SCHOLARSHIPS for Deaf Students in Applied Sign Language Studies, New Delhi, India

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities, signed languages, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR DEAF STUDENTS
in BA (Hons) Applied Sign Language Studies

An initiative by:

International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies, Preston, UK
Indira Gandhi National Open University, New Delhi, India
Deaf Empowerment Foundation, The Netherlands

Program information

1. THE COURSE

Applied Sign Language Studies brings together the study of sign language and deaf communities with areas of study in applied linguistics, such as first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, language planning and policy, and language pedagogy. Graduates will work as sign language teachers, professionals in the field of language support for deaf people, teaching assistants in deaf education, and interpreter trainers.

The course is designed specifically to be accessible for deaf students and is taught through sign language. “Learning by doing” is included in work placements, lab work, and experiential modules. Deaf students without standard secondary school qualifications can take a one-year preparatory course (“Foundation Entry”) and continue with the BA course afterwards.

The BA in Applied Sign Language Studies is a joint international initiative. The course was developed at the International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies in the UK and will be taught at the Indira Gandhi National Open University in New Delhi, India. The beginning of the programme in 2009 is subject to validation.

2. THE SCHOLARSHIPS

The Deaf Empowerment Foundation is providing scholarships for deaf students in the preparatory Foundation Entry course in the 2009/2010 academic year.

Scholarships for Indian students
These cover one year of tuition fees at Rs. 10,000 and are available to Indian nationals. Students from other developing countries may also be eligible and should confirm their status when applying.

Scholarships for international students
These cover one year of tuition fees at ₤1,500 and are available to non-Indian students. This includes all students from industrialised countries and certain categories of students from developing countries other than India. The latter should confirm their status when applying.

Scholarships are for tuition fees only and do not cover travel, accommodation or living expenses.

CONTACT: scholarship@def-intl.org

From: http://www.def-intl.org/?q=node/20



I received this announcement via the Deaf Studies Africa email discussion group. All inquiries about this opportunity should please be directed to scholarship@def-intl.org, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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Training Opportunity: Digital Storytelling Project, June 8-12, 2009, for African Youth with Disabilities and Allies

Posted on 16 April 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Families, Funding, Media & Journalism, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD)
APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet
invite you to
Submit an application to participate in a Digital Storytelling Project
Application DUE 3 May 2009
Workshop dates 8 -12 June 2009

“It’s in the telling of our stories that we discover how much of our experiences and learning we have in common with others. Stories make our connection with others and with the world real. They weave together our individual experiences to reveal a picture of a community, a group and a country.”

Introduction

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) in partnership with APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet, invite you to submit an application to participate in a digital storytelling workshop. We are inviting people living and working in Africa who would like to empower others and affect change by documenting their journey and telling their story. Applicants must be:

(1) parents/carers of children with disabilities and youth
(2) young people with disabilities
(3) people working in organizations to promote the rights of children and youth with disabilities e.g. Advocates, students, CBR workers, teachers, journalists, information activists, content developers, programme officer/managers,

Participants will develop short videos reflecting the experiences of parents and youth with disabilities in particular with regards to challenges and successes in accessing inclusive education, health, employment and acceptance in their communities and country. Participants will also examine the power dimensions of story-telling and how we retain the authenticity of our own voice, as well as the voices of the people whose stories we document, preserve or disseminate.

Parents, youth and individuals working in the field have many stories to tell, but never have the time, knowledge, equipment and space to reflect, understand and tell their own stories, share their responses, understandings and experiences.

There is a large amount of information on the internet but very little that reflects the lived realities of those affected and people working in the field of disability in Africa.

The workshop aims to:
• document real-life stories of a cross-section of parents and youth with disabilities as well as those working in the field
• empower people to tell their own stories, while at the same time create a powerful advocacy tool that can be used in their country and beyond.
• develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills,
• enable parents and youth with disabilities to share and network amongst each other.

More about the workshop

In the workshop we will explore people’s own stories and learn how to develop a story line, use photo’s, video clips, and drawings to tell your story in an effective way.

There is space for twelve applicants who will participate in a five day digital storytelling workshop, 8 -12 June 2009.

In the month before the workshop delegates will need to join an online study group, collect content for their story (pictures etc) and begin to learn some of the software.

At the workshop participants will learn to use computer software and other equipment necessary for making a short (3-5 minutes) multimedia digital story.

The digital storytelling workshop is hands-on and computer intensive, requiring commitment and willingness to develop a short, personal story; learn new software and edit a short digital video of five minutes in length.

Digital storytelling is not like writing a formal document; it’s more like creative, autobiographical writing. To see an example, check out the website
http://www.takebackthetech.net
http://www.silencespeaks.org

In order to be eligible to participate, you must be able to attend all five days of the workshop, and be able to travel to South Africa to arrive by 7 June, departing 13 June 2009. Travel and accommodation will be sponsored by the SADPD. You must be willing to allow your story, or part of it, to be used in advocacy by SADPD and APC WNSP’s Take Back the Tech campaign. The workshop will be conducted in ENGLISH so other language speakers must have a good proficiency in English. Sign language and French / Portugese interpretation will be provided if necessary (Please motivate for this in application form).

This workshop is a chance to learn new skills and tell your story in a creative and visual format. It’s a lot of work . . . AND a lot of fun.

Copyright:
All stories are owned by the person who made them. The story is your story and will be licensed under a Creative Commons license. We are open to discussing a formula that respects your privacy and confidentiality should you be uncomfortable with the widespread sharing and dissemination of some parts of your story. We would like your stories to be part of a public effort promote the rights and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities and their families.

Who Should Apply?
• We are looking for stories told by parent, youth and individuals working in the field of Disability.
• Applicants must be living and working in Africa (preference will be given to women)
• Applicants must preferably be based in an organisation, institution or network, but individuals will also be considered.
• Youth should between the ages of 18 – 35
• The training is in English. Participants must speak and understand English but are welcome to produce their story in any language they choose. If however you require translation into French and Portuguese please motivate in your application.
• The story you tell has to be about you and your experiences. It can be about situations or events but it must be a personal story told in the first person
• The workshop requires a basic level of computer literacy.
• Applicants must be willing to avail themselves for future advocacy work or training in digital stories in their country.

Instructions:
Please complete the form below and email it as a file attachment to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za
DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING APPLICATIONS is 3 May 2009. If you have any questions, feel free to email or Skype Nafisa on nafisababoo. Incomplete forms will not be considered for selection.

APPLICATION FORM

Date:
Name:
Address:
Country:
Organisation:
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Age:
Date of birth:
Disability:
Support needs (Enlarge print, Braille, translation etc)

Please describe in a few sentences the main point of the story you would like to tell.

What issues does your story address?

What do you hope to get out of the digital storytelling workshop?

Have you talked to anyone about the story you’d like to share, or is this the first time you’ll be talking about it in a group?

If this is your first time talking about it, what do you think it’ll be like for you to share the story with a group of people ?

Please write a draft of the story you’d like to share, below. It should be no more than 500 words (about one and ½ pages, double-spaced, typed). Your story should be written in the first-person. Note: If you’d like to see examples of other people’s digital stories, you can go to http://www.silencespeaks.org or http://www.womensnet.org.za or http://www.takebackthetech.net

Please briefly describe to us what you use computers for.

What is your familiarity with the following Software Programs and Processes? Please put an “x” to the right of the statements that most apply.

Using a PC (Windows Operating System) or a Macintosh Computer
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Scanning Photos or Other Images
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Photoshop
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Premiere
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Do you know how to (please mark YES or NO)
Open software applications YES/NO
Save documents and find them again YES/NO
How to use a mouse, cut and paste, drag and drop. YES/NO

It would be useful to know the following applications – Microsoft office or Open office, and using web browsers such as Internet Explorer or Firefox.

There are a limited number of spaces in the workshop. So please note that the submission of an application is no guarantee that APC-Africa-Women will be able to support you to attend. Successful applicants will be notified 5th May 2009.

Thank You!

INFORMATION ABOUT THE ORGANIZATIONS

About the Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities
The African Decade of Persons with Disabilities was proclaimed by the African Union for the period 1999 – 2009. The main goals of the African Decade are to raise awareness about the situation of the estimated 60-80 million persons with disabilities in the region and to identify solutions tailored to the African Experience that enhance participation, equality and empowerment of Africans with Disabilities. The overall aims and priorities of the Decade are stipulated in an AU- Continental Plan of Action. A Secretariat was established to facilitate the realization of these objectives.
The Secretariat is an international Non Governmental Organisation, established in 2004 by all the major Regional Disabled People’s Organisations to give a new dynamism to the implementation of the Continental Plan of Action. It is hosted, at the request of African Union by South Africa in Cape-Town where its headquarters are located. The mission of the Secretariat of the African Decade is to empower Governments, DPO´s, Decade steering committee’s (DSC) and development organizations to work in partnership to include disability and persons with disabilities into policies and programs in all sectors of society. The strategy of action of the Secretariat is to
• Build the capacities of DPOs, persons with disabilities who are most vulnerable and the Decade Steering Committees to enable them to advocate and lobby their respective government so that they integrate disability into all their development processes.
• Advocate and lobby for mainstreaming of disability in the policies and programmes.
• Raise awareness around the main issues related to persons with disabilities in society.
Http://www.sadpd.org

About APC-Africa-Women

APC-Africa-women is the African regional network of the Association for Progressive Communications Women’s Networking Support Programme (APC WNSP). APC WNSP is a global network of women who support women networking for social change and women’s empowerment, through the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). We promote gender equality in the design, development, implementation, access to and use of ICTs and in the policy decisions and frameworks that regulate them. We have a special focus on redressing inequities based on women’s social or ethnic background – through the provision of research, training, information, and support activities in the field of ICT policy, skills-sharing in the access and use of ICT, and women’s network-building.
Http://www.apcwomen.org

APC-Africa-Women hosts Women’s Electronic Network Training (WENT) workshops every two years. WENT workshops aim to build the skills and capacities of women and their organisations to utilise ICTs in women’s empowerment, social development work and policy advocacy. In 2003 participants at WENT Africa developed skills in the repackaging of information through the convergence of old and new technologies using radio and in building websites using a Content Management System. Weaving through the training were sessions on gender and ICT policy issues. In 2005 WENT Africa was hosted in Kampala and using a two-track system, trained women technicians in the use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and women managers of NGOs in technology planning. More information can be viewed at http://wentafrica.blogspot.com/

About Women’sNet
Women’sNet works to advance gender equality and justice in South Africa through the use of ICTs by providing training and facilitating content dissemination and creation that supports women, girls, and women’s and gender organisations and networks to take control of their own content and ICT use. The organisation is one of the few working on technology for social change in South Africa, and the first to do this from a gender perspective our work has focused on technology for purpose – strengthening women’s organisations specifically and civil society in general – to use ICTs for achieving gender justice.
Http://www.womensnet.org.za



This announcement was disseminated on the EENET Eastern Africa listserver. All applications and inquiries should please be directed to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za , NOT to We Can Do.

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Scholarships, BA in Applied Sign Language Studies, India

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities, signed languages, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

The Deaf Empowerment Foundation is offering scholarships for students in the 2009/2010 academic year for study in the newly launched 4-year BA (Hons) Applied Sign Language Studies.

This course is a joint international initiative. It was developed at the International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies in the UK and will be taught at the Indira Gandhi National Open University in New Delhi, India. The beginning of the programme in 2009 is subject to validation.

The 2009/2010 scholarships cover tuition fees for one year full-time study in the Foundation Entry programme, which is a preparatory “Year Zero” of study. The Foundation Entry course focuses on English literacy and other academic skills, including:

English for deaf learners in HE
English reading skills for deaf learners
Text composition skills for deaf learners
Study skills and Personal Development Planning
Information Technology and Numeracy in HE

For further information about the Foundation Entry and the BA in Applied Sign Language Studies, and for further details on scholarship applications, please contact Sibaji Panda at spanda@uclan.ac.uk and click here to read the information sheet, or click here to download the application form (Word format, 144 Kb). See also www.def-intl.org and www.uclan.ac.uk/islands

Deaf students of all nationalities who fulfill the scholarship criteria are eligible. To apply, please email Claire Perdomo at CLPerdomo1@uclan.ac.uk and ask for an application pack to be sent to you. You may also email to request an information sheet to be posted on departmental notice boards etc.

THE APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 MAY 2009.

— Please distribute widely as you see fit —



I received this announcement through the Intl-Dev listserver. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to the Deaf Empowerment Foundation, NOT We Can Do. Thank you.

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JOB POST: Lecturer in Sign Language Linguistics or Deaf Studies, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Posted on 5 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, signed languages, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

IMMIDIATE VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT

• POSITION: Expatriate Lecturers (2)
• Sign Language & Deaf Culture

Position needed: – Lecturer in Linguistics (with expertise in sign language linguistics and/or deaf studies)

Addis Ababa University’s Department of Linguistics has launched the Bachelors of Arts degree in Ethiopian Sign Language and Deaf Culture this academic year (2008-2009). It is the first BA degree course in Sign Language provided in the African continent.

The main objectives of the BA program are to encourage and train:
• sign language teachers in teaching sign language courses at secondary and tertiary levels
• sign linguists in conducting research on Ethiopian Sign Language in order to promote the use, status and function of Ethiopian Sign Language.
• sign language interpreters in the interpreting profession

The program is to:
• Promote collaborative research on Ethiopian Sign Language in conjunction with other institutions of higher learning at local, regional and international levels.
• Provide advisory services to organizations, schools, institutions that work to promote Ethiopian Sign Language and Deaf culture, organize short-term trainings for people involved in Sign language and Deaf Education, compilation of Sign language dictionary etc.

It is a three year regular university program which gives modules focusing on sign language, linguistics, Deaf Culture. Some of the modules the Lecturer is expected to be familiar with are:
• Sign language and Society
• Sign language literature and performance
• Trends in Deaf Education
• The sociology of signing family
• Sign language interpretation and translation
• Deafness in broader perspectives,
• Communication Support for Deaf People (i.e. note-taking, interpreting etc)

We may require the expatriate lecturers (if given sufficient skills needed) to assist us in doing a feasibility study into setting up the African Centre for Deaf Studies and Sign Language Studies at our university.

Contractual time:
The Department of Linguistics and Philology seeks to employ two full-time Lecturer positions. The minimum contractual time is two years as of March 2009 with the possibility of extending the contract.

Requirement:
• Good sign language skills, preferably in American Sign Language
• Postgraduate diploma in Sign linguistics, Deaf Studies, or related field or qualification;
• Knowledge of Deaf history and culture;
• Extensive experience in working with the Deaf community;

The ideal candidates for the position should be a self-starter, detail-oriented, and able to handle multiple assignments and operate in team work and an intense environment.

Salary: details given upon requesting

Application:
Interested candidates are required to send or email a letter of application stating their interest, their curriculum vitae and two letters of references from academics to:

Eyasu Hailu Tamene
Ethiopian Sign Language Program Coordinator
Addis Ababa University, Department of Linguistics
P.O. Box 1176 Addis Ababa
Ethiopia

For further information, please email Eyasu Tamene at: tusaye11@gmail.com



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RESOURCE: Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Children, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Less than a decade ago, more than 100 million primary-school aged children still had never entered a classroom. Today, that number has dropped below 80 million, even though the world’s population has grown in that time. Clearly progress has been made. But children with disabilities are being left behind: one-third of the world’s children out of school are disabled. Many of the rest are excluded for other reasons that pose their own set of challenges: some are left behind because they are girls; or because they don’t speak the dominant language of their country; or because they experience discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity.

How can Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and other Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) help schools in their country be more inclusive of students who have commonly been excluded? Save the Children UK has released a new report that offers guidance: “Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience” (PDF format, 4.14 Mb). This report describes successful projects, and the lessons learned, from countries as diverse as Vietnam, Kyrgyzstan, Peru, Bangladesh, China, Somalia, Brazil, Western Balkans, Mongolia, Nepal, Tajikistan, Serbia, India, and Morocco. Children with disabilities are targeted for many of these projects.

The report begins by describing both the conditions that prevent inclusive education and the conditions that can help make it possible. It also analyzes projects that have made it possible for linguistic minority students–and Deaf students–to obtain a bilingual education. Teacher training programs have helped encourage teachers to create more inclusive classrooms for children with disabilities and other students who have historically been excluded. Several countries have used Community-based Education Management Information Systems (C-EMIS) to draw upon the knowledge and motivation of local community members in making education more inclusive. Each chapter ends by discussing what lessons other communities in other countries may find helpful in implementing their own projects.

Advocates who tire of hearing governments complain there isn’t enough money will especially wish to read the 6th chapter on “Addressing financial barriers to inclusive education.” Funding issues are also discussed briefly throughout earlier chapters of Making Schools Inclusive (PDF format, 4.14 Mb).

The 8th chapter points readers to further materials and resources that may be helpful to them in advocating for more inclusive education in their countries.

The full 64-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (4.14 Mb) at http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Making%20schools%20inclusive%20SCUK.pdf.



We Can Do learned of this report through an announcement posted on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. The discussion group is devoted to issues relating to inclusive education in Eastern Africa.

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CONFERENCE: 2nd Intl Forum of the Deaf in Morocco on Mental Health

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Call for Nominations or Applications, Deaf, Events and Conferences, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Psychiatric Disabilities, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The 2nd international Forum of the Deaf

The 2nd International Forum of the Deaf in Morocco is an initiative that aims to promote: Mental Health awareness among the medical core and the deaf community of Morocco. The establishment of  a national policy to investigate the linguistic, social, mental health, and physical needs of the deaf; for the purpose of developing a cohesive network for the implantation of programs to benefit the unification of the deaf community in Morocco. Subsequently, it will promote contact, participation and cooperation among deaf associations.
 
This Forum is entitled “Mental health and deafness” which will be held in the city of Fez, in order to better educate the population on the issues facing the deaf community.  In accordance with the royal directives, and the initiative of human development, The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf Association, The Africa Contact Group For Mental Health and Deafness and the World Federation of the Deaf are organizing a Forum of the deaf of Morocco from October 9th to 11th 2008.  45 deaf associations with two delegates (1 deaf and 1 hearing) and 120 specialized educators representing all of Morocco national territories will be invited to attend the forum. The forum of the Deaf of Morocco will comprise of three major themes: Mental Health and deafness, Education and academic qualification, and Sign language.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf is engaged in a number of campaigns to raise the standard of living of the deaf in Morocco. There is a growing public interest in the use of sign language in the various social domains where the deaf are involved. These include courts of law, educational institutions, police stations, and other various places of work. An outstanding example of this association’s dedication for the empowerment of the deaf are a special education training for educators May 2008, a SL training for police officers March 2008 and two summer youth camps for the deaf that were held in Rabat August 2006 and Salé August 2007.  These camps gave the deaf youth of Morocco a chance to interact with one another and to build life long friendships.  As well as, the first steps in building cooperation and participation among deaf associations in Morocco.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS), is looking for organizations to help them organize the second international forum of the deaf in Fez.

The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) is a non-governmental organization that strives to address the needs of the entire community, including the deaf youth of Morocco. Its membership consists of over 20 professionals from the city and surrounding areas of the province who have come together to pool their resources and labor in order to help develop the deaf community. The association was incorporated in 2006 under the laws of Morocco with the goal of helping to develop the social and economic roles of the deaf in the larger society. They are led by elected officers, including: a president, treasurer, secretary and vice president, who are chosen each year at an annual meeting.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) is nonprofit and raises money for projects through donations from members, grants, and donations from local, national and international government, and non-government organizations. The group has received various awards and certificates of recognition from the government in advancing the status of the deaf.

The association established The First International Forum of the Deaf of Morocco in 2006 in collaboration with the Dutch Foundation Marokkofonds.  The forum was an instrumental opportunity to promote deaf issues in Morocco and International.  This association has also
been advocating the nationwide adoption of sign language as the medium of instruction in all deaf schools and training institutions.

Furthermore, they lobby the Moroccan government of the challenges facing the deaf community.  Finally, this association developed and implemented deaf youth summer camps in association with the Ministry of Sports and Youth.
 
The successful projects led by The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) have illustrated the need to develop deaf awareness, and networking skills to overcome the limited opportunities for the deaf community within the Moroccan society as a whole. The members of The Moroccan
Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) approaches international institutions with the idea of organizing a group of deaf associations and helping them develop these specific skills, with an end goal of enabling them to advance from their current social and economic situation.

Expected outcomes

  • Meadows of 200 thousand deaf persons together with the Moroccan medical core will be sensitized on the mental health and human right of the deaf issues.
  • Implementing awareness raising projects.
  • Deaf empowerment.
  • Training in special education and sign language
  • Establishing a wide range of contacts.

Methodology
 The statistics of 200 thousand deaf persons usually expose a big number of the deaf to the means of specific communication of the handicapped and the non-implication of the handicapped in the programs or fight projects against the sexually transmittable diseases.

 After the difficulties proven by this category of the handicapped the Moroccan Forum of the Deaf Association takes advantage of this occasion to initiate a campaign of sensitization on the deaf problems, with the assistance of the interpreters in signs. It will also target the medical core and the Moroccan administrations to explain through the different international experts the importance of mental health and deafness.
 
The proposed forum will focus on many of the aforementioned elements in a professional sitting.  A subcommittee of Moroccan facilitators, French facilitators, and other Volunteers will focus on planning programs, while other members of the Moroccan Forum of the Deaf will concentrate on administrative elements of the forum. In implementing both of these as well as cultural activities, the forum will meet the aforementioned objectives.
 
Economic and Social Exchange:

  • Presentations on management methods for the purposes of developing and implementing projects will be presented.
  • Presentation on education and vocational training.
  • Presentation on sign language in the media.
  • Presentations on the need for a unified signing language for the purpose of educational and social development of the deaf will be presented.
  • Exhibition of handcrafted products made by the deaf will be on display.
  • Associations of the deaf will perform musical concert and theatrical presentations daily.

Workshops

  • Mental health and Deafness
  • Education and vocational training
  • Sign language linguistics

If you have any questions related to the conference please feel free to contact :

Mr. Abdelaziz Arssi- Project Director 
Tel/SMS : 0021262102415
Fax:0021235601651
Mail: fmsourds@gmail.com 

Mr. Mohammed DDich -Program Manager
Tel/SMS:0021266511034
Mail:fmsourds@gmail.com

Mr.Rachid El Ouardi- Finance Manager
Tel/SMS: 0021262216863
Mail: fmsourds@gmail.com 

Thank you for your time and consideration on this important issue facing the deaf community of Morocco. 



We Can Do received this announcement via the AdHoc_IDC listserv. People interested in the conference should please contact one of the organizers directly, not We Can Do. (Note their phone numbers and email address given above.)

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NEWS: Sign Language Training Program Launches in Guyana

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Deaf, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Guyana Ministry of Education, in partnership with the Guyana Community Based Rehabilitation Programme (GCBRP), has initiated a sign language training program targeted at improving the quality of education for deaf children, the Kaieteur News has reported. The program will provide sign language training to teachers so they can better accommodate the communicate need of deaf children in their classrooms. It is being offered through the St. Stanislaus College in Brickdam.

Read the original Kaieteur News story entitled “Education Ministry launches sign language training” for more detail at:

http://www.kaieteurnews.com/?p=782



Thank you to Monty Chester for alerting me to this news item.

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RESOURCE: Sri Lankan Sign Language Dictionary Published

Posted on 6 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, News, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A new Sri Lankan Sign Language dictionary has been published with pictures of 350 different signs and short conversational phrases. Sri Lankan Sign Language has different dialects in different parts of the country. The new dictionary focuses on the dialect used at the Rohana Special School community and with deaf people across the Southern Province of Sri Lanka. You can download the entire dictionary for free on-line at the link from this sentence. It is the first known conversational dictionary to be developed for Sri Lankan sign language.

I learned about this dictionary from the blog, Found in Ceylon. The blog is written by a deaf American man, Adam. Adam was a volunteer at the Rohana Special School in Sri Lanka. His blog was originally meant to chronicle his experiences at the school. But he has now returned to the United States and continues to blog about news relevant to the school and his contacts in Sri Lanka.

Learn about the dictionary at:

http://www.foundinceylon.com/blog/2007/12/05/introducing-sri-lankan-sign-language-the-dictionary/

Or download it from:

http://www.rohanaspecialschool.org/Rohana_Special_School_in_Sri_Lanka/Sri_Lankan_Sign_Language_Dictionary.html


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NEWS: World Association of Sign Language Interpreters Conference Report

Posted on 6 November 2007. Filed under: Deaf, Events and Conferences, Interpreting, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The email further below comes from the secretary of the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters (WASLI) regarding their recent conference in Spain. Some sign language interpreters from developing nations were among the participants.

At the WASLI web site (http://www.wasli.org), you can see a daily newsletter from the conference (in English at top, in Spanish if you scroll down the page). You will also find text on topics such as developing a code of ethics for interpreters (see the link to the code of ethics in Kenya); mentoring sign language interpreters; links to information about deaf interpreters; and more.

Their “WASLI Country Reports 2007” (PDF format, 2.8 Mb) presents recent information about the situation of sign language interpreters or Deaf/deaf people generally in dozens of both industrialized and developing nations around the world. Some of the developing nations represented include: Botswana, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Nigeria, Cambodia, India, Peru, and Mexico.

WASLI also published a similar report two years earlier, WASLI Country Reports 2005 (PDF format, 1 Mb). The low- and middle-income countries represented in this report include: Argentina, Brazil, Cameroon, Kenya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Nigeria, Palestine, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Limited summaries of the WASLI website is available in other languages in PDF format by clicking on “About this website in other languages” WASLI’s left-hand navigation bar. Languages include Arabic, Brazialian Portuguese, Italian, Kiswahili, Japanese, Thai, French, Cantonese, Indonesian, Spanish, and Russian.

Email From WASLI Secretary

From: Zane Hema WASLI Secretary
To: secretary@wasli.org
Subject: WASLI
Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2007 00:44:55 -0000

WASLI is committed to developing the profession of sign language interpreting world wide

Greetings Friends

2007 has been an important year for WASLI primarily because it was the year that the 2nd WASLI Conference took place in Segovia, Spain 13-15 July 2007.

WASLI Conference 2007 – UPDATED WEBPAGE

The WASLI 2007 page on the website has been devoted to the WASLI 2007 Conference in Segovia.  It has been updated to include:

A photo gallery,

Minutes of the General Membership meeting,

Scenes from Segovia (Conference Newsletter)

Messages of Greetings

Countries Report

Update on the WASLI 2007 Conference Proceedings

… with more information to follow

WASLI Conference 2007 – OFFICIAL STATISTICS

Total number of participants – 255 (197 women and 58 men) from 41 different countries.  (This figure does not include working interpreters, companions and an individual from Press purposes)

159 were members of an interpreter association.

20 delegates were sponsored (8 people who were sponsored did not come)

Spain had the highest number of participants at 102

Regional Representation

Africa – 6 countries represented

North America – 3 countries represented

Europe – 14 countries represented

Balkans – 3 countries represented

Australasia & Oceania – 2 countries represented

Asia  – 8 countries represented

Transcaucasia & Central Asia – 1 country represented

Latino America – 4 countries represented

More news to follow shortly …

Zane HEMA

WASLI Secretary


We Can Do received the above email via the Intl-Dev email distribution list, which circulates information of interest to international development professionals and others with an interest in the field. The other information about WASLI and its country reports was gathered from the WASLI web site. Neither We Can Do nor Intl-Dev are associated with WASLI–individuals interested in their organization should follow the link to review their web site directly.


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CONFERENCE: Sign Language Research Call for Papers

Posted on 10 September 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Events and Conferences | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

I learned about this conference through the Intl-Dev mailing list.  This announcement was also distributed on DeafAcademics-L.  However, neither I, nor Intl-Dev nor DeafAcademics-L are involved with this conference. If you wish to learn more about this conference, then please follow the links in the announcement below.
 CLSLR3 First Call for Papers
The International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies at the University of Central Lancashire in Preston, UK, is pleased to annouce the third international workshop in the CLSLR series on February 12-15, 2008.  The CLSLR series is intended for a wide international audience in the field of sign language research and deaf studies, and the main conference language is International Sign. We especially welcome participants from developing countries and are able to provide financial support to some of the participants at CLSLR3.

Call for papers

The CLSLR3 programme includes two kinds of sessions:
1. SPECIAL SESSION (February 14-15)
Topic: “Minority sign languages and sign languages in village communities”  (Conference languages: English, British Sign Language, International Sign)
2. ROUND TABLES  (February 12-13)
Topics: “Ethics in sign language research” and “Implications of new technological resources in sign language research” (Conference language: International Sign)
We invite proposals for PAPER PRESENTATIONS in the SPECIAL SESSION and for DISCUSSANT CONTRIBUTIONS to the ROUND TABLES.

THE DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSION IS 1st NOVEMBER, 2007

SPECIAL SESSION:
Slots for presentations are for one hour, with 45 minutes presentation time and 15 minutes for questions and discussion.
We are inviting contributions for PAPER PRESENTATIONS on minority sign languages and sign languages in village communities. The latter are rural communities, often individual villages, with hereditary deafness, also known as Martha’s Vinyard situations. The former include all other kinds of situations where a minority sign language exists side by side with a dominant sign language, often the national sign language of a country, and/or the sign language used in educational settings and in the media. Possible settings for such sign languages include socially segregated minorities e.g. gypsies; communities of signers living outside urban areas and/or away from deaf schools, but without hereditary deafness; and users of an indigenous sign language where a foreign sign language has been introduced and is now the dominant sign language (as in parts of Africa and South East Asia). The scope of the session does NOT include the use of DIALECTS of sign languages by particular user communities.
The presentations could relate to, but are not limited to, one of the following sub-topics:
-Sociolinguistic or socio-cultural profiles of sign languages used in rural communities with hereditary deafness or profiles of other types of minority sign languages.
-Analyses of linguistic data from either of the two types of minority sign languages
-Issues surrounding the documentation of these sign languages, including research ethics in dealing with these communities
-Language politics relating to minority sign languages, including sign language the endangerment of such sign languages

For the SPECIAL SESSION, submission options are:
a) Send an abstract of up to 800 words by email to CLPerdomo1@uclan.ac.uk , or fax it to +44-1772-4933
b) Send a video submission of max. 5 minutes in International Sign or in BSL either as email attachment to CLPerdomo1@uclan.ac.uk , or post your video to the iSLanDS postal address given on our website www.uclan.ac.uk/islands. We can deal with all common video standards.

ROUND TABLES:
We are inviting DISCUSSANT CONTRIBUTIONS for the ROUND TABLE sessions. A contribution should make a coherent argument related to the main topic, including, but not limited to, the given sub-topics (see below). Slots for discussant contributions will be 40 minutes, with 20 minutes of presentation and 20 minutes for questions and discussion. Contributions can be based on research or on the authors experience with one of the two topic areas, as a member of one of the related stakeholder groups, e.g. a researcher, a research assistant, a member of a deaf organisation, or a sign language informant. You will present your thoughts on one of the sub-topics in a coherent argument, either relating your experiences or your research results.

Suggested sub-topics “Ethics in sign language research”
a.The ethics of publishing in sign language research
b.Relationships between sign language researchers & deaf communities
c.Accessibility of research results for target stakeholders
d.Researchers and conflicting priorities
e.Researchers and policy development for sign languages and deaf communities

Suggested sub-topics “Implications of new technological resources in sign language research”
a.Sign language in distance education and e-learning
b.Developing sign linguistics in a new region
c.Resource sharing (e.g. databases, archives)
d.New technological standards in sign language research (e.g. web streaming of video)
e.Use of technological resources for teaching and training in the field

For the DISCUSSANT CONTRIBUTIONS to the ROUND TABLES, submission should be by video in International Sign. Send your video either as email attachment to CLPerdomo1@uclan.ac.uk , or post your video to the iSLanDS postal address given on our website. We can deal with all common video standards.

Important deadlines:
Submission of abstracts:    1st November, 2007
Submission of financial support applications: 1st November, 2007
Notification of acceptance:  20th November, 2007
Deadline for registration:    15th January, 2007

Academic committee:
Clark Denmark, Deaf Studies and iSLanDS, UCLan
Pamela Perniss, MPI, Nijmegen, NL
Christopher Stone, DCAL, London
Ulrike Zeshan, iSLanDS, UCLan

FOR ALL FURTHER INFORMATION, REFER TO THE CONFERENCE WEBSITE:
http://www.uclan.ac.uk/facs/class/edustud/deafcentre/clslr3/index.html
OR CLICK ON “CLSLR-3” ON THE CENTRE HOMEPAGE:
www.uclan.ac.uk/islands


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