JOB POST: CBR Officer, Dadaab Refugee Camp, Garissa, Kenya

Posted on 19 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Assistive Devices, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

*_VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT_*

*_Position_** : CBR Officer ( Prosthesis & Orthotic) _Responsible to _: CBR Coordinator*

*_Location_** : Dadaab Refugee Camp (Garissa) _Family Status_ : Non Family duty Station*

*_Closing Date_** : Open *

*_THE ORGANIZATION_*

HI began its operations in 1992 as an emergency support programme in Garissa (North Eastern Province). Currently, HI is operating a medical referral project for refugees in this region in partnership with the UNHCR. HIV and AIDS activities are also being provided for the local community.

In 1994, HI launched another emergency support programme for internal displaced persons (IDPs) following inter-ethnic clashes, in Trans Nzoia District (Kitale town). Today, we are running in Kitale the most comprehensive HI Programme on HIV and AIDS in Kenya.

In 2002, in Nairobi we began disability activities with local partners (community-based organisations) focusing on support to networking, inclusive education and access to resources.

In April 2005, we have started a Mine Risk Education (MRE) project for the refugees living in the Kakuma Refugee Camp (near the Sudan border).

*_Rehabilitation project in Dadaab refugee camp:_*

Dadaab Refugee Camps, located in Garissa district, are the main settlement for Somali refugees, with a total population of 170,000 refugees, with a recent new influx^^[1] ^ due to the latest political events and severe drought in the southern parts of Somalia. To date some basic services have been developed to meet the refugees with disability needs. UNHCR, CARE International and other implementing partners working in Dadaab refugee camps raised a concern about the critical situation of the refugees with disability and scarce services provided to them. Therefore, UNHCR solicited Handicap International to support and contribute to develop initiatives towards disabled refugees in Dadaab camps.

An assessment carried out by HI from in February 2007 defined HI intervention with focus in two main areas:

(i) */To develop access to adequate rehabilitation services for persons with disability/*, with particular attention to be paid to technical aids and prosthetic production and rehabilitation and counselling services for children with intellectual disability and/or cerebral palsy; and

(ii) */To facilitate access to humanitarian aid and community development for persons with disability/*, through information sharing, counselling and sensitization of staff and agencies in charge of food distribution, sheltering, health, watsan and construction works, education, community development services and livelihood, etc.

The Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) Project Team will consist of 1 x Project Manager, 1 x CBR Coordinator , 1 x Mainstreaming Officer, 3 x CBR Officers (with technical expertise in differing but complimentary areas), 6 x rehabilitation workers, 6 x technical aids workers (leather work/shoe making and carpentry), and 30 x CBR workers.

* *

*THE POSITION*

Under the responsibility of CBR Coordinator, the CBR Officer (Prosthesis & Orthotic) will offer technical support to the CBR team in ensuring quality production and fitting of prosthetics, esthetics, & other orthopedic devices to persons with disability among refugees and host communities. She/he will also build capacity of the local technicians and rehabilitation staff and take lead in the referrals and follow ups of patients.

*S\he will be responsible for :-*

*1) Supervision and management of mobility aids workshops*

· Supervise operations in all mobility aids workshops present in all the three camps including Dadaab workshop.

· Closely monitor and arrange procurement of equipment and materials as required for workshop – production.

· Provide advice on installation of equipment in the workshops including workshop planning and utilization of workshop consumables

· Ensure P&O workshops’ set up are all up to standards and accepted specifications

· Ensure mobility aids workshops are barrier-free for the easy access to persons with disabilities.

· Ensure all safety measures are observed within the workshops to reduce hazards in the operation of various machinery and equipment.

· Develop proper workshop management systems to ensure effective and efficient P&O workshop management.

· Carry out regular monitoring of workshop activities, technicians’ performance and manufacture of devices.

*2) Capacity Building*

· Identify and provide on-the-job training to local technicians in Prosthetics and Orthotics.

· Develop training curriculum for on-the-job training of local technicians.

· Conduct regular evaluation of the on-job training.

· Provide basic orientation to community CBR workers on the maintenance and repair of devices in the field.

· Train P&O Assistants in Workshop Management and information systems.

*3) Supervision of P&O Assistants*

· Develop job descriptions for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Together with the team, develop weekly work plan for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Carry out induction and appraisal for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Monitor P&O Assistants/Technicians performance and production.

* *

*4) Referrals and Physical rehabilitation*

· Ensure persons with disabilities receive good quality and appropriate prosthetic and orthotic devices and services from the workshops as well as in the field and from Garissa/Kangemi.

· Develop a good and effective patient’s follow up mechanism for patients who are fitted with P&O devices from Garissa general hospital and Kangemi.

· Maintain individual file for each person with disability receiving P&O devices and carry out regular follow up as per the requirement of the particular person.

· Maintain all records pertaining to service delivery.

· Ensure required gait training is provided to the clients after prosthetic and orthotic fitments.

· Ensure that the clients receive rehabilitation therapy as required, e.g. release of contracture and healing of stump edema before fitting devices.

*5) Coordination and networking *

· Maintain necessary coordination with Rehabilitation Therapists.

· Work closely with the Physiotherapist and Occupational therapist for patient treatment, follow-up and evaluation.

· Liaise with Technical Advisors for various technical matters and training programs as necessary.

· Represent the organization at forums, workshops and conferences in the areas of Prosthetics and Orthotics as may be required.

*6) Reporting*

· Produce updated reports at regular intervals as required by the project in terms of donor and organizational requirements.

*7) Others*

· Advice Management on various costs related to P&O materials, equipment, maintenance, training and service delivery.

· Capitalize on new areas of learning in P&O or any specific case histories for internal learning and for external dissemination when required.

*/ /*

*Qualifications and experience required:-*

· Diploma in Orthopaedics with 2 years of experience

· Knowledge of CBR implementation and management

· Ability to work in and lead a team

· Good report writing, presentation, communication and interpersonal skills

· Demonstrated ability to transfer knowledge through informal and formal trainings

· Computer literate with Knowledge of Word, Excel and Internet

· Experience with an International NGO is an added advantage

*Conditions*

Living conditions in Dadaab camp may be challenging (remote area, climate very hot), although facilities are offering minimum of comfort.

R&R leave of 7 days will be provided every 8 weeks of continuous accommodation within Dadaab.

If you feel you are the right candidate for this position, kindly send your application along with an up-to-date CV(including 3 referees) by email to the Human Resources Officer : hrofficer@handicap-international.or.ke

*NB: Applications will be processed as they are received and interviews conducted until the appropriate candidate is selected.*

*The email subject line should be marked: “Application for CBR Officer – Dadaab position”*

* *

*Please do not send your academic certificates and other testimonials they will be requested at a later stage.*

Only short listed candidates will be contacted.

*Handicap International is an Equal Opportunity Employer – Females and Persons with Disability are encouraged to apply ***



This job post was recently distributed on the Intl-Dev mailing list. As with all job posts and other opportunities announced at We Can Do, any applications or inquiries should please be directed to the sponsors, NOT to We Can Do.

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RESOURCE: Refugees with Disabilities: Facts and Solutions

Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Inclusion, Resources, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

What population in the world is the most excluded, marginalized, or simply forgotten? Many readers of this blog probably would immediately say, “people with disabilities.” But if you were to talk with someone who is a refugee from war, or someone who works with them, they might immediately say, “refugees.” So who is right? I suspect probably both. So what then of refugees with disabilities–forgotten both by people in the wider disability community and by people who work with refugees? Even this blog, in more than 300 posts, has only barely mentioned them before.

The Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children in June 2008 released two publications highly relevant to this community. The first is a report, Disabilities Among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations (PDF format, 1.81 Mb, 76 pages), that provides an overview of the situation facing disabled refugees. The second publication is meant to give workers some guidance in how they can ensure that refugees with disabilities are fully included in their programs: Disabilities Among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations: Resource Kit for Fieldworkers (PDF format, 328 Kb, 32 pages).

The report estimates that there are about 2.5 to 3.5 million refugees with disabilities around the world–enough, I would point out, to fill a small country. Not surprisingly, the report finds enormous challenges: shelters, food and water distribution centers, latrines, schools, health centers, and other vital services are often inaccessible. Refugees with disabilities are sometimes actively excluded from vocational training programs. Or, if they’re not intentially denied the right to participate, then they are often inherently excluded by the lack of appropriate accommodations.

Refugees dispersed in urban centers, away from refugee camps, often are even worse off. In concentrated refugee populations, at least it becomes easier to identify people with disabilities and thus to tailor services for them. But refugees living in the community, because they may be undocumented, are reluctant to identify themselves to receive services, whether or not they have disabilities. Furthermore, refugees with disabilities in urban settings are often ignored both by services for refugees generally and also by local Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs): in short, they often are being served by no one.

The good news is, some services do exist, including efforts to provide education to children with disabilities at least in refugee settlements. In some locations, refugees with disabilities and their families have organized their own self-help groups.

The accompanying resource kit is targeted at United Nations, nongovernmental organization (NGOs), and Disabled persons’ organization field staff who work with refugees, asylum seekers, and internationally displaced people with disabilities. Readers can consult this kit for ideas on improving services and protection for people with disabilities so they can participate more fully in their communities. If you’re looking for concrete, prescriptive guidelines and checklists, you won’t find that here. What you will find are questions that planners and decision makers should know the answers to, or find the solutions for. These offer broad guidelines as to the kinds of problem areas they should be on the look out for, with suggestions for how to address them.

At first glance, it seems an excellent start–with plenty of room for improvement. The Women’s Commission seems to be highly conscious of this: the introduction indicates they hope to build upon this publication in the future with input from, among others, DPOs and displaced people with disabilities themselves.

Download the report (PDF format, 1.81 Mb) at:

http://www.womenscommission.org/pdf/disab_fulll_report.pdf

Download the resource kit for fieldworkers (PDF format, 328 Kb), at:

http://www.womenscommission.org/pdf/disab_res_kit.pdf



We Can Do found this resource via the Disabled People International electronic newsletter and also during the course of assembling resources to go up on the Resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website. (The latter is still being constructed, but check back in late August or early September.)

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