FUNDING: Small Grants for Deaf Children

Posted on 23 March 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Deaf, Funding, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

GLOBAL: Small grants programme for deaf children

Since 2002, Deaf Child Worldwide has supported organisations working to help deaf children overcome the barriers that contribute to their poverty and isolation.

Round 8 of Deaf Child Worldwide’s Small Grants Programme (SGP) opens on 19 March 2009 and ends 30 May 2009.

The SGP supports projects which show clear, measurable and sustainable improvements to the lives of deaf children and their families in developing countries.

Deaf Child Worldwide fund projects of up to three years and for a maximum amount of £30,000 (£10,000 per year). Visit the website for information on the SGP and the application process.

Successful projects must meet one or more of Deaf Child Worldwide’s strategic aims. Applicants must consider our cross-cutting themes in the development of their proposal.

Deaf Child Worldwide is focusing its activities in East Africa (Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania), South Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka) and Latin America (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru). You must be based in one of these countries to apply to SGP.

Applications are only accepted in ‘concept note’ format in English or Spanish. The deadline for submission of concept notes to Deaf Child Worldwide is 30 May 2009. Selected projects will start in January 2010.

The following documents can be downloaded from the Deaf Child Worldwide website:

* Background information leaflet containing details of the full eligibility criteria
* Guidance on applying
* Concept note format

Visit: www.deafchildworldwide.info

More details on the Small Grant Programme at http://www.deafchildworldwide.info/where_we_work/small_grants_programme/index.html

More details on how to apply at http://www.deafchildworldwide.info/where_we_work/small_grants_programme/how_to_apply/index.html

Missed the May 30, 2009, deadline? Deaf Child Worldwide offers similar grants on a periodic basis, though not always in the same countries. Consult their web site at www.deafchildworldwide.info to learn of future opportunities like this one.



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development mailing list. Please consult the Deaf Child Worldwide website directly, NOT We Can Do, for more detail on this funding opportunity, including more thorough instructions on how to apply.

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JOB POST: Project Manager: Making HIV-AIDS Strategies Inclusive, Tanzania

Posted on 6 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

CCBRT is Seeking to Employ a Project Manager for a PEPFAR funded Project

“Making HIV/Aids Strategies Inclusive for People with Disabilities”

Application Deadline February 21, 2009

*Introduction*
Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation Tanzania (CCBRT) is a locally registered Non Governmental Organization (NGO) first established in 1994. It is the largest indigenous provider of disability rehabilitation services in the country. CCBRT aim is to improve the quality of life of people living with disabilities as well as their families and to enable them to claim and use their legitimate human rights.

*Objective*
The PEPFAR project is aimed to considerably increase access for people with disabilities and their care givers to appropriate HIV/AIDS prevention, care, treatment and support services in Tanzania. The project is funded by PEPFAR for the duration of 3 years beginning 2009. CCBRT will coordinate the project in collaboration with the Government of Tanzania, civil society and other stakeholders.

* *

*The Project Manager will have the following responsibilities*

· Setting up, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project.

· Recruitment of part time HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinators in consultation with the Community Program Director.

· Setting up of the National Platform in consultation with governmental, non-governmental and international stakeholders.

· Selection of target districts and partners in consultation with TACAIDS and NACP.

· Coordination and monitoring of the development of minimum guidelines (VCT, care and treatment), development and distribution of various Information Education and Communication (IEC) materials, and respective training manuals.

· Initiation, coordination and evaluation of trainings in collaboration with technical experts and target organizations.

· Further development of IEC, training materials and programs after lessons learnt in collaboration with technical experts.

· Establishment of follow up mechanisms to support trained experts.

· Establishment of collaborations and referral mechanisms between district authorities, disability and HIV/AIDS organizations.

· Provision and coordination of technical / advisory support to partners.

· Assessment and approval of small project proposals for infrastructure adjustments and campaigns in collaboration with CBM US and a representative of the National Platform.

· Development of public awareness programs on disability, equal right and HIV/AIDS.

· Generation of lessons learnt and continuous integration during the project implementation.

· Development of a reader on making HIV/Aids strategies inclusive in collaboration with technical experts.

· Development of annual work plans and setting of annual targets.

· Compilation of narrative / financial reports in collaboration with the CCBRT Finance Manager.

· Coordination and support of the work of the CCBRT Health, HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinator and three HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinators.

*Experience*
The project manager should have

· a minimum of 5 years working experience in HIV/AIDS

· In depth knowledge about HIV/AIDS strategy framework in Tanzania including HSHSP, NGPRS, NMSF as well as HIV/AIDS related working structures and relevant stakeholders in Tanzania.

· Experience in guideline and training programme development

· Proven working experience with vulnerable groups, preferably persons with disabilities

· Good analytic, report writing and presentation skills

· Experience in coordinating and managing larger teams

· Strong written and oral communication ability, both Kiswahili and English

CCBRT will offer an attractive salary package.

The Project manager is expected to start working latest 16th March 2009.

*How to apply*
If you believe you are the ideal candidate with the necessary background, please submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae detailing your experience, supportive documents as well as contact details of three referees to info@ccbrt.or.tz or by post to

CCBRT Executive Director/ P.O Box 23310, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Tel: +255 (0) 22 260 1543 / +255 (0) 22 260 2192 Fax: +255 (0) 22 2601544

Email: info@ccbrt.or.tz Website: http://www.ccbrt.or.tz

*People with disability are highly encouraged to apply.*

*Closing date for applications: 21st Feb* (only short listed candidates will be contacted)



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SCHOLARSHIP for Tanzanian Students at University of Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted on 31 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Inclusion, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The University in Edinburgh, Scotland, is offering a scholarship for Tanzanian students for the 2009-2010 academic year. Students need to be enrolled at the Masters level. The application deadline is April 1, 2009.

The Julius Nyerere Master’s Scholarship will cover the full overseas tuition fee, living costs of £10,000, and a return flight from Tanzania to the UK. Details are available at http://www.scholarships.ed.ac.uk/postgraduate/internat/nyerere.htm

You can find details of Masters level education courses at http://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/postgraduate/finder/subjectarea.php?taught=Y&sid=14
Some examples include a program in deaf education; a program in inclusive and special education; a program in working with learners with visual impairments; a program in working with learners with specific learning difficulties; and many more.

Please send any queries direct to scholarships@ed.ac.uk



I learned about this scholarship opportunity via the EENET_Eastern_Africa email discussion group. This mailing list, which focuses on inclusive education in Eastern Africa, can be subscribed to for free.

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JOB POST: Coordinator, Regional Diabetes Project, East Africa, Handicap International

Posted on 25 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Health, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Handicap International is seeking a Coordinator for its Regional Diabetes Projecct. The application deadline for this job post is November 30, 2008.

Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit-making, we work alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, in response to humanitarian crises and the effects of extreme poverty. We implement programmes of assistance to individual people and to local organisations, as well as inclusion programmes and programmes focusing on the fight against the main causes of disability. We run projects in almost 60 countries, with the support of a network of 8 national associations ( Germany, Belgium, Canada, United-States, Luxembourg, United Kingdom and Switzerland) Handicap International employs almost 3300 people worldwide, with 330 staff in France and our European and North American sections. For more information on our organisation : http://www.handicap-international.fr/

WORK CONTEXT
The project’s activities will be concentrated in the rural communities where Handicap International has long-standing relations with the health authorities and other local partners. The project will work alongside the international community and the International Diabetes Federation, as well as with existing regional groups and organisations with expertise in the field of diabetes. The project’s initial objective is to strengthen the health system in order to make primary and secondary health care accessible to the rural population, and to diabetics in particular, and find ways of overcoming the main obstacles to access to health services. Local, national and international awareness-raising campaigns will be used to inform the population about the disease, the risks and means of prevention. The project will aim to demonstrate that the integrated management of diabetes (prevention, care and rehabilitation) should be a priority at both local and regional level. A network will be developed to help ensure the effective coordination of actions implemented locally.
Support to awareness-raising activities will contribute towards :

JOB DESCRIPTION
Challenges and objectives :
The project coordinator will work with a regional team in Burundi, Kenya and Tanzania. He/she will be line-managed by the East Africa Desk Officer. In Burundi and Kenya, the project teams, managed by a national project manager, will work with previously identified local partners. In Tanzania, the project will be directly implemented by our local partner, the Tanzania Diabetes Association. The regional coordinator will therefore closely monitor this partner’s activities and financial reporting.

The geographical scope and wide diversity of human resources involved in the implementation of activities is a new and fundamental aspect of this project and confers a high level of responsibility on the regional coordinator.

Missions and responsibilities :
With regard to the regional dimension of the project, the coordinator is responsible for implementing various activities that will have a regional impact, whilst ensuring the project’s overall coherency.

In each target country, he/she will work closely with the field programme director and national project teams, and with our partner in Tanzania, to establish the planning and monitoring of activities at national level. He/she is also responsible for the operational and financial decisions essential for moving activities forward in a coherent manner and in line with the project’s overall objectives.

He/she is specifically responsible for :
y Implementing policy on information, communication, knowledge-management and lesson-learning in the areas developed by the project. This is a fundamental aspect of the project. He/she will therefore be expected to ensure that work carried out in the different target countries becomes part of a global reflection and that information and knowledge is exchanged between the three countries concerned (e.g. via networking, mobilisation of expertise).
y Relations with partner institutions and stakeholders at regional level y Seeking co-financing in liaison with Desk Officers and Field Programme Directors (relations with regional funding agencies). y Ensuring the implementation of specific training for the national teams as outlined in the project document. y Follow up of capacity-building activities carried out with the diabetes-control associations and of the staff involved in the project. y Support and advice to national teams on diabetes and the methodology specific to the project’s implementation, in consultation with the technical advisers concerned.
y Writing narrative and financial reports and introducing financial and control mechanisms + relations with the EU (in particular the delegation in Nairobi), in liaison with the Desk Officer and Field Programme Director for Kenya.

PROFILE SOUGHT : Essential :
A minimum of four years’ experience of management-coordination and/or support to health projects in a developing country, preferably in Africa.
At least three years’ positive experience of managing senior-level teams and of working in partnership with local associations.
General knowledge of the prevention and global care-management of disabling diseases
Competence in the field of managing and planning multi-country projects
Pedagogical skills ( training experience would be an advantage).
Writing skills (reports, capitalisation documents, research)
Communication skills (ability to listen and express oneself clearly and concisely)
Adaptability and diplomacy
Computer literacy

Additional :
General knowledge of disability issues (Handicap Creation Process, UN convention …)
Qualifications :
Diploma in health or social sciences, with additional training in public health.

WORKING LANGUAGES : French / English compulsory
SPECIFICITIES OF THE POST : The need for regular monitoring missions in the three target countries mean frequent travelling. Education, health and leisure facilities are all available in Nairobi, but the city’s crime rate is high.

CONDITIONS : Depending on experience
Volunteer status : Expatriation allowance of €750 to €850 a month + local allowance + accommodation + 100% health cover and medical repatriation insurance. For more information click here. Salaried status : €2200 to €2500 gross salary according to experience + expatriation allowance of €457 + 100% health cover and medical repatriation insurance + “family policy”. For more information click here.
Please send a CV and covering letter quoting the reference given above.

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL -14, avenue Berthelot -69361 LYON CEDEX 07 Or by Email : recrut11@handicap-international.org
Please do not telephone
Candidates from Canada or the United States and nationals of these countries should send their application to the following address :

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL CANADA 1819 Boulevard René Lévesque, bureau 401 -MONTRÉAL, QUÉBEC -H3H 2P5 Or by email : jobs@handicap-international.ca or fax : 514-937-6685
Please do not telephone



I received this announcement via the <a href=”http://www.gpdd-online.org/mailinglistGlobal Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list.

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NEWS: Tanzanians with Albinism Regularly Murdered

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Blind, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , |

In some countries, it is believed that people with albinism have magical powers. This can sometimes lead to the murder of people with albinism so that their body parts can be sold to witch doctors for use in their potions.

Albinism is a condition that causes lack of pigmentation (coloration) in the hair, skin, and eyes; most people with albinism have some degree of vision impairment, and many are legally blind.

Read more about a series of murders committed against people with albinism in Tanzania–and what is being done to stop them–at http://www.underthesamesun.com/home.php

People may sign a petition protesting these murders at http://tinyurl.com/4wk5za



I learned about this story, and the petition, via the Disabled Peoples’ International email newsletter.

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RESOURCE: Young People Share Views on Inclusive Education

Posted on 24 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Reports, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

A new publication is available from the Enabling Education Network (EENET). It is called “Young Voices: Young people’s views of inclusive education” (PDF format, 905 Kb).
 
This easy-to-read A5 booklet contains photographs and drawings taken by disabled and non-disabled students in Uganda and Tanzania, along with quotes from them about what they think makes a school inclusive. The booklet also summarizes some of the important ideas raised by the students. For example, it points out that many children say that the attitudes of teachers and the encouragement of parents are important to helping them feel included.
 
The booklet was published/funded by the Atlas Allliance (Norway), with the participatory work and book production being handled by EENET.
 
A Kiswahili version and a Braille version will be available before the end of 2008. There is also a short DVD (approx 15 minutes) which accompanies the booklet. Copies will be available from EENET in mid-September.
 
EENET hopes that this booklet/DVD will be useful for advocacy and awareness raising around both inclusive education and the importance of listening to children’s opinions. Please in future send EENET any feedback you have about the booklet/DVD, or how you have used it.
 
The booklet can be downloaded from the EENET website in PDF format (905 Kb):

http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Young%20Voices.pdf

People who need a print copy or the accompanying DVD mailed to them can contact EENET directly and give them their mailing address. People who will want the Braille version or the Kiswahili version when they become available also should contact EENET directly. People may either email info@eenet.org.uk or ingridlewis@eenet.org.uk



This announcement is modified from the text of an email circulated by Ingrid Lewis at EENET on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. EENET Eastern Africa discussions focuses on issues related to inclusive education in the Eastern Africa region and can be joined for free.

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Three JOB POSTS with Hellen Keller International

Posted on 16 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Health, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , |

Three Positions with Helen Keller International
Three separate job positions are described below, all with the organization Helen Keller International; two are in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; the third is in New York City, USA. Please apply directly with Helen Keller International, NOT We Can Do.

Tanzania Senior Nutrition Coordinator/Africa Regional VAS M/E Advisor
Country Director, Tanzania
Director, Human Resources, New York City

Tanzania Senior Nutrition Coordinator/Africa Regional VAS M/E Advisor
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Helen Keller International (HKI) is a non-governmental organization whose mission is to save the sight and lives of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged by combating the causes and consequences of blindness and malnutrition. We do this by establishing programs based on evidence and research in vision, health and nutrition. HKI invites applications for
the position of Tanzania Senior Nutrition Coordinator/Africa Regional Vitamin A Supplementation (VAS) Monitoring and Evaluation (M/E) Advisor, based in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

Scope of Position: Tanzania Senior Nutrition Coordinator
responsibilities include: Ensure effective project planning, management and implementation by the HKI Tanzania Nutrition Team to achieve the objectives agreed to
in grants and contracts for HKI Tanzania’s nutrition and child survival projects. Provide technical expertise to the HKI Tanzania program and collaborating partners in nutrition, behavior change communication (BCC), training, facilitation and curriculum development. Serve as lead liaison with government officials, international and non-governmental organizations, technical advisory groups and other in nutrition and child survival.

Lead the development of all materials/tools for BCC, training, budgeting/planning and for any other requirements. Design and oversee training and capacity development workshops for nutrition and child survival within HKI and at the district, regional and national level. Develop concept papers, proposals and donor reports and document HKI’s experiences in nutrition and child survival.

Africa Regional VAS M/E Advisor responsibilities include: Provide technical support and leadership to Africa country offices implementing VAS programs in collaboration with the regional and deputy regional directors and Headquarters program staff. Ensure all aspects of VAS program planning, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation are in line with grant requirements. Particular focus will be on monitoring and evaluation to inform country programs’ moving to goal of universal coverage. Ensure that the quality, impact, scale and cost-effectiveness of HKI’s VAS programs meet standards. Take lead on consolidating country reporting into regional reports to donors and for internal audiences. Represent HKI at relevant
regional and international meetings. Maintain and further the Agency’s international role in VAS by assisting country offices to document and publish/present relevant programmatic findings and lessons learned.

REQUIREMENTS: Doctoral degree in the field of nutrition or public health
and at least 7 years related experience, including strong quantitative analytic skills, ideally including development and management of nutrition programs, especially those related to micronutrients. Strong technical knowledge of nutrition programs in the developing world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa including demonstrated ability to track and disseminate new developments in the field. Outstanding analytic skills. Two years of work experience in the areas of training, curriculum and BCC materials development. Outstanding oral and written communication skills in English; Kiswahili an advantage.

Proven ability to lead, conceptualize, develop, plan and manage programs.

Proven ability to supervise, impart knowledge, facilitate and train.

Computer literate in use of statistical software, spreadsheets and word-processing. Experience in publishing papers and writing for scientific journals. Ability to undertake regional and local travel (approximately 25-40%). Terms of Employment: Two-year contract renewable upon mutual agreement.

How to Apply: Interested candidates should submit: (1) cover letter; (2) current curriculum vitae in English; (3) a short writing sample (2-3 pages) in English, to Ms. Dora Panagides (Deputy Regional Director, East Central and Southern Africa) dpanagides@hki.org, with a copy to Human Resources
at hkihr@hki.org. Please note “TzNutr” in the subject line. Closing Date: Open until filled. Information about HKI is available at www.hki.org.

*******************************

Country Director
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Helen Keller International (HKI) is an international non-governmental organization. Its’ mission is to save the sight and lives of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged by combating the causes and consequences of blindness and malnutrition. We do this by establishing programs based on
evidence and research in vision, health and nutrition. HKI is seeking a Country Director in Tanzania to represent the Agency and be responsible for all HKI/Tanzania programs. Tanzania is a flagship program for HKI in Africa.

Our current programs focus on nutrition and blindness prevention. In the area of nutrition, HKI works in partnership with the Tanzania Food and Nutrition Council and the National Development Partners Group on Nutrition to strengthen the national vitamin A supplementation program and is a key partner in other micronutrient interventions such as advocating for the use of zinc in the treatment of diarrhea. This effort is supported through A2Z: The USAID Micronutrient and Child Blindness Project. In the area of blindness prevention, HKI works with primary schools in 15 districts to prevent trachoma through school health education, and currently works in 5
districts to reduce the backlog of trichiasis cases. In collaboration with the National Eye Care Program and the Kilimanjaro Centre for Community Ophthalmology, HKI is also implementing vision 2020 programs in the Singida region.

Scope of the Position: The Country Director (CD) is responsible for overseeing the implementation of HKI/Tanzania programs and management of project personnel to achieve the objectives agreed to in grants and contracts. The CD is responsible for generating funding from
international and bilateral agencies, corporations, and individuals to continue and
expand project activities in Tanzania. He/she is responsible for implementing strategic plans to further the overall mission and specific programs of HKI that meet the evolving needs and conditions in Tanzania. The CD is responsible for overall program design and proposal development; program implementation; reporting; and grant management, fiscal planning, and
human resource planning. The CD represents HKI in formal and informal meetings with Tanzanian government officials, international donor agencies, and national technical advisory groups pertinent to HKI project activities.

This position is based in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The CD reports to the Deputy Regional Director for East, Central and Southern Africa and closely collaborates with the HKI Africa Regional Office and Headquarters operations and program staff.

REQUIREMENTS: Minimum of a Masters Degree in public health, nutrition, development, management or related field, with strong preference given to doctoral level degree. Five (5) years demonstrated experience in program development, implementation and evaluation, including strong background in nutrition programs. Demonstrated capacity to mobilize program funding including donor cultivation and grants writing. Demonstrated ability to manage staff and other administrative and financial activities in developing country programs. Experience in managing USAID projects and familiarity with USAID policies and regulations. Experience in data analysis and interpretation is highly desirable. Excellent oral and written English language skills, including the ability to quickly synthesize complex technical and programmatic issues into concise communications. Demonstrated ability to undertake high-level representation and advocacy

To Apply: The initial contract is for two (2) years with possibility of renewal depending on funding. Interested candidates should submit: (1) cover letter; (2) current curriculum vitae in English; (3) a short writing sample (2-3 pages) in English, to Ms. Dora Panagides (Deputy Regional Director, East Central and Southern Africa) dpanagides@hki.org, with a copy to
Human Resources at hkihr@hki.org. Please note CD TANZANIA in the header. All correspondence should include physical and e-mail addresses as well as contact telephone number(s). E-mail applications are preferred.

Information about HKI is available at www.hki.org.

*******************************

Director, Human Resources
New York City

Helen Keller International (HKI) is a 92-year old international non-governmental organization whose mission is to save the sight and lives of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged by combating the causes and consequences of blindness and malnutrition. We do this by establishing programs based on evidence and research in vision, health and nutrition. Helen Keller International has approximately 550 staff located in offices in 19 countries and 7 states and the District of Columbia in the United States, with headquarters in New York City. HKI has created an exciting new position – Director, Human Resources – at its Headquarters office. In
collaboration with the Vice President, Human Resources, the Director will integrate Human Resources with HKI’s strategic plan and operational goals. The Director will oversee the daily operations of the program and be responsible for reviewing, maintaining and enhancing systems including implementing and overseeing policies and programs covering employment and performance management, compensation, benefits, training, employee relations, and legal
compliance. For a more detailed position description, please refer to the HKI website. Key challenges include the: Implementation of a new global HRIS system. Revision and updating of human resources policies, procedures and systems. Comprehensive global compensation and benefits analysis and subsequent program design and implementation

REQUIREMENTS: The Director will have a Bachelors Degree with 5-10 years of
broad generalist international nonprofit experience in a multi-location environment. A PHR/SPHR certification or a Masters Degree is highly desirable. Additionally, exceptional managerial skills, the ability to lead by example, and a demonstrated ability to think strategically, tactically
and creatively is a must. Competence in Human Resources Information Systems (HRIS) and strong computing skills are required.

To apply: Qualified candidates should send a cover letter including current salary and salary requirements and resume to hkihr@hki.org noting “Director,
HR” in the subject heading. Only qualified candidates will be contacted.

Information about HKI is available at www.hki.org.



These job announcements were recently circulated on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development email discussion list.

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4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress Report Available Online

Posted on 14 May 2008. Filed under: Assistive Devices, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Reports, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

In low-income countries, the overwhelming majority people who need wheelchairs don’t have one. This has a profound impact on their ability to lead independent lives–or even leave their own homes. Participants in a recent conference in Africa exchanged ideas and knowledge on how to address this challenge.

The 4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress Report (PDF format, 446 Kb) can now be downloaded for free on-line. The report summarizes a series of remarks, panel discussions, and other conference sessions on how to promote appropriate wheelchair services across the African continent. The report also presents a list of resolutions made on the last day of the Congress. The 4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress was held in September 2007 in Tanzania.

The Pan Africa Wheelchair Builders Association (PAWBA) and the Tanzanian Training Centre for Orthopaedic Technologists (TATCOT) facilitated the congress. Co-funders included the World Health Organisation, ABILIS, Motivation Africa, Christoffel Blindenmission (CBM), and SINTEF. The 116 participating members came from Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Angola, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Namibia, South Africa, UK, Norway and USA.

The previous three All Africa Wheelchair Congresses were held in Zambia (2003); Kenya (1998); and Zimbabwe (1995). Each congress was a landmark in developing appropriate and affordable wheelchair products and services in Africa in allowing participants to exchange knowledge across the continent. PAWBA was formed at the 2003 Congress.

You can download the full, 47-page 4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress report in PDF format (446 Kb) at:

http://www.independentliving.org/docs7/pawba-tatcot200709.pdf



We Can Do learned about this report by browsing the AskSource.info database on health, disability, and development. I gathered further detail by skimming the report itself.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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RESOURCE: On-Line Handbook Supports Disabled People in Fighting Poverty

Posted on 8 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Inclusion, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following press release about a helpful resource for people who fight poverty among people with disabilities in developing countries is being circulated by Handicap International, Christian Blind Mission, and GTZ.

Press release – 07 April 2008

In 1999, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) introduced the concept of Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSP). One of its basic ideas is that highly indebted poor countries develop comprehensive strategies how to reduce poverty within the country. Civil society should participate in the formulation, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of the poverty reduction strategy (PRS).

Poverty is a cause and a consequence of disability. Although this is evident, people with disabilities had to realise that PRSPs and the proposed measures did not regard their needs and interests so far. In addition, people with disabilities and their organisations rarely have the possibility to participate in the formulation and implementation of PRSPs.

On behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Handicap International, the Christoffel-Blindenmission (CBM) and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH (German Technical Cooperation) implement pilot projects in Cambodia, Tanzania and Vietnam to address the shortcomings of the PRS processes. These projects are based on the handbook “Making PRSP Inclusive”, published by Handicap International and CBM in 2006, initiated by the World Bank and financed by a German Trust Fund (with financial support of the German government). New experiences made in the projects in 2007 contributed to the revision and update of the handbook.

The key experiences from the projects show that capacity development and networking of local organisations of and for persons with disabilities are crucial for the inclusion of disability in PRS processes. For this reason “Making PRSP Inclusive” introduces subjects around disability and PRSP and at the same time includes basic techniques like project management and lobbying. The handbook also offers a toolbox with participatory methods for the implementation of workshops and projects. In addition it presents case studies from Honduras, Bangladesh, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Vietnam and Cambodia.

The updated version is available as online-handbook at www.making-prsp-inclusive.org. The medium internet offers the opportunity for continuous updating. The website has an accessible design for persons with visual impairments. The handbook is currently available in English; the French translation will be published in a few months.

The organisations:
Handicap International is an international charity working in 60 countries worldwide in the fields of rehabilitation, inclusion of disabled people and in disability prevention. Handicap International stands up for the rights of people with disabilities and is also engaged in the framework of the UN Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities.

Christoffel-Blindenmission (CBM) is an independent, interdenominational Christian relief organization committed to help people with disabilities to live as independently as possible – in more than 1,000 projects in developing countries. Medical help, rehabilitation and integration into society are the main goals, for instance through the support of eye hospitals or hospitals with eye departments, schools for blind persons and special programmes for hearing impaired and physically disabled people.

As an international cooperation enterprise for sustainable development with worldwide operations, the federally owned Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH supports the German Government in achieving its development-policy objectives. It provides viable, forward-looking solutions for political, economic, ecological and social development in a globalised world. Often working under difficult conditions, GTZ promotes complex reforms and change processes. Its corporate objective is to improve people’s living conditions on a sustainable basis.

The three organisations are members of the World Bank imitative “Global Partnership for Disability and Development” (GPDD).

Information:
Ursula Miller, Handicap International, +49 8954 76 06 23, umiller@handicap-international.de
Andreas Pruisken, Christoffel-Blindenmission, +49 6251131 307, andreas.pruisken@cbm.org
Andreas Gude, GTZ, +49 6 196 79 1517, andreas.gude@gtz,de
Dorothea Rischewski, GTZ, +49 6 196 791263, dorothea.rischewski@gtz.de

Handicap International e.V.
Ganghoferstr. 19
80339 München
GERMANY
Tel.: +49 89 54 76 06 0
Fax: +49 89 54 76 06 20
www.handicap-international.de

Christoffel-Blindenmission Deutschland e.V.
Nibelungenstraße 124
64625 Bensheim
GERMANY
Tel.: +49 6251 131-0
Fax: + 49 6251 131-199
www.christoffel-blindenmission.de

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH
Dag-Hammarskjöld-Weg 1-5
65760 Eschborn
GERMANY
Tel.: +49 6196 79-0
Fax: +49 6196 79-1115
www.gtz.de



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FUNDING: Small Grants for Projects for Deaf Children

Posted on 20 March 2008. Filed under: Children, Deaf, Funding, Health, HIV/AIDS, Latin America & Caribbean, Poverty, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[En español más abajo.]

The following email is being circulated by the UK-based international organization Deaf Child Worldwide (formerly known as International Deaf Child Society):

Dear colleagues,

If are in touch with local organisations that want to start new work with deaf children, then please forward the information below about the latest round of the Deaf Child Worldwide Small Grants Programme.

Thank you so much for your help with this.

English
Round 7 of Deaf Child Worldwide’s Small Grants Programme is now open. The deadline for completed concept notes is 30 May 2008.

The Small Grants Programme (SGP), aims to have an impact on the lives of deaf children, their families, service providers and policy makers by establishing quality partnerships with local organisations based in our priority countries within East Africa, South Asia or Latin America. We fund one to three year projects of up to £10,000 per year.

Go to www.deafchildworldwide.info/sgp for more information about how to apply.

If you applied to SGP in the past, then please note that in 2007, we carried out a strategic review and an evaluation of SGP. We have made some significant changes to the programme. These include:

  • Smaller geographic focus. Now only organisations based in East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda), South Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka), and Andean region of Latin America (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru) can apply.
  • New strategic focus areas. We are only looking for projects which work towards these key areas.
  • Cross-cutting themes. All projects must consider poverty, gender, the social model of disability and sexual health and HIV/AIDS.
  • Longer projects. You can now apply for projects that are from one to three years long.

Please e-mail info@deafchildworldwide.org if you have any questions or would like to discuss your project idea.

Español
Se ha abierto la Ronda 7 del Programa de Pequeñas Subvenciones de Deaf Child Worldwide. El plazo final para la presentación de las notas conceptuales es el 30 de mayo del 2008.

El Programa de Pequeñas Subvenciones (PPS) busca tener un impacto en la vida de niños sordos, sus familias, proveedores de servicios y formuladores de política estableciendo para ello asociaciones de calidad con organizaciones locales con sede en nuestros países prioritarios en África Oriental, Asia del Sur o América Latina. Financiamos proyectos de uno a tres años de hasta £10,000 anuales.

Visiten www.deafchildworldwide.info/pps para mayor información sobre cómo postular.

Si ustedes postularon al PPS en el pasado, entonces tomen en cuenta que en el 2007 llevamos a cabo una revisión estratégica y una evaluación del PPS. Hemos hecho algunos cambios significativos al programa. Éstos son:

  • Foco geográfico más pequeño. Ahora sólo organizaciones con sede en África Oriental (Kenya, Tanzania y Uganda), Asia del Sur (Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistán y Sri Lanka) y la región andina de América Latina (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador y Perú) pueden postular.
  • Nuevos ejes estratégicos. Estamos examinando sólo proyectos que trabajen en pro de estos ejes clave.
  • Temas transversales. Todos los proyectos deben considerar pobreza, género, el modelo social de la discapacidad y salud sexual y VIH/sida.
  • Proyectos más largos. Ahora ustedes pueden postular con proyectos que tengan de uno a tres años de duración.

Si tienen alguna pregunta escríbannos a info@deafchildworldwide.org. Trataremos de responder lo más pronto posible, aunque recién podremos responder a indagaciones en español después del 7 de abril del 2008.

Sírvanse reenviar este email a organizaciones o colegas que ustedes consideren estarían interesados en esta oportunidad.

Best wishes,

Kirsty

KIRSTY WILSON
Programmes Manager
Deaf Child Worldwide
www.deafchildworldwide.org

Deaf Child Worldwide is the only UK based international development agency dedicated to enabling deaf children to overcome poverty and isolation. We are the international development agency of The National Deaf Children’s Society in the UK. Registered Charity No 1016532.

Join our network – receive regular updates and share your experiences about work with deaf children and their families. Contact info@deafchildworldwide.org or add your details at www.deafchildworldwide.info/joinournetwork



We Can Do thanks Kirsty Wilson at Deaf Child Worldwide for passing along this announcement.

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MEMORANDUM, Commonwealth Disabled People’s Conference 2007

Posted on 22 November 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Commonwealth Nations, Events and Conferences, Guest Blogger, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Commonwealth Disabled People’s Conference met in early November in Kampala, Uganda. The following memorandum was issued at that conference.


Dear Colleagues,

It’s my pleasure to forward to you a memorandum of decisions made at the recently concluded Commonwealth Disabled peoples’ Conference. Attached to this memorandum is a shorter memorandum which was prepared specifically for sending to CHOGM (Commonwealth Heads of Governments Meeting).

I hope these documents will enable those who are in a position to lobby their respective delegations to CHOGM to raise disability issues during the meeting.

Yours Sincerely,

James Mwandha.


Draft

MEMORANDUM OF THE COMMONWEALTH DISABLED PEOPLES’ CONFERENCE CONVENED IN KAMPALA FROM 4TH – 7TH NOVEMBER 2007

Preamble

The Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Conference convened in Kampala, Uganda from the 4th -7th November 2007;

NOTING with appreciation the theme of this year’s CHOGM, ‘Transforming Commonwealth Societies to achieve political, economic and human development.’

AWARE that Persons with disabilities are among the poorest of the poor and the most socially excluded,

RECOGNISING the diversity of Persons with Disabilities,

EMPHASISING the importance of mainstreaming disability issues as an integral part of relevant strategies of sustainable development,

NOTING the adoption by the 61st UN General Assembly of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

APPRECIATING that India and Jamaica have already ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

RECOGNISING the importance of International cooperation for improving the living conditions of persons with disabilities in every country particularly in developing countries,

The Conference hereby resolves as follows:

1.0 APPRECIATION

1. Appreciates the Government of Uganda for hosting the Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Conference and in particular the support given by Honourable Sayda Bbumba, Minister of, Gender, Labour and Social Development and Honourable Sulaiman Madada, Minister of State for Disability and Elderly Affairs.

2. Thanks to the Right Honourable Rebecca Kadaga, Deputy Speaker of Uganda’s Parliament for officiating at the opening of the Conference and Honourable Okello Oryem, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs in charge of International Relations for performing the closing ceremony and offering to submit the conference memorandum to the Ugandan Head of State.

3. Commends the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of the UK Government for sending a representative to the conference as an observer.

4. Commends further the Uganda disability movement for the initiative taken to hold this first ever conference of Disabled People in the Commonwealth and the excellent arrangements and the hospitality accorded to the delegates.

5. Appreciates the resource persons for the excellent presentations made at the Conference and at the side events.

6. Notes with appreciation the countries that sent delegates to the conference namely: Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, United Kingdom, Zambia, and observers from Rwanda and Sudan.

7. Recognises the participation of the President of the World Blind Union, the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities, the East African Federation of the Disabled, the representative of the President of the World Federation of the Deaf, representatives of Leonard Cheshire Foundation International, and the office of the UN Commissioner for Human Rights.

2.0 CONFERENCE RESOLUTIONS TO CHOGM

8. Submits a short memorandum, appearing as annexture 1 to this memorandum, to CHOGM through the Uganda Minister of State for International Relations.

9. Circulates the short memorandum to as many disabled people and their organisations in the Commonwealth as possible and call upon them to use it to lobby their respective delegations to advocate for disability issues in CHOGM.

3.0 COMMONWEALTH DISABLED PEOPLES’ FORUM

10. Establishes the Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum with Disabled Peoples’ Organisations (DPOs) in the Commonwealth constituting its membership.

11. A steering committee consisting of Honourable James Mwandha (Uganda) Chair, Mr. Mark Harrison (UK), Mr. Thomas On’golo, Secretariat of the African Decade of Disabled Persons (South Africa), a representative from Canada and a representative from India.

12. The steering committee to draw up their terms of reference for the establishment of the forum and convene a forum meeting within a period of ten months.

13. The steering committee to dialogue with the Commonwealth Secretariat and register the forum with the Commonwealth Foundation.

4.0 EQUALITY AND NON-DISCRIMINATION

14. Recommends that data collection at all levels should include disaggregated data concerning disability to enable Governments to plan effectively for the inclusion of disabled people.

15. Calls upon all governments to pass laws that promote equality and inclusion of disabled people in society and do away with laws that perpetuate discrimination and exclusion.

16. Appeals to Governments and donors to resource DPOs to publicize the convention, sensitize the general public and help to implement the Convention.

5.0 ROLE OF GOVERNMENTS, DISABLED PEOPLES’ ORGANISATIONS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION AND MONITORING OF THE CONVENTION

A. Governments.

17. Sign and ratify the Convention and enact laws to domesticate the convention and amend all laws, which negatively impact on disabled people.

18. Translate the Convention document into the local languages and Sign Language to facilitate wider understanding of the rights of disabled people.

19. Put in place programmes that create greater awareness in communities and within government systems relating to disability rights, and promote efforts that encourage positive attitudes towards disabled people.

20. Mainstream disability in social, economic and political programmes and provide for representation of disabled people in the Parliaments, Local Councils and Statutory organizations.

21. Provide access to rehabilitation, education, training, employment opportunities, cultural and sports activities, technical aids, Sign Language Interpretation Services and other assistive devices to facilitate mobility and independent daily living of disabled people.

22. Develop special programmes to cater for the special needs of women, children and the elderly with disabilities.

23. Strengthen DPOs and support creation of new ones, and promote representation of disabled people at local, national and international levels.

24. Include a disability component in all Government budgets and budgetary allocations across all sectors and in all local governments and also to give visibility to disability in all government plans, programmes and activities.

25. Build alliances with other countries, multilateral institutions and donor organizations to promote international cooperation in research, sharing information on best practices and funding for disability programmes.

26. Disability as a cross cutting issue should be mainstreamed and prioritized in all the development planning, implementation, and monitoring processes of governments as a means of achieving the millennium development goals (MDGs).

27. Governments should take special measures to protect persons with disabilities in all situations of conflicts, wars and catastrophes to alleviate the grave suffering caused to them.

B. Disabled Peoples’ Organisations (DPOs)

28. Lobby their Governments to sign and ratify the convention.

29. Once the convention enters into force, lobby Governments and Parliament to enact laws to domesticate it.

30. Ensure that disability issues are fully covered in the countries’ Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) where applicable.

31. Make alliances with other Civil Society organizations and create a common platform that includes disability concerns.

32. Advocate for budgetary allocations at national level across all sectors and at all local levels.

33. Participate actively in the monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of the convention at all levels.

34. Partner with the media for dissemination of the convention and other information relating to disability rights.

6.0 MONITORING: NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL

35. Monitoring is an important aspect of the process of realizing the rights of people with disabilities.

36. Governments should establish monitoring institutions that are well resourced and independent.

37. Monitoring institutions should have adequate and effective representation by different categories of people with disabilities.

38. The monitoring tools should be clear and shared with the key stakeholders.

7.0 INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AND INCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT

39. Development partners should provide technical and financial assistance to DPOs to address the challenges faced by people with disabilities.

40. International Donors should ensure that people with disabilities are involved and benefiting from all bilateral and multilateral funded programmes.

41. Disabled people and disability issues must be included in every development cooperation agenda of international development partners.

42. The international development partners should promote south – south cooperation among DPOs and transfer resources directly to them.

43. International development cooperation/ partnership should promote capacity building and technology support on disability issues to national Governments in the south in line with the UN convention.

44. Development partners and donors should make funding conditional to addressing the concerns of disabled people and ensure that recipient countries of their development aid mainstream issues of disability in their plans and programmes.

45. Investors and service providers should take into account the needs of disabled people when designing their projects.

Dated this 7th day of November 2007


ANNEXURE 1

MEMORANDUM TO CHOGM

Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Conference
4th – 7th November 2007, Hotel Africana, Kampala, Uganda
Final Communiqué

This conference decides to send the following statement to the Commonwealth Heads of Government’s:

Resolution From the Commonwealth Disabled People’s Conference to the CHOGM 2007

Preamble
NOTING with appreciation the theme of this years CHOGM,

AWARE that Persons with disabilities are among the poorest of the poor and the most socially excluded,

EMPHASING the importance of mainstreaming disability issues as an integral part of relevant strategies of sustainable development,

NOTING the adoption by the 61st UN General Assembly of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

APPRECIATING that India and Jamaica have already ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

RECOGNISING the diversity of Persons with Disabilities,

RECOGNISING FURTHER the importance of International cooperation for improving the living conditions of persons with disabilities in every country particularly in developing countries,

Hereby recommends to the Commonwealth Heads of Government, meeting in Kampala from 23rd – 25th November 2007:

That all Commonwealth countries:

1. Ratify and implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability and its Optional Protocol.

2. Adopt disability as a crosscutting issue that should be mainstreamed in domestic policy and planning.

3. Develop disability polices and programmes to cater for the concerns of Persons With Disabilities (PWDs) in line with article 32 of the UN Convention on International Development Cooperation.

Adopted at Kampala, this 7th day of November 2007


Thank you to James Mwandha at the Action on Disability and Development Uganda Programme (ADD Uganda) for granting permission to post this memorandum at We Can Do.


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NEWS: World Association of Sign Language Interpreters Conference Report

Posted on 6 November 2007. Filed under: Deaf, Events and Conferences, Interpreting, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The email further below comes from the secretary of the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters (WASLI) regarding their recent conference in Spain. Some sign language interpreters from developing nations were among the participants.

At the WASLI web site (http://www.wasli.org), you can see a daily newsletter from the conference (in English at top, in Spanish if you scroll down the page). You will also find text on topics such as developing a code of ethics for interpreters (see the link to the code of ethics in Kenya); mentoring sign language interpreters; links to information about deaf interpreters; and more.

Their “WASLI Country Reports 2007” (PDF format, 2.8 Mb) presents recent information about the situation of sign language interpreters or Deaf/deaf people generally in dozens of both industrialized and developing nations around the world. Some of the developing nations represented include: Botswana, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Nigeria, Cambodia, India, Peru, and Mexico.

WASLI also published a similar report two years earlier, WASLI Country Reports 2005 (PDF format, 1 Mb). The low- and middle-income countries represented in this report include: Argentina, Brazil, Cameroon, Kenya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Nigeria, Palestine, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Limited summaries of the WASLI website is available in other languages in PDF format by clicking on “About this website in other languages” WASLI’s left-hand navigation bar. Languages include Arabic, Brazialian Portuguese, Italian, Kiswahili, Japanese, Thai, French, Cantonese, Indonesian, Spanish, and Russian.

Email From WASLI Secretary

From: Zane Hema WASLI Secretary
To: secretary@wasli.org
Subject: WASLI
Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2007 00:44:55 -0000

WASLI is committed to developing the profession of sign language interpreting world wide

Greetings Friends

2007 has been an important year for WASLI primarily because it was the year that the 2nd WASLI Conference took place in Segovia, Spain 13-15 July 2007.

WASLI Conference 2007 – UPDATED WEBPAGE

The WASLI 2007 page on the website has been devoted to the WASLI 2007 Conference in Segovia.  It has been updated to include:

A photo gallery,

Minutes of the General Membership meeting,

Scenes from Segovia (Conference Newsletter)

Messages of Greetings

Countries Report

Update on the WASLI 2007 Conference Proceedings

… with more information to follow

WASLI Conference 2007 – OFFICIAL STATISTICS

Total number of participants – 255 (197 women and 58 men) from 41 different countries.  (This figure does not include working interpreters, companions and an individual from Press purposes)

159 were members of an interpreter association.

20 delegates were sponsored (8 people who were sponsored did not come)

Spain had the highest number of participants at 102

Regional Representation

Africa – 6 countries represented

North America – 3 countries represented

Europe – 14 countries represented

Balkans – 3 countries represented

Australasia & Oceania – 2 countries represented

Asia  – 8 countries represented

Transcaucasia & Central Asia – 1 country represented

Latino America – 4 countries represented

More news to follow shortly …

Zane HEMA

WASLI Secretary


We Can Do received the above email via the Intl-Dev email distribution list, which circulates information of interest to international development professionals and others with an interest in the field. The other information about WASLI and its country reports was gathered from the WASLI web site. Neither We Can Do nor Intl-Dev are associated with WASLI–individuals interested in their organization should follow the link to review their web site directly.


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Including the Disabled in Poverty Reduction Strategies

Posted on 29 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Edited April 8, 2008, to add this paragraph: A new, up-dated version of the handbook described below is now available for free on-line in a format accessible to blind people. It is currently available only in English, but a French translation will be available in a few months from now (April 2008). For more details, go to: https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/04/08/resource-on-line-handbook-supports-disabled-people-in-fighting-poverty/.

A resource, Making PRSP Inclusive (4 Mb), could help disability advocates in developing countries negotiate with their governments to ensure that disabled people, too, benefit from programs meant to enable them to escape poverty.

PRSP stands for “Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers” (PRSPs). A PRSP is a paper developed by governments that describe the policy and strategies they need to follow in order to reduce poverty and meet the Millennium Development Goals within their country.

These four little letters—PRSP—are some of the most powerful letters known in developing countries. These four letters can help fight poverty, disease, starvation, and ignorance among all populations—including the disabled. More precisely, they are meant to help governments figure out exactly what programs and resources they need to solve the biggest challenges that face the poorest citizens of their country. If a PRSP is developed well and wisely, then millions could benefit—and escape poverty. But if it is done poorly, then millions could lose—perhaps most particularly people with disabilities whose needs may often be overlooked.

PRSPs are never—or at least should never be—developed by government officials in isolation. Donors and development banks usually also participate in the process. They are able to offer advice based on what they have learned about PRSPs developed and implemented in many other developing countries. But the most important partners in the PRSP process are members of civil society. That means people like you—represented through non-governmental organizations (NGOs); trade unions; academic institutions; media outlets; federations of poor people; or, essentially, any organization that is not a government agency. Only the ordinary citizens of a country can best know what their own most urgent needs are. And only poor citizens know what barriers they most need to overcome before they can escape poverty.

The trouble is: in many countries, (Disabled People’s Organizations) DPOs, and people with disabilities generally, don’t participate in the process of developing their country’s PRSP. In some countries, the disability movement may still be weak and fragmented. Also, people with disabilities continue to be “invisible” in most societies: non-disabled people simply don’t think to include them unless they are asked or reminded.

The handbook, Making PRSP Inclusive, was written by the German chapter of Handicap International and the Christoffel-Blindenmission Deutschland (German Christian Blind Mission), and was financed by the World Bank and the German government. It is meant for everyone working in the field of disability including NGOs, service providers, professional associations, people with disabilities themselves, DPOs, and parents’ associations, who wants to participate in their national PRSP process. It is for people who want to ensure that the needs and concerns of disabled people are well represented when their government makes important decisions about what projects they should support; what policies they should implement; and what strategies they should follow when fighting poverty.

The handbook will help readers better understand what the PRSP; who helps develop a country’s PRSP; how the PRSP process works; who finances (funds, pays for) the PRSP; why it is important to include disability issues in your country’s PRSP; and how a DPO can participate in the PRSP. It includes ideas for how you can identify and recruit possible allies so you can help each other become more involved in the PRSP process in your country. It also includes suggestions for how you and the other groups you work with can develop a joint strategy for presenting the needs of disabled people in your country. Later chapters include detailed guidance on how you can work to develop a stronger network or alliance of DPOs and other organizations in your country to advocate or lobby for the needs of disabled people. “Case studies” are presented that describe how the disability movement has already succeeded in including disabled people in the PRSP process in Honduras, Bangladesh, Sierra Leone, Tanzania

For people new to disability–or for people who are looking for language that could help them explain disability to others–the Making PRSP Inclusive guidebook includes a section that defines disability and explains the medical, charity, and social models of disability and the World Health Organization (WHO) classifications of disability. (For additional explanation of the medical, charity, and social models of disability, and other models, see the paper Disability Movement from Charity to Empowerment by Kishor Bhanushali.)

The whole handbook, Making PRSP Inclusive, can be downloaded in PDF format; it is 4 megabytes, so people with a slow modem dial-up will need to allow plenty of time. It may also be possible for you to obtain permission to reproduce and distribute the handbook within your country: for instructions, see the page entitled “Imprint” in the handbook. [EDITED TO ADD: As indicated in the first paragraph of this article, a new, updated version of this handbook is now available on-line, without needing to download any PDF files.]

Handicap International has a full listing of its publications and resources that, like Making PRSP inclusive, can be downloaded for free. Some are targeted at disability advocates who need better tools and resources for educating their country governments about disability and persuading them to be more inclusive. Other publications are targeted at mainstream development organizations who want to find more effective ways of ensuring that people with disabilities are able to fully participate in the programs and projects they offer.

The information contained in this We Can Do post was gathered from the Handicap International web site; from the World Bank web site; and from the Making PRSP Inclusive guidebook itself.



Learn about the updated version of this handbook at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/04/08/resource-on-line-handbook-supports-disabled-people-in-fighting-poverty/

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Report: 1st Africa Deaf HIV/AIDS Workshop

Posted on 20 October 2007. Filed under: Case Studies, Deaf, HIV/AIDS, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

No continent has been struck by HIV/AIDS more than sub-Saharan Africa: nearly two-thirds of all people living with HIV are in Africa, and so were three-quarters of those who died from AIDS in 2006 (see UNAIDS report). We also know that people with disabilities are at higher risk for becoming infected with HIV (see Nora Groce’s study). And Deaf/deaf and hard of hearing people are no exception.

Two years ago, people who shared a concern about HIV and AIDS within the Deaf communities of Africa gathered at a workshop to exchange their knowledge and raise awareness within the Deaf community and among government officials about the need to address HIV/AIDS. The report resulting from this workshop is now available in PDF format on-line.

REPORT ON THE CONTINENTAL-WIDE HIV/AIDS SENSITIZATION WORKSHOP FOR DEAF POPULATION IN AFRICA.
VENUE: PEACOCK HOTEL DAR ES SALAAM
DATES: 24 TH – 30TH AUGUST 2005
THEME: OUR FUTURE-OUR RIGHTS TO HIV/AIDS INFORMATION, CARE AND SUPPORT ______________________________________________________________________________ The objectives of the workshop were as follows:
• To provide HIV/AIDS awareness and life skills training to the representatives from the Deaf community in Africa.
• To sensitise the Deaf on their rights to HIV/AIDS information and to care and support when infected by HIV/AIDS.
• To provide a forum for the Deaf to exchange inter-country experience on HIV/AIDS among the Deaf population in Africa.
• To educate and raise awareness among the government officials, UN agencies and participants from institutions working on HIV/AIDS, on the specific problems face by Deaf people in accessing HIV/AIDS information, care and support.

The report summarizes the opening remarks which touched upon the challenges facing Deaf Africans in fighting HIV/AIDs and ideas for moving forward. It also summarizes some of the key presentations including:

“LINGUSITC AND ATTITUDINAL OBSTACLES FACED BY THE DEAF PEOPLE IN ACCESSING HIV/AIDS INFORMATION IN AFRICAN COUNTRIES: THE CASE OF TANZANIA.” By Dr. Mary Mboya, Lecturer Department of Education Psychology-University of Dar es Salaam.

“THE ROLES OF RSESA IN ADVOCATING THE LINGUISTIC RIGHTS OF THE DEAF PEOPLE IN EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA AND INITIATIVE TO ESTABLISH THE AFRICAN DEAF UNION.” By Dominic Majiwa-Regional Director, World Federation of the Deaf, Regional

“BARRIERS FACED BY DEAF WOMEN IN AFRICA THAT CONTRIBUTE TO VULNERABILITY TO HIV/AIDS” By Euphrasia Mbewe – Deaf Women Activist, Zambia.

“UGANDA NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THE DEAF STRUGGLE TO FIGHT HIV/AIDS AMONGST THE DEAF PEOPLE.” By Florence N. Mukasa – Gender and Theatre Coordinator, Uganda National Association of the Deaf.

“SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT HIV/AIDS” By Meena H. A. – UNAIDS Country Office – Dar es salaam.

“THE AFRICAN DECADE AND VISION TO COMBAT HIV/AIDS AMONG THE PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES IN AFRICA” By Thomas Ongolo – The Secretariat of African Decade of Disabled Persons in South Africa.

“LOBBYING AND ADVOCACY STRATEGIES FOR HIV/AIDS AND HEARING DISABILITY INFORMATION, CARE AND SUPPORT.” By Ananilea Nkya – Tanzania Women Media Association (TAMWA)

The report also describes how deaf participants were trained in preventing HIV/AIDS, and in advocating for more inclusion of deaf people in HIV/AIDS work carried out by their governments.

The report can be downloaded in PDF format (143 kilobytes) at http://siteresources.worldbank.org/DISABILITY/Resources/News—Events/BBLs/ADUReport.pdf


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