Marketing and Communications Internship (paid), Global Partnership for Disability and Development, Washington DC

Posted on 18 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS INTERNSHIP
Location: Washington, District of Columbia, 20006, United States
Organization: Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD)

Area of Focus: Disability Issues, International Cooperation
Skill(s): editing, special events planning, Writing
End date: July 9, 2009
Language(s): English
Start date: January 9, 2009
Last day to apply: December 6, 2008
Paid or unpaid: Paid

Description:
The Marketing and Communications Intern will provide critical support in raising awareness about the GPDD and its programs, disseminating information and outcomes, and providing outreach to a large number of diverse stakeholders. The duties of the GPDD Communication Intern include:
* Identifying key constituencies and stakeholders for the organization
* Assisting with the development of communications and marketing strategies to effectively engage them
* Assisting with the development and maintenance of communities of practice and work groups, comprised of individuals and institutions, in order to facilitate the GPDD programmatic and development goals
* Assisting with the development of informational materials about the GPDD, including website content, newsletters, annual reports, videos and other organizational materials
* Assisting with the development of press releases and management of media relations
* Assisting with the coordination of organizational mailings
* Coordinating special events
* Assisting with the maintenance of the organization’s contact and membership databases
* Staying abreast of local events, seminars and publications of interest to the organization and facilitating the organizations participation as necessary
* Management of special projects related to the communications strategy of the organization

Qualifications:
Required Skills: A minimum of 3 years of under-graduate education.
Experience in communications field, disability issues, international relations, or development. Knowledge of information gathering and data building. Fluency in written and oral English; communication skills and ability to draft, edit and proofread. Computer proficiency.

Desired Skills: Experience or knowledge of communications and development. Master’s degree, or working towards a degree, in relevant field. Work experience in non-profit organizations.

Required Attributes: Proactive attitude and ability to work independently. Attention to detail and strong organizational skills. Creative and thorough approach to research. Interest in disability issues.

Application instructions:
To apply, please submit your resume/CV and cover letter to
kmhamel@law.syr.edu.
Please include “Marketing and Communication Internship” in the subject line.
Qualified candidates will be contacted by phone and/or email.



This announcement was disseminated on the GPDD mailing list.

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JOB POST: Assistant General Secretary for Organizational Learning, American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, USA

Posted on 4 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer

The American Friends Service Committee is a Quaker organization, which includes people of various faiths who are committed to social justice, peace, and humanitarian service. Its work is based on the Quaker belief in the worth of every person and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice.

POSITION DESCRIPTION

TITLE: Assistant General Secretary for Organizational Learning
STATUS: Exempt
LOCATION: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
SUPERVISOR: Deputy General Secretary for Programs

Application Deadline: October 3, 2008

POSITION SUMMARY
The Assistant General Secretary for Organizational Learning (AGOL) supervises the directors of Evaluation, Program Planning, Strategic Methods and Constituency Outreach and Engagement and provides overall guidance, coordination, interpretation, and expertise to enhance the organizational learning environment at the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC). The AGOL ensures that senior managers are kept up-to-date on external trends and operational issues that may affect organizational learning at the AFSC. The AGOL works with the associate and assistant general secretaries to strengthen internal management and team building, to establish new models of operation that will facilitate positive cultural changes, and to reinforce a culture of accountability and participation.

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS/RESPONSIBILITIES: The key responsibilities of the AGOL include the following:
Staff Management, Development and Support
• Cultivate a work environment that attracts and maintains a diverse and highly-motivated staff.
• Set expectations and goals for results; develop objectives, strategies, action plans and financial projections to accomplish goals. Conduct annual performance reviews based on these objectives.
• Provide leadership and vision to staff members to promote teamwork, to achieve a common purpose, and to encourage continuous professional growth.
• Ensure that all AFSC policies and procedures are followed by all assigned staff.
• Work with staff members to ensure that all projects and programs are high quality, effective, and focused on the mission, goals and objectives of the AFSC.
Decision-Making
• Function as an effective decision-maker for the organization – using “sense of the meeting,” consultation, concurrent decision-making, and legally binding (union contract) approaches to decision-making as appropriate.
• Recognize that staff members are highly skilled and motivated and that consultative decision-making (where alternative views are sincerely received) is highly desirable.
Planning and Direction
• Provide strategic and creative leadership to the Organizational Learning unit.
• Keep abreast of the major political, economic, social, and cultural issues that may affect the work of the AFSC and ensure that the Organizational Learning unit is highly responsive to the changing external landscape and to opportunities to bring about positive change in the world.
• Ensures that learning is documented and that the Organizational Learning unit provides for the “historical memory” of the AFSC.
• Periodically and systematically assess staff training needs on program planning, strategic methods, program evaluation, constituency outreach and engagement and other strategically significant areas and work with managers across the AFSC to provide staff training as needed.
• Work with staff members across the AFSC to evaluate progress on the strategic plan and assist in updating the plan as needed.
• Foster the understanding of program planning and strategic methods to implement the strategic plan of the organization within resource constraints.
• Provide recommendations to the leadership of the Program area for AFSC-wide responses to urgent matters.
Financial Management
• Engage staff members in Organizational Learning in preparing an annual budget, which should flow from the strategic direction of the AFSC and be based upon the unit target given to the Organizational Learning unit.
• Manage the budgets of the Organizational Learning unit.
• Understand and monitor all financial and management systems, procedures, and processes of the Organizational Learning unit.
Outreach and Communications
• Maintain frequent contacts with the Religious Society of Friends and represent the viewpoints of the AFSC to all constituents.
• Work with the Office of Advancement to maintain on-going dialogue with supportive and potentially supportive individuals, groups and organizations to foster relationships on behalf of the AFSC.
• Function as the chief spokesperson for the Organizational Learning unit.
Collaboration
• Actively seek opportunities to collaborate with organizations, professional groups, institutions, etc. that will expand the reach and maximize the effectiveness of the AFSC.
• Present appropriate collaboration opportunities to staff members.
• Model collaborative behavior to staff members and to the larger humanitarian services community.
• Work closely with Organizational Learning staff members to ensure that all programs and activities interconnect with fund-raising activities.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
EDUCATION:
Baccalaureate degree required; advanced degree in organizational management, public policy, or a related area is desirable. Exceptional work experience may be accepted in lieu of an advanced degree.

EXPERIENCE:
• A minimum of 10 years of broad management experience, with at least five years at a senior level. Non-profit experience is a plus.
• Expertise in one or more of the following areas; strategic planning, program evaluation, strategic methods, or organizational documentation of best-practices.
• Demonstrated organizational skills and experience in budget management.
• Proven track record of staff management, including staff development, coaching and mentoring.
• Experience or thorough comfort level with functioning on an international level.

OTHER REQUIRED SKILLS AND ABILITIES:
• Commitment to the faith-based principles and guidelines that define the work of AFSC, including a commitment to nonviolence, equality and anti-oppression work and a belief in the intrinsic worth of every individual.
• An ability to connect with diverse audiences and to influences situations using tact and diplomacy.
• Ability to persuade and motivate others and to gain the respect and attention of AFSC staff members and volunteers.
• Ability to work well under pressure and adapt easily to changing situations and priorities.
• Proven ability to reach out collaboratively to individuals, groups and organizations.
• Strong interpersonal skills with knowledge of and experience in using consultative decision making processes.
• Ability to travel frequently and to work some weekends.
• Excellent oral and written communication skills.
• Excellent computer skills.
• Initiative, creativity, drive, energy and a sense of humor.

The American Friends Service Committee is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Qualified persons are encouraged to apply regardless of their religious affiliation, race, age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation or disability.

The central office of the AFSC is a unionized workplace, represented by District Council 47 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO. This is a management position and is not represented.

The American Friends Service Committee is a smoke-free workplace.

Candidates must apply for this and other AFSC jobs via www.AFSC.org/jobs



Thank you to Linda Lotz at AFSC for circulating this notice, including to We Can Do. Linda Lotz indicates that, due to internal re-organization at AFSC, several job openings are currently available. More job openings will become available within the next few months. People interested in working at AFSC should monitor their website directly to ensure that they don’t miss any announcements. (I’ll try to post them here also, but can’t guarantee that I will be able to include all of them.) Also check their site for volunteer opportunities. AFSC strives to be inclusive of people with disabilities in the programs it runs in low-income and post-conflict countries and also is interested in hiring workers with disabilities.

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JOB POST: Communications Officer, Handicap International, USA

Posted on 4 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Communications Officer – Washington DC – Metropolitan Region

Handicap International (HI) is an international NGO with eight international offices that collectively support programs for people living in disabling situations in some 60 post-conflict or low income countries. The U.S. office, incorporated in 2006, now seeks to establish a Communications Officer tasked with raising HI’s profile in the U.S. in support of HI’s ongoing fundraising and advocacy work. The Officer will stay abreast of HI’s international program work and will be able to develop myriad creative channels for communicating the impact of this work to potential donors and the general public. Overall responsibilities will include press relations, planning and implementing outreach and advocacy events, overseeing HI’s web site and ensuring that web content supports and enhances HI’s fund raising activities. Fluency in French highly desired. Willingness to travel essential. People with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Salary: $30-$35,000+ commensurate with experience. Excellent benefits.

Deadline to apply: September 30, 2008.

Full job description available at www.handicap-international.us.

Download the full job description (terms of reference) in PDF format at:

http://www.handicap-international.us/uploads/tx_dechiactus/TOR_HI_Communications_Officer___Qualifications__3_Sep__08.pdf

Send resume/CV, cover letter and salary history as email attachments to Ed Kenny at recruitment@handicap-international.us.



Thank you to Ed Kenny for alerting me to this job opening. The text for this blog post is taken directly from the job announcement at Handicap International’s website.

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JOB POST: Consultant, Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Posted on 19 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, signed languages | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Please note that this post gives information on two potential consulting positions: one for an international-level consultant for 15 days, the other for a national-level consultant for 30 days. Both consultants will work together for part of the project, but are being recruited separately. Please read all the information below carefully to ensure that you understand the nature of the project and the qualifications desired for each of the two positions so you can decide which of the two is best suited to your background. Please also note that all inquiries and applications should please be sent to the World Bank, NOT to We Can Do.

Deadline: September 12, 2008

Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project
INVIDIDUAL CONSULTING SERVICES
TF No. TF092635
Expressions of interest

The World Bank has received a “seed fund” from the Japan Social Development Fund toward the cost of preparing a Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project (“the Project”), and intends to apply part of the proceeds for consultant services. The services involve a short assignment to: (i) conduct community-based stakeholder consultations, and (ii) in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in the future Project proposal.

(The Project itself will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community. The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf. The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.)

The World Bank now invites eligible consultants to indicate their interest in providing the services. Interested consultants should provide information showing that they are qualified in the field of assignment and provide information on their technical and organizational capabilities.

A consultant will be selected in accordance with the procedures set out in the World Bank’s Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants by World Bank Borrowers (current edition).

Interested consultants may obtain further information at the address below during office hours (0900 to 1700 hours).

Expressions of interest must be e-mailed to jwaite@worldbank.org by September 12, 2008.

Deaf candidates are encouraged to express their interest in this assignment.

World Bank
Attn: Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist
63 Ly Thai To Street
Hanoi, VIETNAM
Tel: +84-4-9346600
Fax: +84-4-9346597
E-mail: jwaite@worldbank.org

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Vietnam: Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Stakeholder Consultation and Project Design: Terms of Reference
International Consultant Services

August 2008

Introduction
The World Bank has received a Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) “seed fund grant” to carry out stakeholder consultations, with a view to developing the detailed design of an Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project in Vietnam (hereafter “the Project”). This detailed design will form the basis of a proposal for a substantive JSDF Grant to finance the Project.

The World Bank intends to apply part of this seed fund to the hire of an international expert, who, in association with a national expert, will conduct the stakeholder consultations and, in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in a future Project proposal.

Background: deaf children’s development
Early childhood is the time of life when access to language models is crucial to the development of language and therefore to future learning. Deaf children rely on the sense of vision as their main channel of learning and communication. Only when young children who are deaf and their family members can use a shared language together will the child’s cognitive and social development proceed normally. The challenge is breaking through the communication gap with a visually supported language. Yet, worldwide, families with deaf infants and toddlers rarely have access to early education support. As a result, the deaf child’s development often suffers, leaving them at a major disadvantage in school and life.

Background: deaf education in Vietnam
In Vietnam, some 40,000 school-age children (i.e. aged 5 to 17) – or 18 out of every 10,000 – find it “very difficult to hear” (i.e. are severely deaf) or “impossible to hear” (i.e. are profoundly deaf). Almost all deaf children are born to hearing parents; for the most part, hearing parents (like hearing adults in general) have little awareness of the Deaf community, its language and its culture. As a result, young deaf children seldom come into contact with deaf adults (or even, until they start school, older deaf children).

In Vietnam, the provision of formal education to deaf youth began over 125 years ago, with an approach that used a sign language as the language of instruction. Despite this long and rich history, many deaf children still never go to school and those deaf children who do attend school often drop out before completing even Grade 5, with very few deaf youth receiving a secondary or tertiary education. Deaf children may attend special schools or mainstream schools. While special school classroom teachers are more likely than mainstream school classroom teachers to supplement their teaching with the use of signs (but generally not in a natural sign language mode), the dominant teaching approach is an “oralist” one that uses Vietnamese as the primary language of instruction.

IDEO Project concept
The Project will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf.

The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.

Consultant activities, outputs and timeline

Under this assignment, the Consultant will:

1. Produce an initial brief concept note to describe: (a) a range of options for Project activities to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) a range of options for Project implementation “civil society organizations” to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) describe the plan for stakeholder consultation under Activity 3. (Output: Brief concept note) [Timeline: Days 1 – 2]

2. Discuss and agree on this concept note with the World Bank supervisor. [Timeline: Day 3]

3. On the basis of the agreed concept note, consult with stakeholders (deaf associations, parents of deaf children, managers/teachers in schools catering specifically for deaf students, specialists addressing deaf education policy/practice/curriculum, NGOs involved with deaf education or disability support more generally) – in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and, if the schedule permits, Haiphong – to (a) determine appropriateness and feasibility of different Project activities, (b) establish appropriate beneficiary/geographical scope of the Project, and (c) identify appropriate civil society organizations (e.g. deaf associations, NGOs or a combination) to implement Project activities. [Timeline: Days 4 – 10]

4. On the basis of Activity 3 consultation, produce a concise report containing specific recommendations (for inclusion in the proposal for the Project) that describe inter alia (a) the range of Project activities, (b) the scope of the Project, especially in terms of target beneficiary age, target beneficiary numbers and target geographical areas, (c) the selection of civil society organizations to be invited to implement the Project, (d) the specifications of the on-going monitoring and evaluation framework (objectives, indicators, information collection, responsible entities, etc.) to assess Project performance throughout its various phases, and (e) the estimated costs of the Project (disaggregated by phase and expenditure category). (Output: Final report) [Timeline: Days 11 – 14]

5. Brief the World Bank supervisor on the findings of the consultation process and other relevant information, the contents of the report and the specific recommendations. (Output: Briefing) [Timeline: Day 15]

Consultant qualifications and experience

The Consultant will have:
 An advanced university degree in Deaf studies, education, social sciences or a related discipline, with expertise in Deaf education (preferably early child education);
 Substantial international experience in Deaf education, preferably in developing countries;
 Substantial international involvement with Deaf communities, preferably in developing countries;
 An understanding of natural sign language modalities, and preferably some knowledge of a natural sign language (especially a Vietnamese or historically related sign language [e.g. a Thai/Lao sign language, French sign language, American sign language]);
 Demonstrated capacity to organize and manage community-based consultation processes (e.g. workshops, focus groups, town-hall meetings, etc.);
 Demonstrated capacity to work effectively in a team, to manage a range of tasks, to work pro-actively and with diligence, and to manage resources effectively while meeting deadlines;
 Excellent report writing skills in English; and
 Strong computer skills in word processing and communication.

Assignment modalities and duration
The International Consultant will carry out this assignment in association with a National Consultant (who will be hired separately by the World Bank). The International Consultant will be the senior member of the team and will have overall responsibility for: (i) the conduct of the consultation events, (ii) the delivery of the initial note and the final report, and (iii) the briefings for the World Bank team.

It is expected that the International Consultant will work approximately 15 days (half of this time spent in Vietnam for the consultation sessions). (The National Consultant will work approximately 30 days, spending the additional days in preparation tasks: contacting stakeholders, conducting pre-meetings with stakeholders, setting up consultation events, organizing stakeholder consultation logistics, facilitating communication at stakeholder consultation events, and liaising with the World Bank supervisor on organizational matters.)

The two members of the team will be selected to ensure that they are able to communicate effectively with each other, as well as – in some working combination – with stakeholders (in Vietnamese or a Vietnamese sign language, as appropriate) and with the World Bank supervisor (in English).

The Consultant will be responsible for: (i) arranging his/her own travel and accommodation; (ii) managing the stakeholder consultation sessions; and (iii) arranging for the production of the initial note and final report. (The World Bank team will be responsible for making all payments associated with stakeholder consultation events [space rental, food, participants’ per-diems, etc.]).

Administration
The work in this contract is supervised by Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank in Hanoi. The Japan Social Development Fund “seed fund grant” that finances this study ends on August 31, 2009.

Annex 1: Partial list of stakeholders

Haiphong Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hải Phòng)
Hanoi Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hà Nội) [http://www.deafhanoi.com & http://360.yahoo.com/clbnnkh/%5D [Contact: Trần Ngọc Tuần]
HCMC Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc TP.HCM)
See also: Asia Pacific Development Center on Disability: List of disability NGOs in Vietnam: http://www.apcdproject.org/Countryprofile/vietnam/nongov.html

Hoa Sua School, Hanoi (Trường Trung học Tư thục Kinh tế Du lịch Hoa Sữa) [http://www.hoasuaschool.com/]
Nhan Chinh School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Dân lập Dạy Trẻ điếc Nhân Chính)
Thanh Tri School, Hanoi (Trương Nuôi dạy Trẻ Khuyết tật Thanh Trì)
Xa Dan School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Xã Đàn)

Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers College, Dong Nai (Dự án Giáo dục Đại học cho Người điếc Việt Nam, Cao đẳng Sư phạm Đồng Nai, TP. Đồng Nai) [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Hoa]
Hy Vong I School, HCMC (Trường Khuyết tật Thính giác Hy Vọng I)
Hy Vong Binh Thanh School, HCMC (Trường Hy Vọng Bình Thạnh)
Thuan An Education Center, Lai Thieu, Binh Duong (Trung tâm Giáo dục Trẻ Khiếm thính Thuận An) [formerly known as École des sourds-muets de Lái-Thiêu] [http://www.thuongvevietnam.org/webseiten/thuanan/html/thuanan_en.html]

Hanoi Pedagogy University Dại học Sư phạm Hà Nội, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt)
HCMC Pedagogy University (Dại học Sư phạm TP.HCM, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt) [Contact: Cao Thị Xuân Mỹ]
Vietnam Institute for Educational Sciences (Bộ Giáo dục và Đào Tạo, Viện Khoa học Giáo dục, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Giáo dục Trẻ Khuyết tật) [Contact: Lê Văn Tạc]

Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi [Contact: Phạm Minh Hằng]
Save the Children UK, Hanoi [http://www.savethechildren.net/vietnam/] [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Bịch]

Annex 2: Partial list of resources

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2002). Ký hiệu Củ chỉ Điệu bộ của Người điếc Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2004). Ký hiệu của Người điếc Việt Nam / Signs of the Deaf in Vietnam. (3 volumes). Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (n.d.). Tài liệu Ngôn ngữ Ký hiệu cho Trẻ Khiếm thính Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Student Handbooks 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Companion Dictionaries 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Locker-McKee, R. (2005). “As one Deaf person to another”: Deaf paraprofessionals in mainstream schools. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 1-48.

Reilly, C. & Nguyen Cong Khanh. (2004). Final Evaluation Report for Inclusive Education For Hearing-Impaired and Deaf Children in Vietnam. Pearl S. Buck International-Vietnam, U.S. Agency for International Development (Grant No. 492-G-0098-00040-00), Hanoi, Vietnam.
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/humanitarian_assistance/the_funds/pubs/reportlst.html)

Reilly, C. (2004-08). “Outside the Dream” Project (Thailand). UNESCO Programme for the Education of Children in Need / Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education and Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. (http://research.gallaudet.edu/sl/)

Woodward, J. (2000). Sign languages and sign language families in Thailand and Viet Nam. In K. Emmorey & H. Lane (eds.), The Signs of Language Revisited: An Anthology in Honor of Ursuala Bellugi and Edward Klima. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 23-47.

Woodward, J. (2003). Sign languages and Deaf identities in Thailand and Viet Nam. In L. Monaghan et al. (eds.), Many Ways to be Deaf. Washington, D.C., USA: Gallaudet University Press, pp. 283-301.

Woodward, J. et al. (2004). Providing higher educational opportunities to Deaf adults in Viet Nam through Vietnamese sign languages. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 232-263.

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Vietnam: Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Stakeholder Consultation and Project Design: Terms of Reference
National Consultant Services

August 2008

Introduction
The World Bank has received a Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) “seed fund grant” to carry out stakeholder consultations, with a view to developing the detailed design of an Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project in Vietnam (hereafter “the Project”). This detailed design will form the basis of a proposal for a substantive JSDF Grant to finance the Project.

The World Bank intends to apply part of this seed fund to the hire of an national expert, who will support an international expert to conduct the stakeholder consultations and, in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in a future Project proposal.

Background: deaf children’s development
Early childhood is the time of life when access to language models is crucial to the development of language and therefore to future learning. Deaf children rely on the sense of vision as their main channel of learning and communication. Only when young children who are deaf and their family members can use a shared language together will the child’s cognitive and social development proceed normally. The challenge is breaking through the communication gap with a visually supported language. Yet, worldwide, families with deaf infants and toddlers rarely have access to early education support. As a result, the deaf child’s development often suffers, leaving them at a major disadvantage in school and life.

Background: deaf education in Vietnam
In Vietnam, some 40,000 school-age children (i.e. aged 5 to 17) – or 18 out of every 10,000 – find it “very difficult to hear” (i.e. are severely deaf) or “impossible to hear” (i.e. are profoundly deaf). Almost all deaf children are born to hearing parents; for the most part, hearing parents (like hearing adults in general) have little awareness of the Deaf community, its language and its culture. As a result, young deaf children seldom come into contact with deaf adults (or even, until they start school, older deaf children).

In Vietnam, the provision of formal education to deaf youth began over 125 years ago, with an approach that used a sign language as the language of instruction. Despite this long and rich history, many deaf children still never go to school and those deaf children who do attend school often drop out before completing even Grade 5, with very few deaf youth receiving a secondary or tertiary education. Deaf children may attend special schools or mainstream schools. While special school classroom teachers are more likely than mainstream school classroom teachers to supplement their teaching with the use of signs (but generally not in a natural sign language mode), the dominant teaching approach is an “oralist” one that uses Vietnamese as the primary language of instruction.

IDEO Project concept
The Project will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf.

The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.

Consultant activities and timeline

Under this assignment, the Consultant will:

1. In advance of the International Consultant’s arrival in Vietnam, contact stakeholders, conduct pre-meetings with stakeholders, set up consultation events, organize stakeholder consultation logistics, and liaise with the World Bank supervisor on organizational matters. [Timeline: Days 1 – 10]

2. Support the International Consultant in producing an initial brief concept note to describe: (a) a range of options for Project activities to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) a range of options for Project implementation “civil society organizations” to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) describe the plan for stakeholder consultation under Activity 3. [Timeline: Days 11 – 12]

3. Participate in the discussion on this concept note with the World Bank supervisor. [Timeline: Day 13]

4. Support the International Consultant in conducting stakeholders consultation events – in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and, if the schedule permits, Haiphong – with particular responsibility for facilitating communication at these events. [Timeline: Days 14 – 20]

5. Support the International Consultant in producing a concise report containing specific recommendations for inclusion in the proposal for the Project. [Timeline: Days 21 – 24]

6. Participate in the briefing with the World Bank supervisor on the findings of the consultation process and other relevant information, the contents of the report and the specific recommendations. [Timeline: Day 25]

7. After the departure of the International Consultant, liaise with the World Bank supervisor on any follow-up tasks related to the assignment. [Timeline: Days 26 – 30]

Consultant qualifications and experience

The national consultant will have:
 At least an upper secondary education qualification (i.e. having completed Grade 12);
 Experience in Deaf education in Vietnam;
 Involvement with Deaf communities in Vietnam;
 Native or near-native proficiency in a Vietnamese sign language;
 Ability to communicate effectively in Vietnamese, and preferably with at least a basic ability to communicate through written English;
 Demonstrated capacity to organize and manage community-based consultation processes (e.g. workshops, focus groups, townhall meetings, etc.); and
 Demonstrated capacity to work effectively in a team, to manage a range of tasks, to work pro-actively and with diligence, and to manage resources effectively while meeting deadlines.

Assignment modalities and duration
The National Consultant will carry out this assignment in association with an International Consultant (who will be hired separately by the World Bank). The National Consultant will be the junior member of the team; as such, he/she will support the International Consultant in all aspects of the carrying out of the assignment and contribute to the content of the assignment outputs. (The International Consultant, as the senior member, will have overall responsibility for: (i) the conduct of the consultation events, (ii) the delivery of the initial note and the final report, and (iii) the briefings for the World Bank team.)

The National Consultant will work approximately 30 days, including 10 days before the arrival of the International Consultant in Vietnam. (It is expected that the International Consultant will work approximately 15 days [half of this time spent in Vietnam for the consultation sessions].)

The two members of the team will be selected to ensure that they are able to communicate effectively with each other, as well as – in some working combination – with stakeholders (in Vietnamese or a Vietnamese sign language, as appropriate) and with the World Bank supervisor (in English).

The Consultant will be responsible for: (i) arranging his/her own travel and accommodation; (ii) managing the stakeholder consultation sessions; and (iii) arranging for the production of the initial note and final report. (The World Bank team will be responsible for making all payments associated with stakeholder consultation events [space rental, food, participants’ per-diems, etc.]).

Administration
The work in this contract is supervised by Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank in Hanoi. The Japan Social Development Fund “seed fund grant” that finances this study ends on August 31, 2009.

Annex 1: Partial list of stakeholders

Haiphong Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hải Phòng)
Hanoi Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hà Nội) [http://www.deafhanoi.com & http://360.yahoo.com/clbnnkh/] [Contact: Trần Ngọc Tuần]
HCMC Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc TP.HCM)
See also: Asia Pacific Development Center on Disability: List of disability NGOs in Vietnam: http://www.apcdproject.org/Countryprofile/vietnam/nongov.html

Hoa Sua School, Hanoi (Trường Trung học Tư thục Kinh tế Du lịch Hoa Sữa) [http://www.hoasuaschool.com/]
Nhan Chinh School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Dân lập Dạy Trẻ điếc Nhân Chính)
Thanh Tri School, Hanoi (Trương Nuôi dạy Trẻ Khuyết tật Thanh Trì)
Xa Dan School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Xã Đàn)

Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers College, Dong Nai (Dự án Giáo dục Đại học cho Người điếc Việt Nam, Cao đẳng Sư phạm Đồng Nai, TP. Đồng Nai) [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Hoa]
Hy Vong I School, HCMC (Trường Khuyết tật Thính giác Hy Vọng I)
Hy Vong Binh Thanh School, HCMC (Trường Hy Vọng Bình Thạnh)
Thuan An Education Center, Lai Thieu, Binh Duong (Trung tâm Giáo dục Trẻ Khiếm thính Thuận An) [formerly known as École des sourds-muets de Lái-Thiêu] [http://www.thuongvevietnam.org/webseiten/thuanan/html/thuanan_en.html]

Hanoi Pedagogy University Dại học Sư phạm Hà Nội, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt)
HCMC Pedagogy University (Dại học Sư phạm TP.HCM, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt) [Contact: Cao Thị Xuân Mỹ]
Vietnam Institute for Educational Sciences (Bộ Giáo dục và Đào Tạo, Viện Khoa học Giáo dục, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Giáo dục Trẻ Khuyết tật) [Contact: Lê Văn Tạc]

Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi [Contact: Phạm Minh Hằng]
Save the Children UK, Hanoi [http://www.savethechildren.net/vietnam/] [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Bịch]

Annex 2: Partial list of resources

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2002). Ký hiệu Củ chỉ Điệu bộ của Người điếc Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2004). Ký hiệu của Người điếc Việt Nam / Signs of the Deaf in Vietnam. (3 volumes). Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (n.d.). Tài liệu Ngôn ngữ Ký hiệu cho Trẻ Khiếm thính Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Student Handbooks 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Companion Dictionaries 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Locker-McKee, R. (2005). “As one Deaf person to another”: Deaf paraprofessionals in mainstream schools. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 1-48.

Reilly, C. & Nguyen Cong Khanh. (2004). Final Evaluation Report for Inclusive Education For Hearing-Impaired and Deaf Children in Vietnam. Pearl S. Buck International-Vietnam, U.S. Agency for International Development (Grant No. 492-G-0098-00040-00), Hanoi, Vietnam.
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/humanitarian_assistance/the_funds/pubs/reportlst.html)

Reilly, C. (2004-08). “Outside the Dream” Project (Thailand). UNESCO Programme for the Education of Children in Need / Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education and Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. (http://research.gallaudet.edu/sl/)

Woodward, J. (2000). Sign languages and sign language families in Thailand and Viet Nam. In K. Emmorey & H. Lane (eds.), The Signs of Language Revisited: An Anthology in Honor of Ursuala Bellugi and Edward Klima. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 23-47.

Woodward, J. (2003). Sign languages and Deaf identities in Thailand and Viet Nam. In L. Monaghan et al. (eds.), Many Ways to be Deaf. Washington, D.C., USA: Gallaudet University Press, pp. 283-301.

Woodward, J. et al. (2004). Providing higher educational opportunities to Deaf adults in Viet Nam through Vietnamese sign languages. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 232-263.

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