Competition for Best Masters Thesis on Sub-Saharan Africa, 1000 Euros (English and Français)

Posted on 28 May 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Call for Papers, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

en français

Africa Thesis Award 2009

[Editor’s Note: Although this award is not specific to disability issues, it does say that topics should be “socially relevant.” We Can Do readers in Africa or the Netherlands may wish to consider using this competition as an opportunity to submit Masters’ theses on disability issues in Sub-Saharan Africa. I also hope that students with disabilities will compete for the 1000 Euro prize, regardless of the topic of your thesis. Please do NOT inquire with We Can Do. Instead, please consult the official award web site directly for instructions on how to participate in this competition.. The submission deadline is June 16, 2009. Missed the deadline? This is an annual opportunity—consult the official award web site for future details.]

The African Studies Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands, has an annual award for the best Masters thesis on Sub-Saharan Africa by a student at a university in the Netherlands or in Africa. Any final-year student who has completed his/her Masters thesis with distinction (80% or higher or a Dutch rating of at least 8) can apply. The ASC specifically encourage students from Sub-Saharan Africa to submit their theses for this annual competition.

Any thesis thematically related to socio-geographical, economic, political, juridical or anthropological issues or focusing on the humanities such as history, religion and literature (but with the exception of language and/or semiotic studies) can be submitted. The thesis must be socially relevant and can be be written in English, French or Dutch.

The award consists of a price of 1000 euros. The winning thesis will also be published in the ASC African Studies Collection. Submitted theses may be (partially) published on The Broker’s website: www.thebrokeronline.eu.

More detail is available on ASC’s website, including instructions for contacting the people responsible for organizing this opportunity: http://www.ascleiden.nl/Research/Award/

Date limite: le 16 juin 2009!

Vous vous intéressez à l’Afrique et vous avez écrit votre thèse de Master sur un sujet ayant un rapport avec l’Afrique ? Le Centre d’Études africaines (Afrika-Studiecentrum, ASC) vous offre la chance de gagner le Prix de la thèse d’études africaines d’une valeur de 1000€.

Ce prix vise à encourager les étudiants à faire des recherches et à écrire sur l’Afrique sub-saharienne, et à promouvoir les études sur les cultures et les sociétés africaines. Il est décerné une fois par an à un étudiant qui aura achevé sa thèse de Master sur la base d’un travail de recherche sur l’Afrique.

In French/en français: http://www.ascleiden.nl/Research/Award/MastersThesisAward-FR.aspx



I learned of this opportunity via the Deaf Studies Africa listserver and collected additional information via the official award web site.

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Call for Papers: World Religions and Disability: Cross-Cultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Call for Papers, Disability Studies, indigenous people, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

Call for papers
Title: World Religions and Disability: Cross-Cultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Edited by: Darla Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus
Deadline for abstract submissions: May 1, 2009
Email: dschumm@hollins.edu and mjstoltz@valdosta.edu

The editors of World Religions and Disability: Cross-Cultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives invite contributions for an inter-disciplinary and cross-cultural collection of essays that critically examine how the religions of the world represent, understand, theologize, theorize and respond to disability and/or chronic illness. Religious teachings and practices help to establish cultural standards for what is deemed “normal” human physical and mental behavior and in establishing a moral order for the fit and healthy body and mind. Religion plays an important role in determining how disability is understood and how persons with disabilities are treated or mistreated in a given historical-cultural context.

The existent literature exploring intersections between religion and disability typically focuses on a single religious tradition or cultural context, often prioritizing a Judeo-Christian approach. In response to the challenges and opportunities posed by a post-modern, pluralistic, global world, our goal in this volume is to promote interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and inter-religious conversations regarding world religions and disability. We welcome a wide variety of methodological and theoretical approaches including ethnography, historical, cultural, or textual analysis, personal narrative, and theological/philosophical investigation. Contributors are especially encouraged to incorporate into their analysis literature and theoretical perspectives from the growing field of disability studies. Our aim is to produce a comparative text discussing religion and disability which gives voice to scholars and practitioners of many of the world’s rich and varied religious traditions, a

Abstracts not to exceed 600 words are due by May 1, 2009 and should be sent to: dschumm@hollins.edu and mjstoltz@valdosta.edu. The abstracts will be reviewed and decisions will be made regarding inclusion in the volume by June 15, 2009. Please note that acceptance of an abstract does not guarantee inclusion in the collection; editors will review and make final decisions upon receipt of the completed essays.

Any questions may also be directed to Darla Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus at the addresses listed above.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
Asian religions and disability
Indigenous and/or native religions and disability
Disability and inter-religious comparison, contrast, and dialogue
Celtic, Druid, and/or Wiccan religions and disability
Religious and/or sacred texts and disability
Religion, prejudice, ethics and disability
Religious conceptions of creation, evil, sin, healing, suffering and disability
Religious/philosophical conceptions of the body or self and disability
Founders of religions (i.e. Mohammad, Buddha, Jesus, etc.) and their encounters with disability
The shaping of identity, religion, and disability
Religious rituals and the inclusion or exclusion of persons with disabilities
Critical perspectives on religion and disability
Theologies of disability

[Note from We Can Do editor: It is my hope that some readers might consider submitting abstracts/papers focusing on religion and disability in the context of developing countries, particularly in relation to topics such as poverty, human rights, or international development.]



I received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email news dissemination service, which people can subscribe to for free.

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REPORT: World Disasters Report 2007: Focus on Discrimination

Posted on 29 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Human Rights, Inclusion, Reports, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The World Disasters Report (2007) examines what happens to various vulnerable groups during disaster situations, particularly women, elderly people, minorities, and people with disabilities. This report from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies includes many stories of how discrimination and exclusion has made it harder for some people to survive or meet their needs during and after disaster situations. It also includes guidance and recommendations on how agencies, governments, and communities can improve efforts to ensure that emergency aid reaches the most vulnerable people. Discrimination can occur on the basis of ethnic or social origin, language, religion, gender, age, physical or mental disability, and sexual orientation.

The World Disasters Report points out that, although discrimination exists before disaster, an emergency can exacerbate it. However, that discrimination is often invisible because official data on older people, ethnic minorities or people with disabilities may not exist. Furthermore, aid agencies often do not even analyze the needs of vulnerable people when they carry out emergency assessments. And vulnerable groups are usually not included in the disaster planning process before, during, or after emergencies. This accummulative discrimination can be life-threatening during a crisis. Even after the crisis, people who have suffered discrimination may take longer to recover or to regain their livelihoods.

The World Disasters Report calls for agencies to do better in planning for the needs of vulnerable populations, saying bluntly, “One-size-fits-all relief planning is unhelpful in overcoming discrimination” (p. 15).

We Can Do readers will clearly have a particular interest in the chapter that focuses on the needs of people with disabilities during disasters. Information for this chapter was gathered from both industrialized and developing countries. Stories of discrimination are presented, including stories of how emergency shelters and emergency relief agencies have sometimes contributed to the problem. But you can also find stories highlighting the valuable contributions people with disabilities could make for everyone when they are included in disaster planning efforts. This chapter provides an overview of the barriers that can make it harder for people with disabilities to survive disasters or recover their lives afterwards. And it reviews how agencies and others can remove these barriers.

However, even people who wish to focus primarily on the needs of disabled people may still wish to read the full report. In particular, some of the needs of elderly people are similar to some of the needs of people with disabilities. Also, all the issues covered in this report are cross-cutting issues: any population of disabled people will clearly have people among them who are elderly, or women, or children, or gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender, or ethnic minorities, or other minorities. Disabled people who also belong to some other minority group may experience dual or triple discrimination that can create additional barriers during crisis situations.

Read chapter summaries, download individual chapters for free, or order print copies of the report at:

http://www.ifrc.org/publicat/wdr2007/summaries.asp

The full report can be downloaded in PDF format (4 Mb) at:

http://www.ifrc.org/Docs/pubs/disasters/wdr2007/WDR2007-English.pdf



We Can Do learned about the World Disasters Report through the Disabled People’s International newsletter. Further information was gathered from the report itself.

This article has been cross-posted, with some modifications, at the RatifyNow web site with permission of author.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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