NEWS: Bulgarians with Mental Disabilities Suffer Inhumane Treatment

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Cognitive Impairments, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Geneva, 3 December 2008

On the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT), the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee (BHC) and the Mental Disability Advocacy Center (MDAC) come together to express their serious concern over the situation of persons with mental disabilities, one of the most marginalised and discriminated groups in Bulgarian society.

In a series of letters to members of the Bulgarian Parliament and Government, officials and elected representatives in the European Union, and the United Nations Special Procedures mandate holders, the three organisations underline that persons with mental disabilities in Bulgaria, “frequently face social exclusion and severe human rights violations, including violence and ill-treatment”, and express their concern that, “[i]nadequate legislation together with entrenched institutional policies and practices also compromise their socio-economic well-being, as well as that of their families”.

Regardless of the skills and capabilities which persons with mental disabilities in Bulgaria possess, they are often deemed incompetent, deprived of their legal capacity and placed under guardianship. Bulgaria’s outdated legislation on deprivation of legal capacity removes a person’s right to make their own decisions and denies the exercise of their basic human rights, including the rights to marry, vote, work, take legal action and seek judicial remedies. Deprivation of a person’s legal capacity also impedes their rights to a fair trial, to own property and to respect for their personal and family life. In most cases, persons with mental disabilities who are placed under guardianship in Bulgaria are forced to live in large and remote residential institutions and to remain there for the rest of their lives. Once institutionalised, they are at risk of ill-treatment from staff and subjected to prison-like regimes. Indeed, living conditions in some of these institutions have been deemed to amount to inhuman and degrading treatment.

Please read the rest of this news release from the World Organization Against Torture at their web site by clicking on the following URL: http://www.omct.org/index.php?id=&lang=eng&actualPageNumber=1&articleId=8204&itemAdmin=article

I received this press release via several sources including the IDA_CRPD_Forum listserver; the AdHoc_IDC listserver; the RatifyNow organization’s listserver; and others. Only the first two paragraphs is quoted here. Please follow the link provided above to read the full story.

Note that “mental disabilities” is often used to refer to both people with intellectual disabilities and also people with psychosocial disabilities. Although these are very different disabilities, both populations in many countries are frequently locked up in the same institutions and may experience similar types of human rights violations.

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CONFERENCE: World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry General Assembly, Kamapala, Uganda,

Posted on 2 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Opportunities, Psychiatric Disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note a limited number of scholarships for conference participants from developing or low-income countries.]

Dear all,

If you are a user or survivor of psychiatry (a person who has experienced madness or mental health problems, or who has used or survived mental health services), you are welcome to join the WNUSP General Assembly in Kampala, Uganda, March 16-20, 2009.

If you are not a user or survivor yourself but would like to support WNUSP, please help WNUSP to connect with users and survivors in your country or region by forwarding them this email or introducing them to a member of the WNUSP board.

Thanks to everyone in the disability community for their solidarity.

Best wishes,
Tina Minkowitz

WNUSP GA – REGISTER NOW!!!
World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry

http://www.wnusp.net/

• • • WNUSP-News • • •

ANNOUNCEMENT: JANUARY 2009

Dear WNUSP Friends,

This edition of WNUSP news features the Final Announcement for our General Assembly and World Conference.

Final Invitation – Third Announcement
REGISTER NOW!!! Making our Rights a Reality Human Rights in the Age of the CRPD WNUSP General Assembly and Conference, March 16-20 2009, Kampala, Uganda WNUSP has the pleasure to invite you to it’s third general assembly and conference in Kampala, Uganda. After Vancouver, Canada in 2001, Vejle, Denmark in 2004, we are happy to hold our assembly in Africa for the first time and thank our hosts Mental Health Uganda. Delegates from WNUSP member organisations are invited to attend the conference and GA. The conference is open to users and survivors of psychiatry from all regions of the world. Priority will be given to members. If you have not yet joined but are interested in becoming a member, please do so when registering for the conference. All participants who are able to do so, are asked to contribute at least 100 US $ (150 US $) to the overall conference costs. Those who can afford more are kindly asked to contribute 250 US $ or donate even more money in order to enable us to support the participation of delegates from poorer regions. Please register as soon as possible, if you are interested.

Only people from poorer countries can apply for scholarships. We are committed to making this conference as inclusive as possible and will do our best to support scholarships for users and survivors from low income countries. We will only be able to support traveling costs for a limited number of participants (see the attached document). Please use every means you have to raise funds for their participation. Participants have to cover their own travel costs. Participants from developed countries are asked to organise their travel plans themselves. If you have already registered and can fund your own travel costs, you can book your tickets now. If you have any possibility to support WNUSP and MHU with funding the general assembly or contribute to travel costs for other participants, please let us know.

Please register quickly since participation is limited. You can register via the WNUSP website. www.wnusp.net. Registration for the conference is now possible via the WNUSP website. For more information on the conference, follow the link to http://wnusp.rafus.dk/wnusp-general-assembly-and-conference-2009.html

MEMBERS’ NEWS NOTICE
The WNUSP Newsletter aims to present the global struggles and achievements of users and survivors of psychiatry. We invite all members of the WNUSP to write in, sharing your views and giving news about your activities. News reports must be in English, brief (250 words) and giving your name and contact details. You may also submit ideas or proposals for articles to be considered for publication in the newsletter. Write to the Editor, WNUSP-News at newsletter@wnusp.net

Moosa Salie,
Facilitator WNUSP newsletter
Co-Chair WNUSP
Secretary PANUSP

WNUSP-News mailing list
WNUSP-News@oism.info
http://mail.oism.info/mailman/listinfo/wnusp-news_oism.info

Information to consider when applying for a scholarship

Scholarships will be allocated to WNUSP affiliated organizations and individual members to send delegates to the GA based on the following criteria.

• Only a limited number of scholarships will be available

• You only qualify to apply if you live in the Global South, which includes some Arab states (non oil producing), certain agreed upon Eastern European countries, India and other developing Asian and Pacific-rim countries, all of Africa, Latin and Central America.

• Preference will be given to invited speakers from the Global South in allocating scholarships

• Due consideration will be given to a balance in gender and regional representation when deciding on allocating scholarships.

• Applying for a scholarship does not automatically guarantee receiving it. Applicants will be assessed on their potential to add value to the proceedings of the General Assembly and furthering the work of the WNUSP.

• The decisions of the GA organizing committee regarding the allocation of scholarships cannot be queried afterwards.

Conference information at: http://wnusp.rafus.dk/wnusp-general-assembly-and-conference-2009.html



I received this conference announcement via the IDA_CRPD_Forum email discussion group.

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PAPER: Disability and Contraception in Developing Countries

Posted on 24 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cognitive Impairments, Families, Health, Mobility Impariments, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Doctors, social workers, neighbors, and even family members often mistakenly assume that people with disabilities cannot possibly be interested in sex. Or if they are, others believe they cannot physically participate. Or if they can, others think that no one would want to have sex with them. Because of these myths, people with disabilities are often deliberately excluded from sex education programs and reproductive care services. These include contraception to prevent pregnancy, as well as support for people with disabilities who wish to bear and raise healthy, happy children.

The fact is, a great many people with a wide range of disabilities are capable of having children and desire the rewards that can come with parenthood. And many become excellent parents who raise well-adjusted children. But they often lack family planning services that allow them to make their own choices about how many children to have and when to have them. This may be partly because even family planners who understand the need and importance of counseling for people with disabilities may not know how.

Although people with physical disabilities frequently can and do have children, the nature of some physical disabilities may sometimes affect what kind of contraceptions they can use or how to use them. An article published in 1999 by Family Health International’s journal Network, entitled Disabled Have Many Contraceptive Needs, explains how some physical disabilities, or the medications taken for them, may affect the kinds of contraceptions they are able to use. Family planning professionals may consult this article at http://www.fhi.org/en/rh/pubs/network/v19_2/disableneeds.htm

People with mild intellectual disabilities, and also people with psychosocial disabilities, are often as interested in sexuality as the general population. They also may in some cases wish to have children. Both intellectual disabilities and psychosocial disabilities may affect how well contraceptive options or instructions are understood, or how well they may follow instructions. Another article entitled Mental Disabilities Affect Method Options” discusses various examples of how family planning professionals can account for these factors. This article, also published in 1999, can be read at http://www.fhi.org/en/RH/Pubs/Network/v19_2/mentaldisab.htm



I learned about these articles through a class I’m taking on Gender, Disability and Development this semester. Thanks, Barbara Earth!

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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MIUSA International Leadership Employment and Disability Professional exchange program, March 15-April 5, 2009 (English and Espanol)

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Employment, Events and Conferences, Latin America & Caribbean, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

YES, late applications are being accepted after the application deadline. , se puede presentar su solicitud despues 16 de enero, 2009.

En español

In English
MIUSA is currently accepting applications from professionals with disabilities from Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, and Guatemala for MIUSA’s International Leadership, Employment, and Disability (I-LEAD) Professional exchange program in Eugene, Oregon USA, March 15 – April 5, 2009.

MIUSA strongly encourages professionals with all types of disabilities to apply, including people who have hearing, visual, psychiatric, learning and health related disabilities.

Applications and two references are due by January 16, 2009. However, late applications will be accepted.

The 2009 I-LEAD Professional exchange program will bring together influential leaders in government, business, education, community development, and disability rights organizations who demonstrate the capacity and commitment to expand employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Latin America.

Spanish-English translation and American Sign Language interpretation will be provided during formal program activities.

Partial scholarships are available for this program.

Completed applications should be submitted to apply@miusa.org, or via fax at +1-541-343-6812.

Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact lshula@miusa.org or sygall@miusa.org.

Thank you so much, and we look forward to collaborating with you and your team, to increase employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Latin America.

Warmly,

Lydia Shula
Executive Project Specialist / Executive Assistant to the CEO
Mobility International USA
132 East Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Tel/TTY: +1 (541) 343-1284
Fax: +1 (541) 343-6812
Email: lshula@miusa.org
Web: http://www.miusa.org

Empowering people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

En español
PARA DISTRIBUCIÓN INMEDIATA
Diciembre 2008

EMAIL: apply@miusa.org
SITIO WEB: www.miusa.org
Programa de Intercambio sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad I-LEAD Profesional: Eugene, Oregón, EE.UU.

Diciembre 10, 2008 — Mobility International USA (MIUSA) se encuentra aceptando solicitudes de profesionales con discapacidad de Argentina, Brasil, Costa Rica, y Guatemala para el Programa de Intercambio Profesional de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD por sus siglas en inglés) en Eugene, Oregón, EE.UU., del 15 de marzo al 5 de abril, 2009.

MIUSA alienta a los profesionales con todo tipo de discapacidad a presentar su solicitud, incluyendo personas con discapacidad auditiva, visual, psiquiátrica, de aprendizaje y relacionada con la salud.

Las solicitudes junto con dos referencias deben entregarse hasta el 16 de enero, 2009. Por favor ver solicitud adjunta.

El programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009 congregará a líderes influyentes de organizaciones gubernamentales, educativas, de desarrollo comunitario, negocios y de organizaciones que trabajan por los derechos de las personas con discapacidad que hayan demostrado capacidad y compromiso en la expansión de las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

Los líderes seleccionados para este programa intensivo participarán en talleres interactivos, seminarios, visitas a instalaciones, y paneles de discusión para examinar temas críticos que enfrentan las personas con discapacidad en el área laboral. Como resultado del programa, los líderes desarrollarán estrategias prácticas y crearan planes de acción conjuntos para impulsar sus esfuerzos y compromiso por incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad a nivel local, nacional, y/o regional.

Únicamente las actividades formales del programa contarán con traducción español-inglés y al lenguaje de señas estadounidense. Se facilitará materiales en formatos alternativos y podrán negociarse otras adecuaciones de accesibilidad que aseguren una completa participación.

MIUSA, una organización sin fines de lucro, se dedica a empoderar a las personas con discapacidad alrededor del mundo a alcanzar sus derechos humanos mediante los intercambios internacionales y el desarrollo internacional. Desde 1981 MIUSA ha liderado programas intercambio internacional para personas con y sin discapacidad en más de 90 países, incluyendo Australia, Azerbaiyán, China, Costa Rica, Inglaterra, Alemania, Japón, México, Rusia y Uzbekistán.

Los co-patrocinadores del programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009 incluyen a Wal-Mart y el Fondo de Becas Lisa y Mike Sygall. Habrá disponibles becas parciales para este programa.

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)

Programa de Intercambio Profesional sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad
(I-LEAD por sus siglas en inglés)

Marzo 15 a Abril 5, 2009 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

En el programa de Intercambio I-LEAD Profesional de MIUSA, tanto mujeres como hombres con y sin discapacidad de seis distintos países de América Latina que son líderes en el gobierno, en empresas, en el sector educativo, y en organizaciones de desarrollo comunitario y de defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, edificarán redes de contactos, desarrollarán estrategias prácticas, y generarán planes de acción conjuntos que incrementen las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

QUIÉN PUEDE PRESENTAR SU SOLICITUD:
Mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad provenientes de Argentina, Brasil, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala y México.

MIUSA seleccionará individuos que demuestren capacidad y compromiso en la realización de cambios que expandan las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad a nivel local o regional o a nivel nacional. Por ejemplo:

• Líderes de coaliciones de Organizaciones de Personas con Discapacidad (OPDs), a nivel municipal o nacional, u OPDs que incluyan diversas discapacidades que sean influyentes.

• Líderes del gobierno, incluyendo alcaldes o ministros u otros funcionarios clave en agencias de Servicios Sociales, Ministerios de Educación o Transporte, u otros.

• Educadores influyentes, tales como directores de escuelas, programas vocacionales, o universidades.

• Empresarios líderes que empleen o faciliten capacitación a personas con discapacidad, o que estén interesados en expandir su inclusión de personas con discapacidad como parte de su fuerza laboral.

• Profesionales y líderes de organizaciones comunitarias que promuevan la microempresa y el empleo, incluyendo adiestradores empresariales, formadores vocacionales, micro-prestamistas.

LENGUAJE:
Los lenguajes oficiales de I-LEAD Profesional son el español, el inglés y el lenguaje de señas estadounidense.

Se facilitará traducción español-inglés e interpretación en lenguaje de señas únicamente durante los talleres formales del programa, los seminarios y las visitas a instalaciones.

DETALLES GENERALES DEL PROGRAMA:
El programa I-LEAD incluirá talleres, visitas a instalaciones y actividades prácticas sobre temas que incluyan:

• Estrategias de empleo para mujeres y hombres con discapacidad incluyendo educación, capacitación, empleo asistido, rehabilitación vocacional.
• Políticas y legislación para oportunidades de trabajo.
• Oportunidades igualitarias en la educación, incluyendo escuelas inclusivas y escuelas específicas para discapacidad, legislación y servicios y adecuaciones de accesibilidad.
• Planificación profesional y educación superior incluyendo políticas y sistemas de apoyo para personas con discapacidad.
• Transporte y comunidades accesibles: políticas y modelos de sistemas de transporte accesibles y acceso público.
• Asociaciones entre microempresa y sector privado.
• Estrategias de liderazgo para empleo, incluyendo formulación de proyectos, uso de medios de comunicación, generación de coaliciones.
• Experiencias multiculturales y de formación de grupos de trabajo.
• Metas y planes de acción para el empleo de las mujeres y los hombres con discapacidad.
ALOJAMIENTO Y TRANSPORTE:
• Se proveerá alojamiento simple pero cómodo con habitaciones y baños compartidos.
• Se ofrecerán el desayuno, el almuerzo y una cena ligera al día. Todas las comidas adicionales, aperitivos, o gastos varios (incluyendo lavandería) serán responsabilidad de cada delegado.
• Se proveerá transporte público accesible.

COSTO DEL PROGRAMA:
• El costo total del programa es USD $250. Es posible que hayan becas limitadas en base a la necesidad que haya demostrado el solicitante.

• MIUSA proporcionará: los boletos de avión ida y vuelta para que los participantes viajen desde sus países hasta Eugene, Oregón, EEUU; comida, alojamiento y transporte local para todas las actividades del programa I-LEAD Profesional.

• Los participantes del programa serán responsables por obtener sus pasaportes y visas estadounidenses vigentes y todos costos relacionados.

PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN CONTACTARSE CON:
Mobility International USA
Programa de Intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) es una organización cuya misión es empoderar a las personas con discapacidad alrededor del mundo para que alcancen sus derechos humanos mediante los intercambios internacionales y el desarrollo internacional.

Mobility International USA
Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional
Marzo 15 a Abril 5 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

SOLICITUD e INSTRUCCIONES

1. Por favor llene TODAS LAS SECCIONES de esta solicitud, incluyendo:
_____ Formulario de Información de Solicitud (Sección 1 a 3)
_____ Preguntas de Redacción (usar hojas adicionales para sus respuestas)
_____ Dos Formularios de Recomendación Completos

IMPORTANTE: LAS SOLICITUDES NO SERÁN REVISADAS HASTA QUE ESTÉN COMLETAS.

2. Se aceptarán solicitudes en inglés y en español. ¡NO se tendrá en cuenta la ortografía, el vocabulario o la gramática en inglés de lo solicitantes!

3. Dos Formularios de Recomendación: DEBEN completarse por dos personas familiarizadas con su trabajo y cualidades de líder. Miembros de la familia no pueden completar sus recomendaciones.
• Al menos una referencia debería venir de la organización, institución o empresa a la que usted representará en I-LEAD Profesional.
• Las personas de referencia deberían completar y firmar el Formulario de Recomendación y enviarlo a MIUSA vía e-mail (de preferencia) o vía fax. (E-mail a: apply@miusa.org, Fax: +1-541-343-6812.)

4. ¡ENVÍE SU SOLICITUD PRONTO! Esperamos revisar un gran número de solicitudes para un número limitado de cupos.

Fecha límite de solicitud: enero 16, 2009.

Envíe su solicitud vía e-mail (de preferencia), vía fax o por correo postal a:

Mobility International USA
I-LEAD Professional 2009
apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Website: www.miusa.org

FORMULARIO DE INFORMACIÓN DE SOLICITUD:

SECCIÓN 1: Información del Solicitante

Apellido del solicitante: _________________________________________________________
Nombre del solicitante: _________________________________________________________

Fecha de nacimiento: Mes: ________ Día: ________ Año: ____________

Dirección de e-mail 1: _________________________________________________________
Dirección de e-mail 2: _________________________________________________________

Dirección residencial: _________________________________________________________
Ciudad: Provincia/Estado:
País: Código postal:

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

¿Tiene un pasaporte vigente? NO SÍ País del pasaporte ___________________

Número de pasaporte: _________________________________________________________

Fecha de expiración de pasaporte: Mes: ________ Día: ________ Año: ____________

Idioma materno (hablado o de señas):_______________________________________________

Nivel de Idioma Inglés: Principiante _______ Lento ________ Rápido ________ Fluido ________

Nivel de Idioma Español: Principiante _______ Lento ________ Rápido _______ Fluido _______

Nivel de Lenguaje de Señas (EEUU): Principiante _____ Lento _____ Rápido _____ Fluido _____

Otros idiomas (hablados o de señas): _______________________________________________

¿Cuál es su ocupación?: _________________________________________________________

Por favor liste una persona que podría contactarse con usted si nosotros no logramos contactarnos con usted:
Nombre:___________________________________ Relación con usted:__________________

Direcciones de e-mail:__________________________________________________________

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

SECCIÓN 2:

Organización/ONG/Negocio que usted representará: __________________________________

Su Posición/Título de su Cargo en esta Organización/Institución/Empresa:
____________________________________________________________________________

Persona de Contacto en la Organización: ___________________________________________
E-mail:_______________________________________________________________________

Dirección residencial: _________________________________________________________
Ciudad: Provincia/Estado:
País: Código postal:

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

SECCIÓN 3:

INFORMACIÓN DE DISCAPACIDAD
El programa de intercambio de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional tendrá un equilibrio de mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad. MIUSA realizará los arreglos adecuados para asegurar que cada delegado con discapacidad pueda participar de forma completa e igualitaria. Para ayudarnos a cumplir esta meta, por favor complete la siguiente información:

¿Tiene usted una discapacidad? NO SÍ

De ser así, por favor describa su discapacidad: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mobility International USA

1. Organización/ONG/Empresa a la que representará:
a) ¿Cuál es el nombre de la organización, ONG o empresa al cuál usted representará?

b) ¿Cuál es su posición en la organización, ONG o empresa? Por favor resuma sus responsabilidades.

c) ¿Cuál es el propósito, misión u objetivo de la organización, institución o empresa? (Límite 100 palabras)

d) ¿En qué forma están involucradas, incluidas o beneficiadas las personas con discapacidad a través de su organización, institución o empresa?

2. Participación Comunitaria:
a) Por favor liste otras organizaciones a las cuales pertenece, y las actividades de servicio comunitario en las que esté involucrado a nivel local o nacional.

3. Empleo para personas con discapacidad:
a) Por favor liste los tres problemas más críticos (en su opinión) que limiten las oportunidades de trabajo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad.

b) ¿Qué ha hecho usted o su organización para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad?

c) Por favor liste otras organizaciones o individuos con quienes su organización haya colaborado para promover las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad.

4. Ideas de proyectos o acciones
a) Por favor describa un proyecto, una iniciativa o acción(es) que usted o su organización podrían implementar para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las mujeres y hombres con discapacidad en su comunidad.

b) ¿Cuál sería el resultado del proyecto, iniciativa o acción(es)? ¿Cuántas personas con discapacidad se beneficiarían?

c) Liste cinco socios comunitarios y describa cómo estarían involucrados en este proyecto, iniciativa o acción(es).

5. ¿Por qué y en qué forma su participación en I-LEAD Profesional 2009 resultaría en la expansión de las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad? Por favor sea específico/a.

6. Por favor liste:
a.) Cualquier experiencia previa en programas de intercambio o conferencias internacionales (dónde, por qué y cuándo).

b.) Cualquier viaje previo a los EEUU (dónde, por qué y cuándo).

7. Por favor añada cualquier otro comentario relevante respecto a su participación en este intercambio.

Fecha límite de solicitud: enero 16, 2009. (O depues)

Envíe su solicitud vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal mail a:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
I-LEAD Professional 2009
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Página Web: www.miusa.org

Mobility International USA
Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional
Marzo 15 a Abril 5, 2009 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

Apellido del Solicitante: _________________________________________________________
Nombre del Solicitante: _________________________________________________________

Dirección(es) de e-mail: ____________________________________ País:

FORMULARIO DE RECOMENDACIÓN

Nota para la Persona de Referencia: La persona mencionada a continuación está solicitando participar en el programa de intercambio de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional, en el que mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad que son líderes en el gobierno, en empresas, en el sector de la educación, en organizaciones de desarrollo comunitario y de defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, desarrollarán estrategias prácticas y planes de acción conjuntos para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

Por favor envíe el formulario completo vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal a MIUSA (ver abajo) o devuélvaselo al solicitante para que lo entregue conjuntamente con su solicitud TAN PRONTO COMO SEA POSIBLE. (Use hojas de papel adicionales si es necesario). Gracias.

Por favor escriba a máquina o claramente en letra imprenta. Use papel adicional si es necesario.

Nombre de la persona que facilita la referencia: _____________________________________
Organización: _________________________________________________________________
E-mail:_______________________________________________________________________

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

1.) ¿Por qué recomienda al/la solicitante para el Programa de Intercambio de MIUSA I-LEAD Profesional?

2.) Por favor mencione brevemente las metas u objetivos de su organización (100 palabras o menos).

3.) ¿Qué rol(es) tiene el/la solicitante en su organización?

4.) De ser seleccionado/a, ¿en qué forma ayudaría la participación del/la solicitante en el programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional para que su organización incremente las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad?

5.) Por favor describa el apoyo que su organización puede ofrecer a proyectos y actividades para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad.

Firma de la Persona de Referencia: ___________________________ Fecha: ____________

Por favor devolver al solicitante o enviar vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal a:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
I-LEAD Professional
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Página Web: www.miusa.org



I received this announcement via Joan Durocher and also via the Intl-Dev email news distribution list.

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FUNDING: Campaigns to Ratify, Implement Disability Rights Treaty (CRPD)

Posted on 1 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Are you a disability rights advocate working in a developing country? Is your organization trying to persuade your country’s government to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)? Or, has your country already ratified the CRPD–and you are now working on making sure the CRPD is fully implemented, so that all people with disabilities in your country have their rights respected and protected? Do you need funding support?

The grantmaking foundation, Open Society Institute, has now established the Disability Rights Initiative that supports the efforts of disability rights advocates working on ratification and implementation of the CRPD around the world. The initiative gives priority to efforts promoting the rights of people with intellectual and psycho-social disabilities. However, OSI is willing to support a range of programs and projects that advance the CRPD.

Learn more detail about this funding opportunity and how to apply for it at:

http://www.soros.org/initiatives/special/focus/disability/grants

This is an on-going funding opportunity.

Please note that all inquiries and funding applications should be directed to the Open Society Institute, NOT We Can Do.

Advocates working on issues related to implementing the CRPD in developing countries will also want to keep checking the Disability Rights Fund web site for announcements of future, additional funding opportunities there. The application deadline for their first round of grants passed in August 2008, but they will be offering more funding grants to more countries in the future. Also check the resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website for links to more possible funding sources in general.

New to the CRPD? Learn more about this international, legally-binding human rights treaty that protects the human rights of people with disabilities around the world at http://ratifynow.org/ratifynow-faq/



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for alerting me to the OSI funding opportunity.

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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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TRAINING: International Diploma in Mental Health Law, Human Rights

Posted on 8 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

The World Health Organization (WHO) recently announced the first ever one-year International Diploma in Mental Health Law and Human Rights. The new academic program will launch in October 2008 in Pune, India, and is the result of a collaborative effort between the Indian Law Society Law College and WHO Mental Health Improvements for Nations Development (MIND). Based on WHO materials and tools, the program is meant to enhance student understanding of international human rights standards and mechanisms to protect the rights of people with mental disabilities and provide them with the skills to apply this knowledge in their own national contexts.

This program is particularly relevant in light of the new international disability rights treaty–the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)–that will be entering into force on May 3, 2008.

To be eligible for the new International Diploma in Mental Health Law and Human Rights, students should have a degree from any recognized university in any of the following subjects: law, medicine, psychiatry, nursing, psychology, social work, other social sciences, or other natural sciences.

Alternately, people who use mental health services, and caretakers, are also encouraged to pursue the diploma program so they can become effective advocates for change. These candidates can be eligible with graduate qualification in any discipline from a recognized university.

The application deadline is June 15, 2008 in order to be considered for entering with the first class of students in October 2008.

UPDATE, July 2, 2008: it has been confirmed that another course will be offered in the year 2009. People who have missed the deadline to apply for the 2008 course should monitor the website for the International Diploma in Mental Health Law and Human Rights directly for updates, deadlines, and other details relating to subsequent courses.

Students may apply on line. Tuition for international students will be $7000 in US dollars. Prospective students should follow the link to the website for the diploma program for information on the availability of scholarship options. As of July 2008, their website indicates that limited scholarships are available primarily for people in India.

Learn more about the program via their web site at:

http://www.mentalhealthlaw.in/index.html

Inquiries about the program should please be directed to the Indian Law Society College, not to We Can Do.



We Can Do first learned about this program via the Disabled Peoples International e-newsletter. Further details was collected at the web site for the Diploma program.

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RESOURCE: Implementing the Disability Rights Treaty, for Users, Survivors of Psychiatry

Posted on 19 March 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Psychiatric Disabilities, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (WNUSP) has released a manual that can guide users in implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), with people who have used or survived psychiatry.

People with all types of disabilities may experience human rights violations at one time or another. People who have used or survived psychiatric services, however, may be particular targets for certain types of violations. For example, they may be more commonly denied the right to make their own choices about accepting or refusing medical care or entering the hospital. They may be required to take certain drugs or submit to other treatments even if they hold the strong opinion that the potentially harmful side effects outweigh the benefits.

WNUSP’s implementation manual highlights aspects of the interational disability rights treaty (CRPD) that are particularly relevant to users and survivors of psychiatry. These include the areas of legal capacity, liberty, right to live in the community, freedom from forced psychiatric interventions, and the right to participate in enforcing the CRPD.

The manual also explains relevant terminology. For example, the CRPD uses the term “people with mental impairments” to refer to people with mental health problems, or who have mental disabilities, or who have used or survived psychiatry. This term was chosen with WNUSP’s agreement during the process of negotiating the international disability rights treaty. However, WNUSP prefers the use of the phrase “psychosocial disability.”

WNUSP’s manual explains and summarizes each article of the CRPD, with particular attention to its relevance for people with psychosocial disabilities. The manual also makes recommendations for how to address common concerns that governments and others may express about certain aspects of the CRPD as they apply to people with psychosocial disabilities. It describes an array of alternate approaches to healing, treatment, or supporting people in making and expressing their own choices that have been used in various countries. The manual ends with an explanation of how user/survivor organizations can be involved with monitoring the implementation of the CRPD.

Learn more about WNUSP’s implementation manual for the CRPD, or download it in Word format (289 Kb), at:

http://www.wnusp.net/UnitedNations_MMtmp03630c55/UnitedNationsConventionfortheRightsofPersonswithDisabilities.htm



We Can Do first learned about WNUSP’s implementation manual for the CRPD via the Disabled People’s International email newsletter. Further detail was obtained from the manual itself.

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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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NEWS: Human Rights Abuses of Disabled Children, Adults in Serbia

Posted on 17 November 2007. Filed under: Blind, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

MENTAL DISABILITY RIGHTS INTERNATIONAL

Embargoed Until November 14th, 2007

Contact: Laurie Ahern – 202.361.1402
Eric Rosenthal – 202.361.9195
Email: Lahern@mdri.org
Email: Erosenthal@mdri.org

HUMAN RIGHTS GROUP ACCUSES SERBIA OF TORTURE AND ABUSE AGAINST CHILDREN AND ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES

Belgrade, Serbia – November 14, 2007 – Following a four year investigation, Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI) released its findings today in a report detailing the human rights abuses perpetrated against children and adults in Serbia with disabilities, forced to live out their lives in institutions. Torment not Treatment: Serbia’s Segregation and Abuse of Children and Adults with Disabilities describes children and adults tied to beds or never allowed to leave their cribs – some for years at a time. In addition, filthy conditions, contagious diseases, lack of medical care, rehabilitation and judicial oversight renders placement in a Serbian institution life threatening for both children and adults. The children and adults had a range of disabilities including Downs Syndrome, deafness, visual impairment, autism, and mobility impairments.

“These are Serbia’s most vulnerable citizens. Thousands confined to institutions are subjected to inhuman and degrading treatment and abuse. Children and adults tied down and restrained over a lifetime is dangerous and painful treatment tantamount to torture – clear violations of the European Convention on Human Rights,” said Attorney Eric Rosenthal, Executive Director of MDRI and an expert on human rights law.

“We call on the government of Serbia to stop these abuses immediately and to respect the human rights of all people with disabilities,” concluded Rosenthal.

For more information visit www.mdri.org, where you can download a copy of the full report in PDF format, videos, and photos. The video footage does not have captions available. As a deaf person, I found that if you read the executive summary of the report and look at some of the photos before viewing the video then most of the images in the video speak for themselves. I’m guessing that there is probably no audio description for blind people; as a sighted deaf person, I’m afraid I’m not in a position to judge how much sense the video will make without it. Readers who are deaf or blind–or who support their interests–may wish to contact MDRI to encourage them to make their video materials available with both captions and audio description.

MDRI is an international human rights and advocacy organization dedicated to the full participation in society of people with mental disabilities worldwide. We Can Do published an earlier press release from MDRI reporting on similar human rights abuses in Argentina; the Argentina report, entitled Ruined Lives, can still be downloaded from the front page of the MDRI web site (scroll down the page). More reports about human rights abuses of people with disabilities in Turkey, Peru, Uruguay, Mexico, Kosovo, Russia, and Hungary can be downloaded in PDF format from http://www.mdri.org/publications/index.htm

Most of the text of this blog post comes from the MDRI press release, which can be retrieved at www.mdri.org.


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UPCOMING Post-Conflict Rehabilitation Book

Posted on 9 November 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Opportunities, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I have now been informed that the editors for this book are NO LONGER ACCEPTING NEW SUBMISSIONS. This notice is left in place for informational purposes ONLY, and so that people can seek out the book after it is published.

WAS Recruiting chapter authors for a new book
Estimated Completion Date: August 2009
[Again, please note that the date for author applications has now passed and all desired authors have been selected.]

Book title: Post-Conflict Rehabilitation: Creating a Trauma Membrane for Individuals and Communities and Restructuring Lives after Trauma

WAS Recruiting for these chapters:

1. Survival stabilization: This chapter covers the dynamics of providing physical sustenance, medical assistance, and housing to individuals after a conflict situation.
2. Psychological stabilization and crisis intervention: This chapter contains short-term interventions that can be used in the immediate aftermath of the crisis, as well as interventions that are appropriate for several weeks following the crisis. Denial of trauma will be covered in this chapter.
3. Physical rehabilitation: This chapter outlines the basic principles of physical rehabilitation, and the current trends and techniques that are used in developed and developing countries.
4. Psychological rehabilitation for veterans: This chapter addresses acute, conflict-related mental health issues, such as combat stress reactions, grief reactions, and Acute Stress Disorder. Psychological services offered near the front line are explained.
5. Psychological rehabilitation for civilians: This chapter details acute, post-conflict mental health issues from the civilian side, which may include terrorization from military sources. Thus, grief reactions, Acute Stress Disorder, and other psychological reactions to acute stress will be discussed.
6. Trends in coping with trauma: This chapter will review the empirical literature published on coping with traumatic events. This includes gender-related differences in coping with trauma, and distinctions between veterans and civilians.
7. Social reconstruction and economic stabilization: Processes are discussed by which governments and NGOs formulate plans, rebuild infrastructures, and develop resources.
8. Political and social rehabilitation: This chapter focuses on how inter-group tensions are stabilized and healed after treaties are signed and the war or conflict stops (i.e., community-level interventions).

Contact:
Erin Martz, Ph.D. (Editor), Assistant professor, 119D Patterson Hall, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 USA

As of September 23, 2008, I have been informed that authors are no longer needed for this endeavor.


We Can Do received this announcement via the email distribution list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (<a href=”GPDD mailing list“>GPDD). However, neither We Can Do nor GPDD are associated with this publication endeavor. Although it is no longer possible for authors to offer their writing skills, people interested in the topic may wish to keep their eyes open for the release of this book after August 2009.


Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do.

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NEWS: Human Rights Violations of Argentines with Psychosocial, Mental Disabilities

Posted on 25 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Cognitive Impairments, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opinion, Psychiatric Disabilities, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

SEGREGATED FROM SOCIETY IN ATROCIOUS CONDITIONS – ARGENTINA’S MENTAL
HEALTH SYSTEM VIOLATES HUMAN RIGHTS

WASHINGTON, DC—September 25, 2007— Argentina is among countries with the most psychiatrists per capita in the world—yet people detained in the country’s public psychiatric institutions are subject to serious human rights violations. Ruined Lives, an investigative report released today by Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI)and the Argentine human rights organization Center for Legal and Social Studies(CELS), finds that 25,000 people are locked away in Argentina’s institutions, segregated from society, many for a lifetime and with no possibility of ever getting out.

Ruined Lives exposes widespread abuse and neglect in these institutions, including people burning to death in isolation cells, complete sensory deprivation in long-term isolation, forced sterilization and sexual and physical abuse. In one psychiatric penal ward in Buenos Aires, men were locked naked in tiny, barren isolation cells with no light or ventilation for months at a time. At another institution, four people died while locked in isolation cells. Toilets overflowed with excrement and floors were flooded with urine.

Investigators found a 16 year-old boy in a crib, his arms and legs tied to his body with strips of cloth, completely immobilized. Staff said he had been tied up since being admitted to the institution more than a year before.

“Argentina’s mental health system detains people on a massive scale without any legal protections,” said Eric Rosenthal, MDRI’s ExecutiveDirector. “The inhumane and degrading treatment we observed is banned by international human rights treaties and should not be tolerated in any society.”

MDRI is an international human rights and advocacy organization dedicated to the full participation in society of people with mental disabilities world wide. For more information, visit www.mdri.org.

CELS is an Argentine organization devoted to fostering and protecting human rights and strengthening the democratic system and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.cels.org.ar.

The report and photographs can be downloaded from the MDRI web site in either English or Spanish.

MENTAL DISABILITY RIGHTS INTERNATIONAL
1156 15th St NW, Suite 1001, Washington, DC 20005
Phone: (202) 296-0800, Fax: (202) 728-3053
E-mail: mdri@mdri.org
http://www.mdri.org

This press release comes from Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI</a).


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NEWS: Researching Mental Health in Developing Countries

Posted on 15 October 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This press release is taken from the Global Forum for Health Research web site.

PRESS RELEASE Geneva, 10 October 2007– Mental and neurological disorders are responsible for 13% of the global burden of disease. In addition, more than half of the 10 leading risk factors that cause one third of premature deaths worldwide have behavioural determinants, such as unsafe sex, tobacco or alcohol consumption, etc. Despite this evidence, mental health is a neglected and an under researched area of public health, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

On the occasion of World Mental Health Day, the Global Forum for Health Research is pleased to launch the following electronic publication:

Research capacity for mental health in low- and middle-income countries: Results of a mapping project

Pratap Sharan, Itzhak Levav, Sylvie Olifson, Andrés de Francisco and Shekhar Saxena (eds.) Geneva, World Health Organization and Global Forum for Health Research, 2007 (www.globalforumhealth.org)

Download full-text PDF (146 p.): www.globalforumhealth.org/filesupld/MentalHealthRC/MHRC_FullText.pdf or see
http://www.who.int/mental_health/evidence/en/

The printed publication will be launched at Forum 11, Beijing, People’s Republic of China, 29 October to 2 November 2007 (www.globalforumhealth.org).

This report provides an account of the current status of mental health research in 114 LMICs of Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean. The scale of the study makes it the first systematic attempt to confirm the pressing needs of improving research capacity in mental health. Thus, the report enables evidence-based decision-making in funding and priority setting in the area of mental health research in LMICs. It strongly requests all policy-makers, programme managers, and funders of research for health, at national and global levels, to place mental health high on their agendas.

A total of 4633 mental health researchers and 3829 decision-makers, university administrators and association workers working in the field of mental health were identified:
• Half of the countries mapped had only five or fewer mental health researchers.
• Fifty-seven per cent of the 114 LMICs were found to contribute fewer than five articles to the international mental health indexed literature for a 10-year period (1993–2003), while very few articles could be identified from non-indexed sources in almost 70% of the countries, suggesting a paucity of researchers and mental health research in many LMICs.
• Some countries, such as Argentina, Brazil, China, India, the Republic of Korea and South Africa contributed significantly to international mental health publications – a finding that attests to notable variations in mental health research production within as well as across regions.

The main reasons for this paucity of mental health research identified in the study are the many demands faced by clinicians and academics in a context characterized by poor funding, a lack of trained personnel, little infrastructural support, and a paucity of research networks, in institutions which mostly lacked a research culture.

The survey results showed broad agreement among researchers and other mental health related stakeholders, and across regions, regarding priorities for mental health research in LMICs. Epidemiological studies of burden and risk factors, health system research, and social science research were the highest ranked types of needed research. Depression/anxiety, substance use disorders, and psychoses were identified as the top three priority disorders, while prioritized population groups were children and adolescents, women, and persons exposed to violence/trauma. The most important criteria for prioritizing research were burden of disease, social justice, and availability of funds, although researchers and other stakeholders differed markedly regarding the importance of personal interest of researchers as a criterion for prioritizing research.

These findings highlight the need to review and strengthen the management of mental health research so that it meets the national needs of LMICs as well as contributes to the global fund of knowledge. Governments and other institutions in LMICs should devise mechanisms to allocate greater funds to research, capacity and infrastructure strengthening. Although some examples of research impacting policy and practice are available, in general there is little interface between research and policy. There is a need for organizations to bridge the gap between policy and research by sensitizing researchers about the usefulness of involving other stakeholders in their research and sensitizing stakeholders about the importance of good mental health research.

“This report highlights the weak research structures and the lack of connection between mental health decision-makers and researchers in LMICs. It gives nine key recommendations for the development of research for action.”
Professor Lars Jacobsson, Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Psychiatry, Umea University, Sweden

Principal Investigators: Carla Gallo, Oye Gureje, Exaltacion E Lamberte, Jair de Jesus Mari, Guido Mazzotti (deceased), Vikram Patel, Leslie Swartz–ENDS

____________________________________________________________

For additional information or interviews, contact Sylvie Olifson T +41 22 791 1667 sylvie.olifson@globalforumhealth.org or Shekhar Saxena T +41 22 791 3625 saxenas@who.int


If you have been to We Can Do before then you may have noticed that this blog has a new appearance and structure. How do you like it? Do you find it easy (or hard) to find the information you’re looking for? Any other feedback on how to improve the We Can Do blog in general? Whether you’re a new-comer or repeat visitor, please share your thoughts in the comments area at the post where I describe We Can Do’s new look or email me at ashettle at patriot dot net.

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The WHO MIND Project: Psychosocial, Psychiatric Disabilities

Posted on 6 October 2007. Filed under: News, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The World Health Organization (WHO) has unvieled a project meant to improve the access to, and quality of, treatments available for psychosocial (psychiatric) disabilities such as depression or schizophrenia and neurological disorders such as epilepsy in developing nations.

Psychosocial disabilities and neurological disorders can make it harder for people living in poverty to earn a living and create better futures for themselves and their families.  In addition to the challenges presented by their differences, people with psychosocial or neurological disabilities must also face stigma, discrimination, and human rights violations.   The new WHO Mental Health Improvements for Nations Development (MIND) project is meant to help people overcome these barriers so that people with psychiatric and neurological disabilities can participate more fully in society.  The new web site is at:

http://www.who.int/mental_health/policy/en/


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