Call for Applications to Receive Global Disability Rights Library

Posted on 12 January 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opportunities, Resources, technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

MEDIA RELEASE

Call for Applications to Receive Global Disability Rights Library
January 7, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Andrea Shettle, Program Manager: Global Disability Rights Library
Telephone: (877) 535-0506
Email: gdrl@usicd.org

Washington, DC – The Global Disability Rights Library project announces a call for organizations to apply to receive a free digital Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL).  Applications are open to disabled people’s organizations, universities, government agencies, and other organizations in developing countries.   Sixty organizations will receive the digital library to empower them to disseminate valuable disability rights knowledge and toolkits to their communities.

The goal of the GDRL project is to improve the lives of persons with disabilities in developing countries.  The project uses an innovative off-line digital storage technology to deliver digital resources to people beyond the reach of the internet.  The electronic library will be stored in a hard drive, called an “eGranary unit” that also contains an interface emulating the look and functioning of the web but without requiring actual internet connectivity.  Users will include disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), decision makers, government agencies, individual advocates, and others who cannot easily download information from the web.  Read more about the GDRL project at:

http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/global-disability-rights-library

The GDRL is a collaborative effort between the U.S. International Council on Disabilities and the University of Iowa’s WiderNet Project with support from USAID to bring the best materials on disability rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to developing countries.

Ideal deployment site candidates will have a demonstrated commitment to promoting and facilitating disability rights.  Successful applicants will have the organizational capacity to become a hub for disseminating disability rights information and will be inclusive of a diverse disability community. Interested organizations are urged to review the application and full eligibility criteria posted on WiderNet’s website at:

http://www.widernet.org/digitallibrary/GDRLSiteSelection

Individuals and organizations with internet access are encouraged to please assist in reaching out to organizations with poor internet connectivity to assist them with the application process.  There will be several selection rounds.  Applicants not accepted in an early selection round will be immediately rolled over into subsequent selection rounds.  Candidates are encouraged to apply early.  Please do not wait until the final deadline.

Apply by March 1, 2011, to be considered for deployment by June 30, 2011
Apply by September 1, 2011, to be considered for deployment by December 31, 2011
Apply by May 1, 2012, to be considered for deployment by August 31, 2012

Questions about the application process or eligibility criteria should be directed to gdrl@usicd.org.  Applicants who cannot use email also may reach us by post mail at

Andrea Shettle, MSW, MA
Program Manager, Global Disability Rights Library
United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD)
1012-14th Street, NW, Suite 105
Washington, DC 20005
United States of America

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RESOURCE: MindFreedom Kenya Promotes Mental Health Rights

Posted on 18 December 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Psychiatric Disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

MindFreedom Kenya is an affiliate of MindFreedom International, formed in response to identified gaps in mental health rights, lack of adequate information about substance abuse and impact to society and those directly affected. Since its inception, MindFreedom Kenya has endeavored to develop efforts to transform and diversify the marginalized and the most vulnerable-persons with psychosocial disabilities.

It helps users and survivors to be involved in care planning and making informed decisions about their care and upholding of human rights, advocating inhumane treatment and creating awareness about substance abuse and psychosocial disabilities.

For users and survivors of psychiatry, one of the most important things about the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is that it says we have an equal right to legal capacity, which is the right to make our own decisions; and the right to free and informed consent in health care; and that we should not be deprived of liberty based on disability – which means that governments are violating this treaty if they lock us up in psychiatric institutions and do forced treatment. They also have positive obligations, to provide support and services needed to live in the community, and to provide access to support in exercising legal capacity if the person wants this support. Support in exercising legal capacity is the opposite of guardianship, because it means the person is in control of her/his own decisions and chooses the kind of help that she/he wants.

MindFreedom Kenya aim is to influence policy and planning, and to encourage improvements in the management and delivery of mental health services.

Ø Policy makers acknowledging the need and strongly pursuing mental health policies that positively impact their constituents and calling for revision of existing mental policies to match today’s complex and changing mental health care.
Ø Leaders in health profession, professional associations, mental health boards and health care companies to take a leading role in initiatives that increase access, quality and equity. On the same note, they must be able to establish a mental health advisory council independent from government that works collaboratively with policy makers. This mental health advisory council will create a mental health reform blueprints with support and input from both public and private health care sectors. The mental health advisory council along and/with sponsoring policy makers will ensure that such mental health policies are passed, implemented and delivered.
Ø Human Right organizations must recognize equity, access and quality of mental health care is a basic human right and they must take initiatives that will harness just distribution, fair and favorable policies and practically implementable mental health rights processes.
Ø Humanitarian Organizations involved in health care, WHO (World Health Org.) and UN (United Nations) to continue supporting mental health locally made policies and initiatives that are practical to the social realities of the people who need equal representation against abuses within the mental health system.

Regards,
Jeff Makana
kenya@mindfreedom.org
[Addendum, March 23, 2009: MindFreedom Kenya has a new website of its own at http://www.mindfreedomkenya.interconnection.org/

People also can learn about the organization at Jeff Makana’s blog at www.erucall.com.



Thank you to Jeff Makana for permission to post this information at We Can Do.

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International CONFERENCE on Independent Living, Nov 28-29, 2008, Stockholm, Sweden

Posted on 5 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Invitation to International Conference
”25 Years Independent Living in Sweden”

Stockholm November 28-29, 2008

How far has the Independent Living Movement come and where are we going? The conference celebrating 25 years of the Independent Living movement in Sweden will evaluate the achievements of our international civil rights movement in Sweden, Europe and other parts of the world and plan for tomorrow.

Together with Judy Heumann and Marilyn Golden, USA, Bente Skansgård, Norway, Kalle Könkkölä, Finland, Shoji Nakanishi, Japan, John Evans, UK, Horst Frehe, Germany, Jos Huys, Belgium, representatives of the Swedish movement and allies in administration, research and politics we will discuss successful Independent Living strategies and examples of good practice in our respective countries and regions, look back at our development and set the course for the future.

In plenary sessions and workshops we will share our experiences in working for de-institutionalization, personal assistance, legislation for non-discrimination and accessibility, and for spreading the Independent Living philosophy and approach to other countries. Have we been able to influence social policy, have we had an impact on society’s and our own view of disabled people, has our work led to concrete improvements in our group’s living conditions? How can we better support each other in our struggle for full citizenship, self-determination and self-respect?

The conference is intended for disabled people and their organizations, service providers, civil servants, politicians, researchers and the general public. Expect to leave the event with new friends, insights and impulses.

Adolf Ratzka, Independent Living Institute

Register with Nicoletta Zoannos at nicoletta.zoannos@independentliving.org for participation and help in finding hotel accommodations.

For continually updated information about the conference see www.independentliving.org

We Can Do readers will note that the presenters listed seem to be primarily from developed countries. People from developing countries will want to examine their website and communicate with Nicoletta Zoannos to decide for themselves the extent to which this conference will be relevant to their concerns. (The website, at least, does make some reference to some developing nations.)

Readers might also be interested in reading a paper by Shoji Nakanishi, featured among the presenters at this conference, entitled “Independent Living Movement in Developing Countries.



I received the original announcement for this conference via the IDA_CRPD_Forum listserver and via Ghulam Nabi Nizamani.

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Are Development Programs Achieving Disability Inclusion? If Not, What Next?

Posted on 4 September 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Reports, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

We cannot put all the world’s children into school, or eradicate global poverty and hunger, or stop the spread of HIV/AIDS, until and unless mainstream international development programs proactively include people with disabilities. The good news is that a slowly growing number of international agencies and organizations have written policies declaring their support for disability inclusion, otherwise known as disability mainstreaming. These include, as a few examples, the US Agency of International Development (USAID); the World Bank; The Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD); and the UK Department for International Development (DFID).

But, how well do these nice-sounding policies translate into practice? Do these programs actually reach poor people with disabilities in developing countries, or improve the quality of their lives, any better than before they wrote these policies? One DisabilityKar publication explores this question: Has Disability Been Mainstreamed into Development Cooperation? (Word format, 921 Kb)

One of the conclusions of this report is that the question is harder to answer than you might think: even the definition of what makes a “policy” a “policy” is apparently not always as obvious as it might seem. Then there are even trickier concepts to define, such as “inclusion,” “mainstreaming,” and “disability.” But ultimately the answer is mostly disappointing. Apart from some limited progress, many policies fail to go beyond pretty words on a page into pragmatic action in the field. If they are implemented, it is more or less haphazardly.

This conclusion in itself will probably not be especially new to close observers of the development field. What makes this study interesting, however, is that it is one of the few attempts to formally document what it terms a “disconnect between promise and results.” More importantly, it makes an attempt to answer why this disconnect happens, and what committed organizations can do to ensure that disability-friendly policies are carried out in practice. The study was published in July 2005, so some information has changed since then. But many of the underlying challenges are likely still similar today. Organizations and agencies that are serious about disability inclusion may wish to review this study with their own policies and practices in mind and consider ways they can help close the gap.

Has Disability Been Mainstreamed into Development Cooperation? (Word format, 921 Kb) analyzes policies and practice at USAID, the World Bank, NORAD, and DFID. The most common reason why disability inclusion policies fail include: lack of institutional support; failure to communicate policies; failure to break down traditional attitudes toward disability; failure to provide practical guidance in how to implement the policies; and inadequate resources.

Download the full 107-page report in Word format (921 Kb) at:

http://handicap-international.fr/bibliographie-handicap/4PolitiqueHandicap/mainstreaming/MainstreamDevCoop.doc

People interested in the DisabilityKar report may also be interested in reading a study of US-based organizations with an international focus on the extent to which they proactively include the concerns of women and girls with disabilities in their programs. This study, entitled Gender And Disability: A Survey of InterAction Member Agencies: Findings And Recommendations on Inclusion of Women and Men with Disabilities in International Development Programs (PDF format, 286 Kb), explores both policies and practice in dozens of relief and international development agencies and organizations. It also includes recommendations for how mainstream organizations can move forward in promoting genuine disability inclusion. Published by Mobility International USA, it is a few years older than DisabilityKar’s study, but covers more organizations and includes a gender focus as well as a disability focus. It can be downloaded in PDF format (286 Kb) at:

http://www.miusa.org/publications/freeresources/media/genderdisabilityreport.PDF



I discovered DisabilityKar’s study by exploring Handicap International’s new, on-line, free CD on Disability Rights and Policies. I encourage readers to explore the on-line CD on their own to find more publications and resources of interest. I first learned of MIUSA’s publication when I took my first course in international development and disability a few years ago at Gallaudet University.

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RESOURCE: Disability Rights and Policies

Posted on 21 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Handicap International has released a new CD on “Disability Rights and Policies.” Each of the 8 major sections of this CD offers an extensive range of reference documents and resources, in both English and French, related to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and to international development. The CD is targeted at organizations at all levels from local to international, and across many sectors including development, emergency relief, and human rights. It is meant to be used as a reference tool for any organization that supports inclusive development, including disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), public authorities, and service providers.

Many of the publications and web sites offered in this free, on-line CD, with some exceptions, are unfamiliar to me. In other words, many haven’t yet been featured at We Can Do. Some seem to be valuable enough to deserve individual blog posts to themselves in the future, though I know I’ll never get to them all. Instead, I encourage We Can Do readers to browse the “Disability Rights and Policies” CD for themselves.

The content of the CD is grouped into 8 different thematic areas:

The CD can be downloaded from the following website:
http://handicap-international.fr/bibliographie-handicap/

It is available in both English and French.

The CD also can be requested from Handicap International (info@handicap-international.us).



Thank you to Handicap International for alerting me to this resource.

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JOB POST: Assistant Coordinator, Bangladesh, National Forum of Organizations Working with the Disabled (NFOWD)

Posted on 30 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Career Opportunity
Application deadline: August 5, 2008

The National Forum of Organizations Working with the Disabled (NFOWD) is the apex federating body of NGOs working in the field of disability in Bangladesh. Established in 1991, it is registered with the Department of Social Services under the Ministry of Social Welfare and with the NGO Affairs Bureau. At the national level, it is a member of the National Coordination Committee and the National Executive Committee on Disability (formed under the Disability Welfare Act 2001) and the National Social Welfare Council and the National Foundation for Development of the Disabled Persons. With current membership strength of over 200 organizations, it has earned the recognition & reputation as the only interface between the Government and NGOs in the field of Disability, for its role in coordination and policy advocacy to uphold the rights & privileges of persons with disabilities in this country.

In order to strengthen its secretariat, NFOWD is looking to fill in the following position with immediate appointment:

Assistant Coordinator:
This is a mid-level position reporting to the Program Coordinator. Major responsibilities will include:
(a) Overseeing project related activities,
(b) Preparation of analytical reports on national and international policies, strategies, events and programs relating to Disability, and to suggest policy options for NFOWD.
(c) Developing necessary documents and materials for publication and/or circulation/distribution, such as annual reports, newsletters, articles, advocacy campaigns etc.
(d) Preparing workshop/ meeting reports/minutes and assisting the Director on matters arising out of the meeting decisions.
(e) Disseminating information on special events or any other related documents to member organizations.
(f) Responding to the requirements of GOB and other agencies concerned with the interests of NFOWD.

The position calls for extensive independent travel across the country. Salary is negotiable.

The ideal candidate will be a dynamic team person, willing & capable to travel frequently & independently. Strong interpersonal & communication skills both in Bangla & English, and computer skills both in Bangla and in English, along with at least three years’ hands on experience are essential. Working experience in any Disability program is desirable. Women will be encouraged. People with disabilities are also strongly encouraged to apply.

If you fulfill the abovementioned criteria, and feel that you are the person to take up the challenge, please send your curriculum vitae to NFOWD at the address mentioned below positively by Tuesday, the 5th of August 2008 either by post or e-mail. (To reiteriate: please do NOT contact We Can Do. Instead, please use the contact information provided below to reach NFOWD directly.)

Contact will be established with only short-listed applicants for further recruitment process. Any sort of persuasion in this regard, either in person, by mail or phone, will automatically disqualify the candidate.

The Secretary General
National Forum of Organizations Working with the Disabled (NFOWD)
8/9 Block – A, Lalmatia
Dhaka – 1207
Bangladesh
E-mail: nfowd@bdmail.net



We Can Do received this announcement via the Disability Information Dissemination Network, which is managed by the Centre for Services and Information on Disability (CSID) in Bangladesh and sponsored by Handicap International. To join the CSID mailing list (email discussion group), people may send an email to csid@bdmail.net and to csid@bdonline.com with the word “join” in the subject line.

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that, although abstracts are due by August 1, 2008, completed papers will not be due until 2009. This same announcement was posted at We Can Do in April, but the editors are circulating this notice again in an attempt to collect more abstracts for them to choose among.

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies
Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

  • What is the relationship between disability and poverty?
  • How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?
  • What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?
  • What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?
  • What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1st.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



This announcement was circulated by Daniel Mont via email. Any inquiries and abstracts should please be directed to Daniel Mont or to Rosangela Berman Bieler as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 26 April 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Education, Employment, Health, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies

Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

 
The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

What is the relationship between disability and poverty?

How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?

What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?

What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?

What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1, 2008.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



Daniel Mont recently circulated this announcement on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

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TRAINING: 4th Int’l Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability

Posted on 13 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Fellowships & Scholarships, Funding, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Mobility International USA’s (MIUSA)
4th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD)

August 12 – September 2, 2008
Eugene, Oregon, U.S.A.

APPLY NOW!
Application deadline: FRIDAY APRIL 4, 2008
Generous scholarships available.

American Sign Language interpretation*

MIUSA is currently accepting applications from emerging and established
women leaders with disabilities who are:

  • From Africa, Asia, Eurasia, Latin America, the Middle East, and
    Oceania/Pacific
  • First time visitors to the USA and have NOT participated in a MIUSA WILD
    program
  • From an organization led by and for people with disabilities, or by and for women, with particular attention to issues of women and girls with disabilities; or employed in a business or program committed to inclusion of women and girls with disabilities
  • **Women with disabilities who are from rural areas and/or indigenous backgrounds are especially encouraged to apply**
  • Generous scholarships are available for this program.

The WILD program will include workshops, site visits and practical activities on priority issues for women with disabilities, including:

  • Leadership for economic empowerment, including employment policy, legislation, private sector partnerships and coalition building
  • Educational rights and opportunities including specialized and inclusive schools, policy and legal rights, services and accommodations for accessibility
  • Career planning and higher education, including policies and support systems for women and girls with disabilities
  • Employment strategies for women with disabilities including training models, supported employment, microenterprise, private sector partnerships, career mentorship and skill-building
  • Health and family issues including parenting, health care and violence prevention
  • Accessible transportation and communities including policy and implementation, public advocacy, model transport systems, solutions for accessibility
  • Using the media and coalition building
  • Organizational development and sustainability, including funding resources and strategies, and fostering partnerships with community organizations and businesses
  • Cultural, team-building and community service experiences
  • Goals and action plans to strengthen collaborative relationships with other organizations and/or businesses and to implement plans for the employment of women with disabilities locally, regionally or internationally

The official languages of WILD are English and American Sign Language (ASL). However, some language translation may be provided during formal program workshops and activities only. Specific languages (e.g. Arabic, French, Russian, and/or Spanish) will be determined based on need and availability of resources.

Materials in alternative formats will be provided. Other disability-related accessibility arrangements will be negotiated to ensure full participation of all program participants.

APPLY EARLY! Limited space available!

Application deadline is April 4, 2008. Late applications will be accepted as space permits. Application materials are available in alternative formats upon request.

Applications can be downloaded at http://www.miusa.org/miusa-exchange-programs/WILD2008/index_html or requested via e-mail at: womenleaders@miusa.org

Application forms are currently available in English, Spanish, or Arabic. Translations into French and Russian are forthcoming.

Since 1981, MIUSA has been pioneering short-term international exchange programs for people with and without disabilities from over 90 countries. As a non-profit organization, MIUSA is dedicated to empowering people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

Contact information:
Mobility International USA
WILD 2008
E-mail: womenleaders@miusa.org
Website: www.miusa.org



We Can Do learned about this opportunity from MIUSA.

I was fortunate enough to have been able to participate in the 2nd International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability in 2003. I had a great time getting to know a group of 30 brilliant, ambitious, hard working women with different disabilities from nearly 30 developing countries around the world. It was a good reminder to me, as someone in a developed country, how much talent, energy, and creativity there is among disabled people in some of the poorest countries in the world.

To any Deaf (or deaf) people reading this: When I participated in 2003, there were six of us women who were Deaf/deaf. One besides me was fluent in ASL and used the ASL interpreter; another did not know ASL but could lipread in English and used an interpreter who signed in English word order while mouthing the words in English; another came with someone bilingual in Spanish and Panama Sign Language who listened to the Spanish interpreters and translated to Panama signs for her; another lipread one of the Spanish interpreters who was assigned to her for this purpose; another did not know any of the primary languages used in the workshop, so a deaf interpreter was assigned to her to translate from ASL to their own pidgeon mixture of international signs.

If you are deaf, then you will probably get the most of the workshops if you either know ASL or are able to lipread well in one of the primary languages used during the training program. But if you have other communication needs, then please do talk with the people with MIUSA and see what can be arranged. Contact MIUSA directly at the website or email addresses provided above. We Can Do is NOT responsible for WILD and cannot assist with your inquiries.



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