HIV and Disability Policy Brief Released

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Health, HIV/AIDS, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability advocates have long known from observation that people with disabilities around the world are often at higher risk for HIV/AIDS. The difficulty has been in persuading mainstream educators and service providers of this fact. A new policy brief on disability and HIV can help advocates educate governments, mainstream organizations, and agencies about the need to include people with disabilities in HIV-related programs and services.

Disabled people are routinely excluded, sometimes by accident and sometimes on purpose, from mainstream education outreach programs on HIV and from health care services meant for people with AIDS. But a growing body of evidence shows that people with disabilities have an active sex life and are as likely as anyone else in engage in risky behaviors. They also are far more likely to be targeted for sexual assault, particularly from men who have HIV. The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS), World Health Organization (WHO), and the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) have jointly released a new, 8-page policy brief on disability and HIV. This policy brief summarizes what is known about disabled people and their high risk level for being infected with HIV. It also summarizes some of the reasons why they have been excluded from mainstream programs meant to prevent HIV transmission. For example, many workers in the field mistakenly assume that people with disabilities don’t have sex or never abuse drugs. Or they may simply neglect to consider the needs of deaf people who need information delivered in sign language or highly visual materials; blind people who need materials in audio or Braille formats; people with intellectual disabilities who need information in plain language; or people with mobility impairments who may need to attend training workshops held in wheelchair accessible buildings.

The Disability and HIV Policy Brief includes a set of recommendations for governments, including suggestions such as ratifying the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); providing HIV information in different formats tailored for different disability groups; providing people with disabilities with the same range of HIV, sexual, and reproductive health services as the rest of the population; ensuring that people with disabilities are trained to provide HIV-related education and care; and more. The policy brief also includes a few recommendations for civil society (for example, Non-Governmental Organizations) as well as for international agencies. The last section of the policy brief describes an example of AIDS-related activities in South Africa.

Learn more about the new policy brief at http://www.unaids.org/en/KnowledgeCentre/Resources/FeatureStories/archive/2009/20090409_Disability_HIV.asp. Or download the 8-page policy brief in PDF format (207 Kb) at http://data.unaids.org/pub/Manual/2009/jc1632_policy_brief_disability_en.pdf.



We Can Do learned about this policy brief via a notice posted to the IDA CRPD Forum email discussion group. I then gathered additional information about the UNAIDS web site and from the policy brief in PDF format (207 Kb).

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 12 so far )

Feedback Sought for United Nations Study on Disability Rights

Posted on 16 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following email has been circulated by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

En español; En français

4 June 2008

Dear Sir/Madam

I am writing to seek your contribution to a study being undertaken by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in relation to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol.

The Human Rights Council, in its resolution 7/9, decided to request “the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner to prepare a thematic study to enhance awareness and understanding of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, focusing on legal measures key for the ratification and effective implementation of the Convention, such as those relating to equality and non-discrimination, in consultation with States, civil society organizations, including organizations of persons with disabilities, and national human rights institutions” (para.16).

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights would be grateful to receive any relevant information for the preparation of this study. In particular, views and information would be welcome on:

a) Legal measures for ratification of the Convention and Optional Protocol;
b) Legal measures for implementation of the Convention and Optional Protocol;
c) Legal measures on national monitoring, particularly in relation to article 33 of the Convention;
d) Any other information relating to paragraph 16 of the resolution.

The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights would be grateful if any information could be sent to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (United Nations Office at Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 10; Fax. +41 22 917 90 08; E-mail: registry@ohchr.org) by 15 August 2008. Please indicate whether the information provided could be made available on the OHCHR website. I thank you in advance for your cooperation.

Yours sincerely,

Ibrahim Wani
Chief,
Development, Economic and Social Issues Branch


4 de junio de 2008

Estimado Señor, estimada Señora,

Tengo el honor de escribirle para pedir la contribución de su organización en relación con un estudio de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos sobre la Convención de los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad.

En su resolución 7/9, el Consejo de Derechos Humanos decidió pedir “a la Oficina del Alto Comisionado que prepare un estudio temático para mejorar el conocimiento y la comprensión de la Convención sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad centrado en las medidas jurídicas esenciales para la ratificación y la aplicación efectiva de la Convención, como las relativas a la igualdad y la no discriminación, en consulta con los Estados, las organizaciones de la sociedad civil, incluidas las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad, y las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos” (párrafo 16).

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos estaría muy agradecida de recibir información concerniente a la mencionada decisión. En particular, se agradecería información y opiniones referentes a los siguientes aspectos:

a) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la ratificación de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;
b) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la aplicación efectiva de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;
c) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la aplicación y el seguimiento nacionales en relación con el artículo 33 de la Convención;
d) Cualquier otra información relacionada con le párrafo 16 de la resolución.

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos agradecería que toda la información en respuesta a la presente nota verbal sea enviada a la Oficina del Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos (Oficina de las Naciones Unidas en Ginebra, CH 1211 Ginebra 10; Fax. +41 22 917 90 08; E-mail: registry@ohchr.org) antes del
15 de agosto de 2008.

Reciban un cordial saludo,

Ibrahim Wani
Jefe,
Servicio de Desarrollo y Cuestiones Económicas y Sociales


4 juin 2008

Madame/Monsieur,

J’ai l’honneur de vous écrire afin de solliciter votre contribution pour l’élaboration d’un rapport du Haut-Commissariat aux Droits de l’Homme sur la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées et son protocole facultatif.

Dans sa résolution 7/9, le Conseil des droits de l’homme prie «le Haut-Commissariat de réaliser une étude thématique visant à faire mieux connaître et comprendre la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, en insistant sur les principales mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification et à la mise en œuvre effective de la Convention, telles que les mesures ayant trait à l’égalité et à la non-discrimination, en consultation avec les Etats, les organisations de la société civile, notamment les organisations de personnes handicapées, et les institutions nationales des droits de l’homme» (paragraphe 16).

Le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme serait reconnaissant de recevoir tout renseignement relatif à l’étude, notamment sur les questions suivantes :

a) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification de la Convention et Protocole Facultative;
b) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à la mise en œuvre de la Convention et Protocole Facultative;
c) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à l’application et au suivi au niveau national (article 33 de la Convention);
d) ainsi que toute autre information se rattachant au paragraphe 16 de la résolution.

Merci de bien vouloir communiquer votre information au Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme, Office des Nations Unies à Genève, CH – 1211 Genève 10 ;
Fax. +41 22 917 90 08 ; E-mail: registry@ohchr.org, avant le 15 août 2008 et de nous indiquer si vous souhaitez que cette dernière soit placée sur le site Internet du Haut Commissariat.

Je vous prie d’agréer, Madame/Monsieur, l’expression de mes salutations distinguées.

Ibrahim Wani
Chef,
Service du développement et des questions économiques et sociales



We Can Do received this email via the AdHoc_IDC listserv and also via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

Readers unfamiliar with the CRPD may wish to review a brief “FAQ” at the RatifyNow.org website. More detail on the CRPD can also be found at the United Nation’s official web page on the topic at www.un.org/disabilities.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Bangkok Event Marks Entry into Force of Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 29 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

United Nations in Bangkok to Mark Entry into Force of Treaty on Disability Rights
Special Event to be Held on Wednesday, 30 April 2008

Bangkok (United Nations Information Services) – A ground-breaking new international treaty, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, will enter into force on 3 May 2008 – one month after it was ratified by the twentieth country.

In Asia and the Pacific, which is home to about 400 million persons with disabilities, Bangladesh, India and the Philippines are the three countries which have already ratified the Convention. Thailand is expected to do so soon.

The Convention is the first ever international treaty on the human rights of persons with disabilities. It was adopted by the UN General Assembly in December 2006, and it aims to ensure that people with disabilities enjoy human rights on an equal basis with others.

To celebrate the Convention’s entry into force, three UN bodies in Bangkok will organize a special event on Wednesday, 30 April 2008, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 a.m., at the United Nations Conference Centre.

It is being jointly organized by the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the International Labour Organization (ILO).

Noeleen Heyzer, UN Under-Secretary-General and ESCAP’s Executive Secretary, will address the event, which will feature a keynote speech by Senator Monthian Buntan of Thailand – who is blind – on the impact of the entry into force of the Convention and the importance of its ratification for countries in the region. Ms. Syeda Saiyidain Hameed, a member of the
Government of India’s Planning Commission, will also speak.

A related photo exhibition, entitled “Decent Work for Persons with Disabilities,” will be on display featuring various prize-winning photographs. The special event will also include a live musical performance by a group from Thailand, “The Network of Music and Arts of Persons with Disabilities.”

About ten per cent of the world’s total population – around 650 million people – are estimated to be living with various forms of disabilities. The percentage is even higher among the world’s poorest people, around 20 per cent of them having some kind of disability. People with disabilities are mostly marginalized and among the poorest of the poor, with limited access to education, employment, housing, transportation and health services. They represent a significant, but generally overlooked, development challenge.

Ensuring equality of rights and access for all persons with disabilities would have a beneficial impact on the social and economic conditions of each country, by enhancing their participation in education, employment, cultural, social and political activities and increasing their consumer power.

The new Convention marks a significant step in this direction. It encourages States to stop viewing persons with disabilities as passive recipients of charity, medical treatment and social protection. Instead, it casts persons with disabilities as active members of society and “subjects” who have rights and are capable of claiming those rights, being also able to make key decisions based on their free and informed consent.

NOTE TO THE MEDIA: Media representatives are cordially invited to attend this special event on Wednesday, 30 April, 2008, at 11:00 a.m. at the Reception Hall, Ground Floor, United Nations Conference Centre, at ESCAP’s headquarters in Bangkok.

***

For further information, please contact:

Ms. Aiko Akiyama
Population and Social Integration Section
Emerging Social Issues Division
ESCAP
Bangkok
Tel: 662-2882315
Mobile: 66-81-8309176
Fax: 662-2881030 or 2881009

or

Mr. Ari Gaitanis
United Nations Information Services
ESCAP
Bangkok
Tel: 662-2881862
Fax: 662-288-1052
Email: unisbkk.unescap@un.org

Aiko Akiyama
Social Affairs Officer
Emerging Social Issues Division (ESID)
UNESCAP
RAJDAMNERN NOK AVENUE,
BANGKOK 10200
THAILAND
Tel: 66-2-288-2315
Fax: 66-2-288-1030
Cellular: 66-81-830-9176
Email akiyama@un.org
http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/disability/index.asp



This announcement was recently circulated on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

INFORMATIONAL RESOURCE: UN Human Rights Disability Section

Posted on 21 March 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) has launched a disability section within their web site. Its purpose is to strengthen the work of the United Nations OHCHR on disability-related issues. It will promote the development of long-term projects to integrate disability issues into international treaty monitoring bodies, including the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. It is available in English, Spanish, and French.

At the OHCHR disability section web site, readers can find information about a range of human rights treaties that touch upon disability issues; the text of a study on human rights and disability; information about various committees that monitor how well human rights are implemented and what is being done to ensure that disability issues are integrated into their activities; links to disability-related speeches by the high commissioner of human rights; and links to statements by disability leaders and country government representatives on the occasion that the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was first opened for countries to sign and ratify.



We Can Do learned about the disability section of the OHCHR web site via the AskSource.info data base of resources related to development, disability, and health issues.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

New Handbook on Disability Rights

Posted on 21 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Human Rights, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

UNITED NATIONS

Press Release

OHCHR, IPU, and UNDESA launch handbook for the new Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities

Geneva, 8 October 2007

The Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), and the United Nations Department for Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) recently launched a handbook on the newly adopted Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol, aimed at raising the awareness of this new legal instrument among parliamentarians. The handbook will particularly enable legislators to become more familiar with the Convention and provide them with the tools to facilitate its ratification and subsequent implementation.

Persons with disabilities – some 650 million worldwide – remain amongst the most marginalized in every society. While the international human rights framework has changed lives everywhere, persons with disabilities have not reaped the same benefits. To fill this gap, the United Nations General Assembly adopted in December 2006 the new Convention and its accompanying Optional Protocol.

“Parliaments and parliamentarians have a key role to play in promoting and protecting human rights. This Handbook is our contribution to help bring down barriers, remove prejudices, and outlaw discrimination in the area of disability. We stand behind the new Convention as an important tool to help persons with disabilities achieve the transition from exclusion to equality”, said the IPU Secretary General, Mr. Anders B. Johnsson.

“The Convention, the first human rights treaty of the new century, marks a historic step in ensuring that disabled persons enjoy full participation in society and can contribute to the community to their full potential. I hope that the Handbook, in addition to raising awareness, will foster the speedy ratification of the Convention so to end the protection vacuum that has, in practice, affected persons with disabilities”, said Louise Arbour, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

“The Convention has enormous potential to advance the great goals of human rights and development for all. It provides a framework where all stakeholders can work together to create policy and practices that lead to societies where persons with disabilities are fully appreciated, acknowledged, and encouraged to flourish. Parliamentarians have a crucial role to perform in this effort, hence the launch of this Handbook”, added Mr. Sha Zukang, UN Under-Secretary General for Economic and Social Affairs.

The English version of the Handbook was launched October 8, 2007, before some 600 legislators attending the 117th IPU Assembly in Geneva. French, Spanish, and Arabic translations were launched in spring 2008. The Handbook will also be available online on the websites of IPU, OHCHR and UNDESA.

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) will enter into force after twenty ratifications are received. As of today, 117 countries have signed the Convention and 7 have ratified it. In addition, 67 countries have signed, and 3 countries ratified, the optional protocol. The CRPD prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities, with specific provisions related to rehabilitation, habilitation, education, employment, health and access to information, public facilities and services. The Optional Protocol addresses how individuals or groups can seek redress for violations of the CRPD once national remedies are exhausted. The original text of the CRPD is available in English, Spanish, French, Arabic, Russian, or Chinese. The plain-language version of the CRPD is available at http://tinyurl.com/36ofsl.

Advocates are able to use a pair of guidebooks from Disabled People International to help them persuade their governments to sign, ratify, and fully implement the CRPD. The guidebooks–a ratification toolkit and an implementation toolkit–are available in English, Spanish, or French at http://www.icrpd.net/.

Established in 1889 and with its Headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, the IPU – the oldest multilateral political organization in the world – currently brings together 147 affiliated parliaments and seven associated regional assemblies. The world organization of parliaments has an Office in New York, which acts as its Permanent Observer to the United Nations.

The Office of the High Commissioner is the principal United Nations department responsible for United Nations human rights activities. It is mandated to promote and protect all civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights.

The main development department of the United Nations, the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) works on a wide range of economic, social and environmental issues, with the core mission of promoting development for all.

Contacts : IPU: Ms. Luisa Ballin, IPU Information Officer. Tel.: +41 22 919 41 16, e-mail: lb@mail.ipu.org or cbl@mail.ipu.org. IPU website: www.ipu.org.

OHCHR: Mr. Yvon Edoumou, Information Officer. Tel. +41 22 917 9383; e-mail: yedoumou@ohchr.org. OHCHR website: www.ohchr.org;

UN: Mr. Edoardo Bellando, Information Officer. Tel. +1 212 963 8275; e-mail: bellando@un.org. UN website: www.un.org.

Most of the text for this announcement is taken from a press release. We Can Do modified this press release particularly to add background information on the convention and to add links to the handbook and other useful information, as well as to alter verb tense as relevant. It was edited in June 2008 to note the availability of Spanish, French, and Arabic translations.

Also see a subsequent United Nations story from after the launch.


Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

    About

    Ending poverty among and oppression toward disabled people in developing countries.

    RSS

    Subscribe Via RSS

    • Subscribe with Bloglines
    • Add your feed to Newsburst from CNET News.com
    • Subscribe in Google Reader
    • Add to My Yahoo!
    • Subscribe in NewsGator Online
    • The latest comments to all posts in RSS

    Meta

  • Help the U.S. Ratify the Disability Treaty!

    Image of an hour glass overlaid on image of the Capitol building in DC. Text says, "Time is running out! Now is the time for the Senate to Act! Ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities! www.disabilitytreaty.org #CRPD

    Learn why the CRPD matters and how to take action at www.disabilitytreaty.org!

  • Subscribe!

  • Bookmark and Share
  • Translate!

  • Connect to Andrea Shettle via Linked In

  • Archives

  • Topic Categories

  • Make WeCanDo Your “Favorite”

  • Stumble Upon It!

    Stumble It! Share this blog with other readers via "Stumble Upon"!
  • Follow We Can Do in Facebook!

  • We Can Do is in the GDRL!

  • Blog Stats

    • 710,670 hits
  • Map of Visitors

    Map
  • Meta

  • Facebook Networked Blogs

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: