelie Wolting and Huib Cornielje and supported by the HIV-AIDS working group of the Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development.

Dates
19th and 20th of November 2008
(10.00 to 17.00 hours)

Venue
Kontakt der Kontinenten, Soesterberg, The Netherlands

Course fees
€ 500,00 (including tea/coffee, lunches and a course map)

Maximum number of participants
24

Application and Further Information
Interested people should apply well in advance (before the 1st of October 2008) by filling out the attached application form.

Huib Cornielje Enablement Langenhorst 36 2402PX Alphen aan den Rijn
Tel: +31-172-436953
Fax: +31-172-244976 E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl Internet: www.enablement.nl
We gratefully acknowledge the financial support provided by CORDAID.

Interested participants should send the following information to h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT to We Can Do.

Application form for Disability- HIV&AIDS training
19th and 20th of November 2008

This form to be submitted to: Enablement, Langenhorst 36, 2402PX, Alphen aan den Rijn, The Netherlands. E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl

General Information participant

First name
Family Name
Address
Postal code
City
Country
Telephone
Cell Phone
Fax
E-mail address
Employer/organisation
Profession or function within organisation
Organisation name (if different from information above)
Address
Postal Address
Postal Code
City
Telephone
Cell phone
Fax
E-mail address
Website

Dietary requirements?
If any special requirements please specify

Signature of applicant
Date
Place

Again, send application form to h.cornielje@enablement.nl




The above text was taken from an announcement being circulated by Enablement, an organization committed to disability and rehabilitation management, particularly in less developed nations.

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NEWS: Disabled People in China Face Discrimination, Says Human Rights Watch

Posted on 12 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

China has made progress in confronting discrimination toward people with disabilities–but significant problems remain, Human Rights Watch recently told the media. Human Rights Watch is a major international organization that monitors the status of human rights around the world.

Sophie Richardson, a representative of Human Rights Watch, praised China for creating laws that protect people with disabilities and for ratifying the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). But the Human Rights Watch website reports her as saying, “So far these protections have meant little to persons with disabilities and their advocates in China who struggle to promote their rights and, in particular, to fairly compete for employment.”

Also according to the Human Rights Watch website, their organization has called upon the Chinese government to ratify the Optional Protocol that accompanies the CRPD. The Optional Protocol can help strengthen the CRPD by giving citizens the option of pursuing justice at the international level if they are unable to address human rights abuses domestically. The Human Rights Watch also has called on China to remove restrictions that make it harder for grassroots organizations to help people with disabilities.

Read the full story on what Human Rights Watch says about the human rights situation for people with disabilities in China at:

http://hrw.org/english/docs/2008/09/04/china19751.htm

Learn more about the CRPD by reading the RatifyNow FAQ; or learn more about the Optional Protocol.



Several people helped alert me to this news story including Diana Samarasan, Joan Durocher, and Catherine Townsend.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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NEWS: Arab Region Lacks Disability Awareness, Says Outgoing UN Special Rapporteur on Disability

Posted on 12 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Sheikha Hissa Khalifa Al Thani, who is nearing the end of her six-year tenure as the United Nations special rapporteur on disability, told The National that the Arab region lags behind the rest of the world in disability awareness. The National is a newspaper in the United Arab Emirates.

“It doesn’t need to be this way,” Sheika Hissa told The National “Countries like Qatar and Saudi Arabia could have standards like Scandinavian countries – but there is this obstacle, which is the lack of awareness.”

Read the full interview with Sheika Hissa; her perspective on disability rights in the Arab region; and her involvement with disability issues both before and during time at the United Nations at:

http://www.thenational.ae/article/20080903/FOREIGN/331820926/1011/SPORT



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for alerting me to this news story.

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Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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International Day of Persons with Disabilities, December 3, 2008

Posted on 11 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , |

[One of the most common kinds of announcements I post at We Can Do are events and conferences organized by a wide range of organizations and agencies. But this time, this is an event that YOU can help organize for YOUR country or local community.]

International Day of Persons with Disabilities – 3 December
2008 Theme: “Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Dignity and justice for all of us”.

Dignity and justice for all of us is the theme of this year’s International Day for Persons with Disabilities, as well as for the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Dignity and justice for all persons are established universal principles. Since its inception, the United Nations has recognized that the inherent dignity and the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family are the foundations of freedom, justice and peace in the world. These principles, along with equality and non-discrimination, have guided the work of the United Nations for the past 60 years and are enshrined in various instruments such as the UN Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as well as in treaties such as the International Covenants on Human Rights, and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. These instruments are among those which make up the international human rights framework, are complementary and reaffirm that all human rights are universal, indivisible, interrelated, interdependent and mutually reinforcing.

2008 is a significant year in the international human rights movement given the entry into force on 3 May of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol, legally binding instruments which set out the legal obligations of States to promote and protect the rights of persons with disabilities, as well as the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Article 25 of the UDHR provides that each person has “the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age, or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control”. Several articles in the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities expound on this right to security, including article 10 on right to life and article 14 on liberty and security of person. Article 28 is more specific in that it asks that States Parties take steps to safeguard and promote that realization of the right to an adequate standard of living and social protection, including ensuring “access by persons with disabilities and their families living in situations of poverty to assistance from the State with disability-related expenses, including adequate training, counselling, financial assistance and respite care”. These instruments mark a clear reaffirmation that persons with disabilities have the right to full and equal enjoyment of their human rights. They also mark a clear reaffirmation of the principles of ‘dignity and justice for all of us’.

Around 10 per cent of the world’s population, or 650 million people, live with disabilities. The Convention promotes and protects the human rights of persons with disabilities in civil, cultural, economic, political, and social life. However, all over the world, persons with disabilities continue to face barriers to their participation in society and are often forced to live on the margins of society. They are routinely denied basic rights such as to equal recognition before the law and legal capacity, freedom of expression and opinion, and the right to participate in political and public life, such as voting. Many persons with disabilities are forced into institutions, a direct breach of the rights to freedom of movement and to live in the community.
Eighty per cent of persons with disabilities – more than 400 million people – live in poor countries and there is a strong link between disability and poverty. For example, the statistics on employment for persons with disabilities are staggering. In developing countries, 80 per cent to 90 per cent of persons with disabilities of working age unemployed and in industrialized countries it is estimated to be between 50 per cent and 70 per cent. The rights to education and health are also routinely denied. Ninety per cent of children with disabilities in developing countries do not attend school, says UNESCO. Approximately 20 million women acquire disabilities as a result of complications during pregnancy or childbirth. This continued marginalization against persons with disabilities highlights the need for all States to sign, ratify and implement the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol.

The United Nations and the global community must ensure that all its work is inclusive of persons with disabilities. The Millennium Development Goals will not be achieved if persons with disabilities are not included. Efforts to achieve the MDGs and implement the Convention are interdependent and mutually reinforcing.

On this International Day of Persons with Disabilities, as well during the year-long celebration of the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, let us use “dignity and justice for all of us” as a rallying call, as these principles are far from being realized for everyone. Dignity and justice are embodied in the civil, cultural, economic, political, and social rights promoted by the Convention. Therefore, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities is a time to make a renewed commitment to the ratification and full implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol.

One of the fundamental obligations contained in the Convention is that national law should guarantee the enjoyment of the rights enumerated in the Convention. States Parties should thus consider the best ways of giving effect to the rights guaranteed by the Convention in domestic law. Implementing legislation should include the terms of the Convention or a specific reference to them, in order to indicate clearly that the laws should be interpreted in accordance with the letter and spirit of the Convention.

Legislation alone will not ensure that persons with disabilities can enjoy their human rights. States will need to formulate effective policies and programmes that will transform the provisions of the Convention into practices that will have a real impact on the lives of persons with disabilities. For persons with disabilities, as for all persons, the denial of one right can lead to the denial of other rights and opportunities throughout their lives.

Article 33 explains that States must set up national focal points governments in order to monitor implementation of the Convention’s precepts. States must also set up independent monitoring mechanisms, which usually take the form of an independent national human rights institution.

The full participation of civil society, in particular persons with disabilities and their representative organizations, is essential in the national monitoring and implementation process. International monitoring is achieved via the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Conference of States Parties. The first meeting of the Conference of States Parties will be convened by the Secretary-General no later than six months after the entry into force on 3 May 2008 of the Convention.

This International Day for Persons with Disabilities is a time to make a renewed commitment to these principles of dignity and justice and to ensure implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

All human beings are not only entitled to rights, but also have the responsibility of making universal human rights a reality for all of us.

The annual observance of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, 3 December, aims to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights and well-being of persons with disabilities. It also seeks to increase awareness of gains to be derived from the integration of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life. The theme of the Day is based on the goal of full and equal enjoyment of human rights and participation in society by persons with disabilities, established by the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons, adopted by General Assembly in 1982. The official title of the Day was changed from International Day of Disabled Persons to International Day of Persons with Disabilities by General Assembly resolution 62/127 on 18 December 2007.

How the Day may be observed
Involve: Observance of the Day provides opportunities for participation by all interested communities – governmental, non-governmental and the private sector – to focus upon catalytic and innovative measures to further implement international norms and standards related to persons with disabilities. Schools, universities and similar institutions can make particular contributions with regard to promoting greater interest and awareness among interested parties of the social, cultural, economic, civil and political rights of persons with disabilities.

Organize: Hold forums, public discussions and information campaigns in support of the Day focusing on disability issues and trends and ways and means by which persons with disabilities and their families are pursuing independent life styles, sustainable livelihoods and financial security.

Celebrate: Plan and organize performances everywhere to showcase – and celebrate – the contributions by persons with disabilities to the societies in which they live and convene exchanges and dialogues focusing on the rich and varied skills, interests and aspirations of persons with disabilities.

Take Action: A major focus of the Day is practical action to further implement international norms and standards concerning persons with disabilities and to further their participation in social life and development on the basis of equality. The media have especially important contributions to make in support of the observance of the Day – and throughout the year – regarding appropriate presentation of progress and obstacles implementing disability-sensitive policies, programmes and projects and to promote public awareness of the contributions by persons with disabilities.



The text for this announcement is taken from the United Nations Enable website.

In a developing country? Organizing activities for the local disability community? Please send announcements about your event to We Can Do at ashettle [at] patriot.net.

Understand the CRPD better by reading the RatifyNow FAQ on the CRPD.

Read more about past celebrations of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

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Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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Right to Food for People with Disabilities: Tell FAO What You Know

Posted on 2 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

English; Français; español

Does disability make a difference in who does, and who doesn’t, have access to food in your country? If so, what are the causes of this inequality? This call for information and comments from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations is not specifically targeted at the disability community. However, this would be a good opportunity to share what you know about disability and food. The reports that FAO gathers can be used to help educate people about why people with disabilities may need special attention when protecting the rights of all people to have access to food.

Please read the following text closely then send your inquiries or comments to righttofood@fao.org, NOT We Can Do. Comments may be sent to FAO at any time. Feedback sent by September 10, 2008, might be shared at an upcoming Forum on the Right to Food, but is still equally welcome after that date. Thank you.

English; Français; español

NEW IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS
The Right to Food Unit at FAO is currently working towards the creation of a database where experiences with the implementation of right to food at country level will be recorded. The aim is to gather, compile and make available information on various actions undertaken by governments, other administrative bodies and civil society to implement the Voluntary Guidelines for the progressive realization of the right to adequate food (Right to Food Guidelines, see www.fao.org/righttofood). In so doing, we need your help to assemble experiences and record specific examples of actions.

Your contributions to this exchange of practical experiences and lessons learned will be crucial to promote the implementation of the right to food in the context of national food security. Selected contributions will be compiled into a background document to be discussed at the Right to Food Forum which will be held from 1 to 3 October 2008 in Rome. The Forum’s purpose is to review achievements and draw lessons learned from the experiences of key players in the field of right to food. A number of country experiences will be presented and working groups will focus on five thematic areas: advocacy and capacity development; vulnerability information and assessment; legislation and accountability; strategies and coordination; and benchmarks and monitoring. Authors of the case studies selected will be acknowledged in the above-mentioned document.

In order to write your narrative of the specific case that you will report on, we have attached an outline, with a request to complete it following the guidelines provided below:

Please complete the first part of the outline providing:
– a short title for the case which typifies the lesson(s) that it provides,
– the country concerned,
– the year in which the action took place,
– your full name as the author/ narrator of the story,
– sources used to obtain specific information,
– the name and email of a person we can contact for further information, other than yourself, and
– any website or other internet link you deem relevant for your report.

We are looking for the best practices and good examples in one or more of the aforementioned five thematic areas. For organizational purposes, please check the category box to which your report corresponds. Contextual information about each area is provided below, as well as some examples of concrete experiences that could be shared in the narrative part:

Advocacy and Capacity Development: Actions found in this category are the first steps in the implementation of the Right to Food. Indeed, to be able to meet their obligations, duty-bearers must be informed of their responsibilities and rights-holders should know how to claim their right to food. Activities comprise actions which raise the public’s awareness on the right to food, or which empower individuals to actually claim their rights, capacity development of duty-bearers, awareness raising activities by duty-bearers and civil society organizations, etc.

Vulnerability Information and Assessment: It is important to identify the food insecure, the vulnerable and the marginalized and to understand why they are food insecure. Assessments of existing institutions, laws, policies and programmes will help identify gaps, shortcomings and priorities for action. Activities comprise the critical analysis of underlying and root causes of hunger; undertaking assessments of legal, institutional and policy frameworks for the realization of the right to food; the identification of vulnerable groups; the collection, analysis and availability of disaggregated data; efforts to ensure involvement of the most vulnerable in decisions affecting their lives; actions undertaken to combat discrimination, etc.
Legislation and Accountability: With enforceable justice, trusted institutions and a legal system oriented towards the human right to food, rights-holders will be in a position to hold duty-bearers accountable for guaranteeing food security. The allocation of obligations and responsibilities must be clear. Lessons learned relate to activities in promoting the legal recognition of the right to food; drafting and adopting a specific framework law; revising sectorial laws and harmonizing them with right to food principles and food security goals; improving the implementation of existing laws; the development and implementation of local regulations; training of judges and lawyers; experiences on how recourse mechanisms – judicial, quasi-judicial – have addressed right to food cases; the introduction and use of administrative recourse mechanisms in social programmes (e.g. school feeding); information about roles and responsibilities; initiatives to increase accountability, transparency, as well as the legal empowerment of rights holders, etc.

Strategies and Coordination: Through effective human rights-oriented policies, coherent strategies and coordinated functional programmes, duty-bearers can fulfil their obligations to enable people to feed themselves. Public policies should focus on those whose rights are not fully realized, and on their participation in the formulation, implementation and evaluation of processes. Experiences in this area will refer to the incorporation of the right to food in policies and strategies; the review of other policies and strategies in view of their impact on the realization of the right to food; the inclusion of human rights principles in food security programmes; eligibility criteria to access public services (e.g. social assistance); the improvement of coordination and coherence among different sectors and levels of government; the creation, mandate and legal clarity of institutional arrangements; the political empowerment of the most vulnerable; etc.

Benchmarks and Monitoring: By measuring progress towards achievable goals through ongoing, community-based, national and international evaluation, duty-bearers and rights-holders can contribute to sustainable food security for all. Governments or other relevant bodies should monitor the implementation of laws, strategies, policies, and programmes, to ensure that their implementation is conducive to the realization and protection of the right to food and to take remedial action in case they are not. Lessons learned with implementation of the right to food in this area comprise the definition of benchmarks and targets; the work of institutions mandated with right to food monitoring; the inclusion of human rights-based indicators, targets and benchmarks; the observation of human rights principles of transparency, participation, non-discrimination and empowerment in the monitoring process; the dissemination of right to food monitoring information to rights-holders and duty-bearers; the examination of public expenditure in view of making the best use towards the realization of the right to food; etc.

The last part of the narrative outline is the “Experiences” box where you should write the actual report. This should be analytical on factors of success and failure, rather than a descriptive account of actions. Your report should take a maximum of two pages (any background materials can be attached) and should follow the following structure:

1- Lessons learnt:
Briefly state the relevance of the action you are reporting on for the right to food. In essence, why is the action relevant or helpful to right to food advocates or practitioners, duty-bearers or right- holders?

2- Background:
Provide a brief background for the action in question. What initiated the action or the event you are reporting on? If you talk about a government activity, was this part of a larger programme? If you report on an advocacy or a training event, what triggered it? In general what were the objectives of the action? How should it foster the realization of the right to food? Lastly, explain how the action was put in place and what government bodies or other parties are responsible for its monitoring. Feel free to add anything else you judge relevant.

3- Implementation:
This is the most important section for this exercise. Has the action’s implementation resolved the right to food issues it was created for? Did the implementation process conform to human rights principles? Please also analyse the success or failures of the action. What were the external and internal factors that influenced, positively or negatively, a certain activity? How was success measured, (e.g. by the popularity of an action among the population or by its benefits to the marginalized groups of society)? Factors of failure may be found in the failure to follow human rights principles, failures in the design of the measure or institutional weaknesses. Also, please assess the impact of the action on peoples’ possibility to realize their right to food. Any figures you might have to support your argument should be included here.

4- Recommendations/ conclusion:
Based on the analysis you have presented, conclude with the main lessons learned and recommendations for improving the process and/or outcome of the action. If you refer to a case or recommendations drawn from a study by FAO, other UN bodies, NGOs, institutions or individual authors, please provide these and identify the organisation or author. Alternatively, please name the document from which we can extract the recommendations.

Any additional comments should be included in the “Remarks” box. Additionally, please attach any publications and supporting material that you deem relevant.

We appreciate your cooperation in developing the right to food implementation database and look forward to receiving your contributions. Please use our generic email account: righttofood@fao.org.

Note that in order for your contributions to be reviewed in time for the Forum, they should be sent no later than September, 10th 2008. Reports received at a later stage are equally welcome and will make a valuable contribution to the ongoing work on our database and the continuing exchange on how to promote the implementation of the right to food.

Should you have any questions regarding how to complete the form, please address your message to:
Mr. Frank Mischler, Tel. +39-06-57053919,
fax: +39-06-57053712.

For further information on the Forum, kindly consult our website: http://www.fao.org/righttofood/rtf_forum/index_en.html

Thank you for your time and collaboration.

Right to Food Unit
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

English; Français; español

NOUVEAUX PROCÉDÉS DE MISE EN OEUVRE
L’Unité pour le droit à l’alimentation de la FAO est en train de développer une base de données qui regroupera les différentes expériences des pays dans la mise en œuvre du droit à l’alimentation. Le but est de regrouper, compiler, et de rendre accessible l’information sur les différentes actions entreprises par les gouvernements ou autres entités publiques et la société civile pour mettre en œuvre les Directives volontaires à l’appui de la concrétisation progressive du droit à une alimentation adéquate dans le contexte de la sécurité alimentaire nationale (Directives sur le Droit à l’alimentation, voir www.fao.org/righttofood). Pour ce faire, nous avons besoin de votre aide pour rassembler les expériences et enregistrer des exemples spécifiques d’actions entreprises.

Vos contributions à cet échange d’expériences et de leçons apprises seront cruciales à la promotion de la mise en œuvre du droit à l’alimentation dans le contexte de la sécurité alimentaire nationale. Les contributions choisies, seront compilées dans un document de base qui facilitera la discussion pendant le Forum sur le droit à l’alimentation qui se déroulera du 1 au 3 Octobre 2008 à Rome. Le but du forum est non seulement de réviser les accomplissements des différents pays, mais aussi de tirer des leçons de l’expérience de pays clef dans le domaine du droit à l’alimentation. Un bon nombre d’expériences seront présentés et des groupes de travaille se concentreront sur cinq domaines d’interventions: sensibilisation et formation; information et évaluation; législation et obligation de rendre des comptes; stratégies et coordination; et critères et contrôle. Les auteurs des rapports choisis seront reconnus dans le document de travail mentionné ci-dessus.

Pour faciliter la rédaction de votre narrative sur des cas spécifiques, nous vous proposons de suivre le plan en annexe, que nous vous demandons de compléter en suivant les instructions suivantes:

Veuillez remplir la première partie du plan en donnant:
– un nom assez court à votre rédaction qui résume la leçon que celle-ci contient,
– le nom du pays concerné,
– l’année dans laquelle l’action s’est déroulée,
– votre nom complet en tant qu’auteur de la narration ainsi que votre adresse,
– les sources que vous avez consultées pour obtenir les informations que vous présentez,
– le nom et le courrier électronique d’une personne, autre que vous-même, que nous pourrions contacter pour plus d’informations et,
– un site Internet ou autre lien Internet que vous jugez utile pour votre rapport.

Nous recherchons les meilleures pratiques et de bons exemples dans un ou plusieurs des cinq domaines d’interventions ci-dessous : .

Sensibilisation et formation: les actions que l’on trouve dans cette catégorie représentent les premiers pas vers une mise en œuvre du droit a l’alimentation. En effet, pour pouvoir s’acquitter de leurs obligations dans la lutte contre la faim, les porteurs d’obligations doivent être informés de leurs responsabilités et les titulaires de droits doivent savoir comment faire valoir leur droit à l’alimentation. Les activités comprennent des actions de sensibilisation du public, ou qui renforcent le pouvoir des individus de faire valoir leur droit, le développement des capacités des porteurs d’obligations, des activités de sensibilisation par la société civile.

Information sur la vulnérabilité et évaluation: Il est important d’identifier les titulaires de droits les plus démunis, les plus vulnérables et les plus marginalisés et de comprendre pourquoi ils sont dans une situation alimentaire précaire. L’évaluation des institutions en place, des lois, des politiques et des programmes aidera à identifier les lacunes, les limitations et les priorités pour agir. Les activités comprennent l’analyse critique des raisons et des causes profondes de la malnutrition; l’évaluation de la structure des institutions légales et des politiques institutionnelles pour la réalisation du droit a l’alimentation ; l’identification des groupes vulnérables ; la collection, l’analyse et la disponibilité de données désagrégées ; les efforts pour s’assurer de la participation des plus démunis dans la prise de décisions qui affectent leurs vies ; les actions entreprises pour combattre la discrimination, etc.

Législation et obligation de rendre des compte: A l’aide d’une justice exécutoire, fiable et d’un système juridique axé sur le droit humain à l’alimentation, les titulaires de droits seront a même de tenir les porteurs d’obligations responsables de la garantie de la sécurité alimentaire. La répartition des obligations et des responsabilités doit être claire. Les leçons apprises sont liées aux activités promouvant la reconnaissance légale du droit à l’alimentation; la formulation et l’adoption d’une loi cadre; la révision des lois sectorielles et leur harmonisation avec les principes du droit à l’alimentation et le but de la sécurité alimentaire; l’amélioration de la mise en place des lois existantes; le développement et la mise en place de réglementations locales; la formation de juges et d’avocats; diverses expériences sur la façon dont les mécanismes de recours – judiciaires et quasi-judiciaires – ont adressé des cas lié au droit à l’alimentation ; l’introduction et l’usage de mécanisme de recours administratifs dans les programmes sociaux (ex : alimentation scolaire); l’information sur les rôles et responsabilités de chacun; les initiatives pour améliorer la responsabilité, la transparence ainsi que le renforcement légal des titulaires de droits, etc.

Stratégie et coordination: À travers une politique orientée sur les droits de l’homme, des stratégies cohérentes et des programmes fonctionnels et coordonnés, les porteurs d’obligations peuvent s’acquitter de leurs obligations et permettre aux gens de se nourrir indépendamment. Les politiques publiques doivent se concentrer sur ceux dont les droits ne sont pas entièrement reconnus, et sur la participation de ceux-ci dans la formulation, mise en œuvre et évaluation des procédés de mise en oeuvre. Les expériences dans ce domaine se référèrent à l’incorporation du droit à l’alimentation dans les politiques et stratégies en vue de leur effet sur la réalisation du droit à l’alimentation; l’inclusion des principes des droits de l’homme dans les programmes pour la sécurité alimentaire; les critères d’éligibilité pour pouvoir accéder aux services publiques (ex : assistance sociale); l’amélioration de la coordination et la cohérence entre les différents secteurs et niveaux du gouvernement; la création, le mandat et la clarté légale des arrangements institutionnels; le renforcement du pouvoir politique des plus vulnérable; etc.

Critères et contrôle: Les porteur d’obligations et les titulaires de droits peuvent participer a une sécurité alimentaire durable pour tous, s’ils s’engagent avec des organismes nationaux et internationaux dans une évaluation continue des institutions mises en place et en mesurant les progrès fait vers des objectifs achevables. Les gouvernements et autres entités en rapport avec le droit à l’alimentation doivent contrôler la mise en oeuvre des lois, des stratégies, des politiques et des programmes, pour s’assurer que ces instruments mènent effectivement à la réalisation du droit à l’alimentation et prendre des mesures correctionnelles si ce n’est pas le cas. Les leçons apprises avec la mise en place du droit à l’alimentation dans ce domaine comprennent la définition de critères et objectifs; le travail des institutions responsables du contrôle du droit à l’alimentation; l’inclusion d’indicateurs basés sur les droits de l’homme; l’observation des principes des droits de l’homme de la transparence, la participation, la non-discrimination et l’autonomisation tout au long du processus de contrôle ; la diffusion aux porteurs d’obligations et aux titulaires de droits d’informations sur le contrôle; l’examen des dépenses publiques en vue d’en faire le meilleur usage pour le droit à l’alimentation; etc.

La dernière partie du plan de la narration est la case « Expériences » où vous écrirez votre rapport. Celui-ci devra être une analyse des facteurs de succès et d’échecs, plutôt qu’une description des actions. Votre rapport devra faire un maximum de deux pages (vous pouvez attacher tout document que vous jugez nécessaire) et devra suivre la structure suivante:

1- Leçons apprises:
Indiquez brièvement la pertinence de l’action que vous rapportez pour le droit à l’alimentation. Essentiellement, en quoi l’action que vous rapportez aide-t-elle les militants et pratiquants du droit à l’alimentation, les porteur d’obligations et les titulaire de droits?

2- Contexte:
Veuillez fournir un contexte bref pour l’action dont il est question. Quel a été le facteur initiateur de cette action? Si vous parlez d’une activité gouvernementale, l’action fait-elle partie d’un programme plus important? Si votre rapport porte sur un événement de plaidoyer ou de formation, quel a été le facteur déclencheur? En général quels ont été les objectifs de l’action? Comment peut-elle aider à la réalisation du droit à l’alimentation? En dernier lieu, expliquez comment l’action a été mise en place et quelles entités publiques ou autres parties sont responsables pour son contrôle. Vous pouvez rajouter toute autre information que vous jugez utiles.

3- Mise en place:
Cette partie est la plus importante de cet exercice. La mise en place de l’action en question a-t-elle résolu les problèmes liés au droit à l’alimentation pour lesquelles elle a été entreprise? Le processus de mise en place était-il conforme aux principes des droits de l’homme? Veuillez aussi analyser le succès ou l’échec de l’action. Quels ont été les facteurs internes et externes qui ont influencé positivement ou négativement une certaine action? Comment le succès a-t-il été mesuré, (ex : par la popularité de l’action chez la population ou par les bénéfices de cette action pour les communautés marginalisées)? Les facteurs d’échec peuvent être mesurés par le non suivi des principes des droits de l’homme, les problèmes issus de la conception des mesures ou de la faiblesse des institutions en place. Veuillez aussi évaluer l’effet de l’action sur la capacité de la population à réaliser leur droit à l’alimentation. Si vous disposez de chiffres qui puissent appuyer vos arguments, veuillez les inclure dans cette section.

4- Recommandations/ Conclusions:
Basé sur votre analyse, veuillez conclure en rappelant les leçons apprises les plus importantes et formulez des recommandations pour améliorer le processus de mise en oeuvre et/ou le résultat de l’action. Si vous vous référez à un cas ou à des recommandations documenté dans une étude de la FAO, ou d’une autre organisation des Nations Unies, ONGs, institutions ou auteurs indépendant, veuillez les attacher à ce document et identifier l’organisation ou l’auteur. Sinon, veuillez préciser le nom du document duquel nous pourrons extraire les recommandations.

Tout autre commentaire devrait être inclus dans la case « Remarques ». Aussi, veuillez attacher tout document et matériel de support que vous jugez utile.

Nous apprécions votre coopération dans le développement de la base de données sur la mise en place du droit à l’alimentation et nous réjouissons de recevoir vos contributions, que vous voudrez bien envoyer à notre adresse électronique: righttofood@fao.org.
Notez que pour que vos contributions puissent être retenues pour le Forum, elles doivent être reçues d’ici le 10 septembre 2008. Les rapports reçus plus tard seront également très utiles et constitueront une contribution importante pour base de données et pour l’échange continu en vue de la promotion de la mise en oeuvre du droit à l’alimentation.
Si vous avez besoin de renseignements supplémentaires, veuillez adresser votre message à: Frank Mischler, tel. +39-06-57053919, fax: +39-06-57053712. Pour plus d’information sur le Forum, veuillez consulter notre site Internet: http://www.fao.org/righttofood/rtf_forum/index_en.html

En vous remerciant sincèrement pour votre collaboration.

Unité pour le droit a l’alimentation
Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et l’Agriculture.

English; Français; español

NUEVO PROCESO DE IMPLEMENTACIÓN

La Unidad del Derecho a la Alimentación de la FAO se encuentra actualmente trabajando en una base de datos en la cual se recopilarán las experiencias relacionadas con la implementación del derecho a la alimentación a nivel nacional. El objetivo consiste en reunir, compilar y tener a disposición la información relacionada con las actividades desarrolladas por los gobiernos, la sociedad civil y demás entidades administrativas encaminadas a implementar las Directrices Voluntarias en apoyo de la realización progresiva del derecho a una alimentación adecuada (Directrices del Derecho a la Alimentación, ver www.fao.org/righttofood) . Para cumplir con tal objetivo, necesitamos que nos ayuden a reunir las distintas experiencias para así poder archivar ejemplos específicos de acciones que hayan sido emprendidas a nivel nacional.

Sus contribuciones en el marco de este intercambio de experiencias y lecciones aprendidas serán de gran importancia para promover la implementación del derecho a la alimentación en el contexto de la seguridad nacional alimentaria. Algunas de las contribuciones serán seleccionadas y compiladas en un documento que será discutido en el Foro sobre el Derecho a la Alimentación que tendrá lugar del 1 al 3 de Octubre de 2008 en Roma. El Foro tiene como propósito revisar los logros obtenidos y sacar provecho de las lecciones aprendidas por parte de aquellos actores clave en materia del derecho a la alimentación. Un gran número de experiencias relativas a diversos países serán presentadas y los grupos de trabajo se enfocarán en las siguientes temáticas: promoción y desarrollo de capacidad, evaluación e información, legislación y responsabilidad, estrategias y coordinación e indicadores y seguimiento. Los autores de los estudios de casos que sean seleccionados serán reconocidos y citados en la parte inicial del documento que será discutido en el Foro anteriormente mencionado.

Para redactar el caso específico sobre el cual deseen informarnos, hemos adjuntado un esquema que les pedimos completar, siguiendo las instrucciones siguientes:

Completen por favor la primera parte del esquema indicando:

– un breve título para el estudio del caso específico por medio del cual se ilustre la(s) lección(es) que de éste se ha(n) podido desprender.
– el país respectivo
– el año en el cual la acción u actividad tuvo lugar
– su nombre completo como autor/ narrador de la historia,
– fuentes utilizadas en la obtención de información específica
– el nombre y el correo electrónico de una persona distinta a usted que podamos contactar para mayor información, y
– algún sitio o página de internet que usted considere relevante para nuestro informe.

Estamos en búsqueda de las mejores prácticas y de los mejores ejemplos aplicados en una o en varias de las áreas temáticas anteriormente mencionadas. Por motivos de organización, por favor señale la casilla correspondiente a la categoría a la cual pertenece su informe.

Promoción y Capacitación: Las actividades enmarcadas dentro de esta categoría constituyen los primeros pasos para la implementación del derecho a la alimentación. De hecho, los titulares de obligaciones sólo pueden cumplir éstas mismas si han sido previamente capacitados sobre sus responsabilidades y los titulares de derechos sólo saben cómo reclamar su derecho a la alimentación si han sido previamente informados. Las actividades incluyen acciones destinadas a aumentar la sensibilización del público en materia del derecho a la alimentación, a dotar a los individuos de capacidades para que puedan reclamar sus derechos, incluyen igualmente desarrollo de capacidad por parte de los titulares de obligaciones, actividades de sensibilización destinadas a los titulares de obligaciones y a las organizaciones de la sociedad civil.

Información y evaluación: Es de gran importancia identificar la inseguridad alimentaria, las personas más vulnerables y aquellas que se encuentran en condiciones marginales y así poder entender las razones que generan tal inseguridad. La evaluación de ciertas instituciones, leyes, políticas y programas ayuda a identificar los vacíos, las limitantes y las prioridades al momento de actuar. Las actividades incluyen el análisis de las raíces y las profundas causas del hambre, evaluaciones sobre el aspecto legal, institucional y el marco político de la realización del derecho a la alimentación; la identificación de los grupos más vulnerables; la recolección, análisis y disponibilidad de datos individualizados, esfuerzos para asegurar la participación de las personas más vulnerables en las tomas de decisiones que afectan sus vidas, acciones realizadas para combatir la discriminación, etc.

Legislación y responsabilidad: A través de una justicia efectiva, instituciones fidedignas y un sistema jurídico orientado hacia el derecho humano a la alimentación, los titulares de derechos podrán hacer responder a quienes tienen la obligación de garantizar su seguridad alimentaria. La repartición de obligaciones y responsabilidades debe ser clara. Las lecciones se encuentran en relación con la promoción del reconocimiento legal del derecho a la alimentación, la elaboración y la redacción de un marco legal específico, la revisión de las leyes correspondientes a cada sector y su respectiva armonización con los principios del derecho a la alimentación y con los objetivos de la seguridad alimentaria. Otras actividades se encuentran destinadas a mejorar la implementación de leyes, a desarrollar nuevas regulaciones, a la formación de jueces y abogados, experiencias relativas a la forma mediante la cual los recursos de tipo judicial o cuasi judicial han abordado los casos del derecho a la alimentación, la interposición y el uso de recursos de tipo administrativo al interior de programas sociales (ej. alimentación escolar), información sobre los roles y las responsabilidades, las iniciativas destinadas a incrementar la responsabilidad de quienes son titulares de obligaciones, la transparencia y la capacidad de los titulares respecto de sus propios derechos, etc.

Estrategia y coordinación: Mediante políticas eficaces orientadas hacia los derechos humanos y mediante estrategias coordinadas basadas en el derecho humanitario, los titulares de obligaciones pueden cumplir con su deber de hacer posible que los titulares de derechos se alimenten por sus propios medios. Las políticas públicas deberían enfocarse en la formulación, implementación y evaluación de ciertos procesos. La experiencia hace referencia a la incorporación del derecho a la alimentación en las políticas y estrategias, la revisión de otras políticas y estrategias teniendo en cuenta su impacto para la realización del derecho a la alimentación, la inclusión de principios de derechos humanos en los programas de seguridad alimentaria, criterios de elegibilidad para tener acceso a los servicios públicos (ej. protección social); los avances en materia de coordinación y coherencia dentro de los diferentes sectores y niveles del gobierno, la creación, el mandato y la claridad legal de los acuerdos institucionales; el empoderamiento a nivel político de aquellos que son más vulnerables, etc.

Indicadores y seguimiento: Mediante objetivos realizables y mediante una evaluación de base comunitaria y continua a nivel nacional e internacional, los titulares de derechos y los titulares de obligaciones pueden contribuir para lograr una seguridad alimentaria para todos. Los gobiernos y demás actores que resultan relevantes deberían hacerle seguimiento a las leyes, a las estrategias, a las políticas y a los programas con el objetivo de asegurar que su implementación esté encaminada a la realización y a la protección del derecho a la alimentación y a tomar medidas en caso de que así no sea. Las lecciones que deja la implementación del derecho a la alimentación en esta área comprenden la definición de indicadores y objetivos, el trabajo de instituciones cuyo mandato consiste en hacer seguimiento al derecho a la alimentación; la inclusión de objetivos e indicadores basados en los derechos humanos; el respeto a la transparencia, la participación, la no-discriminación y el empoderamiento como principios de derechos humanos aplicables en la etapa de seguimiento, difusión de información relativa a dicho seguimiento; el análisis del gasto público esperando que éste sea destinado a la realización del derecho a la alimentación, etc.

La última parte del esquema es la casilla de “experiencias” en la cual deberán escribir su informe. Este debe contener un análisis de los factores que han producido éxito y fracaso en vez de ser un informe que contenga una mera descripción de actividades. Sus informes deberán contener un máximo de dos páginas (cualquier material adicional podrá ser adjuntado) y deberán seguir la siguiente estructura.

1- Lecciones aprendidas:
Establecer brevemente la relevancia de las actividades sobre las cuales nos está informando en materia del derecho a la alimentación. ¿Por qué la acción resulta ser relevante o de ayuda para la promoción del derecho a la alimentación en manos de quienes lo defienden así como para quienes son titulares de derechos y titulares de obligaciones?

2- Antecedentes:
Brindar un breve conjunto de antecedentes para el tema en cuestión. ¿Qué suscitó el inicio de la acción o el evento respecto del cual usted nos está informando? En caso de estar haciendo referencia a una actividad gubernamental, ¿se encontraba ésta al interior de un programa de mayor escala? Si nos está informando sobre un evento relativo a promoción o capacitación, ¿qué o quiénes le dieron tal impulso? ¿Cuales eran los objetivos iniciales de tal acción? ¿En qué sentido esta acción resulta ser positiva para el derecho a la alimentación? Finalmente, explique por favor la manera por medio de la cual esta acción fue puesta en práctica así como las responsabilidades que los órganos del gobierno y otros actores tienen en lo relativo a su seguimiento. Por favor adjunte información adicional si considera que ésta puede resultar relevante.

3. Implementación:
Esta es la parte más importante de este ejercicio. ¿La acción llevada a cabo ayudó o no a resolver las problemáticas para las cuales ésta fue creada? ¿El proceso de implementación respetó o no los principios de derechos humanos? Por favor tenga en cuenta y analice el éxito o el fracaso de esta acción. ¿Cuáles pudieron ser los factores externos e internos que influenciaron de manera positiva o negativa una determinada actividad? ¿Con qué criterio fue determinado el carácter exitoso de tal acción (ej: por su popularidad dentro de la opinión pública o por los beneficios que ésta aportó a los grupos más marginados de la sociedad)? Es posible que los factores de fracaso tengan como origen la mala aplicación de los principios de derechos humanos, un diseño no adecuado de la medida como tal o simplemente la fragilidad institucional. Por favor formule una evaluación del impacto que la acción haya tenido sobre la posibilidad de que las personas logren realizar su derecho a la alimentación. Cualquier tipo de elemento que pueda dar sustento a su argumentación deberá ser incluido en esté acápite.

4- Recomendaciones/ conclusiones:
Tomando como base el análisis que usted ha presentado, concluya a partir de las principales lecciones aprendidas y brinde las recomendaciones que considere pertinentes para mejorar el proceso o el resultado de determinada acción o actividad. Si usted hace referencia a un determinado caso o a recomendaciones cuyo origen es un estudio realizado por la FAO, otros organismos de Naciones Unidas, organizaciones no gubernamentales, instituciones o individuos, por favor cítelos e identifique la respectiva organización o el respectivo autor. Podrá igualmente inserir el título del documento a partir de cual se pueden extraer dichas recomendaciones.

Los comentarios adicionales deberán ser incluidos en la casilla “Comentarios”. Adicionalmente, por favor adjunte al informe las publicaciones y el material de base que considere relevante.

Apreciamos su cooperación para desarrollar la implementación de la base de datos del derecho a la alimentación y esperamos recibir sus contribuciones. Por favor diríjase a nuestro correo electrónico general righttofood@fao.org.

Tenga presente que para que podamos revisar sus contribuciones con anterioridad al Foro, éstas deberán ser enviadas a más tardar el 10 de septiembre de 2008. Los informes recibidos con posterioridad a la fecha indicada serán igualmente bienvenidos, constituirán de igual forma una valiosa contribución para el desarrollo de nuestra base de datos y serán de gran importancia para una continua retroalimentación encaminada a la promoción de la implementación del derecho a la alimentación.

Para mayor información relacionada con el diligenciamiento del presente formato, por favor dirigirse al Sr. Frank Mischler. Tel +39-06-57053919, fax: +39-06-57053712.
Para mayor información relacionada con el Foro, tenga la amabilidad de consultar nuestra página web: http://www.fao.org/righttofood/rtf_forum/index_en.html

Gracias por su tiempo y por su atención,

Unidad del Derecho a la Alimentación
Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Agricultura y la Alimentación

English; Français; español



I received this notice via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development email discussion list.

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RESOURCE: Refugees with Disabilities: Facts and Solutions

Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Inclusion, Resources, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

What population in the world is the most excluded, marginalized, or simply forgotten? Many readers of this blog probably would immediately say, “people with disabilities.” But if you were to talk with someone who is a refugee from war, or someone who works with them, they might immediately say, “refugees.” So who is right? I suspect probably both. So what then of refugees with disabilities–forgotten both by people in the wider disability community and by people who work with refugees? Even this blog, in more than 300 posts, has only barely mentioned them before.

The Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children in June 2008 released two publications highly relevant to this community. The first is a report, Disabilities Among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations (PDF format, 1.81 Mb, 76 pages), that provides an overview of the situation facing disabled refugees. The second publication is meant to give workers some guidance in how they can ensure that refugees with disabilities are fully included in their programs: Disabilities Among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations: Resource Kit for Fieldworkers (PDF format, 328 Kb, 32 pages).

The report estimates that there are about 2.5 to 3.5 million refugees with disabilities around the world–enough, I would point out, to fill a small country. Not surprisingly, the report finds enormous challenges: shelters, food and water distribution centers, latrines, schools, health centers, and other vital services are often inaccessible. Refugees with disabilities are sometimes actively excluded from vocational training programs. Or, if they’re not intentially denied the right to participate, then they are often inherently excluded by the lack of appropriate accommodations.

Refugees dispersed in urban centers, away from refugee camps, often are even worse off. In concentrated refugee populations, at least it becomes easier to identify people with disabilities and thus to tailor services for them. But refugees living in the community, because they may be undocumented, are reluctant to identify themselves to receive services, whether or not they have disabilities. Furthermore, refugees with disabilities in urban settings are often ignored both by services for refugees generally and also by local Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs): in short, they often are being served by no one.

The good news is, some services do exist, including efforts to provide education to children with disabilities at least in refugee settlements. In some locations, refugees with disabilities and their families have organized their own self-help groups.

The accompanying resource kit is targeted at United Nations, nongovernmental organization (NGOs), and Disabled persons’ organization field staff who work with refugees, asylum seekers, and internationally displaced people with disabilities. Readers can consult this kit for ideas on improving services and protection for people with disabilities so they can participate more fully in their communities. If you’re looking for concrete, prescriptive guidelines and checklists, you won’t find that here. What you will find are questions that planners and decision makers should know the answers to, or find the solutions for. These offer broad guidelines as to the kinds of problem areas they should be on the look out for, with suggestions for how to address them.

At first glance, it seems an excellent start–with plenty of room for improvement. The Women’s Commission seems to be highly conscious of this: the introduction indicates they hope to build upon this publication in the future with input from, among others, DPOs and displaced people with disabilities themselves.

Download the report (PDF format, 1.81 Mb) at:

http://www.womenscommission.org/pdf/disab_fulll_report.pdf

Download the resource kit for fieldworkers (PDF format, 328 Kb), at:

http://www.womenscommission.org/pdf/disab_res_kit.pdf



We Can Do found this resource via the Disabled People International electronic newsletter and also during the course of assembling resources to go up on the Resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website. (The latter is still being constructed, but check back in late August or early September.)

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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News from Kyrgyzstan: Projects, Laws, Funding Opportunities

Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Families, Funding, Human Rights, News, Policy & Legislation, Uncategorized, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following newsletter was sent to We Can Do from Kyrgyzstan–thanks to Azat Israilov for passing this on. This contains news about projects for people with disabilities in Kyrgyzstan; a new law protecting the rights of people with disabilities; the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and announcements for a couple of funding opportunities. Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

We are for equal possibilities and better future!
INFORMATIONAL BULLETIN

The newsletter is published under the Health Prom project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund

July 2008
Content:
Letter from A.Israilov, national in-country project manager
Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Brief information about participants of the project
HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Young people: new horizons!
President signed the Decree “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The new law about social order accepted
Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for
people with disabilities

Projects on employment for disabled people
The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Grants

Top of this page; Bottom of this page

Dear readers, colleagues and partners,

We welcome you on the pages of the first issue of the Informational bulletin which is published under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund. The important aims of the bulletin will be providing news that are related to children with special needs and their families, and also updating on the progress of the project. The bulletin will be published and distributed once a quarter. At the same time neither the project, nor the bulletin will be involved in political processes in the country. In the first issue you will find some information on the project, its participants and also learn about
some latest events in social sphere of Kyrgyzstan.

It is hoped that the bulletin as a specialist publication will continue its existence beyond the project, and will become a useful source of information for parents and concerned organizations and people. And to become so we will be delighted to publish your interesting news and helpful information which you would like to share with.
Sincerely,
A.Israilov, national in-country project manager

“Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”
Contacts: Bishkek, m/r Kok-Zhar, h. 1, p/p 4, Tel./fax (0312) 517634, aisrail@gmail.com

Top of this page; Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Charitable organisation HealthProm, located in London, UK, together with the Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI) and Public Association “Shoola Kol” has started a project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in the Kyrgyz Republic” funded by the Big Lottery Fund. The project is for three years and will help to establish two rehabilitation and resource centres in two pilot localities – Bishkek and Issyk-Kul oblast with Bokonbaevo v. as a centre. The project aims to improve on improving health and well-being of young children with disabilities and their parents through rehabilitation services, informational support and consultations. The project will not be involved in politics.

Prior to the project beginning there were study visits and research done during which the distress of people with disabilities, especially children, was revealed, whose families belong to the group with the lowest incomes in the country. According to the Ministry of Labour and Social Development, there are about 117 thousand people with disabilities in the republic now, out of them more than nineteen thousand are younger than 18, and 66% out of general number live in rural areas. The number of the disabled makes up 2,1% of the whole population while in the developed countries this figure varies approximately from 10 up to 20% (for example, in
the UK it is about 15%, in Russia up to 10%).

The project will fill the gap in knowledge and information resources in the Republic about prevention of disability, alternative approaches to child disability. Various trainings based on current needs will improve knowledge and skills of people with disabilities as well as of medical and social professionals. There will be developed or translated and published a number of necessary materials, and a specialised web site on disability issues will be created. A specialised microbus for each centre will connect experts and volunteers with disabled children and their families in the remote areas.

“The project focuses on sustainable development of our partners and the centres, and also on cooperation with local communities, non-governmental organisations and relevant local government agencies.” – underlines Tatyana Buynovskaja, the project manager. – “It includes programs on early intervention and providing advisory and practical support to new families with disabled children.” Tamara Dyikanbaeva, ARDI chairwoman, adds: “The project was developed taking into account the needs and wishes of parents and disabled children, considering provision of complex and versatile support to children and their parents. The project activity is based on social model of disability which recognises, that disability is not an illness (and in the developed countries it was recognised and accepted), and disabled people do not need pity and constant
guardianship, but need possibilities to study, work and communicate to become useful members of society”.

As a result of project activities it is planned to reach out about one and a half thousand parents of disabled children, and these children can participate in joint social events together with other children. It is expected in the end of the project the rehabilitation and resource centres in cooperation with local communities and government agencies will become vital for work with disabled children and their parents, and that this experience can be replicated in other regions.

Top of this page; Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

Brief information about participants of the project
Partner organisations responsible for implementing the project:

HealthProm – a charitable non-commercial organisation, based in London, works since 1984 with local communities for improving health and social support for vulnerable women and children in the countries of the former Soviet Union (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Russia, Uzbekistan, Ukraine, Tajikistan and recently in Kyrgyzstan). The primary activities of the organisation are social and medical projects. Recently HealthProm has successfully finished similar (to Kyrgyzstan) a 3-year project in Altay region of Russia. Local authorities immediately supported the initiative and provided premises and financing for two centres.

The Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI), Bishkek, established in 1995, gives advisory support to parents of disabled children, and also aspires to realise capabilities of disabled children and youth by their development and integration into society.

Public Association Shoola Kol, Bokonbaevo v. in Issyk-Kul region, is the human rights organisation and engaged in educational activity and raise public awareness. Shoola Kol also advises and educates people with disabilities and helps them establish NGOs for advancement of interests and rights of disabled people.

People who are involved in the project:
* Tatyana Buynovskaya – HealthProm manager, as well as the project manager “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund.
* Jonathan Watkins – senior project expert, social worker, consultant.
* Mark Hunter – child disability consultant, paediatrician.
* Azat Israilov – in-country project manager in Kyrgyzstan.
* Tamara Dyikanbaeva – Association of Parents of Disabled Children chair, project officer in Bishkek.
* Antonina Lee – Shoola Kol chair, project coordinator in Issyk-Kul region, Bokonbaevo.

Top of this page; Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Under the project funded by the Big Lottery Fund HealthProm delegation of three people (see list above) have visited Kyrgyzstan for meetings with the representatives of government agencies and international and local non-governmental organisations. Between 11 and 23d May, 33 meetings took place in Bishkek and Bokonbaevo, one of them was an interview to the newspaper “Vechernij Bishkek”. In addition HealthProm representatives visited homes of families with disabled children. The results of these meetings will help partners to define the area of specialization for new rehabilitation centres. These centres will work in close interaction with local authorities and government agencies. Currently through consultations with local authorities and additional meetings there is a search for premises for the future centres as one of overall
project objectives is sustainability of the centres.

Young people: new horizons!
The youth of the Association of Parents of Disabled Children is becoming more active in public life of the country, and has also achieved some successes in education. In June this year Seinep Dyikanbaeva, project and PR manager of ARDI, has been named one of the first New Heroes of Kyrgyzstan for the positive contribution to the development of our society, a nomination organised by NGO “Atool” (Karakol). More detailed information can be found at: http://www.atuul.kg/?pid=19&hid=3. In addition, recently Seinep, a first year student of the American University in the Central Asia, has passed through a rigid competitive selection for a year training in Japan, sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA).

Ukei Muratalieva, another active young volunteer of ARDI, a student of the Kyrgyz Technical University, has been chosen together with other two Kyrgyz citizens for another training program on leadership and building networks, also sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA). She leaves for a month for Tokyo to learn how to train and at the same time to learn how local disabled people live and the organisations of disabled people work. After returning home she will conduct a series of trainings and seminars.
Best wishes to them!

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President signed the Law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
President of the Kyrgyz Republic has signed the law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”.

This law aims to improve social protection of persons with disabilities, provide them with equal with other citizens of the Kyrgyz Republic possibilities to practice their rights and freedoms, avoid restrictions in their lives.
Source: 24.kg, 12 April 2008

UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The General Assembly of the United Nations in the beginning of June, 2008 approved the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. It became the first universal international legal document aiming to protect the rights of persons with various kinds of permanent physical, mental, intellectual or sensor limitations. The convention contains 50 articles that protect and encourage the rights of the disabled, decrease discrimination towards them, provide them with rights to work, health services, education and full participation in society life, and also access to justice, inviolability of person, freedom from exploitation and abuse, and freedom of movement.
Source: 24.kg, 16 June 2008

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The new law about social order accepted
The law accepted in the second reading on 5th June this year intends to involve non-commercial organisations in realisation of government social programs through placing on a competitive basis and implementation the government social orders. This will also allow the government to essentially increase the efficiency of implementation of social programs and to involve in social sphere additional human, material and financial resources from non-government sources and it will partially reduce dependence of the non-governmental organisations on foreign funding.

The Minister of labour and social development of the Kyrgyz Republic Uktomkhan Abdullaeva supporting the law, underlined that “now in Kyrgyzstan, some social establishments, children’s homes, boarding schools, houses for aged people opened by the donor funding and the international organisations are on the verge of closing because of the termination of their financing by the foreign organisations. So why can’t we support the efforts of non-governmental organisations and public associations which will render social services to the
population and care for certain number of the aged, homeless children or the disabled who cannot be accommodated in the formal establishments now since there are no places or shortage of funds?”.

Similar laws has been successfully working for a long time in the countries of Europe, in Kazakhstan and 6 federal areas of Russia. Source:
Source: “The third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for people with disabilities
“The Japanese agency for international cooperation (JICA) plans to open in Kyrgyzstan a centre for people with disabilities”, – informed today at a press conference Uktomkhan Abdullaeva, the Minister of labour and social development of KR. According to her, there is the Asian-Pacific centre on problems of the disabled located in Japan. It is going to expand its activities in Central Asia. “After a working visit by Kyrgyz delegation to Japan it decided to open a head office in Kyrgyzstan for the countries of CA. It will bring to the republic additional investments. After the discussion of details of opening of the centre in October 2008 an international conference will take place in which well-known people with disabilities will take part”, – says Uktomkhan Abdullaeva.

As Minister of labour and social development KP emphasizes, such decision was affected by the new law “About the rights and guarantees of people with disabilities” recently passed by the government. “We have excluded articles from it that this category of people cannot work. Their number in workforce should make not less than 5 percent”, – said Uktomhan Abdullaeva.
Source: 24.kg, 22.05.08

Projects on employment for disabled people
We have to break the stereotype that disabled people are defective, said Edward Vinter, the executive director of Eurasia Foundation in Central Asia (EFCA). According to his words, disabled people in Kyrgyzstan are especially vulnerable group of population as being full members of society they simply cannot get a job. Many businessmen, in his opinion, are just confident that the disabled cannot work properly. In this regard, there are now some projects in Kyrgyzstan aiming to render assistance to disabled people in work search. In particular, the Eurasia Foundation in CA together with the Republican independent association of disabled women has
started cooperation with businesses of Bishkek and their management in granting workplaces for disabled people. There will also be a vacancy fair in Bishkek for people with disabilities.

Besides that, today the World Bank and EFCA declared winners of the Program of small grants of 2008 in Kyrgyzstan. “It is intended for the local organisations of a civil society. For 1996-2007 we have given out 121 small grants for a total sum of $315 thousand”, – said the chief executive of Fund Eurasia in the Central Asia Edward Vinter. Thirteen organisations have become winners.
Source: 24.kg

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The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
The Minister of Education and Science Ishenkul Boldzhurova presented a law providing such a grant recently at a committee meeting on international affairs and inter-parliamentary communications of the parliament of KR. She said, that in 2005 the ministry of education and science requested the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to support children with disabilities. “This project is supported by the Japanese Fund on reduction of poverty which will allocate $1 million, $50 thousands are provided by our government”, – added Ishenkul Boldzhurova.

The minister informed, that in the republic there are now about 19 thousand disabled children of which 250 children study at comprehensive schools in KR, in addition three thousand children study at the special boarding schools.

Ishenkul Boldzhurova noted that grant money will go on preparation of methodical manuals for schools and future teachers for training children with disabilities. According to her, for implementing the future project 35 comprehensive schools all over the country have already been selected – 5 in each region of the country, and also four boarding schools (internats) and two kindergartens.
Source: 24.kg, 15.04.2008

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Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Thanks to allocated 50 holiday vouchers by the Kyrgyzstan Federation of Trade unions the Association of Parents of Disabled Children organised on 4 – 25 July holiday for members of the Association, including 50 children ith special needs. Children’s recreational centre “Ulan” located near Balykchy accommodated them, and under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund transportation expenses for all children have been covered.

The recreational centre can accommodate about 250 people. Besides swimming on lake, there were joint cultural events organised for children, which promoted integration of disabled children with other children, and also promoted tolerance among their peers.

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Grants
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) (Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan) on behalf of the Canadian Foundation announces call for applications for small grants program for Central Asia.

The main areas: poverty reduction, sustainable development, increase participation of women, protection the children’s rights, capacity building for organisations, environment.

The maximum size of a grant is $20,000. The general grant pool is $50,000.

Projects should be short-term ending and presenting a financial report until 1st March 2009. For additional information please write to Anna Zhugan on: Anna. Zhugan@international.gc.ca

Bradley Foundation contests
Bradley Foundation supports: conducting annual events, holding conferences and seminars, purchasing equipment, general support, training, investments related to a project, publications, researches, stipends, development of educational programs.

Applications accepted: 1 March, 1 July, 1 September, 1 December each year.

The size of a grant: from $100 up to $550,000.

Priority areas of support: development of civic sense – projects can be aimed at any sphere of public life (economy, politics, culture, civil society), but they should advance citizenship to the bottom idea of elections and vote. For example, these can be projects showing increased public participation, political or academic research, media projects and others. Building projects and individuals are not financed.

Application procedure can be found at the Fund’s site. Results of selection appear in February, May-June, September and November, depending on application submission. More information can be found at: http://www.bradleyfdn.org/
Source: “the Third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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Global Forum for Inclusion 2008: Transforming Rights into Action, Nov 17-26, 2008

Posted on 26 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Families, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following open letter of invitation comes from Diane Richler, President of Inclusion International.

GLOBAL FORUM FOR INCLUSION 2008: Transforming Rights into Action. 17-26 Nov 2008.

The Forum for Inclusion 2008: Transforming Rights into Action is Co-Hosted by Inclusion International and the Canadian Association for Community Living

To be held at the Westin Hotel in Ottawa, Canada in November 2008, this Forum will engage self-advocates, families, activists, professionals and partners from around the world. Focused on the new UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Forum will look at how to transform rights into actions that lead to full inclusion and citizenship for people with intellectual disabilities.

Several events will take place in Ottawa: International Gathering of Families (November 17-18); International Gathering of Self-Advocates (November 17-18); International Conference: Putting the UN Convention into Action for People with Intellectual Disabilities (November 18-19); and Inclusion in Focus: Spotlight on Canada, at the 50th Anniversary Conference of the Canadian Association for Community Living (November 19-21). These events will be followed by study tours in Canada and the United States.

For information on these events, registration, accommodation and more please visit:
WWW.INCLUSION2008.COM Conference information is available in English, French, or Spanish.

If you need letters of invitation or have questions concerning your attendance, please contact
Raquel González R.Gonzalez@uel.ac.uk

We hope to see you there!

Diane Richler
President of Inclusion International



Thank you to Inclusion International for sending this announcement to be posted here. Interested parties should please contact them directly to inquire about the conference, NOT We Can Do.

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JOB POST: Social Affairs Officier, P-4, United Nations, New York USA

Posted on 19 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The United Nations Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities within the Department of Education and Soscial Affairs has a job opening available for a Social Affairs Officer. The job, at level P-4, is based at the United Nations headquarters in New York, USA. The application deadline is September 30, 2008.

The following description of responsibilities is taken from the official United Nations job post for Social Affairs Officer:

Responsibilities
Under the guidance of the Chief of the Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and within delegated authority, the incumbent is responsible for:

1. Promoting and facilitating the outreach and dialogue for the implementation of the rights of persons with disabilities within inter-governmental/non-governmental communities, especially academic institutions as well as among specialized constituencies in the disability community: to further policy dialogue and improve the knowledge base on the rights of persons with disabilities and the implementation of the Convention and other international instruments relating to disability.

2. Leading the development of a research agenda and establishing partnerships with experts and stakeholders, especially research institutes and academia; overseeing the development of and/or conceptualizing, formulating and managing major projects/studies; analyzing key trends and changes in socio-economic structures and related issues (e.g. occupational, cultural, educational, demographic patterns, gender issues, etc.) at global, regional or national levels.

3. Establishing partnerships with other experts and stakeholders (e.g. governments, research institutes, academia, UN system and other international organizations, NGOs, the private sector, etc.) to discuss emerging topics related to social development, exchange views on latest findings, policy guidelines, new models of development.

4. Serving as a focal point for collaboration on major issues/topics concerning disability; providing authoritative technical and policy advice and assistance to inter-governmental bodies, Member State officials, international and other organizations on planning, evaluating and implementing strategies, policies and programmes which impact socio-economic development at global, regional or national levels.

5. Writing and preparing studies on disability, law and social and socio-economic issues for publication within the UN system and in academic journals and other publications.

6. Promoting the organization at national and international fora and presenting institutional views/policies; coordinating and chairing and/or contributing substantively to sectoral seminars, general training programmes, workshops and expert group meetings.

Read more about the required qualifications for this job and how to apply at the United Nations web site at:

https://jobs.un.org/Galaxy/Release3/vacancy/Display_Vac.aspx?lang=1200&VACID=b9496c61-3c77-48f6-bd5e-e773f790ef75

Please note that all applications and queries should be directed to the United Nations, NOT to We Can Do. To learn how to apply or inquire with the United Nations, please follow the above link to learn the information that you require. Thank you.



We Can Do first learned about this job opportunity via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development email discussion group.

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CALL for Views, Information on Ratifying, Implementing, Monitoring Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 18 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Call for Papers, Human Rights, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

English; español; français

The following announcement from the United Nations should be of interest to anyone who has been watching developments with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities CRPD. It is also important for anyone who wishes to be involved with implementing or monitoring the CRPD. Individuals or organizations who wish to be involved with sharing feedback might also wish to join the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group and also the IDA_CRPD_Forum email discussion group. Please note that any related feedback or queries should please be directed to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, NOT to We Can Do. The deadline for feedback is September 15, 2008.

In English, español, or français

In English
On 4 June 2008, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights sent a letter to non-governmental organizations in relation to Human Rights Council resolution 7/9 entitled “human rights of persons with disabilities,” requesting views and information on:

a) Legal measures for the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and Optional Protocol;
b) Legal measures for implementation of the Convention and Optional Protocol;
c) Legal measures on national monitoring, particularly in relation to Article 33 of the Convention;
d) Any other information relating to paragraph 16 of the resolution.

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights has the pleasure to extend the deadline for submissions and consequently would be grateful if any response could be forwarded to the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, (United Nations Office at Geneva, Ch-1211 Geneva 10; Fax. + 41 22 917 90 08; email: registry@ohchr.org by September 15, 2008.)

7/9. Human rights of persons with disabilities

The Human Rights Council

Recalling the relevant resolutions of the General Assembly, the most recent of which are resolution 62/170 of 18 December 2007 on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Optional Protocol thereto, and resolution 62/127 of 18 December 2007 on the implementation of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons,

Recalling also the relevant resolutions of the Commission on Human Rights, the most recent of which is resolution 2005/65 of 25 April 2005, as well as those of the commission for Social Development of the Economic and Social Council,

Reaffirming the universality, indivisibility, interdependence and interrelatedness of all human rights nad fundamental freedoms and the need for persons with disabilities to be guaranteed their full enjoyment without discrimination,

Recognizing that disability is an evolving concept and that disability results from the interaction between persons with impairments and attitudinal and environmental barriers that hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others,

Recognizing also the importance of accessibility to the phyiscal, social, economic and cultural environment, to health, education, information and communication, in enabling persons with disabilities to enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms fully,

Recognizing further the importance of international cooperation for improving the living conditions of persons with disabilities in every country, particularly in developing countries,

Recognizing that women and girls with disabilities are often subject to multiple discrimination, and emphasizing the need to incorporate a gender perspective in all efforts to promote the full enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms by persons with disabilities,

1. Reaffirms the need to promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity, and in this regard, calls upon Governments to take active measures:

(a) To prevent and prohibit all forms of discrimination against persons with disabilities;
(b) To ensure, for persons with disabilities, full and effective participation and inclusion, respect for their individual autonomy, including the freedom to make one’s own choices; independence; and equality of opportunity;

2. Welcomes the adoption by the General Assembly on 13 December 2006 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol, and expresses the hope that they will enter into force at an early date;

3. Also welcomes the fact that, since the opening for signature of the Convention and Optional Protocol on 30 March 2007, 126 States have signed and 17 have ratified the Convention, and that 71 States have signed and 11 have ratified the Optional Protocol, and calls upon those States and regional integration organizations that have not yet done so to consider signing and ratifying the Convention and the Optional Protocol as a matter of priority;

4. Further welcomes the attention that several special rapporteurs ahve paid to the rights of persons with disabilities in carrying out their mandates, and requests special procedures, in carrying out their mandates, to take into account the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights by persons with disabilities;

5. Encourages the Human Rights council Advisory committee, and other mechanisms of the Council, to integrate the perspective of persons with disabilities, as appropriate, in carrying out their work and in their recommendations so as to facilitate the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the work of the council;

6. Urges all stake holders to give consideration to the rights of persons with disabilities at all stages of the universal periodic review, including during the consultations carried out by States at the national level for the preparation of information to be submitted for the review, so as to include national human rights institutions and non-governmental organizations representing persons with disabilities in such consultations;

7. Welcomes the attention pad to the rights of persons with disabilities in the work of several human rights treaty monitoring bodies and encourages all such bodies to further integrate the perspective of persons with disabilities in their work, including in their monitoring activities and through the issuing of general comments;

8. UrgesGovernments to address fully, in consultation with, inter alia, national human rights institutions and organizations of persons with disabilities, the rights of persons with disabilities when fulfilling their reporting obligations under the relevant United Nations human rights instruments, and welcomes the efforts of those Governments that have begun to do so;

9. Welcomes the report of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on progress in the implementation of the recommendations contained in the study on the human rights of persons with disabilities (A/HRC/7/61) and invites the High Commissioner to continue to provide adequate support for the integration of the perspective of persons with disabilities in the work of the Council and to continue the activities of her Office that contribute to raising awareness and understanding of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, including in cooperation with the Department for Economic and Social Affairs of the Secretariat;

10. Encourages States to raise awareness regarding the rights of persons with disabilities, including through public awareness campaigns and training programmes, to combat stereotypes, prejudices, harmful practices and attitudinal barriers relating to persons with disabilities and to promote positive perceptions and greater social awareness of persons with disabilities;
11. Encourages the High Commissioner for Human Rights to take fully into account the progressive implementation of standards and guidelines for the accessibility of facilities and services of the United nations system, also taking into account relevant provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and underlines the need for the Council, including its Internet resources, to be fully accessible to persons with disabilities;

12. Encourages States to take appropriate measures to identify and eliminate obstacles and barriers to accessibility for persons with disabilities, in particular to ensure that persons with disabilities have access, on an equal basis with others, to the physical environment, transportation, information and communications, and to other facilities open or provided to the public, both in urban and rural areas;

13. Welcomes the important role played by national human rights institutions and civil society organizations, including organizations of persons with disabilities, in the negotiation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and encourages relevant institutions and organizaitons to continue their efforts to promote understanding of the Convention and, where appropriate, its implementation;

14. Encourages the Office of the United Nations High commissioner to continue to strengthen its partnerships with and its outreach activities toward civil society organizations, with a particular emphasis on organizations representing persons with disabilities, so as to raise awareness among them about the work of the human rights system;

15. Decides to hold an annual interactive debate in one of its regular sessions on the rights of persons with disabilities and that the first such debate should be held at its tenth session, focusing on key legal measures for ratification and effective implementation of the convention, including with regard to equality and non-discrimination;

16. Requests the Office of the High Commissioner to prepare a thematic study to enhance awareness and understanding of the convention on the Rights of Persons with disabilities, focusing on legal measures key for the ratification and effective implementation of the Convention, such as those relating to equality and non-discrimination, in consultation with States, civil society organizations, including organizations of persons with disabilities, and national human rights institutions, and requests that the study be available on the website of the Office of the High Commissioner, in an accessible format, prior to the tenth session of the Council;

17. Notes that the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to submit to the Assembly at its next session a report on the status of the Convention and the Optional Protocol and on the implementation of resolution 62/170, and that it also requested the Secretary-General to submit that report to the Council as a contribution to its discussion of the rights of persons with disabilities;

18. Invites the Special Rapporteur on disabiltiy of the Commission for Social Development to continue cooperating with the Council and to address it on activities undertaken pursuant to his/her mandate, in accordance with its programme of work.

40th meeting, 27 March 2008 [Adopted without a vote. See chap. III.]

Top of page English; español; français

En español
Estimado Señor, estimada Señora,

El 4 de junio de 2008, la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos envió una carta a las organizaciones no gubernamentales, en relación con la resolución 7/9 del Consejo de Derechos Humanos titulada “Los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad,” pidiendo información referente a:

a) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la ratificación de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;
b) Medidads jurídicas esenciales para la aplicación efectiva de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;
c) Medidads jurídicas esenciales para la aplicación y el seguimiento nacionales en relación con el articulo 33 de la Convención;
d) Cualquier otra información relacionada con le parrafo 16 de la resolución.

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos tiene el honor de prolongar el periodo para someter la correspondiente información. En consecuencia, la Oficina agradeceria que toda información en respuesta a la nota verbal se enviara a la Oficina del Alto comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechose Humanos, (Oficina de las Naciones Unidas en Ginebra, CH-1211 Ginebra 10; Fax. + 41 22 917 90 08; email: registry@ohchr.org, antes del 15 de septiembre de 2008.

7/9. Los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad

El Consejo de Derechos Humanos,

Recordando las resoluciones pertinentes de la Asamblea General, las más recientes de las cuales son la resolución 62/170, de 18 de diciembre de 2007, relativa a la Convención sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad y su Protocolo Faculativo, y la resolución 62/127, de 18 de diciembre de 2007, relativa a la aplicación del Programa de Acción Mundial para las Personas con Discapacidad,

Recordando asimismo las resoluciones pertinentes de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos, la más reciente de las cuales es la resolución 2005/65, de 25 de abril de 2005, y las de la Comisión de Desarrollo Social del Consejo Económico y Social,

Reafirmando la universalidad, indivisibilidad, interdependencia e interrelación de todos los derechos humanos y liberatdes fundamentales, asi como la necesidad de garantizar que las personas con discapacidad los ejerzan plenamente y sin discriminación,

Reconociendo que la discapacidad es un concepto que evoluciona y que resulta de la interacción de las personas condeficiencias y las barreras debidas a la actitud y el entorno que evitan su particiación plena y efectiva en la sociedad en igualdad de condiciones con las demás,

Reconociendo asimismo la importancia de la accessibilidad al entorno fisico, social, económico y cultural, a la salud, la educación, la información y las comunicaciones para que las personas con discapacidad puedan gozar plenamente de todos los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales,

Reconociendo además la importancia de la cooperación internacional para mejorar las condiciones de vida de las personas con discapacidad en todos los paises, particularmente en los paises en desarrollo,

Consciente de que las mujures y las niñas con discapacidad están sujetas a multiples formas de discriminación, y surayando la necsidad de incorporar una perspectiva de género en todas las actividades destinadas a promover el pleno goce de los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales por las personas con discapacidad,

1. Reafirma la necesidad de promover, proteger y asegurar el goce pleno y en condiciones de igualdad de todos los derechos humanos y liberatdes fundamentales por todas las personas condiscapacidad y de promover el respeto de su dignidad inherente y, a este respecto, pide a los Gobiernos que adopten medidas activas para:

(a) Prevenir y prohibir todas las formas de discriminación contra las personas con discapacidad; y
(b) Garantizar a las personas con discapacidad la participación e inclusión plenas y efectivas en la sociedad; el respeto a su autonomia individual, incluida la libertad de tomar sus propias decisiones; la independencia, y la igualdad de oportunidades;

2. Acoge con satisfacción la aprobación por la Asamblea General, el 13 de diciembre de 2006, de la Convencion sobre los Derechos de las personas con discapacidad y su Protocolo Facultativo, y expresa el deseo de que entren en vigor en breve;

3. Acoge con satisfacción asimismo que desde la apertura a la firma de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo, el 30 de marzo de 2007, hayan firmado la Convención 126 Estados y la hayan ratificado 17, y que hayan firmado el Protocolo 71 Estados y lo hayan ratificado 11, y pide a los Estados y las organizaciones de integración regional que todavia no lo hayan hecho que consideren como cuestion prioritaria la firma y la ratificación de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;

4. Acoge con satisfacción además la atención prestada por varios rlatores especiales en el cumplimiento de sus mandatos a los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, y pide que todos los responsables de los procedimientos especiales, en el cumplimiento de sus mandatos, tengan en cuenta el disfrute pleo y en condiciones de igualdad de todos los derechos humanoes por las personas con discapacidad;

5. Alienta al comite Asesor del Consejo de Derechos Humanos y a los demas mecanismos del Consejo a que integren la perspectiva de las personas con discapacidad, segun proceda, en sus actividades, y en sus recomendaciones para facilitar la inclusión de esas personas en la labor del Consejo;

6. Insta a todos los intersados a que tengan en consideración los derechos de las personas condiscapacidad en todas las etapas del examen periódico universal, por ejemplo en las consultas cleebradas por los Estados a nivel nacional para preparar la información que se ha de presentar para el examen, de modo que incluyan en esas consultas a las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos y a las organizaciones no gubernamentales que representan a las personas con discapacidad;

7. Acoge con satisfacción la atención prestada a los derechos de las personas con dicapacidad en la labor de varios órganos de supervisión de tratados de derechos humanos y alienta a estos a que sigan integrando la perspectiva de las personas con discapacidad en su trabajo, especialmente en sus activades de supervisión y al formular las observaciones generales;

8. Insta a los gobiernos a que, en consulta con las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos y las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad, entre otros, tengan plenamente en cuenta los derechos de las personas con discapacidad cuando presenten los informes previstos en los instrumentos pertinentes de las Naciones Unidas en materia de derechos humanos, y se contratula de los esfuerzos de los gobiernos que han empezado a hacerlo;

9. Acoge con satisfacción el informe de la Alta comisionada para los Derechos Humanos sobre los progresos alcanzados en la aplicación de las recomendadiones en el estudio sobre los derechos humanos y la discapacidad (A/HRC/7/61), e invita a la Alta comisionada a que siga prestando la ayuda oportuna con miras a integrar la perspectiva de las personas con discapacidad en el trabjo del Consejo y a proseguir las activi dades de su Oficina que contribuyan a dar a conocer y explicar la Convención sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, por ejemplo en cooperación con el Departamento de Asuntos Económicos y Sociales de la Secretaria;

11. Alienta asimismo a la Alta Comisionada para los Derechos Humanos a que tenga plenamenta en cuenta la aplicacion progresiva de normas y directrices sobre la accesibilidad de las instalaciones y los servicios del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, teniendo presentes ademas las disposiciones pertinentes de la Convencion sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, y subraya la necesidad de que el Consejo sea totalmente accesible a las personas con discapacidad, incluidos sus recursos de Internet;

12. Alienta ademas a los Estados a que adopten las medidas oportunas para identificar y eliminar los obstaculos e impedimentos a la accesibilidad de las personas con discapacidad, en particular para velar por que esas personas tengan acceso, en igualdad de condiciones con las demas, al entorno fisico, el transporte, la informacion y las comunicaciones y a otros servicios abiertos o suministrados al publico, tanto en las zonas urbanas como en las rurales;

13. Se congratula por el importante papel desempenado por las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos y las organizaciones de la sociedad civil, en particular las organizaciones de personas con dicapacidad, en la negociacion de la Convencion sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, y alienta a las instituciones y organizaciones pertinentes a que prosigan sus actividades para fomentar la comprension de la Convencion y, cuando proceda, su aplicacion;

14. Alienta a la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos a que siga fortaleciendo sus aliaznas con las organizaciones de la sociedad civil y sus actividades de comunicacion con ellas, centrandose especialmente en las organizaciones que representan a las personas con discapacidad, para hacerlas mas conscientes de la labor del sistema de derechos humanos;

15. Decide celebrar en uno de sus periodos ordinarios de sesiones un debate interactivo anual sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, y que el primero de esos debates se celebre en su decimo periodo de sesiones y trate de las medidads juridicas esenciales para la ratificacion y la aplicacion efectiva de la Convencion, y tambien en relacion con la igualdad y la no discriminacion;

16. Pide a la Oficina del Alto comisionado que prepare un estuido tematico para mejorar el conocimiento y la comprension de la Convencion sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad centrado en las medidas juridicas esenciales para la ratificacion y la aplicacion efectiva de la convencion, como las relativas a la igualdad y la no discriminacion, en consultat con los Estados, las organizaciones de la sociedad civil, incluidas las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad, y las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos, y pide que el estuido este disponible en el sitio web de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado en un formato acceisble antes del decimo periodo de sesiones del Consejo;

17. Toma nota de que la Asamblea General pidió al Secretario General que le presentara en su próximo periodo de sesiones un informe sobre la situación de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo y sobre la aplicación de la resolución 62/170, y de que tambien pidió al Secretario General que presentara ese informe al Consejo para facilitar el examen de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad;

18. Invita al Relator Especial de la Comisión de Desarrollo Social encargado de la situación de la discapacidad a que siga cooperando con el Consejo y a que le informe, de conformidad con el programa de trabajo del Consejo, sobre las actividades que haya realizado en cumplimiento de su mandato.

40a sessión, 27 de marzo de 2008. [Aprobada si nvotación. Vease cap. III.]

Top of page English; español; français

En français
Madame/Monsieur,

Le 4 juin 2008, le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droit de l’homme a envoyé une lettre aux aorganisations non gouvernementales, en référence à la résolution 7/9 du Conseil des droit de l’homme intitulée <> en demandant des informations sur les points suivants:

a) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification de la Convention et Protocole Facultative;
b) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à la mise en œuvre de la Convention et Protocole Facultative;
c) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à l’application et su suivi au niveau national (article 33 de la Convention);
d) ainsi que toute autre information se rattachant au paragraphe 16 de la résolution.

Le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droit de l’homme a l’honneur de prlonger le délai pour soumettre les réponses. en conséquence, il serait utile que toute information en réponse à la note verbale soit communiquée au Haut-Commissariat aux droit de l’homme, Office des Nations Unies à Genéve, CH-1211 Genéve 10, Fax + 41 22 917 90 08; Courrier électronique: registry@ohchr.org, vant le 15 septembre 2008.

Je vous prie d’agréer, Madame/Monsieur, l’expression de mes salutations distinguées.

Ibrahim Wani, Chef, Service du développement et des questions économiques et sociales.

7/9. Droits fondamentaux des peronnes handicapées

Le Conseil des droits de l’homme,

Rappelant les résolutions pertinentes de l’Assemblée générale, dont les plus récentes sont la résolution 62/170 du 18 décembre 2007 sur la Conventoin relative aux droits des personnes handicapées et le Protocole facultatif s’y rapportant et la résolution 62/127 du 18 décembre 2007 sur la mise en œuvre du Programme d’action mondial concernant les personnes handicapées,

Rappelant également les résolutions pertineentes de la Commission des droits de l’homme, dont la plus récente est la résolution 2005/65 du 25 avril 2005, ainsi que celles de la Commission du déeleoppement social du Conseil économique et social,

Réaffirmant que tous les droits de l’homme et toutes les libertés fondamentales sont universels, indivisibles, interdépendants et intimement liés, et qu’il est indispensable de garantir aux peronnes handicapées la pleine joussance de ces droits et libertés sans discrimination aucune,

Reconnaissant que la notion de handicap évolue et que le handicap résulte de l’interaction entre des personnes présentant des incapacités et les barriéres comportementales et environnementales qui font obstacle à leur pleine et effective participation à la société à égalité avec les autres,

Reconnaissant également qu’il importe que les personnes handicapées aient accés aux équipements physiques, sociaux, économiques et culturels, à la santé, à l’éducation, à l’information et à la communication pour jouir pleinement de tous les droits de l’homme et de toutes les libertés fondamentales,

Reconnaissant en outre l’importance de la coopération internationale pour améliorer les conditions de vie des personnes handicapées dans tous les pays, en particulier dans les pays en développement,

Reconnaissant que les feemes et les filles handicapées sont souvent exposées à de multiples discriminations et soulignant la nécessité d’intégrer le principe de l’égalité des sexes dans tous les efforts visant à promouvoir la pleine joussance par les peronnes handicapées des droits de l’homme et des libertvs fondamentales,

1. Réaffirme qu’il est nvcessaire de promouvoir, de protéger et d’assurer la pleine et égale joussance de tous les droits de l’homme et de toutes les libertés fondamentales par les personnes handicapées et de promouvoir le respect de leur dignité intrinséque et, à cet égard, demande aux gouvernements de prendre des mesures énergiques pour:

a) Empêcher et interdire toutes les formes de discrimination envers les personnes handicapées; et
b) Garantir la participation et l’intégration pleines et effectives des personnes handicapées dans la société, le respect de leur autonomie individuelle, y compris leur liberté de faire leurs propres choix, le respect de leur indépendance et l’égalité des chances;

2. Note avec satisfaction l’adoption par l’Assemblée générale, le 13 décembre 2006, de la Convention relative aux dorits des personnes handicapées et de son Protocole facultatif, et exprime l’espoir que ces instruments entreront en vigueur à une date proche;

3. Note également avec satisfaction que, depuis l’ouverture à la signature de la Convention et du Protocole facultatif le 30 mars 2007, 126 États ont signé la Convention et 17 l’ont ratifiée, et que 71 États ont signé le Protocole et 11 l’ont ratifié, et demande aux États et aux organisations régionales d’intvgration qui ne l’ont pas encore fait d’envisager de signer et de ratifier la Convention et le Protocole facultatif à titre prioritaire;

4. Note en outre avec satisfaction l’attention que plusieurs rapporteurs spéciaux ont portée aux droits des personnes handicapées dans l’exercice de leur mandat et invite les titulaires de mandats relevant des procédures spéciales à tenir compte, dans l’exercice de leur mandat, de la pleine jouissance — dans des conditions d’égalité–de tous les droits fondamentaux par les personnes handicapées;

5. Encourage le Comité consultatif du Conseil des droits de l’homme et dautres mécanismes du Conseil à intégrer la question des personnes handicapées, selon qu’il convient, dans l’exécution de leur tâche et dans leurs recommandations afin de faciliter l’incorporation de cette question dans les travaux du Conseil;

6. Prie instamment toutes les parties prenantes de prendre en considération les droits des personnes handicapées à toutes les étapes de l’Examen périodique universel, notamment lors des consultations que les États ménent au niveau national pour réunir les informations à présenter à l’Examen, afin que les institutions nationales des droits de ‘lhomme et les organisations non gouvernementales représentant les personnes handicapées prennent part à ces consultations;

7. Se félicite de l’attention accordée aux droits des personnes handicapées dans les travaux de plusieurs organes conventionnels relatifs aux droits de l’homme et encourage tous ces organes à poursuivre l’intégration de la question des personnes handicapées dans leurs travaux, notamment dnas leurs activitvés de suivi et dans les observations générales qu’ils publient;

8. Prie instamment les gouvernements, en consultation avec, notamment, les institutions nationales des droits de l’homme et les organisations de personnes handicapées, de traiter en détail de la question des droits des personnes handicapées dans les rapports qu’ils sont tenus de présenter en vertu des instruments pertinents des Nations Unies relatifs aux droits de l’homme, et salue l’initiative des gouvernements qui ont commencé à le faire;

9. Accueille avec satisfaction le rapport de la Haut-Comissaire des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme sur les progrés accomplis dans la mise en œuvre des recommandations formulées dans l’étude sur les droits de l’homme et l’invalidité (A/HRC/7/61) et invite la Haut-Commissaire à continuer à appuyer comme il convient l’intégration de la question des personnes handicapées, notamment en coopération avec le Département des affaires économiques et sociales du secrétariat;

10. Encourage les États à faire œuvre de sensibilisation au sujet des droits des personnes handicapées, y compris au moyen de campagnes de sensibilisation du public et de programmes de formation, afin de lutter contre les stéréotypes, les préjugés, les praticques dangereuses et les barriéres comportementales concernant les personnes handicapées, et à promouvoir les perceptions positives et une plus grande conscience sociale à l’égard des personnes handicapées;

11. Encourage la Haut-Commissaire aux droits de l’homme à tenir pleinement compte de l’application progressive des normes et des directives régissant l’accessibilité des lcaux et des services du systéme des Nations Unies, en tenant également compte des dispoitions pertinentes de la Convention relative au droits des personnes handicapées, et souligne que le Conseil, y compris ses rssources Internet, doit être pleinement accessible aux personnes handicapées;

12. Encourage les États à prendre des mesures appropriées pour recenser et éliminer les obstacles et les entraves à l’accesibilité pour les personnes handicapées, en particulier à veiller à ce qu’elles aient accés, à égalité avec les autres, aux équipements physiques, aux transports, à l’information et à la communication et à d’autres équipements ouverts ou destinés au public, tants dans les zones urbaines que dans les zones rurales;

13. Se félicite du rôle important joué par les institutions nationales des droits de l’homme et les organisations de la socétécivile, notamment les organisations de personnes handicapées, dans la négocation de la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, et encourage les institutions et les organisations intéressées à poursuivre leurs efforts pour faire comprendre la Convention et, le cas échéant, promouvoir sa mise en œuvre;

14. Encourage le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme à continuer de renforcer ses partenariats avec des organisations de le sociét civile, notamment les organisations et les activités de sensibilisation qu’il méne dans leur direction, en privilégiant en particulier les organisations représentant les personnes handicapées, afin de les sensibiliser aux travaux du systéme des droits de l’homme;

15. Décide de tenir tous les ans, au cours d’une de ses sessions ordinaires, un débat interactif sur les droits des personnes handicapées dont le premir devrait avoir lieu à sa dixiéme session, l’accent étant mis sur les principales mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification et à la mise en œuvre effective de la Convention, notamment en ce qui concerne l’égalité et la non-discrimnation;

16. Prie le Haut-Commissariat de réaliser une étude thématique visant à faire miux connaître et comprendre la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, en insistant sur les principales mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification et à la mise en œuvre effective de la Convention, telles que les mesures ayant trait à l’égalité et à la non-discrimination, en consultation avec les États, les organisations de la société civile, notamment les organisations de personnes handicapées, et les institutions nationales des droits de l’homme, et demande que cette étude soit disponible sur le site Web du Haut-Commissariat, dans un format accessible, avant la dixiéme session du Conseil;

17. Note que l’Assemblée générale a prié le Secrétaire général de lui présenter à sa prochaine session un rapport sur l’état de la Convention et du Protocole facultatif et sur la’application de la résolution 62/170 et l’a également prié de soumettre ce rapport au Conseil en tant que contribution à son débat sur les droits des personnes handicapées;

18. Invite le Rapporteur spécial de la Commission du développement social chargé d’étudier la situation des handicapés à continuer à coopérer avec le Conseil et à lui rendre compte des activités entreprises en application de son mandant, conformément au programme de travail du Conseil.

40e séance, 27 mars 2008 [Adoptée sans vote. Voir chap. III.]

Top of page English; español; français



This letter, in all three languages, was recently circulated on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development email discussion group; the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group and also the IDA_CRPD_Forum email discussion group. Please note that any related feedback or queries should please be directed to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, NOT to We Can Do.

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History of Disability Rights in El Salvador

Posted on 18 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Upside Down World has recently published an extensive history of the disability rights movement in El Salvador from the 1990s through today, with special attention to the 12-year civil war; land mines and land mine victims; disability-related legislation in the country; and the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). 

El Salvador is one of 34 countries to have ratified the CRPD.  The CRPD is the first international, legally-binding treaty to protect the human rights of people with disabilities.  It protects many different human rights including: the right to healthcare and to informed consent in health services; the right to procreate and to obtain contraceptives; the right to education; the right to live with one’s own family in the community; and many more. 

El Salvador also is one of 20 countries to have ratified the accompanying Optional Protocol.  The Optional Protocol gives people with disabilities another way to obtain justice if their human rights have been violated under the CRPD.  People must first pursue all means of justice available to them within their own country.  If all of these attempts fail, and if their country has ratified both the CRPD and the Optional Protocol, then they may register a complaint with the international Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.  The Committee is authorized to investigate human rights violations under the CRPD.

In addition to the countries that have ratified the CRPD and Optional Protocol so far, another 96 countries also have declared official interest in ratifying the CRPD in the future, and 51 of these countries also are officially interested in ratifying the Optional Protocol.  A country signals strong official interest in an international treaty by signing it.  Signing a treaty is the first step toward ratifying it.  A country that has signed a treaty is not yet obligated to obey it, but must still avoid taking actions that would violate it.  A country that has fully ratified a treaty must make its laws more consistent with the treaty by creating new laws as necessary, or by abolishing old laws that violate the treaty.

Read the full story on the history of disability rights in El Salvador, entitled “A Recent History of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador” at

http://upsidedownworld.org/main/content/view/1384/1/

Find out if your country has signed or ratified the CRPD and Optional Protocol at http://www.un.org/disabilities/countries.asp?navid=12&pid=166

Learn more about the CRPD and Optional Protocol by reading the RatifyNow FAQ.

Learn how you can become involved with the global campaign to promote the ratification and implementation of the CRPD and Optional Protocol in your country and elsewhere.

This blog post was first published at <a href=”http://www.RatifyNow.orgRatifyNow.org and is re-posted here with permission of author. RatifyNow is an organization working to promote the ratification and implementation of the CRPD around the world, and periodically posts links like this one to interesting news stories related to disability rights and the CRPD.

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Finding, Publicizing Disability Organizations

Posted on 6 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Opportunities, Resources | Tags: , , , , , |

People now have one more way that they can look for organizations run by and for people with disabilities around the world. And Disabled Peoples’ Organizations have one more way they can make sure that people around the world are able to learn about their organization and the work they do.

The United Nations Enable website, which focuses on people with disabilities, has a new listing of Civil Society organizations that focus on disability issues:

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=739

Follow the link above to find organizations in the region or country that interests you.

If you want your organization to be added to their list, then you can send an email to enable@un.org with the following information:

1. The name of your organization

2. The website address (URL) for your organization

3. The country or region in which your organization carries out its activities

Looking for more DPOs? Look at some of the other relevant blog posts at We Can Do that have more leads on finding disability-related organizations around the world.

Don’t have a website for your organization yet? Don’t have enough resources to establish one on your own? The organization DanishKadah is accepting applications from DPOs that need free webhosting services to establish accessible websites for them. Follow the link to learn more details.



Please note that any inquiries relating to the UN Enable listing should be directed to enable@un.org, NOT to We Can Do. Inquiries about applying for free web hosting services should be directed to DanishKadah, NOT to We Can Do.

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VIII International Human Rights Colloquium

Posted on 18 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, Uncategorized, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , |

 

VIII International Human Rights Colloquium
“60th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: Challenges for the Global South”

8 to 15 november 2008, sao paulo, brazil

What is the International Human Rights Colloquium?
The Colloquium is an annual capacity building and peer-learning event designed for young activists from the Global South (Africa, Asia and Latin America). The objective of the VIII International Human Rights Colloquium is to strengthen the impact of human rights activists work and to offer the opportunity to build new collaborative networks among activists, academics and the Organization of the United Nations (ONU). 

Structure
The Colloquium offers lectures, seminars and working groups. In the morning sessions, participants will attend lectures, while in the afternoon sessions, they will take part in workshops and working groups, as well as visit human rights organizations.

Organization
The VIII Colloquium is organized by Conectas Human Rights together with Sur – Human Rights University Network. The VIII Colloquium is supported by Open Society Institute, the Ford Foundation, the United Nations Democracy Fund (UNDEF), among others.

Who can apply?
Young human rights defenders from the Global South who demonstrate commitment to the human rights cause as well as at least two-years of professional experience in the area. Additionally, criteria such as race, gender, and regional/social origin will be taken into
consideration during the selection process. Candidates who have participated in previous colloquia are not eligible for participation in 2008.

Fees and Scholarships
In order to cover costs, each participant must pay a participation fee.  A limited number of scholarships will be granted to guarantee participation of individuals. Candidates should submit a written request along with the application to be considered for a scholarship.

Applications
Required documents:

  • Application form;
  • 1 Reference Letter (to be sent by mail or e-mail);
  • Letter of Support from your organization;
  • Resume/C.V. (1 page);
  • Writing sample (1 page)

 Applications for the VIII International Human Rights Colloquium will be accepted until June 30th, 2008.

Candidates can apply on-line at www.conectas.org/coloquio (NOT at We Can Do) or download the application form (Word format, 155 Kb). The off-line version of the Application Form should be submitted by e-mail to coloquio@conectas.org. Candidates will be notified on August 1st, 2008.

Please, share this information with your colleges and partners!

 For more information, please visit: http://www.conectas.org/coloquio or email
coloquio@conectas.org (NOT We Can Do!)

Information is available in English, Portuguese, and Spanish.

I am not familiar with what accommodations the Colloquium organizers are able to offer to participants with disabilities. Interested parties are urged to communicate directly with them (email
coloquio@conectas.org, NOT We Can Do) regarding their needs.

Anyone with prior experience with this colloquium is encouraged to leave comments in the comments area below.



We Can Do received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD) listserve. Readers may join the GPDD listserve for themselves by contacting Maria Reina at mvreina@law.syr.edu.

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Disability Rights Fund Opens Grantmaking to DPOs in 7 Countries

Posted on 16 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

En español

PRESS RELEASE
Disability Rights Fund Opens Grantmaking to DPOs in 7 Countries

JUNE 16, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced its first grants competition.

The broad objective of the Fund — which was launched by the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the United Kingdom Department for International Development, and an anonymous donor on the first anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) — is to empower disabled persons organizations in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to effectively implement and monitor the CPRD.

In 2008, the Fund plans to give out a total of USD $700,000 in one-year grants ranging from USD $5000 – $50,000 and aimed at awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

To be eligible for this year’s grants program, applicant organizations must be based in and conduct the majority of their activities in the following seven countries: in Africa, Ghana, Namibia and Uganda; in Latin America, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru; in Asia, Bangladesh. In these countries, the Fund will support Disabled Persons’ Organizations activities that advance the human rights of persons with disabilities at country-level.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, www.disabilityrightsfund.org. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by July 15. The deadline for applications is August 15.

Disability Rights Fund Steering Committee Co-Chair, William Rowland, President of the World Blind Union, stated “The Disability Rights Fund heralds an innovative partnership between donors and persons with disabilities. The flow of new resources to support our struggle for rights is a development of major significance.”

####

COMUNICADO DE PRENSA
El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad abre su período de subvenciones a OPDs en 7 Países

16 de junio de 2008

PARA SU INMEDIATA PUBLICACIÓN

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad, una iniciativa colaborativa que apoya los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad – anunció hoy su primera competición por subvenciones.

El objetivo amplio del Fondo – que fue lanzado por el Open Society Institute, el Sigrid Rausing Trust, el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional del gobierno británico, y un donante anónimo, en el primer aniversario de la Convención Sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD) de las Naciones Unidas – es el de empoderar a organizaciones de personas con discapacidad en el mundo en desarrollo y la Europa del Este/antigua Unión Soviética, para la implementación y monitoreo efectivos de la CDPD.

En el 2008, el Fondo tiene planificado otorgar un total de USD $700,000 (dólares estadounidenses) en subvenciones de un año de duración que varían desde los USD $5,000 hasta $50,000, dirigidos al aumento de la concientización, el fortalecimiento de alianzas y redes, y la defensa de derechos.

Para poder optar al programa de subvenciones de este año, las organizaciones aplicantes deben tener su sede y realizar la mayoría de sus actividades en alguno de los siguientes siete países: en África, Ghana, Namibia y Uganda; en América Latina, Ecuador, Nicaragua y Perú; en Asia, Bangladesh. En estos países, el Fondo apoyará actividades de las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad que contribuyan al avance de la CDPD a nivel de los países.

Se alienta a que las organizaciones interesadas revisen los criterios de eligibilidad y los detalles para aplicar que se encuentran en el sitio de Internet del Fondo: www.disabilityrightsfund.org. Cualquier pregunta acerca del proceso para realizar propuestas deberán dirigirse a: info@disabilityrightsfund.org a más tardar el 15 de julio de 2008. La última fecha para enviar aplicaciones es el 15 de agosto de 2008.

William Rowland, Co-Presidente del Comité Coordinador del Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad, quien también funge como Presidente de la Unión Mundial de Ciegos, declaró “El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad ha constituído una asociación innovadora entre donantes y personas con discapacidad. La canalización de nuevos recursos hacia la lucha por reivindicar nuestros derechos, es un desarrollo de importancia significativa.”



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this press release for publication at We Can Do.

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Feedback Sought for United Nations Study on Disability Rights

Posted on 16 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following email has been circulated by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

En español; En français

4 June 2008

Dear Sir/Madam

I am writing to seek your contribution to a study being undertaken by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in relation to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol.

The Human Rights Council, in its resolution 7/9, decided to request “the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner to prepare a thematic study to enhance awareness and understanding of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, focusing on legal measures key for the ratification and effective implementation of the Convention, such as those relating to equality and non-discrimination, in consultation with States, civil society organizations, including organizations of persons with disabilities, and national human rights institutions” (para.16).

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights would be grateful to receive any relevant information for the preparation of this study. In particular, views and information would be welcome on:

a) Legal measures for ratification of the Convention and Optional Protocol;
b) Legal measures for implementation of the Convention and Optional Protocol;
c) Legal measures on national monitoring, particularly in relation to article 33 of the Convention;
d) Any other information relating to paragraph 16 of the resolution.

The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights would be grateful if any information could be sent to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (United Nations Office at Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 10; Fax. +41 22 917 90 08; E-mail: registry@ohchr.org) by 15 August 2008. Please indicate whether the information provided could be made available on the OHCHR website. I thank you in advance for your cooperation.

Yours sincerely,

Ibrahim Wani
Chief,
Development, Economic and Social Issues Branch


4 de junio de 2008

Estimado Señor, estimada Señora,

Tengo el honor de escribirle para pedir la contribución de su organización en relación con un estudio de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos sobre la Convención de los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad.

En su resolución 7/9, el Consejo de Derechos Humanos decidió pedir “a la Oficina del Alto Comisionado que prepare un estudio temático para mejorar el conocimiento y la comprensión de la Convención sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad centrado en las medidas jurídicas esenciales para la ratificación y la aplicación efectiva de la Convención, como las relativas a la igualdad y la no discriminación, en consulta con los Estados, las organizaciones de la sociedad civil, incluidas las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad, y las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos” (párrafo 16).

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos estaría muy agradecida de recibir información concerniente a la mencionada decisión. En particular, se agradecería información y opiniones referentes a los siguientes aspectos:

a) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la ratificación de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;
b) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la aplicación efectiva de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;
c) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la aplicación y el seguimiento nacionales en relación con el artículo 33 de la Convención;
d) Cualquier otra información relacionada con le párrafo 16 de la resolución.

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos agradecería que toda la información en respuesta a la presente nota verbal sea enviada a la Oficina del Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos (Oficina de las Naciones Unidas en Ginebra, CH 1211 Ginebra 10; Fax. +41 22 917 90 08; E-mail: registry@ohchr.org) antes del
15 de agosto de 2008.

Reciban un cordial saludo,

Ibrahim Wani
Jefe,
Servicio de Desarrollo y Cuestiones Económicas y Sociales


4 juin 2008

Madame/Monsieur,

J’ai l’honneur de vous écrire afin de solliciter votre contribution pour l’élaboration d’un rapport du Haut-Commissariat aux Droits de l’Homme sur la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées et son protocole facultatif.

Dans sa résolution 7/9, le Conseil des droits de l’homme prie «le Haut-Commissariat de réaliser une étude thématique visant à faire mieux connaître et comprendre la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, en insistant sur les principales mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification et à la mise en œuvre effective de la Convention, telles que les mesures ayant trait à l’égalité et à la non-discrimination, en consultation avec les Etats, les organisations de la société civile, notamment les organisations de personnes handicapées, et les institutions nationales des droits de l’homme» (paragraphe 16).

Le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme serait reconnaissant de recevoir tout renseignement relatif à l’étude, notamment sur les questions suivantes :

a) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification de la Convention et Protocole Facultative;
b) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à la mise en œuvre de la Convention et Protocole Facultative;
c) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à l’application et au suivi au niveau national (article 33 de la Convention);
d) ainsi que toute autre information se rattachant au paragraphe 16 de la résolution.

Merci de bien vouloir communiquer votre information au Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme, Office des Nations Unies à Genève, CH – 1211 Genève 10 ;
Fax. +41 22 917 90 08 ; E-mail: registry@ohchr.org, avant le 15 août 2008 et de nous indiquer si vous souhaitez que cette dernière soit placée sur le site Internet du Haut Commissariat.

Je vous prie d’agréer, Madame/Monsieur, l’expression de mes salutations distinguées.

Ibrahim Wani
Chef,
Service du développement et des questions économiques et sociales



We Can Do received this email via the AdHoc_IDC listserv and also via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

Readers unfamiliar with the CRPD may wish to review a brief “FAQ” at the RatifyNow.org website. More detail on the CRPD can also be found at the United Nation’s official web page on the topic at www.un.org/disabilities.

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UN Launches Blog-Based Discussion on Inclusion and Development

Posted on 9 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Please direct inquiries to the email addresses provided in the announcement below, not to We Can Do. Dirija por favor las preguntas a los correos electronicos abajo, no a We Can Do. Veuillez diriger les questions vers les email address fournis ci-dessous, pas a We Can Do.

Version française; Versión español

Dear Colleagues and Partners,

The adoption of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities marks a renewed commitment of the United Nations to improving the situation of people with disabilities, wherever they are. A man, a woman, or a child suffering from any kind of disability is much more likely to be poor, unemployed or discriminated against than a person without a disability. The disparity is even starker in developing countries.

More than 50 United Nations Development Program (UNDP) country offices in recent years have implemented programmes to recognize and respect the rights of persons living with disabilities, to provide them with training to help navigate better in life and to stand a better chance to be employed, to improve their participation in decision-making, to address the needs of millions of people who became disabled because of devastating conflicts and disasters. This year, UNDP made a commitment at the highest level to consolidate and strengthen our work to support persons with disabilities. On the other hand we are also looking at UNDP as employer and are decided to make our organization more accessible for employees, partners, and guests living with a disability.

In that context, we invite you to a blog-based discussion on Inclusion and Disability, to be held from 9 June to 9 July 2008. The blog-based discussion departs from traditional discussion methods. It is hosted on an interactive collaborative space hosted by UNDP Bratislava Regional Centre and enables each participant to share their views and resources. The lead
moderators will be:

  • Lance Clark, UNDP Resident Representative and UN Resident Coordinator, UNDP Serbia
  • Milena Isakovic, Programme Officer, UNDP Serbia
  • Marielza Oliveira, Programme Advisor, Regional Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Louise Nylin, Human Rights Advisor, Bratislava Regional Centre
  • Susanne Milcher, Social Inclusion Advisor, Bratislava Regional Centre
  • Ronald Wiman, author of the Manual on Inclusive Planning, Senior Social Development Advisor, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and STAKES, Finland
  • Geraldine Glassman, HR Associate, BOM/OHR/Staff Wellbeing Unit

To enrich the discussion, we encourage you to invite your colleagues and partners from UN agencies, the civil society, governments and media.

The outcomes of this discussion will help develop a UNDP policy and programming guidance document, as well as help formulate a more inclusive human resource strategy of UNDP.

To participate or contribute to the discussion, please notify by sending an e-mail to pr-net@groups.undp.org or to martin.santiago@undp.org

The specific details on how to participate will be shared on Monday 9 June.

We look forward to your participation.

Best regards,

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Director, Poverty Practice
Director, Office of Human Resources

Co-chairs of UNDP’s Task Force on Disability

Version française
Chers Collègues et Partenaires,

L’ adoption de la Convention sur les Droits des Personnes Handicapées marque le renouvellement de l’engagement des Nations Unies à améliorer les conditions de vie des personnes handicapées, où qu’ils soient. Un homme, une femme ou un enfant affecté par une forme d’handicap court plus que d’autres, en pleine possession de leurs moyens, le risque d’être pauvre, sans emploi ou victime de discrimination. La différence est encore plus frappante dans les pays en développement.

Au cours des dernières années, plus de 50 bureaux de pays du PNUD ont mis en œuvre des programmes visant à reconnaître et respecter les droits des personnes handicapées, à leur fournir la formation nécessaire à pouvoir mieux se diriger dans la vie et être plus en mesure d’être recruté pour emploi, à augmenter leur participation dans la prise de décision, à répondre aux besoins de millions de personnes qui sont devenues victimes d’un handicap à la suite de conflits et catastrophes dévastateurs. Cette année, c’est à l’échelon le plus élevé que le PNUD s’est engagé à consolider et renforcer notre travail d’appui aux personnes handicapées. En outre, c’est aussi en tant qu’employeur que nous examinons le rôle du PNUD et nous sommes déterminés à faire en sorte que notre organisation soit plus accessible aux employés, partenaires et hôtes souffrant d’un handicap.

Dans ce contexte, nous vous invitons à une discussion sur le thème de L’Intégration et le Handicap hébergée sur un blog et prévue du 9 Juin au 9 Juillet 2008. Une discussion à partir d’un blog se démarque de méthodes traditionnelles de discussion. Elle sera hébergée sur un espace collaboratif interactif aménagé par le Centre Régional de Bratislava du PNUD et donne à chaque participant l’occasion de partager son point de vue et ses ressources. Les principaux modérateurs seront:

  • Lance Clark, Représentant Résident PNUD et Coordonateur Résident de l’ONU, PNUD Serbie
  • Milena Isakovic, Administrateur de Programme, PNUD Serbie
  • Marielza Oliveira, Conseiller pour les Programmes, Bureau régional d’Amérique Latine et des Caraïbes
  • Louise Nylin, Conseiller pour les Droits de l’Homme, Centre Régional de Bratislava
  • Susanne Milcher, Conseiller en matière d’Intégration Sociale, Centre Régional de Bratislava
  • Ronald Wiman, auteur du Manual on Inclusive Planning, (Manuel de Planification de l’Intégration) Conseiller principal en matière de Développement Social, Ministère des Affaires Etrangères et STAKES, Finlande
  • Geraldine Glassman, Associé RH, BOM/OHR/Staff Wellbeing Unit (cellule de bien-être du personnel)

Nous vous encourageons à enrichir la discussion en invitant vos collègues et partenaires d’agences onusiennes, de la société civile, des gouvernements et des médias.

Les résultats de cette discussion contribueront tant à l’élaboration d’un document d’orientation de politique et de programmation du PNUD, qu’à la formulation d’une stratégie de ressources humaines plus intégrante au sein du PNUD.

Pour participer ou contribuer à la discussion, prière de nous en avertir en envoyant un mail à pr-net@groups.undp.org ou à martin.santiago@undp.org.

Les détails spécifiques sur les modalités de participation seront communiqués le lundi 9 Juin.

Dans l’attente de votre participation.

Meilleures salutations,

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Directeur, Pratique de la Lutte contre la Pauvreté
Directeur, Bureau des Ressources Humaines

Co-présidents de l’équipe spéciale duPNUD œuvrant sur les personnes handicapées

Version Español
Estimados colegas y socios,

La adopción de la Convención sobre los Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad marca un compromiso renovado de las Naciones Unidas a mejorar la situación de las personas con alguna discapacidad, sean de donde sean. Es mucho más probable que un hombre, mujer o niño que padezca cualquiera discapacidad sea pobre, desempleado o discriminando que una persona sin ninguna discapacidad. La disparidad es incluso más dura en los países en vías de desarrollo.

Durante los últimos años más de 50 oficinas de la UNDP en diferentes países han implementado programas para reconocer y respetar los derechos de las personas con alguna discapacidad, para suministrarles la formación necesaria para ayudarles a navegar por la vida con más facilidad y para que tengan más oportunidades de empleo, para su mejor participación en la toma de decisiones, y además los programas tratan de dirigirse a las necesidades de los miles de personas que son discapacitadas por causa de conflictos y desastres devastadores.

Este año la UNDP se está comprometido al nivel más alto, para consolidar y reforzar nuestro trabajo de apoyo a personas discapacitadas. Por otro lado, estamos también viendo a la UNDP como empleador y estamos decididos en hacer que nuestra organización sea más accesible a empleados, socios e invitados con discapacidades.

En este contexto, os invitamos a una discusión basada en un blog sobre Inclusión y Discapacidad, que tendrá lugar desde el 9 de junio hasta el 9 de julio de 2008. La discusión en un blog se desvía de los métodos tradicionales de discusión. Se encuentra en un espacio interactivo colaborativo presentado por el Centro Regional de la UNDP en Bratislava y permite que cada participante pueda compartir sus puntos de vista y sus recursos. Los moderadores clave serán:

  • Lance Clark, UNDP Representante Residente y Coordinador Residente, UNDPSerbia
  • Milena Isakovic, Oficial de Programa, UNDP Serbia
  • Marielza Oliveira, Asesor de Programa, Agencia Regional para América Latina y el Caribe
  • Louise Nylin, Asesor Derechos Humanos, Centro Regional de Bratislava
  • Susanne Milcher, Asesor de Inclusión Social, Centro Regional de Bratislava
  • Ronald Wiman, autor delManual on Inclusive Planning, Asesor Superior de Desarrollo Social, Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores y STAKES, Finlandia
  • Geraldine Glassman, Asociada de Recursos Humanos, BOM/OHR/Unidad del Bienestar de Empleados

Para enriquecer la discusión, os animamos a invitar a vuestros colegas y socios de las agencias de la ONU, la sociedad civil, los gobiernos y la prensa.

Los resultados de esta discusión ayudarán a desarrollar un documento de orientación de política y programación además de ayudar a formular una estrategia de recursos humanos de la UNDP más inclusiva.

Para participar o contribuir a la discusión, por favor, notificarnos con un correo electrónico a pr-net@groups.undp.org o responder a martin.santiago@undp.org.

Los detalles específicos de cómo participar estarán disponibles el lunes 9 de junio.

Esperamos vuestra participación.

Saludos

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Director, Poverty Practice
Director, Office of Human Resources
Co-chairs of UNDP’s Task Force on Disability



We Can Do first learned about the UNDP blog-based discussion on Inclusion and Development via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserv.

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Listing Your Organization in UN Enable Website

Posted on 9 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

The United Nations is currently building an online list of civil society organizations that include persons with disabilities in their work, in order to facilitate knowledge sharing and network building. If you would like your organization to be listed on the United Nations Enable website, kindly reply to enable@un.org with the following information by Monday 16 June 2008 (with the Subject: civil society contacts)

  1. Organization name
  2. Organization website address
  3. Country or region of activities

Please note that a disclaimer will be included on the website stating the following: ‘The below contacts and information are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only; they do not constitute endorsement of or an approval by the United Nations of any of the products, services, or opinions of the corporation, organization, or individual. The United Nations bears no responsibility for the accuracy, legality or content of their statements and opinions.’

Thank you for your time and interest.

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NEWS: Disability Rights Fund Launches Website

Posted on 2 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Funding, Human Rights, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund Launches Website

May 28, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Diana Samarasan, Director
Telephone: 617-261-4593
Email: dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund, a groundbreaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities, has launched its website at http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org

With a clear and easy to use design, the website provides information on the Fund’s history and strategy, governance, as well as its advisors and donors. In mid-June, the site will also publish information about the Fund’s first request for proposals.

A unique partnership between donors and the worldwide disability community, the broad objective of the Disability Rights Fund is to empower disabled persons organizations around the world to effectively implement and monitor the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Fund’s structure reflects the international disability community’s slogan, “Nothing About Us Without Us.” A global advisory panel, made up of 12 individuals, most of whom are persons with disabilities, provides recommendations on grantmaking strategies for the Fund; four of the Panel members also serve on the Fund’s grantmaking decision body—the Steering Committee. The members of the panel come from five continents and reflect a broad cross-section of the disability community. The majority were nominated by international and regional disabled persons’ organizations. Detailed biographies of advisors are available on the website.

In 2008, the Disability Rights Fund will be seeking grant proposals from disabled persons’ organizations in seven countries. Grants will support the human rights work of disabled persons’ organizations in Bangladesh, Ecuador, Ghana, Namibia, Nicaragua, Peru, and Uganda.

“2008 is the Disability Rights Fund’s pilot grantmaking year,” stated DRF director Diana Samarasan, “as the Fund develops, the website will become a dynamic source of information on human rights grantmaking within the global disability community.”

For more information on the Disability Rights Fund, see www.disabilityrightsfund.org or write to info@disabilityrightsfund.org


____________________________________________

Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this press release for publication at We Can Do.

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JOB POST: Making it Work Program Manager, Handicap International, USA

Posted on 26 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

Handicap International is recruiting for a new position in the U.S. office.

Making it Work Program Manager – Washington DC Metropolitan Region
Handicap International (HI), an NGO that works to improve living conditions of people living in disabling situations in post-conflict or low income countries, is launching Making it Work, a multi-stakeholder initiative to create an international knowledge management platform to support the implementation of the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The ratification of the UNCRPD sets a major challenge: how to bridge the huge gap between the standards set by this international convention and existing services, systems and policies in developing countries. The central aim for Making it Work is to reduce this gap through information dissemination and exchange, and in doing so, to promote a model for rights-based inclusive development.

Making it Work (MIW) is a two -year initiative that will:

  • Build capacities to research services and practices in developing countries as a means to influence national systems and policies;
  • Build capacities at local, national and regional levels to promote disability rights and implement policies; and
  • Raise awareness on key disability issues and present solutions to the barriers faced by persons with disabilities.

HI is seeking a Program Manager to oversee the successful completion of the three phases of the initiative. Willingness to travel essential. Fluency in Spanish highly desired. People with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Duration of contract: Six month full-time contract from July to December 2008 & planned extension through March 2010 funding permitting. Salary: $40-$50,000 commensurate with experience. Excellent benefits.

Deadline to apply: May 30, 2008.

Click on this link to read the full job description for the “Making it Work” Program Manager.

Also review the Handicap International US web site at http://www.handicap-international.us

Send resume/CV, cover letter and salary history as email attachments to Ed Kenny at recruitment@handicap-international.us



We Can Do received this announcement via several sources, including the Intl-Dev listserv. Please note that any inquiries or applications should be directed to Handicap International, not to We Can Do.

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NEWS: Kampala, Uganda, Declaration on Disability and HIV & AIDS

Posted on 25 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

From: AfricaCampaign@webmail.co.za
Subject: Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV&AIDS update

******* version française dessous *************

It has been just over three-weeks since we converged for the 2nd General Meeting of the Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV & AIDS was held March 11 – 13, in beautiful Kampala, Uganda.

We would like to once again take this opportunity to express our gratitude to the National Union for Disabled People in Uganda (NUDIPU) and the Government of Uganda, through the Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development for gracefully hosting our gathering. Our gratitude is also extended to The Secretariat of the African Decade, Handicap International and once again NUDIPU for supporting the event and last but not least to each and every member of the National Organizing Committee for their exceptional contribution prior to and during the meeting. It would not have been possible without your sterling efforts, long and hard hours and sleepless nights!!!

We were more that 170 delegates representing more that 20 African countries and 10 countries outside of Africa. We came from a wide variety of backgrounds, including civil society, government, academic and research institutions, international NGOs, funding agencies, international stakeholders in HIV/AIDS work and the media.

In addition to networking and rich exchange among groups and countries, the constitution of five working groups with plans of action to further Campaign objectives, a renewed steering committee, we also gave birth together to the Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV&AIDS. (full text is enclosed in English. Portuguese and French will be forwarded ASAP)

The declaration calls on governments, HIV/AIDS service providers, the African Union, UN agencies, funding agencies, research and academic institutions and disabled people’s organizations to action toward

  • Equal access to HIV/AIDS prevention and services and
  • Full participation by persons with disabilities in the response to HIV/AIDS in every country and at every level.

We hereby encourage you to disseminate this declaration widely within your country, to persons with disabilities, governments, HIV/AIDS service providers, UN agencies, funding agencies, researchers and academic institutions. Please also use opportunities you have with media to highlight this important message. Feel free to add it onto your organisation’s website.

We would like to take this opportunity also to introduce our steering committee and at the same time extend our warmest welcome to the newer members of the committee. They are:

  • Mr. Tambo Camara (Pan African Federation of the Disabled (PAFOD) – Mauritania;
  • Ms. Farida Gulamo (Association of Disabled Mozambicans (ADEMO) – Mozambique;
  • Mr Martin Babu Mwesigwa (National Union of Disabled Persons of Uganda (NUDIPU) – Uganda;
  • Dr. Elly Macha (African Union of the Blind (AFUB) – Kenya;
  • Mrs. Rachel Kachaje (Southern African Federation of the Disabled (SAFOD) – Malawi
  • Mr. Obuya George Onyango (African Deaf Union (ADU) – Kenya;
  • Mr. Paul Tezanou (Chair of the Secretariat of the African Decade) – Cameroon;
  • Hon. Hendrietta Bogopane-Zulu (Member of SA parliament, Disability respresentative of SA National AIDS council executive structure) – South Africa;
  • Ms. Fri Beatrice Bime (Global Fund) – Geneva NEW
  • Mr. Oumar Diop (Handicap FormEduC, Resource Centre for the promotion of the rights of persons with disabilities) – Senegal NEW
  • Mr. David O. Anyaele (Centre for citizens with disabilities) – Nigeria NEW

We would also like to bring your attention to changes in the campaign management. At the end our gathering we said goodbye to Dr. Susan Girois. She will no longer be actively involved in the work on the Campaign Management Team (CMT), although her expertise, experience, guidance and spontaneity will be sought more often than she expects. Her active participation will surely be missed however knowing she’s on call sets the rest of us at ease. In the same breath we would like to welcome two new additions to the CMT: Kevin Henderson who is the HIV&AIDS technical advisor at Handicap International’s Kenya program and Aïda Sarr, a programme manager for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities’ West, North and Central Africa regional programme.

We would like to encourage you to please keep us updated on the developments in your respective countries, regions and districts and we promise to share your experiences with the rest of the world.

Gouwah Samuels, Kevin Henderson, Aïda Sarr
Campaign Management Team

Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV & AIDS

PREAMBLE:

We, the participants of the Second Meeting of the Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV&AIDS representing Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs), Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working with and for persons with disabilities, Funding and Development Agencies from 21 African countries and representatives from other parts of the world, a meeting hosted by the National Union of Disabled Persons of Uganda (NUDIPU) in conjunction with the Government of Uganda, with support from Handicap International and the African Decade Secretariat, in Kampala, Uganda, March 11-13, 2008;

NOTING the fact that the incidence of HIV is disproportionately high among groups that are excluded socially, culturally and economically, including persons with disabilities, and that these groups are disregarded in a majority of national and international HIV/AIDS programming initiatives in Africa. Further noting the importance of mainstreaming disability issues in relevant strategies to achieve sustainable development;

RECOGNIZING that national, regional, continental and international instruments on human rights, such as the United Nations Human Rights Bill and the International Covenants on Human Rights, have proclaimed and agreed that everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in these instruments, without distinction of any kind. Further recognizing the principles and objectives of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 2006, the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS – adopted at the UN General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS in 2001 and the Millennium Development Goals (MDG);

CONSIDERING that despite these various instruments and undertakings to which many United Nations member states are signatories, persons with disabilities continue to face barriers in their participation as equal members of society and violations of their human rights in all parts of the world, including Africa. Persons with disabilities should have the opportunity to be actively involved in decision-making processes about policies and programmes, including those directly concerning them; and the importance of accessibility to the physical, social, economic and cultural environment, to health and education and to information and communication in enabling persons with disabilities to fully enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms. Further considering the fact that children and women with disabilities are often at greater risk, both within and outside the home, of violence, injury or abuse, neglect, maltreatment or exploitation;

We call on all African Governments to include disability in its diversity as a crosscutting issue in ALL poverty reduction strategies.

Mindful of the above preamble, the signatories to the Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV & AIDS make the following call that:

African Governments shall ensure that:

National AIDS strategic plans recognize persons with disabilities as vulnerable to the impact of HIV and AIDS as well as valuable contributors in the response to HIV/AIDS.

National HIV/AIDS monitoring and evaluation systems and the existing population surveillance systems include disability specific and disaggregated indicators to be used for planning and programming purposes;

The National HIV/AIDS Commissions/Councils include active representation of persons with disabilities;

Information Education Communication (IEC) strategies at all levels ensure provision for IEC which is accessible to persons with intellectual, mental, physical and sensory disabilities;

HIV/AIDS is recognized as a cause of disability.

HIV/AIDS prevention specialists and service providers shall:

Develop targeted prevention messages and methods that are disability-specific, gender-specific, age-specific and adapted to local language and cultural variations;

Equip all HIV/AIDS care and support service centres to provide comprehensive information and confidential counselling to persons with intellectual, mental, physical and sensory disabilities;

Provide equal opportunity to persons with disabilities to train for and engage in counselling and care provision (i.e. Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT), Preventing Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) and adherence counsellors, and home based care providers;

Associations of people living with HIV and AIDS recognise the rights of persons with disabilities living with HIV and AIDS to ‘access for all’ and provide greater involvement of persons with disabilities in the issues that affect them.

African Union AIDS portfolio and Africa AIDS Watch shall:

Ensure that their strategies, programmes and monitoring systems include disability in its diversity as a cross-cutting issue.

UNAIDS and its composite UN agencies—UNHCR, UNICEF, WFP, UNDP, UNFPA, UNODC, ILO, UNESCO, WHO and the World Bank—shall:

Recognise disability in its diversity as a cross-cutting issue in all HIV/AIDS policies, guidelines and programmes;

Ensure that their monitoring mechanisms track the involvement of persons with disabilities as planners, implementers as well as beneficiaries of HIV/AIDS programmes.

Funding Agencies shall:

Ensure that their funding requirements include both disability and HIV/AIDS as cross cutting issues;

Provide all key documents related to funding opportunities in formats that are accessible to persons with different types of disabilities;

Ensure that their monitoring mechanisms track the involvement of persons with disabilities in planning and implementation as well as beneficiaries of recipient programmes;

Independent research agencies and academic institutions shall:

Include disability and HIV/AIDS as a priority area for research;

Include disability issues in protocols for designing research programmes;

Ensure that research methods capture data that is disability-specific, gender-specific, age-specific and adapted to local language and cultural variations;

Ensure that persons with disabilities are included as researchers, not only respondents or subjects.

Disabled People’s Organisations shall:

Seek accreditation for civil society representation at the UNGASS through UNAIDS;

Provide/give input into HIV/AIDS country reports through governments;

Solicit the Civil Society Task Force for the High Level HIV/AIDS Meetings for membership and active participation;

Implement measures for the protection and promotion of the rights, needs, confidentiality and dignity of persons with disabilities living with HIV and AIDS;

Raise awareness among persons with disabilities and build HIV/AIDS into their regular programmes;
Avail human resources/disability experts to support the HIV/AIDS response for disabled and non-disabled people at all level

****************************************************************************
***********************

Chers membres du Comité de Pilotage, Sympathisants et Amis de la Campagne Africaine,

Cela fait tout juste 3 semaines depuis que nous nous sommes retrouvés pour la seconde Assemblée Générale de la Campagne Africaine sur le Handicap et le VIH&SIDA. C’était dans la jolie ville de Kampala, Ouganda du 11 au 13 Avril 2008.

Nous aimerions encore une fois saisir cette opportunité pour exprimer notre gratitude à l’Union Nationale des Personnes Handicapées d’Ouganda, au Gouvernement Ougandais, par le biais du Ministère de Genre, du Travail et du Développement Social pour avoir généreusement abrité cette rencontre. Nos remerciements vont également au Secrétariat de la Décennie, Handicap International et encore une fois au NUDIPU pour son soutien sans
faille lors de cet événement. Et enfin, à tous les membres du Comité National d’Organisation pour leur contribution exceptionnelle et efforts considérables déployés avant et durant la réunion. Cela n’aurait pas été possible sans votre dure labeur et nuit sans sommeil !!!

Nous étions plus de 170 délégués venant de plus de 20 pays Africains et 10 hors du continent. Des représentants de la société civile, du gouvernement, d’Institutions académiques, d’ONG internationales, d’Agences de Financement, des partenaires internationaux travaillant dans le domaine du VIH/SIDA et des médias étaient également présents lors de ce grand
rendez-vous.

L’aboutissement de tous nos efforts comme vous le savez, est la Déclaration de Kampala sur le Handicap et le VIH&SIDA. A cela s’ajoute, les discussions fructueuses notées au sein des groupes, la mise en place de 5 groupes de travail avec des plans d’action sur les objectifs de la Campagne et l’entrée au sein du comité de pilotage de nouveaux membres. (ci-joint le texte intégral de la déclaration en Anglais, Portugais et Français, sera transféré ASAP
La Déclaration appelle les gouvernements, les prestataires de services, l’Union Africaine, les Agences des NU, les Agences de financement, les Institutions Académiques et les Organisations de Personnes Handicapées à entreprendre les actions suivantes :

  • L’accès égal à la prévention et aux services du VIH/SIDA et
  • La pleine participation des personnes handicapées à la réponse au VIH/SIDA dans chaque pays et à tous les niveaux.

Nous vous encourageons ainsi, à faire de cette Déclaration une large diffusion dans votre pays, auprès des personnes handicapées, des gouvernements, des prestataires de services, des Agences des NU, des Agences de Financement, des Institutions Académiques. Saisissez les opportunités que vous avez avec les médias pour relayer cet important message auprès du grand public et le publier sur le site web de votre organisation.

Permettez nous également, de vous présenter le comité de pilotage qui s’est élargit et d’accueillir chaleureusement les 3 nouveaux venus :

  • M. Tambo Camara (Panafricaine des Personnes Handicapées (PAFOD) – Mauritanie;
  • Mme. Farida Gulamo (Association des Mozambicains Handicapés (ADEMO) – Mozambique;
  • M. Martin Babu Mwesigwa (Union Nationale des Personnes Handicapées d’Ouganda (NUDIPU) – Ouganda;
  • Dr. Elly Macha (Union Africaine des Aveugles (AFUB) – Kenya;
  • Mme. Rachel Kachaje (Fédération des Personnes Handicapées d’Afrique Australe (SAFOD) – Malawi;
  • M. Obuya George Onyango (Union Africaine des Sourds (ADU) – Kenya;
  • M. Paul Tezanou (Membre du Conseil D’Administration du Secrétariat de la Décennie) – Cameroun ;
  • L’Honorable Député, Hendrietta Bogopane-Zulu (Parlementaire Sud Africaine; Représentante de la structure exécutive du Conseil National de Lutte contre le Sida) Afrique du Sud) – Afrique du Sud;
  • Mme. Fri Beatrice Bime (Global Fund) – Genève NEW
  • M. Oumar Diop (Handicap FormEduC, Centre de Ressources pour la Promotion des Droits des Personnes Handicapées) – Sénégal NEW
  • M. David O. Anyaele (Centre des Citoyens Handicapés) – Nigéria NEW

Autre changement, le départ du Dr Susan Girois de l’Equipe de Gestion de la Campagne à qui nous disons aurevoir. Elle ne sera plus activement impliquée dans le travail de l’Equipe de Gestion de la Campagne (EGC), cependant son expertise sera toujours mise à contribution. Son expérience, ses conseils and sa spontanéité seront plus souvent sollicités qu’elle ne le pense. Sa participation active nous manquera mais la sachant sur répondeur nous rassure. Dans le même temps, nous aimerions souhaiter la bienvenue au sein de l’ECG à Kevin Henderson, Conseiller Technique en VIH&SIDA à Handicap International et Aïda Sarr Assistante du Programme Régional pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest, Central et du Nord, du Secrétariat de la Décennie Africaine des Personnes Handicapées.

Un rapport détaillé y compris la liste des participants vous sera transmis par email end -Avril. Si vous avez besoin d’une copie sur CD, envoyez nous un email à cette adresse : khenderson@handicap-international.or.ke.

Nous souhaitons que vous nous teniez informer des derniers développements dans vos pays respectifs, régions et districts et nous promettons de les partager avec le reste du monde.

Gouwah Samuels, Kevin Henderson, Aïda Sarr
Equipe de Gestion de la Campagne



We Can Do received the Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV&AIDS via the Intl-Dev listserv on international development.

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Bangkok Event Marks Entry into Force of Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 29 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

United Nations in Bangkok to Mark Entry into Force of Treaty on Disability Rights
Special Event to be Held on Wednesday, 30 April 2008

Bangkok (United Nations Information Services) – A ground-breaking new international treaty, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, will enter into force on 3 May 2008 – one month after it was ratified by the twentieth country.

In Asia and the Pacific, which is home to about 400 million persons with disabilities, Bangladesh, India and the Philippines are the three countries which have already ratified the Convention. Thailand is expected to do so soon.

The Convention is the first ever international treaty on the human rights of persons with disabilities. It was adopted by the UN General Assembly in December 2006, and it aims to ensure that people with disabilities enjoy human rights on an equal basis with others.

To celebrate the Convention’s entry into force, three UN bodies in Bangkok will organize a special event on Wednesday, 30 April 2008, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 a.m., at the United Nations Conference Centre.

It is being jointly organized by the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the International Labour Organization (ILO).

Noeleen Heyzer, UN Under-Secretary-General and ESCAP’s Executive Secretary, will address the event, which will feature a keynote speech by Senator Monthian Buntan of Thailand – who is blind – on the impact of the entry into force of the Convention and the importance of its ratification for countries in the region. Ms. Syeda Saiyidain Hameed, a member of the
Government of India’s Planning Commission, will also speak.

A related photo exhibition, entitled “Decent Work for Persons with Disabilities,” will be on display featuring various prize-winning photographs. The special event will also include a live musical performance by a group from Thailand, “The Network of Music and Arts of Persons with Disabilities.”

About ten per cent of the world’s total population – around 650 million people – are estimated to be living with various forms of disabilities. The percentage is even higher among the world’s poorest people, around 20 per cent of them having some kind of disability. People with disabilities are mostly marginalized and among the poorest of the poor, with limited access to education, employment, housing, transportation and health services. They represent a significant, but generally overlooked, development challenge.

Ensuring equality of rights and access for all persons with disabilities would have a beneficial impact on the social and economic conditions of each country, by enhancing their participation in education, employment, cultural, social and political activities and increasing their consumer power.

The new Convention marks a significant step in this direction. It encourages States to stop viewing persons with disabilities as passive recipients of charity, medical treatment and social protection. Instead, it casts persons with disabilities as active members of society and “subjects” who have rights and are capable of claiming those rights, being also able to make key decisions based on their free and informed consent.

NOTE TO THE MEDIA: Media representatives are cordially invited to attend this special event on Wednesday, 30 April, 2008, at 11:00 a.m. at the Reception Hall, Ground Floor, United Nations Conference Centre, at ESCAP’s headquarters in Bangkok.

***

For further information, please contact:

Ms. Aiko Akiyama
Population and Social Integration Section
Emerging Social Issues Division
ESCAP
Bangkok
Tel: 662-2882315
Mobile: 66-81-8309176
Fax: 662-2881030 or 2881009

or

Mr. Ari Gaitanis
United Nations Information Services
ESCAP
Bangkok
Tel: 662-2881862
Fax: 662-288-1052
Email: unisbkk.unescap@un.org

Aiko Akiyama
Social Affairs Officer
Emerging Social Issues Division (ESID)
UNESCAP
RAJDAMNERN NOK AVENUE,
BANGKOK 10200
THAILAND
Tel: 66-2-288-2315
Fax: 66-2-288-1030
Cellular: 66-81-830-9176
Email akiyama@un.org
http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/disability/index.asp



This announcement was recently circulated on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

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RESOURCE: AIFO, DPI Release Training Manual on Human Rights for Persons with Disabilities

Posted on 4 April 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

In recent months, many new training manuals have been released targeted at those who wish to train themselves or others in the human rights of people with disabilities, with a particular focus on the new international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The latest of these, entitled “The Training Manual on Human Rights for Persons with Disabilities,” (PDF format, 617 Kb) was launched in March by AIFO (Italian Association Amici di Raoul Follereau) and DPI (Disabled Peoples International) Italy in collaboration with the Mongolian National Federation of Organizations of Persons with Disabilities, with financial contributions from the United Nations.

The new training manual, available in both English and Mongolian, is meant to promote the participation of people with disabilities and their families in ratifying and implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). AIFO and DPI also are supervising the translation of the manual into French, Spanish, and Portuguese. (I was unable to find the Mongolian text on-line; if someone knows of a link, please let me know using the comments area below.)

Some of the front material (foreword, introduction, etc.), to my mind at least, is marred by clumsy writing. Either the foreword or the introduction or both should, for example, clarify precisely the intended audience for the training manual. Yes, the description given by Disabled People International states that the manual is meant to help people with disabilities and their families. But are they meant to read the training manual directly? Or is the manual meant to be read by trainers who then use the manual as a guide in training the target audience? From reading the main body of the manual I would guess the latter. But this information is not made immediately clear for the casual reader.

However, The Training Manual on Human Rights for Persons with Disabilities (PDF format, 617 Kb) does have some redeeming content. For example, it begins with a brief history of the United Nations and other international institutions related to disability and human rights. It then reviews why human rights conventions matter and in what ways they can help create change. It provides a history of people with disabilities and explains how the more modern human rights perspective differs from older attitudes. This kind of information provides helpful background content for the reader that can help in understanding the relevance and importance of the CRPD. It then guides the reader through a summary of the 50 articles of the CRPD with suggested teaching points for each. Perhaps the most helpful part of the manual are its extensive appendices, which point readers at a rich collection of documents and web sites on human rights, including disability rights.

Some of the guidance this manual offers for would-be trainers is very broad. For example, one passage says this, “Underline the importance of statistics concerning disability [….] Illustrate the condition of the people with disabilities of the country in various areas related to rights using the available data, publications and reports.” (Section 2.4.1) However, the manual does not–at least in my admittedly superficial review–point readers to resources that could help them locate statistics relevant to their country. Nor does it suggest how trainers might improvise if relevant statistics for their country are either non-existent or of poor quality.

The vagueness of its advice suggests that this training manual may be most helpful to people who are already very knowledgeable about disability and disability rights, including how to locate additional information relevant to the training they wish to provide. It is probably also most helpful to individuals who already have prior experience in independently designing their own lectures and workshop activities with minimal guidance. Because minimal guidance is all it provides.

Would-be trainers who need concretely detailed teaching content, a suggested training schedule, or other structured guidance may be better off consulting some of the other materials that have become available within the past year. (See further below for suggested links.)

The Training Manual on Human Rights for Persons with Disabilities (617 Kb) can be downloaded for free in PDF format at:

http://www.aifo.it/english/resources/online/books/cbr/manual_human_rights-disability-eng07.pdf

Those of you who prefer to draw upon more structured lesson plans, or who have too little time to develop your own handouts or power point programs, may wish to consider linking to one or both of these (click on the relevant title that you want):

Training Manual in Disability Human Rights
Teaching Kit on International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Also consult the guide to

Resources and Toolkits on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)




We Can Do learned about the AIFO/DPI Training Manual on Human Rights for Persons with Disabilities (PDF format, 617 Kb) via the Disabled Peoples International electronic newsletter, which is available for free.

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NEWS: International Coalition Launches Groundbreaking Disability Rights Fund

Posted on 2 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

PRESS RELEASE

International Coalition Launches Groundbreaking Disability Rights Fund
MARCH 31, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Diana Samarasan, Director
Telephone: 617-261-4593
Email: dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org

BOSTON, MA – The Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the United Kingdom Department for International Development, and an anonymous donor today announced a groundbreaking collaborative to support the human rights for people with disabilities.

Launched on the first anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD), the Disability Rights Fund will provide financial support for human rights advocacy in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union. The broad objective of the Fund will be to empower disabled persons organizations around the world to effectively implement and monitor the CPRD. The Fund is a project of Tides.

“The Fund is a unique partnership among donors and the worldwide disability community,” said Emily Martinez, Director of Special Initiatives at the Open Society Institute. “It will directly support the human rights work of disabled persons organizations in the developing world.”

The CRPD recognizes that self-representation is essential to the enjoyment of human rights. It underscores the importance of including people with disabilities in the development of disability law, policies and programs. Through its unique governance structure, the Disability Rights Fund incorporates this principle.

A global advisory panel, made up of 12 individuals, most of whom are persons with disabilities, will provide recommendations on grantmaking strategies for the Fund; four of the Panel members will also serve on the Fund’s grantmaking decision body. The members of the panel come from five continents and reflect a broad cross-section of the disability community. The majority were nominated by international and regional disabled persons organizations.

The structure of the Fund not only reflects the international disability community’s slogan, “Nothing About Us Without Us,” it also reflects a growing trend within the grantmaking community to better listen to the communities they seek to serve and to redefine the relationship between grantmaker and grantee in the interest of more effective grantmaking.

Grants disbursed by the Disability Rights Fund will be centered on three major areas: increasing the participation of persons with disabilities in their communities through trainings and networking opportunities; developing awareness of the CPRD among stakeholders; and supporting advocacy projects that promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights by persons with disabilities. The Fund expects to make its first grants in late spring/early summer 2008.

“The broad, international support for the Disability Rights Fund is a remarkable characteristic of this grantmaking enterprise. It is our hope that this diversity in funding sources will expand as the Fund develops,” said Diana Samarasan, Director of the Fund.

####




Thank you to Diana Samarasan for sending this press release to We Can Do.

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