Training Opportunity: Digital Storytelling Project, June 8-12, 2009, for African Youth with Disabilities and Allies

Posted on 16 April 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Families, Funding, Media & Journalism, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD)
APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet
invite you to
Submit an application to participate in a Digital Storytelling Project
Application DUE 3 May 2009
Workshop dates 8 -12 June 2009

“It’s in the telling of our stories that we discover how much of our experiences and learning we have in common with others. Stories make our connection with others and with the world real. They weave together our individual experiences to reveal a picture of a community, a group and a country.”

Introduction

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) in partnership with APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet, invite you to submit an application to participate in a digital storytelling workshop. We are inviting people living and working in Africa who would like to empower others and affect change by documenting their journey and telling their story. Applicants must be:

(1) parents/carers of children with disabilities and youth
(2) young people with disabilities
(3) people working in organizations to promote the rights of children and youth with disabilities e.g. Advocates, students, CBR workers, teachers, journalists, information activists, content developers, programme officer/managers,

Participants will develop short videos reflecting the experiences of parents and youth with disabilities in particular with regards to challenges and successes in accessing inclusive education, health, employment and acceptance in their communities and country. Participants will also examine the power dimensions of story-telling and how we retain the authenticity of our own voice, as well as the voices of the people whose stories we document, preserve or disseminate.

Parents, youth and individuals working in the field have many stories to tell, but never have the time, knowledge, equipment and space to reflect, understand and tell their own stories, share their responses, understandings and experiences.

There is a large amount of information on the internet but very little that reflects the lived realities of those affected and people working in the field of disability in Africa.

The workshop aims to:
• document real-life stories of a cross-section of parents and youth with disabilities as well as those working in the field
• empower people to tell their own stories, while at the same time create a powerful advocacy tool that can be used in their country and beyond.
• develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills,
• enable parents and youth with disabilities to share and network amongst each other.

More about the workshop

In the workshop we will explore people’s own stories and learn how to develop a story line, use photo’s, video clips, and drawings to tell your story in an effective way.

There is space for twelve applicants who will participate in a five day digital storytelling workshop, 8 -12 June 2009.

In the month before the workshop delegates will need to join an online study group, collect content for their story (pictures etc) and begin to learn some of the software.

At the workshop participants will learn to use computer software and other equipment necessary for making a short (3-5 minutes) multimedia digital story.

The digital storytelling workshop is hands-on and computer intensive, requiring commitment and willingness to develop a short, personal story; learn new software and edit a short digital video of five minutes in length.

Digital storytelling is not like writing a formal document; it’s more like creative, autobiographical writing. To see an example, check out the website
http://www.takebackthetech.net
http://www.silencespeaks.org

In order to be eligible to participate, you must be able to attend all five days of the workshop, and be able to travel to South Africa to arrive by 7 June, departing 13 June 2009. Travel and accommodation will be sponsored by the SADPD. You must be willing to allow your story, or part of it, to be used in advocacy by SADPD and APC WNSP’s Take Back the Tech campaign. The workshop will be conducted in ENGLISH so other language speakers must have a good proficiency in English. Sign language and French / Portugese interpretation will be provided if necessary (Please motivate for this in application form).

This workshop is a chance to learn new skills and tell your story in a creative and visual format. It’s a lot of work . . . AND a lot of fun.

Copyright:
All stories are owned by the person who made them. The story is your story and will be licensed under a Creative Commons license. We are open to discussing a formula that respects your privacy and confidentiality should you be uncomfortable with the widespread sharing and dissemination of some parts of your story. We would like your stories to be part of a public effort promote the rights and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities and their families.

Who Should Apply?
• We are looking for stories told by parent, youth and individuals working in the field of Disability.
• Applicants must be living and working in Africa (preference will be given to women)
• Applicants must preferably be based in an organisation, institution or network, but individuals will also be considered.
• Youth should between the ages of 18 – 35
• The training is in English. Participants must speak and understand English but are welcome to produce their story in any language they choose. If however you require translation into French and Portuguese please motivate in your application.
• The story you tell has to be about you and your experiences. It can be about situations or events but it must be a personal story told in the first person
• The workshop requires a basic level of computer literacy.
• Applicants must be willing to avail themselves for future advocacy work or training in digital stories in their country.

Instructions:
Please complete the form below and email it as a file attachment to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za
DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING APPLICATIONS is 3 May 2009. If you have any questions, feel free to email or Skype Nafisa on nafisababoo. Incomplete forms will not be considered for selection.

APPLICATION FORM

Date:
Name:
Address:
Country:
Organisation:
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Age:
Date of birth:
Disability:
Support needs (Enlarge print, Braille, translation etc)

Please describe in a few sentences the main point of the story you would like to tell.

What issues does your story address?

What do you hope to get out of the digital storytelling workshop?

Have you talked to anyone about the story you’d like to share, or is this the first time you’ll be talking about it in a group?

If this is your first time talking about it, what do you think it’ll be like for you to share the story with a group of people ?

Please write a draft of the story you’d like to share, below. It should be no more than 500 words (about one and ½ pages, double-spaced, typed). Your story should be written in the first-person. Note: If you’d like to see examples of other people’s digital stories, you can go to http://www.silencespeaks.org or http://www.womensnet.org.za or http://www.takebackthetech.net

Please briefly describe to us what you use computers for.

What is your familiarity with the following Software Programs and Processes? Please put an “x” to the right of the statements that most apply.

Using a PC (Windows Operating System) or a Macintosh Computer
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Scanning Photos or Other Images
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Photoshop
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Premiere
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Do you know how to (please mark YES or NO)
Open software applications YES/NO
Save documents and find them again YES/NO
How to use a mouse, cut and paste, drag and drop. YES/NO

It would be useful to know the following applications – Microsoft office or Open office, and using web browsers such as Internet Explorer or Firefox.

There are a limited number of spaces in the workshop. So please note that the submission of an application is no guarantee that APC-Africa-Women will be able to support you to attend. Successful applicants will be notified 5th May 2009.

Thank You!

INFORMATION ABOUT THE ORGANIZATIONS

About the Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities
The African Decade of Persons with Disabilities was proclaimed by the African Union for the period 1999 – 2009. The main goals of the African Decade are to raise awareness about the situation of the estimated 60-80 million persons with disabilities in the region and to identify solutions tailored to the African Experience that enhance participation, equality and empowerment of Africans with Disabilities. The overall aims and priorities of the Decade are stipulated in an AU- Continental Plan of Action. A Secretariat was established to facilitate the realization of these objectives.
The Secretariat is an international Non Governmental Organisation, established in 2004 by all the major Regional Disabled People’s Organisations to give a new dynamism to the implementation of the Continental Plan of Action. It is hosted, at the request of African Union by South Africa in Cape-Town where its headquarters are located. The mission of the Secretariat of the African Decade is to empower Governments, DPO´s, Decade steering committee’s (DSC) and development organizations to work in partnership to include disability and persons with disabilities into policies and programs in all sectors of society. The strategy of action of the Secretariat is to
• Build the capacities of DPOs, persons with disabilities who are most vulnerable and the Decade Steering Committees to enable them to advocate and lobby their respective government so that they integrate disability into all their development processes.
• Advocate and lobby for mainstreaming of disability in the policies and programmes.
• Raise awareness around the main issues related to persons with disabilities in society.
Http://www.sadpd.org

About APC-Africa-Women

APC-Africa-women is the African regional network of the Association for Progressive Communications Women’s Networking Support Programme (APC WNSP). APC WNSP is a global network of women who support women networking for social change and women’s empowerment, through the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). We promote gender equality in the design, development, implementation, access to and use of ICTs and in the policy decisions and frameworks that regulate them. We have a special focus on redressing inequities based on women’s social or ethnic background – through the provision of research, training, information, and support activities in the field of ICT policy, skills-sharing in the access and use of ICT, and women’s network-building.
Http://www.apcwomen.org

APC-Africa-Women hosts Women’s Electronic Network Training (WENT) workshops every two years. WENT workshops aim to build the skills and capacities of women and their organisations to utilise ICTs in women’s empowerment, social development work and policy advocacy. In 2003 participants at WENT Africa developed skills in the repackaging of information through the convergence of old and new technologies using radio and in building websites using a Content Management System. Weaving through the training were sessions on gender and ICT policy issues. In 2005 WENT Africa was hosted in Kampala and using a two-track system, trained women technicians in the use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and women managers of NGOs in technology planning. More information can be viewed at http://wentafrica.blogspot.com/

About Women’sNet
Women’sNet works to advance gender equality and justice in South Africa through the use of ICTs by providing training and facilitating content dissemination and creation that supports women, girls, and women’s and gender organisations and networks to take control of their own content and ICT use. The organisation is one of the few working on technology for social change in South Africa, and the first to do this from a gender perspective our work has focused on technology for purpose – strengthening women’s organisations specifically and civil society in general – to use ICTs for achieving gender justice.
Http://www.womensnet.org.za



This announcement was disseminated on the EENET Eastern Africa listserver. All applications and inquiries should please be directed to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za , NOT to We Can Do.

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JOB POST: Research Assistant for AFrican Policy on Disability and Development

Posted on 10 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Vacancy – Research Assistant Position for African Policy on Disability and Development (A-PODD)

Application Deadline: 13 March , 2009

A-PODD has a Research Assistantship position for 1 Year, and the candidate has to be from Sierra Leone. We seek a person with experience in researching disability issues for the above position. The project is housed at the Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and the Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin and The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disability, being other partners.

The Research Assistant should have a degree in a relevant social or health science, or evidence of operating at an equivalent level. The Research Assistant will be considered for fully-funded registration for a Masters in Research at Stellenbsoch University. Limited travel to South Africa will be required, with the Research Assistant based in Sierra Leone.

This is a re-advertisement as only two applicants with the relevant qualifications have been shorted listed. We need 3 interviewees so that we have a wide selection. The teleconferencing interview will take place on the 19th April 2009. People with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Project Description
A-PODD is a three year project funded by the (Irish) Health Research Board and Irish Aid. A-PODD is led by Prof Mac MacLachlan, Centre for Global Health and School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin; Ms Gubela Mji, Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and Mr A.K. Dube, The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disability.

This research investigates how disability can be put on the agenda of national and international development initiatives. It focuses on how research evidence can be utilised to inform the policy environment (such as PRSPs and SWAps), development institutions (such as the IMF, World Bank and WHO), as well as less formal local, community and grass-roots decision making and inclusion efforts.

A-PODD will undertake four country case studies: in Sierra Leone, a country emerging from conflict that resulted in many people being disabled; Malawi and Uganda, the only two African countries that have Ministries for people with disabilities; and Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Africa, with significant geographical barriers and a highly dispersed population, presenting significant challenges to the inclusion of people with disability.

Our comparative analysis will inform disability policy and implementation within the region. Barriers and facilitators will be identified along implementation pathways, and so too will local means and mechanisms of addressing these. Country reports will be discussed at a concluding workshop to which governments, civil society, donors, researchers and others will be invited. A code of best practice will be drawn up for Moving Evidence to Action on African Disability Policy.

Other collaborating partners on this project are:

International Partners:
Department of Psychology at Stellenbosch University
Southern African Federation of the Disabled
Ministry of Persons with Disabilities and the Elderly, Government of Malawi
Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa
South African Medical Research Council’s Cochrane Centre
SINTEF Health Research (Norway)
World Bank

Irish Partners:
Institute for Nursing Research, University of Ulster Law & Policy Research Unit, NUI Galway.
National Institute for Intellectual Disability, Trinity College Dublin
Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin.

Bursary
Research Assistants will be appointed in the range EUR8,000-10,000 (Euro)

Applications
Interested applicants should send
1) A statement of interest – 1 page
2) A Curriculum Vitae –
3) Contact details for at least two referees (at least one of which should be an academic).

For any quiries, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Please forward your application to:

Dr Tsitsi Chataika (Post doctoral Research Fellow)
E-mail: tchataika@sun.ac.za

Dr Tsitsi Chataika – Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Stellenbosch University
Tygerberg Campus
Faculty of Health Science
Centre for Rehabilitation Studies
African Policy On Disability and Development (A-PODD) Project
P.O Box 7505
Tygerberg, 7505
South Africa
Tel: +27 219389816 (office)
+27 7764085148 (Cell/Mobile)
Fax:+27 219146875



I received this job post announcement via the Disability-Research listserv.

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Disability International Small Business Conference, April 6-7, 2009, Cape Town, South Africa

Posted on 19 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Employment, Events and Conferences, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The aim of the Disability Workshop Development Enterprise (DWDE) International Small Business Conference is to bring together entrepreneurs with disabilities and other key industry stakeholders to deliberate, share knowledge and exchange ideas on the fundamental building blocks for sustainable entrepreneurship development amongst people with disabilities. We would like to create the platform to give entrepreneurs with disabilities all the tools they need to become participants in the mainstream economy. This conference will be geared towards finding solutions for entrepreneurship amongst the disability sector.

Application deadline is January 31, 2009 for conference occurring April 6-7, 2009.

Please see the Invitation below for more details as well as the Registration Form and Events Pack, please feel free to contact the conference organizers with any queries.

Wendile Basse OR Mandy Barnes
Phone: +27 (0) 21 674 6139
Fax: +27 (0) 21 674 6238
dwderesearch@telkomsa.net

DISABILITY WORKSHOP DEVELOPMENT ENTERPRISE
21 CAVENDISH STREET
CLAREMONT
7735
TEL: 021 674 6139
FAX: 021 674 6238

DWDE- International Small Business Conference – 2009

SCULPTING ENTREPENEURS WITH DISABILITIES IN AFRICA
VENUE Cape Town International Convention Centre
DATE
6, 7th of April 2009
PRICE 2,500 ZAR
• Includes Gala Dinner
CONTACT PERSON Wandile Basse
TEL 021 674 6139
FAX 021 674 6238
EMAIL dwderesearch@telkomsa.net

PAYMENT DETAILS
BANK DETAILS
Account Holder DISABILITY WORKSHOP DEVELOPMENT ENTERPRISE
Account Number 28-004-575-1
Branch Number 051001

SWIFT CODE SBZAZAJJ
Branch Claremont, Cape Town, South Africa
PAYMENT REFERENCE Initial + Surname+CONF
Eg: Thembi Green
TGreenCONF

[Note to We Can Do readers: People with disabilities will want to communicate closely with the conference organizers to determine whether they are able to meet your accommodation needs. For example, the informational materials I received about this conference was partly in Word format but also with some separate information in purely visual PDF format (NOT the kind converted from Word but from a JPEG image). People who access electronic materials through a screen reader will want to ensure that they are prepared to provide all information in formats accessible to them. Their conference information does not clarify whether they will be providing sign language interpreters or captioning for deaf participants. Nor does it clarify whether adaptations will be made for people with intellectual disabilities, etc.]



I learned of this conference via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development email discussion group.

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Disability Conferences in 2009

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

One common reason why many We Can Do readers come to this blog is because they want to learn about upcoming conferences related to disability issues in developing countries. The single most popular page at this blog carries the quite inelegant but pragmatic title of Conferences, Events, Call for Papers, Training Opportunities (which also includes the very few job listings posted here and other things that didn’t fit in the title).

But, there is another page that We Can Do readers can consult to learn about upcoming disability and rehabilitation related conferences for the year 2009:

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/conference.php

This page, maintained by the Center for International Rehabilitation, Research, Information, and Exchange (CIRRIE), has listings that go as far out as December 2009. People who monitor We Can Do regularly will find a few of these announcements are familiar. But many have never been announced at We Can Do.

In some cases, this may be because they don’t quite fit my parameters. Before I publish a conference announcement, I try to determine whether it would be of genuine interest or use to people living or working in developing countries. This is not to say that I do this perfectly. But I strive to do this. Some conferences may carry the word “international” in their title, but on closer examination, “international” may often mean “North America and Europe.” I often skip over such conference announcements.

But in other cases, I simply had not heard of these conferences. For example, there is Neurorehabilitation 2009, held by the Southern African Rehabilitation Association in Johannesburg, South Africa, August 26-28, 2009. Or a conference being held by World Association for Psychosocial Rehabilitation, One World: Quest for Integration, November 12-15, 2009, in Bangalore, India. And some others.

It is worth exploring the list of conferences on your own at
http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/conference.php
Those who know how to use RSS Feeds can also subscribe to the CIRRIE listing to learn of new conference announcements as they are posted.



I discovered this listing of conferences by browsing the CIRRIE web site.

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JOB POST: Sesotho-speaking Economist/Socio-Economist

Posted on 4 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Health, HIV/AIDS, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Note that resumes/c.v.s need to be submitted by 9 a.m. EST, December 4, 2008. This means by 2 p.m. GMT/UTC time. Please contact Pia Rockhold directly at prockhold@worldbank.org, NOT We Can Do.

Call for Applications
I urgently need a Sesotho speaking STC (Short Term Contract) economist/socio-economist preferable in Lesotho or South Africa, but all can do – for a possible 40 to 60 days assignment in Lesotho from January to July 2009, working with me (epidemiologist and health sector specialist) and another macro economist on the impact of HIV/AIDs on the macro-econmy in Lesotho.

Might anybody out there know somebody I will need the CV and approval of availability latest by early tomorrow (before 9 am DC time).

Best Pia
prockhold@worldbank.org


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Disabled, Poor–and Ignored: Results of Research in Zimbabwe and South Africa

Posted on 6 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Research conducted in Zimbabwe and South Africa has confirmed what grassroots advocates have known all along: people with disabilities aren’t just at higher risk of poverty. People with disabilities are also more likely to be ignored by many donors who support programs to end poverty.

The 77-page study is entitled, “Are Disabled Peoples’ Voices from both South and North Being heard in the Development process? A Comparative analysis between the situation in South Africa, Zimbabwe, United Kingdom and Northern Europe.” Conducted in 2005, this research explores the extent to which Disabled Peoples’ Organizations (DPOs) in Zimbabwe and South Africa have access to funding, and the extent to which DPOs were able to explain to donors what kind of funding would help them best.

People with disabilities who were interviewed for this study said they wanted to be involved with disability programs, from the planning stage through implementation. However, they felt they were often excluded, both by the government and also by DPOs themselves. The study concludes that many DPOs lack the capacity to reach large numbers of people with disabilities at the grassroots level. As a result, many people with disabilities in South Africa and Zimbabwe are not part of any network. They also usually lacked awareness of policies and programs that were meant to benefit them, such as the African Decade on Persons with Disabilities or the Millennium Development Goals.

DPOs, too, said they lacked opportunity to contribute to dialogue about what kinds of projects would be most beneficial for them. DPOs in South Africa and Zimbabwe said that donors from developed countries often impose their own tailor-made programs on them without asking for their input. They wanted to be more involved with designing the programs that they implement. DPOs usually were more aware than grassroots individuals of programs such as the African Decade or the Millennium Development Goals, but even some DPOs were not aware of them.

Even in the UK and Northern Europe, DPOs felt that they were struggling for donations. DPOs also complained that non-disability oriented international non-governmental organizations used information about people with disabilities to obtain donations for themselves instead of for DPOs.

The study makes recommendations based on its findings, including the need for more capacity building for DPOs in developing countries; stronger partnerships among DPOs in developing and developed countries and donors; and closer involvement of people with disabilities and DPOs in planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating programs.

Learn more about the study; download the 6-page executive summary (Word format); or the full 770-page report (Word format) at:

http://www.disabilitykar.net/research/thematic_voices.html



We Can Do found this study on the DisabilityKar.net site after exploring links from the Heathlink Worldwide site.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS on African Policy on Disability and Development

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Research Positions for African Policy on Disability & Development (A-PODD)

Two Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships for 3 years
Four Research Assistantships for 1 Year,
one in each of Sierra Leone, Uganda, Ethiopia & Malawi

We seek people with experience in researching disability issues for the above positions which will be based at the Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, with associated appointments at the Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin and The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disability.

Post-Doctoral Fellows should have completed, or be completing, a PhD in disability or a closely related area, and be willing to travel between Ireland, South Africa, and two of the project countries.

Research Assistants should have a degree in a relevant social or health science, or evidence of operating at an equivalent level. Research Assistants may be considered for fully-funded registration for a Masters in Research at Stellenbsoch University. Limited travel to South Africa will be required with Research Assistants based in one of the four project countries.
We are particularly keen to encourage applications from persons with disability.

Project Description
A-PODD is a three year project funded by the (Irish) Health Research Board and Irish Aid. A-PODD is led by Prof Mac MacLachlan, Centre for Global Health and School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin; Ms Gubela Mji, Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and Mr A.K. Dube, The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disability.

This research investigates how disability can be put on the agenda of national and international development initiatives. It focuses on how research evidence can be utilised to inform the policy environment (such as PRSPs and SWAps), development institutions (such as the IMF, World Bank and WHO), as well as less formal local, community and grass-roots decision making and inclusion efforts.

A-PODD will undertake four country case studies: in Sierra Leone, a country emerging from conflict that resulted in many people being disabled; Malawi and Uganda, the only two African countries that have Ministries for people with disabilities; and Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Africa, with significant geographical barriers and a highly dispersed population, presenting significant challenges to the inclusion of people with disability.

Our comparative analysis will inform disability policy and implementation within the region. Barriers and facilitators will be identified along implementation pathways, and so too will local means and mechanisms of addressing these. Country reports will be discussed at a concluding workshop to which governments, civil society, donors, researchers and others will be invited. A code of best practice will be drawn up for Moving Evidence to Action on African Disability Policy.

Other collaborating partners on this project are:

International Partners:
Department of Psychology at Stellenbosch University
Southern African Federation of the Disabled
Ministry of Persons with Disabilities and the Elderly, Government of Malawi
Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa
South African Medical Research Council’s Cochrane Centre
SINTEF Health Research (Norway)
World Bank

Irish Partners:
Institute for Nursing Research, University of Ulster
Law & Policy Research Unit, NUI Galway.
National Institute for Intellectual Disability, Trinity College Dublin
Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin.

Salaries
Post-Doctoral Research Fellows will be appointed in the range €25,000-30,000 (Euro)
Research Assistants will be appointed in the range €8,000-10,00 (Euro)

Applications
Interested applicants should send

1) A statement of interest
2) A Curriculum Vitae
3) Contact details for at least two references (at least one of which should be an academic).

To either:

1. Ms Magdalena Szewczyk, Centre for Global Health, Trinity College, Dublin.
E-mail: szewczym@tcd.ie

2. Ms Annette Coetzee, Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Health Science Faculty,
Tygerburg, Cape Town, South Africa. E-mail: annettec@sun.ac.za

3. Mr AK Dube, The Secretariat of the Africa Decade of Persons with Disabilities,
Cape Town, South Africa. E-mail: akdube@africandecade.co.za

The project starts in October 08 and we look forward to making appointmentss as soon as possible.



We Can Do received the above announcement via the Global Parntership for Disability and Development email discussion group.

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Successful Projects–What Makes Them Work?

Posted on 2 June 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Case Studies, Cognitive Impairments, Reports, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Ideas are easy. Any 10 disability advocates will have 100 ideas for projects to fight poverty or otherwise improve the lives of people with disabilities in developing countries. But knowing how to implement projects that actually do what advocates and funders hope they will do is much harder. So, what makes successful projects work? Why do they work? What lessons can other project leaders learn from them?

Inclusion International has released a 66-page study entitled “Successful Projects–What Makes Them Work?” (PDF format, 3.5 Mb). As it happens, their analysis focuses on projects for people with intellectual disabilities in India, Romania, Kenya, and South Africa. But its conclusions are broad enough that this guide may be useful across disability groups and regions.

Successful Projects by Anders Gustavsson and Johans Sandvin and Annika and Lennart Nilsson examines 13 different projects. Each project was chosen because it was interesting, successful, or outstanding in improving the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. Chapters 1 and 2 describe the research process and the national reports used. Chapters 3 to 7 provide a cross national analysis of the 13 projects, and chapter 8 presents conclusions and implications. The study aimed to answer the following questions (taken from page 8 of the report):

  • Which projects resulting in sustainable improvements of life conditions for adults and children with intellectual disabilities can be found in the four countries?
  • What are the most strategic change agents, internationally, nationally and locally?
  • Which methods are most effective at initiating and maintaining the processes of change?
  • What other factors, deliberate project interventions as well as contextual factors, are important to achieve a positive change?

Experienced leaders, advocates, and professionals may agree with some of Inclusion International’s conclusions but may disagree with others. The study’s conclusion suggests, for example, that any criteria used to measure improvement in the quality of life must be specific to the local culture. The rationale is that different cultures define “quality of life” very differently. This seems a valid point.

But then the study goes further to baldly assert, “the idea of developing a model of best practice to be applied across cultural contexts would never work” (p. 57). This seems too overgeneralized a conclusion from my view.

If by “a model of best practice” you mean “a rigidly prescribed, one-size-fits all project plan,” then I have no hesitation in agreeing. Projects that are too strict in emulating their original model adapt poorly to the unique needs of the people they serve. I also agree wholeheartedly with the study’s assertion that projects work best when they are generated by local people themselves, in response to their own ideas and passions. Projects imposed by outsiders rarely work as well, either because they are not responsive to actual local problems or because local leaders don’t support them as strongly.

But it is a dangerously false assumption to believe that projects originated in other cultural contexts can never offer lessons for leaders elsewhere. As one example (though not disability specific): some years ago, Mexico and Brazil each launched what is now called “conditional cash transfer” programs. Governments give the very poorest families cash. In exchange, parents must do certain things such as sending their children to school or bringing them to health clinics.

The original conditional cash transfer idea has now proliferated not only within Latin America but also to countries as culturally disparate as Kenya, Turkey, Indonesia, and even New York City in the United States. They help improve school attendance, child health, and family nutrition as well as helping families cope with poverty. Yes, each project does need to be carefully tailored for the local culture and conditions. But the broad concept of this program has survived the transition across cultures very well.

Surely there must be broad strategies for certain types of projects targeted at people with disabilities that could similarly survive the transition from one culture to another, even if the details must be dramatically altered.

I should hasten to point out I may be over-reacting to an admittedly superficial glance at the study’s conclusions and accompanying powerpoint programs. The flaw may well be in my reading rather than in the study.

These caveats aside, project leaders, disability advocates, and international development professionals all may find it interesting to read the common “story line” of how successful projects tend to get started. And, as mentioned further above, some of its conclusions do strike me as valid and interesting.

The 66-page report can be downloaded for free in PDF format (3.5 Mb) at:

http://www.inclusion-international.org/site_uploads/File/Inclusion%20International%20Study%20-%20A%20Cross-National%20Analysis%20-%20Final.pdf

An accompanying powerpoint program, and more detailed reports on individual countries, can be found at the Inclusion International web site at:

http://inclusion-international.org/en/projects/10.html



I first found this study by browsing the Inclusion International web site.

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4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress Report Available Online

Posted on 14 May 2008. Filed under: Assistive Devices, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Reports, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

In low-income countries, the overwhelming majority people who need wheelchairs don’t have one. This has a profound impact on their ability to lead independent lives–or even leave their own homes. Participants in a recent conference in Africa exchanged ideas and knowledge on how to address this challenge.

The 4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress Report (PDF format, 446 Kb) can now be downloaded for free on-line. The report summarizes a series of remarks, panel discussions, and other conference sessions on how to promote appropriate wheelchair services across the African continent. The report also presents a list of resolutions made on the last day of the Congress. The 4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress was held in September 2007 in Tanzania.

The Pan Africa Wheelchair Builders Association (PAWBA) and the Tanzanian Training Centre for Orthopaedic Technologists (TATCOT) facilitated the congress. Co-funders included the World Health Organisation, ABILIS, Motivation Africa, Christoffel Blindenmission (CBM), and SINTEF. The 116 participating members came from Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Angola, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Namibia, South Africa, UK, Norway and USA.

The previous three All Africa Wheelchair Congresses were held in Zambia (2003); Kenya (1998); and Zimbabwe (1995). Each congress was a landmark in developing appropriate and affordable wheelchair products and services in Africa in allowing participants to exchange knowledge across the continent. PAWBA was formed at the 2003 Congress.

You can download the full, 47-page 4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress report in PDF format (446 Kb) at:

http://www.independentliving.org/docs7/pawba-tatcot200709.pdf



We Can Do learned about this report by browsing the AskSource.info database on health, disability, and development. I gathered further detail by skimming the report itself.

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NEWS: Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum Founded

Posted on 8 April 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Ghulam Nabi Nizamani has asked that people circulate the following press release.

COMMONWEALTH DISABLED PEOPLES’ FORUM

Press Release

A New Voice Shouts to the Commonwealth –
Nothing About us Without Us.

Disabled youth and adult people from 16 Commonwealth countries came together from 15-17 March, 2008 in London to launch a unique Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum (1), the purposes of which will be to provide a link between disabled people’s organisations in all Commonwealth countries and all the political structures of the Commonwealth.

At the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in October 2007 the civil society challenge to CHOGM was to mainstream disability in sustainable development, to ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (CRPD) and to adopt disability inclusive policies. This cannot be achieved without a strong, democratic forum of disabled youth and adults to ensure implementation.

We had a vibrant and dynamic series of meetings to consolidate the vision, constitution and activities of the Forum (2). The youth met separately to devise their own creative methods of self representation and organisation. We came together in a final agreement of how to go forward together. It is essential that the voice of young disabled people is heard clearly in the work of the CDPF. They are the future leaders and builders of our shared vision of a Commonwealth built on equality, human rights and respect for diversity.

The major focus of our work in the next two years, including a major conference before CHOGM in 2009, will be to ensure that Commonwealth countries sign, ratify and implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. As Rachel Kachaje said at the Launch of the CDPF, hosted by the Commonwealth Foundation at Marlborough House,
‘Disabled people see that hope springs out of the convention – hope for a new, inclusive world where disabled people can be seen as fully human’

We, All Sanghar Handicaps’ Association Pakistan are very proud to have part of this exciting new beginning and look forward to working with our disabled colleagues to ensure our full inclusion in all the nations of our shared Commonwealth.

For further information contact:
Ghulam Nabi Nizamani
South Asia /South East Asia Regional Representative
Bakhoro Road Sanghar-68100, Pakistan. (3)
Ph # +92-333-2916281
Email: ghulamnabi.nizamani@gmail.com (4)

(1) This meeting was funded by the Commonwealth Foundation, DFID, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and ADD.
(2) Officers elected were: Chair: James Mwanda (Uganda), Vice Chair: George Daniel (Tinidad & Tobago), Secretary: Javed Abidi (India), Treasurer: Richard Rieser (UK), Women’s Representative: Rachel Kachaje, (Malawi) Youth Representatives: Laura Kanusu (Uganda)
George Kasara (Kenya), Regional Representatives: Ghulam Nabi Nizaamani (Pakistan), Lesley Emmanuel (Antigua), Setareki Macanawai (Fiji), Steve Estey (Canada) Thomas Ongolo (South Africa).
(3) The registered office of the CDPF will be in India and there will be a liaison office in the UK to work directly with the Commonwealth Secretariat and Foundation.
(4) This email address can be changed after website of CDPF.



In addition to the above press release, Ghulam Nabi Nizamani also made the following note in mid March:

The following countries from South Asia and South East Asia are member countries of Commonwealth. These Countries are invited to submit application for Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum (CDPF) Country Focal Point.
Bangladesh
Brunei Darussalam
India
Malaysia
Maldives
Pakistan
Singapore
Sri Lanka

The Organization must be National Level Organization in respective country if in any country there will be no National Organization we will support to encourage to estabilish National organization in that country. Please also send establishment date of Organization, Network in the Country, Some credible work done in past. Please send information by mail or email before the first week of April 2008.

Cheers!
Ghulam Nabi Nizamani
Regional Representative CDPF
South and South East Asia

Note: We have no contact from Brunei Darussalam please help us for finding National organization there.



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for sharing the above press release. Any inquiries should please be emailed to him directly at ghulamnabi.nizamani@gmail.com.

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NEWS: The Law Has Been Instrument of Our Oppression, Says Disability Advocate

Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People with psychosocial disabilities have been quick to embrace the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). One of them is David Stolper, a South African advocate for the human rights of people with psychosocial disabilities.

Stolper, says, “The whole world looks at our constitution in South Africa and sees it as the most progressive one for the rights of all people, but we in mental health have been totally marginalized.” Stolper, who has been institutionalized in both the United Kingdom and also in South Africa, terms himself a “psychiatric survivor.”

Of the CRPD, he says, “I think it gives us a legal framework and something on paper that will be binding that is a dramatic shift from what we have had before. There has always seemed to be some kind of barbaric tool to control us. The law has been an instrument of our oppression. The convention says that it is time that the government and people around us drop this notion that we cannot think for ourselves.”

We Can Do readers can read a full-length interview with David Stolper about his perspectives on the CRPD at the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities:

http://www.africandecade.org/reads/articles/legalcapacityarticle/view

The interview also was published in the newsletter Human Rights Africa, 2007, Issue 2 (PDF format, 1.8 Mb). Human Rights Africa focuses on issues relevant to human rights for persons with disabilities in Africa.

Past issues of Human Rights Africa are available in both English and French in both PDF and Word format at:

http://www.africandecade.org/humanrightsafrica



We Can Do learned of this article through the Disabled People International (DPI) newsletter.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



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NEWS: 12 Countries Ratify International Disability Rights Treaty (CRPD)

Posted on 17 December 2007. Filed under: Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The United Nations (UN) has announced that 12 countries have now ratified the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Six of these countries also have ratified the optional protocol.

This international disability rights treaty is meant to “promote, protect, and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights by persons with disabilities,” including self-determination, physical and programmatic access, personal mobility, health, education, employment, habilitation and rehabilitation, participation in political life, and equality and non-discrimination. (Source: RatifyNow.) The CRPD will become legally binding after 20 countries have ratified it. The optional protocol is a separate document that would allow individuals to seek redress (justice or compensation) for treaty violations internationally after they have exhausted everything that can be done at the national level. The optional protocol will be legally binding after 10 countries have ratified it.

The most recent four countries to ratify the convention (treaty) are: Bangladesh (November 30); Spain, for both the convention and the optional protocol (December 3); Namibia, for both the convention and the optional protocol (December 4); and Nicaragua (December 7). The other eight ratifying countries are Croatia, Cuba, Gabon, Hungary, India, Jamaica, Panama, and South Africa; of these, Croatia, Hungary, Panama, and South Africa also ratified the optional protocol.

A total of 118 countries have signed the convention, and 67 countries have signed the optional protocol. Signing the convention and optional protocol does not legally bind a country to obey them. However, signing these documents does commit the country to take no action that would conflict with the goals of the CRPD.

If you are sighted, you can view a global map that shows visually which countries have signed or ratified the CRPD or the optional protocol. I am not sure if this map is accessible to people with visual impairments. If not, then please consult the UN Enable web site accessibility statement, which encourages people to contact them regarding accessibility issues at their web site.

More information on the CRPD is available in the RatifyNow factsheet and the RatifyNow FAQ. More information on the optional protocol is also available at the RatifyNow website.



We Can Do learned about these ratifications in part through the AdHoc_IDC (International Disability Caucus) email list. This on-line, email-based news and discussion service can be joined for free. I also gathered additional background information from the RatifyNow and UN Enable web sites.



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CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Forum on Women’s Rights and Development

Posted on 16 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The 11th AWID International Forum on Women’s Rights and Development

The Power of Movements

November 14-17, 2008
Cape Town, South Africa
www.awid.org/forum08

(Click here to download the PDF of the full Call for Proposals)

From November 14-17, 2008, up to 1,500 women’s rights activists from around the world will gather in Cape Town, South Africa to debate and strategize about how to build stronger women’s movements globally. The Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID) invites you to contribute to this urgent discussion by submitting a proposal to organize a session at the 11th AWID forum: The Power of Movements.

We Can Do readers will note that this forum is not specifically focused on disability issues. However, it would be an opportunity for Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and other interested parties to introduce topics of relevance to movements among women with disabilities in developing countries. We Can Do readers may also wish to consider submitting proposals for sessions on including women with disabilities among the wider women’s movements generally. You could also explore how to build bridges between women’s movements and disability movements, or explore what lessons each movement has to learn from the other.

Session proposals should consider one of the following questions:

Understanding social movements and collective power

  • What is a movement and what is movement building? What are the diverse ways in which movements can be built?
  • What are the strengths and limitations of movements? How do you recognize a movement in decline?
  • What role does constituency building play in movements? How do you build constituencies?
  • What makes a movement “feminist”, and how do its character, approaches and strategies differ from other movements, even if they are led and constituted by women?

Unpacking the architecture of feminist and women’s movements

  • What kinds of organizational structures have evolved through time to successfully support feminist and women’s movements? What other structures do we need to strengthen or build in order to build up the institutional capacity and impact of women’s movements?
  • What role (formal and informal) do organizations play in movements? How can the relationship between women’s organizations and movements be understood?
  • What forms of organizing have appeared in recent years, both in women’s movements and in other social movements? What can we learn from these forms, and what other forms do we still need to develop?

Challenges to effective movement building work

  • What are the key obstacles to movement building today? What are some innovative and effective responses to these obstacles?
  • How can we strengthen and build new and innovative leadership styles and models that contribute to movement building? Which models obstruct or impede movement building?
  • How do we deal collectively and constructively with the politics and tensions within our movements over issues such as over-specialization, North-South/East-West tensions, unequal access to resources, leadership, succession, competition, etc.?
  • What are the movement building challenges faced by social movements in areas or countries under occupation, armed conflict or war? What are examples of effective ways to support their efforts? What are alternatives to movement building in countries where social movements are routinely targeted with threats and intimidation?

Overcoming fragmentation and building inclusive movements

  • How do we build more inclusive movements? What mistakes have we made in the past, and how do avoid them going forward? What have been key lessons learnt in dealing with issues such as class, race, age, religion, ethnicity and other conditions in trying to build inclusive movements?
  • How do we overcome the fragmentation and overspecialization in our movements-e.g. the increasing specialization on particular issues, sectors or themes-to build bridges, common political agendas and shared strategies?
  • How can we build better linkages and do more effective strategizing across levels of activism-e.g., between those doing grassroots work and those doing advocacy at the public-policy level?
  • What other linkages do we urgently need to build, and how do we build them?

Building sustainable, multi-generational movements

  • What are the diverse needs and contributions of different generations of women, and how can we draw upon them to create stronger and more sustainable movements?
  • How can multi-generational dialogues work to strengthen our movements? What are some good experiences of such dialogues and what impacts-good or bad-have they had?
  • How can women’s movements build spaces that significantly incorporate and support-rather than tokenize-young women’s contributions to gender equality and women’s rights struggles?
  • How do we create more sustainable models of activism? How do we renew and sustain our movements and ourselves (and each other)?

Building effective alliances with and learning from other social movements

  • How do we move beyond women’s movements to identify, build and expand solidarities and collective actions with other social movements – and why should we do so? What is the cost of remaining insular?
  • In working with other social movements, where do we draw the line between strategic compromise and marginalization of a women’s rights agenda?
  • What are other movements doing right? What can we learn from them?
  • What have been some organizational experiences in local, national, regional and global joint work with members of other social movements your organization has had? Tell us about your challenges and achievements.

Mobilizing resources for movement building

  • What does funding for movement building look like? Are there any specific examples of experiences that demonstrate how this might be done in an effective way?
  • How does the way in which money is given by donors support or undermine movement building work? What changes are needed in donor policies and strategies to strengthen women’s movements?
  • What changes do we need to make in how we mobilize resources for movement building work? What are the successful strategies that we can learn from?
  • How do we expand the resources for our movement building and for our work in general?

Measuring the success of movements

  • How do we know when we’ve achieved our goals? What constitutes “success”? And how do we measure our impact?
  • What kinds of evaluation methodologies contribute to movement building? How can we use the data from these methodologies to strengthen our movement building work?
  • How do we capture and evaluate the movement building aspects of our work? What are some examples of innovative indicators and evaluation frameworks?

New directions in movement building

  • What new tools, processes, methodologies and innovations are available for movement building? What are their benefits as well as some of their pitfalls?
  • What new language, terminology and ideas around women’s rights can we build that are accessible, make sense to and motivate larger numbers of women, and will increase our political impact? What are other innovative ways of reaching out to the broader public and having greater societal impact?
  • What are some innovative ways that movements can deal effectively with emerging challenges, such the rise of religious fundamentalisms, the potential abuses of new technologies, the feminization of HIV and AIDS, the emerging environmental crisis, etc.?

The Power of Movements

Submit your proposal online at www.awid.org/forum08

Email or call AWID for more information or a
Word version/hard copy of the application form
forum08@awid.org
+1 416 594 3773

SUBMISSION DEADLINE:
JANUARY 28, 2008



Are you a person from a developing country who would need funding in order to attend this or other conferences? Learn about possible limited funding sources for participating in conferences at:

https://wecando.wordpress.com/2007/11/29/funding-for-conference-participation-from-developing-nations/



We Can Do learned of this opportunity through contacts at Women Leaders at Mobility International USA (MIUSA). Most of the text in this announcement originates with AWID, except for the paragraph targeted at We Can Do readers.



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FUNDING for Conference Participation from Developing Nations

Posted on 29 November 2007. Filed under: East Asia Pacific Region, Events and Conferences, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[You can reach this post directly with this short URL: http://tinyurl.com/yvhakm]

Every year there are dozens of international disability-related conferences. These conferences allow thousands of participants to network with colleagues around the world, forge partnerships across national and professional boundaries, and enrich their knowledge and understanding of the work they do with disabled people in their home countries.

But every year, there are also thousands of people from developing countries who are cut off from these opportunities because most conferences do not take their financial limitations into account. Usually the easiest expense for conference organizers to control are the registration fees. But many do not even have discounted fees for participants from developing countries. Even those that do usually don’t, or cannot, help reduce the cost of travel or lodging. So where can would be conference-participants from developing countries turn for assistance?

Although limited, a few options may be available to you depending on your country of origin, the location of the conference, the goals of the organization that you represent, or the purpose of your trip. Try exploring one of the following three organizations. (Note that the AJ Muste Memorial Institute and the Inter-American Foundation are primarily for people in the Latin American region. Only the Ford Foundation addresses the needs of people from all or most regions.).

Please note that any requests or applications for funding should be directed to these three organizations, NOT to We Can Do. Leaving a comment here will NOT help you contact these three organizations. Instead, please follow the link to the official web sites for each of the three organizations below.

Ford Foundation
The Ford Foundation has 12 country offices in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Russia. The country offices have travel grant monies which may be usable for attending international conferences. Go to their contact us page to find and contact a regional office near you. Also try looking at their grants page for more information on applying for Ford Foundation grants in general.

AJ Muste Memorial Institute
The AJ Muste Memorial Institute has a number of different grants for projects that promote nonviolence means for achieving social justice, particularly in areas such as peace and disarmament; social and economic justice; racial and sexual equality; and labor rights.

This includes the NOVA Travel Fund (in Spanish), which makes grants of up to $1,500 to help base-level activists from Latin America and the Caribbean attend regional conferences and meetings. Grant recommendations are made by a committee of advisors representing different regions of Latin America. Their next deadline is October 1, 2008 for trips that would begin after November 15, 2008–but check back at their web site for future deadlines.

Follow the links for the NOVA application form in html format or to download the NOVA application form in RTF format (in Spanish).

Inter-American Foundation (IAF)
The IAF funds the self-help efforts of grassroots groups in Latin America and the Caribbean to improve living conditions of the disadvantaged and the excluded, enhance their capacity for decision-making and self-governance, and develop partnerships with the public sector, business and civil society. The IAF does not identify problems or suggest projects; instead it responds to initiatives presented. Projects are selected for funding on their merits rather than by sector. IMPORTANT: The IAF only supports projects in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The above links to the IAF web site in English, but their web site is also available in Spanish, Portuguese, and Creole:

IAF in Spanish
IAF in Portuguese
IAF in Creole

Also see the web page on IAF’s involvement with Disabled Peoples’ Organizations (DPOs).

Grant requests need to come from organizations, not from individuals. The IAF has supported disability rights activists from Latin America in attending the Ad-Hoc Commitee meetings at the United Nations and also in attending meetings in Panama for the Latin America Decade.

 


 

Some of the text in this blog entry is taken from the relevant web sites describing the grant funds in question. Thank you to Diana Samarasan at the Fund for Global Human Rights–Disability Rights Initiative for alerting We Can Do to these funding sources. Anyone who is aware of additional resources relevant to DPOs in developing countries is urged to please let me know. You can leave a comment in the comments area below, or you can email me at ashettle [at] patriot [dot] net.

[Edited 16 January 2008 to correct links to Ford Foundation web site and to add a sentence amplifying that two of these foundations are primarily oriented at the Latin American region. People from other regions will want to look at the Ford Foundation.]
[Edited 19 October 2008 to add a line emphasizing that people interested in applying for any of these opportunities should please contact the relevant organization, NOT We Can Do. In other words, leaving a comment here will NOT help you apply for funding. Instead, please follow the relevant link from the organization you think is most likely to be able to help you. Then read their official web site carefully and apply directly with the relevant organization.]

 


 


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MEMORANDUM, Commonwealth Disabled People’s Conference 2007

Posted on 22 November 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Commonwealth Nations, Events and Conferences, Guest Blogger, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Commonwealth Disabled People’s Conference met in early November in Kampala, Uganda. The following memorandum was issued at that conference.


Dear Colleagues,

It’s my pleasure to forward to you a memorandum of decisions made at the recently concluded Commonwealth Disabled peoples’ Conference. Attached to this memorandum is a shorter memorandum which was prepared specifically for sending to CHOGM (Commonwealth Heads of Governments Meeting).

I hope these documents will enable those who are in a position to lobby their respective delegations to CHOGM to raise disability issues during the meeting.

Yours Sincerely,

James Mwandha.


Draft

MEMORANDUM OF THE COMMONWEALTH DISABLED PEOPLES’ CONFERENCE CONVENED IN KAMPALA FROM 4TH – 7TH NOVEMBER 2007

Preamble

The Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Conference convened in Kampala, Uganda from the 4th -7th November 2007;

NOTING with appreciation the theme of this year’s CHOGM, ‘Transforming Commonwealth Societies to achieve political, economic and human development.’

AWARE that Persons with disabilities are among the poorest of the poor and the most socially excluded,

RECOGNISING the diversity of Persons with Disabilities,

EMPHASISING the importance of mainstreaming disability issues as an integral part of relevant strategies of sustainable development,

NOTING the adoption by the 61st UN General Assembly of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

APPRECIATING that India and Jamaica have already ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

RECOGNISING the importance of International cooperation for improving the living conditions of persons with disabilities in every country particularly in developing countries,

The Conference hereby resolves as follows:

1.0 APPRECIATION

1. Appreciates the Government of Uganda for hosting the Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Conference and in particular the support given by Honourable Sayda Bbumba, Minister of, Gender, Labour and Social Development and Honourable Sulaiman Madada, Minister of State for Disability and Elderly Affairs.

2. Thanks to the Right Honourable Rebecca Kadaga, Deputy Speaker of Uganda’s Parliament for officiating at the opening of the Conference and Honourable Okello Oryem, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs in charge of International Relations for performing the closing ceremony and offering to submit the conference memorandum to the Ugandan Head of State.

3. Commends the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of the UK Government for sending a representative to the conference as an observer.

4. Commends further the Uganda disability movement for the initiative taken to hold this first ever conference of Disabled People in the Commonwealth and the excellent arrangements and the hospitality accorded to the delegates.

5. Appreciates the resource persons for the excellent presentations made at the Conference and at the side events.

6. Notes with appreciation the countries that sent delegates to the conference namely: Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, United Kingdom, Zambia, and observers from Rwanda and Sudan.

7. Recognises the participation of the President of the World Blind Union, the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities, the East African Federation of the Disabled, the representative of the President of the World Federation of the Deaf, representatives of Leonard Cheshire Foundation International, and the office of the UN Commissioner for Human Rights.

2.0 CONFERENCE RESOLUTIONS TO CHOGM

8. Submits a short memorandum, appearing as annexture 1 to this memorandum, to CHOGM through the Uganda Minister of State for International Relations.

9. Circulates the short memorandum to as many disabled people and their organisations in the Commonwealth as possible and call upon them to use it to lobby their respective delegations to advocate for disability issues in CHOGM.

3.0 COMMONWEALTH DISABLED PEOPLES’ FORUM

10. Establishes the Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum with Disabled Peoples’ Organisations (DPOs) in the Commonwealth constituting its membership.

11. A steering committee consisting of Honourable James Mwandha (Uganda) Chair, Mr. Mark Harrison (UK), Mr. Thomas On’golo, Secretariat of the African Decade of Disabled Persons (South Africa), a representative from Canada and a representative from India.

12. The steering committee to draw up their terms of reference for the establishment of the forum and convene a forum meeting within a period of ten months.

13. The steering committee to dialogue with the Commonwealth Secretariat and register the forum with the Commonwealth Foundation.

4.0 EQUALITY AND NON-DISCRIMINATION

14. Recommends that data collection at all levels should include disaggregated data concerning disability to enable Governments to plan effectively for the inclusion of disabled people.

15. Calls upon all governments to pass laws that promote equality and inclusion of disabled people in society and do away with laws that perpetuate discrimination and exclusion.

16. Appeals to Governments and donors to resource DPOs to publicize the convention, sensitize the general public and help to implement the Convention.

5.0 ROLE OF GOVERNMENTS, DISABLED PEOPLES’ ORGANISATIONS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION AND MONITORING OF THE CONVENTION

A. Governments.

17. Sign and ratify the Convention and enact laws to domesticate the convention and amend all laws, which negatively impact on disabled people.

18. Translate the Convention document into the local languages and Sign Language to facilitate wider understanding of the rights of disabled people.

19. Put in place programmes that create greater awareness in communities and within government systems relating to disability rights, and promote efforts that encourage positive attitudes towards disabled people.

20. Mainstream disability in social, economic and political programmes and provide for representation of disabled people in the Parliaments, Local Councils and Statutory organizations.

21. Provide access to rehabilitation, education, training, employment opportunities, cultural and sports activities, technical aids, Sign Language Interpretation Services and other assistive devices to facilitate mobility and independent daily living of disabled people.

22. Develop special programmes to cater for the special needs of women, children and the elderly with disabilities.

23. Strengthen DPOs and support creation of new ones, and promote representation of disabled people at local, national and international levels.

24. Include a disability component in all Government budgets and budgetary allocations across all sectors and in all local governments and also to give visibility to disability in all government plans, programmes and activities.

25. Build alliances with other countries, multilateral institutions and donor organizations to promote international cooperation in research, sharing information on best practices and funding for disability programmes.

26. Disability as a cross cutting issue should be mainstreamed and prioritized in all the development planning, implementation, and monitoring processes of governments as a means of achieving the millennium development goals (MDGs).

27. Governments should take special measures to protect persons with disabilities in all situations of conflicts, wars and catastrophes to alleviate the grave suffering caused to them.

B. Disabled Peoples’ Organisations (DPOs)

28. Lobby their Governments to sign and ratify the convention.

29. Once the convention enters into force, lobby Governments and Parliament to enact laws to domesticate it.

30. Ensure that disability issues are fully covered in the countries’ Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) where applicable.

31. Make alliances with other Civil Society organizations and create a common platform that includes disability concerns.

32. Advocate for budgetary allocations at national level across all sectors and at all local levels.

33. Participate actively in the monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of the convention at all levels.

34. Partner with the media for dissemination of the convention and other information relating to disability rights.

6.0 MONITORING: NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL

35. Monitoring is an important aspect of the process of realizing the rights of people with disabilities.

36. Governments should establish monitoring institutions that are well resourced and independent.

37. Monitoring institutions should have adequate and effective representation by different categories of people with disabilities.

38. The monitoring tools should be clear and shared with the key stakeholders.

7.0 INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AND INCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT

39. Development partners should provide technical and financial assistance to DPOs to address the challenges faced by people with disabilities.

40. International Donors should ensure that people with disabilities are involved and benefiting from all bilateral and multilateral funded programmes.

41. Disabled people and disability issues must be included in every development cooperation agenda of international development partners.

42. The international development partners should promote south – south cooperation among DPOs and transfer resources directly to them.

43. International development cooperation/ partnership should promote capacity building and technology support on disability issues to national Governments in the south in line with the UN convention.

44. Development partners and donors should make funding conditional to addressing the concerns of disabled people and ensure that recipient countries of their development aid mainstream issues of disability in their plans and programmes.

45. Investors and service providers should take into account the needs of disabled people when designing their projects.

Dated this 7th day of November 2007


ANNEXURE 1

MEMORANDUM TO CHOGM

Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Conference
4th – 7th November 2007, Hotel Africana, Kampala, Uganda
Final Communiqué

This conference decides to send the following statement to the Commonwealth Heads of Government’s:

Resolution From the Commonwealth Disabled People’s Conference to the CHOGM 2007

Preamble
NOTING with appreciation the theme of this years CHOGM,

AWARE that Persons with disabilities are among the poorest of the poor and the most socially excluded,

EMPHASING the importance of mainstreaming disability issues as an integral part of relevant strategies of sustainable development,

NOTING the adoption by the 61st UN General Assembly of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

APPRECIATING that India and Jamaica have already ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

RECOGNISING the diversity of Persons with Disabilities,

RECOGNISING FURTHER the importance of International cooperation for improving the living conditions of persons with disabilities in every country particularly in developing countries,

Hereby recommends to the Commonwealth Heads of Government, meeting in Kampala from 23rd – 25th November 2007:

That all Commonwealth countries:

1. Ratify and implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability and its Optional Protocol.

2. Adopt disability as a crosscutting issue that should be mainstreamed in domestic policy and planning.

3. Develop disability polices and programmes to cater for the concerns of Persons With Disabilities (PWDs) in line with article 32 of the UN Convention on International Development Cooperation.

Adopted at Kampala, this 7th day of November 2007


Thank you to James Mwandha at the Action on Disability and Development Uganda Programme (ADD Uganda) for granting permission to post this memorandum at We Can Do.


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PAPER: Violence Against Women with Disabilities in South Africa

Posted on 18 November 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Some studies suggest that nearly one in three women are the targets of violence from their intimate partners. Women with disabilities are no exception. In fact, some studies suggest that violence against disabled women may happen even more frequently than does violence against non-disabled women. Yet, violence against women with disabilities is rarely studied at all even in rich countries–and studied even less often in developing countries.

One exception is a small-scale exploratory research project on gender-based violence and disabled women conducted by the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) in South Africa entitled “On the Margins: Violence Against Women with Disabilities,” (PDF format, 341 Kb) written by Ereshnee Naidu, Sadiyya Haffejee, Lisa Vetten, and Samantha Hargreaves.

Although this research project was small, it helps highlight what has often been an ignored problem perpetuated against an ignored population:

“This exploratory research study on violence against women with disabilities strongly indicates that women with disabilities are extremely vulnerable to gender-based violence, that the violence and abuse they confront is shaped by the nature and form of their particular disability, and that they are especially disadvantaged in their access to the criminal justice system and gender-based violence support services, as compared to women without disabilities.”

Yet, when the researchers asked what services are available to women with disabilities who are the target of violence, the result, although not surprising, was nevertheless worrying:

“While many of the informants from service organisations reached through this survey were aware of and concerned about violence against women with disabilities, their organisations were, in the main, failing to address the needs of this specific, and very neglected, constituency.”

Interested We Can Do visitors can follow the link to download “On the Margins” (PDF format, 341 Kb) for themselves. The paper offers a more detailed discussion of how and why women with disabilities in South Africa are vulnerable to violence. It also describes the barriers they experience both in finding help to escape violence and in seeking justice in the legal system. Finally, the authors make recommendations for what action should be taken in South Africa to address the problem including advocacy and awareness; networking and collaboration; promoting accessible services; and policy, monitoring, and research.

The paper is available in PDF format (341 Kb) at: http://www.csvr.org.za/docs/gender/onthemargins.pdf

For more We Can Do articles related to violence, click on the word “violence” under “categories” in the right hand navigation bar.



[Edit 17 June 2008: Edited to update the link to the paper, which had moved. Apologies for the inconvenience to people who had clicked on the old, incorrect link.]

We Can Do learned of this paper through a bi-monthly newsletter from www.AskSource.info. AskSource offers an extensive, on-line library of materials and resources related to health or to disability in developing countries. Their bi-monthly newsletter alerts subscribers to the newest resources available at their web site.

We Can Do readers who would like to subscribe to the AskSource newsletter for themselves can do so by filling out the form at http://www.AskSource.info. Or you can email source@ich.ucl.ac.uk and type SUBSCRIBE
SOURCE in the subject line, and state your name, organisation and email address. Additional information, such as your subject interests or activities, will help AskSource tailor their communications to your needs.


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NEWS: World Association of Sign Language Interpreters Conference Report

Posted on 6 November 2007. Filed under: Deaf, Events and Conferences, Interpreting, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The email further below comes from the secretary of the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters (WASLI) regarding their recent conference in Spain. Some sign language interpreters from developing nations were among the participants.

At the WASLI web site (http://www.wasli.org), you can see a daily newsletter from the conference (in English at top, in Spanish if you scroll down the page). You will also find text on topics such as developing a code of ethics for interpreters (see the link to the code of ethics in Kenya); mentoring sign language interpreters; links to information about deaf interpreters; and more.

Their “WASLI Country Reports 2007” (PDF format, 2.8 Mb) presents recent information about the situation of sign language interpreters or Deaf/deaf people generally in dozens of both industrialized and developing nations around the world. Some of the developing nations represented include: Botswana, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Nigeria, Cambodia, India, Peru, and Mexico.

WASLI also published a similar report two years earlier, WASLI Country Reports 2005 (PDF format, 1 Mb). The low- and middle-income countries represented in this report include: Argentina, Brazil, Cameroon, Kenya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Nigeria, Palestine, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Limited summaries of the WASLI website is available in other languages in PDF format by clicking on “About this website in other languages” WASLI’s left-hand navigation bar. Languages include Arabic, Brazialian Portuguese, Italian, Kiswahili, Japanese, Thai, French, Cantonese, Indonesian, Spanish, and Russian.

Email From WASLI Secretary

From: Zane Hema WASLI Secretary
To: secretary@wasli.org
Subject: WASLI
Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2007 00:44:55 -0000

WASLI is committed to developing the profession of sign language interpreting world wide

Greetings Friends

2007 has been an important year for WASLI primarily because it was the year that the 2nd WASLI Conference took place in Segovia, Spain 13-15 July 2007.

WASLI Conference 2007 – UPDATED WEBPAGE

The WASLI 2007 page on the website has been devoted to the WASLI 2007 Conference in Segovia.  It has been updated to include:

A photo gallery,

Minutes of the General Membership meeting,

Scenes from Segovia (Conference Newsletter)

Messages of Greetings

Countries Report

Update on the WASLI 2007 Conference Proceedings

… with more information to follow

WASLI Conference 2007 – OFFICIAL STATISTICS

Total number of participants – 255 (197 women and 58 men) from 41 different countries.  (This figure does not include working interpreters, companions and an individual from Press purposes)

159 were members of an interpreter association.

20 delegates were sponsored (8 people who were sponsored did not come)

Spain had the highest number of participants at 102

Regional Representation

Africa – 6 countries represented

North America – 3 countries represented

Europe – 14 countries represented

Balkans – 3 countries represented

Australasia & Oceania – 2 countries represented

Asia  – 8 countries represented

Transcaucasia & Central Asia – 1 country represented

Latino America – 4 countries represented

More news to follow shortly …

Zane HEMA

WASLI Secretary


We Can Do received the above email via the Intl-Dev email distribution list, which circulates information of interest to international development professionals and others with an interest in the field. The other information about WASLI and its country reports was gathered from the WASLI web site. Neither We Can Do nor Intl-Dev are associated with WASLI–individuals interested in their organization should follow the link to review their web site directly.


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Report: 1st Africa Deaf HIV/AIDS Workshop

Posted on 20 October 2007. Filed under: Case Studies, Deaf, HIV/AIDS, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

No continent has been struck by HIV/AIDS more than sub-Saharan Africa: nearly two-thirds of all people living with HIV are in Africa, and so were three-quarters of those who died from AIDS in 2006 (see UNAIDS report). We also know that people with disabilities are at higher risk for becoming infected with HIV (see Nora Groce’s study). And Deaf/deaf and hard of hearing people are no exception.

Two years ago, people who shared a concern about HIV and AIDS within the Deaf communities of Africa gathered at a workshop to exchange their knowledge and raise awareness within the Deaf community and among government officials about the need to address HIV/AIDS. The report resulting from this workshop is now available in PDF format on-line.

REPORT ON THE CONTINENTAL-WIDE HIV/AIDS SENSITIZATION WORKSHOP FOR DEAF POPULATION IN AFRICA.
VENUE: PEACOCK HOTEL DAR ES SALAAM
DATES: 24 TH – 30TH AUGUST 2005
THEME: OUR FUTURE-OUR RIGHTS TO HIV/AIDS INFORMATION, CARE AND SUPPORT ______________________________________________________________________________ The objectives of the workshop were as follows:
• To provide HIV/AIDS awareness and life skills training to the representatives from the Deaf community in Africa.
• To sensitise the Deaf on their rights to HIV/AIDS information and to care and support when infected by HIV/AIDS.
• To provide a forum for the Deaf to exchange inter-country experience on HIV/AIDS among the Deaf population in Africa.
• To educate and raise awareness among the government officials, UN agencies and participants from institutions working on HIV/AIDS, on the specific problems face by Deaf people in accessing HIV/AIDS information, care and support.

The report summarizes the opening remarks which touched upon the challenges facing Deaf Africans in fighting HIV/AIDs and ideas for moving forward. It also summarizes some of the key presentations including:

“LINGUSITC AND ATTITUDINAL OBSTACLES FACED BY THE DEAF PEOPLE IN ACCESSING HIV/AIDS INFORMATION IN AFRICAN COUNTRIES: THE CASE OF TANZANIA.” By Dr. Mary Mboya, Lecturer Department of Education Psychology-University of Dar es Salaam.

“THE ROLES OF RSESA IN ADVOCATING THE LINGUISTIC RIGHTS OF THE DEAF PEOPLE IN EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA AND INITIATIVE TO ESTABLISH THE AFRICAN DEAF UNION.” By Dominic Majiwa-Regional Director, World Federation of the Deaf, Regional

“BARRIERS FACED BY DEAF WOMEN IN AFRICA THAT CONTRIBUTE TO VULNERABILITY TO HIV/AIDS” By Euphrasia Mbewe – Deaf Women Activist, Zambia.

“UGANDA NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THE DEAF STRUGGLE TO FIGHT HIV/AIDS AMONGST THE DEAF PEOPLE.” By Florence N. Mukasa – Gender and Theatre Coordinator, Uganda National Association of the Deaf.

“SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT HIV/AIDS” By Meena H. A. – UNAIDS Country Office – Dar es salaam.

“THE AFRICAN DECADE AND VISION TO COMBAT HIV/AIDS AMONG THE PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES IN AFRICA” By Thomas Ongolo – The Secretariat of African Decade of Disabled Persons in South Africa.

“LOBBYING AND ADVOCACY STRATEGIES FOR HIV/AIDS AND HEARING DISABILITY INFORMATION, CARE AND SUPPORT.” By Ananilea Nkya – Tanzania Women Media Association (TAMWA)

The report also describes how deaf participants were trained in preventing HIV/AIDS, and in advocating for more inclusion of deaf people in HIV/AIDS work carried out by their governments.

The report can be downloaded in PDF format (143 kilobytes) at http://siteresources.worldbank.org/DISABILITY/Resources/News—Events/BBLs/ADUReport.pdf


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