Scholarships, BA in Applied Sign Language Studies, India

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities, signed languages, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

The Deaf Empowerment Foundation is offering scholarships for students in the 2009/2010 academic year for study in the newly launched 4-year BA (Hons) Applied Sign Language Studies.

This course is a joint international initiative. It was developed at the International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies in the UK and will be taught at the Indira Gandhi National Open University in New Delhi, India. The beginning of the programme in 2009 is subject to validation.

The 2009/2010 scholarships cover tuition fees for one year full-time study in the Foundation Entry programme, which is a preparatory “Year Zero” of study. The Foundation Entry course focuses on English literacy and other academic skills, including:

English for deaf learners in HE
English reading skills for deaf learners
Text composition skills for deaf learners
Study skills and Personal Development Planning
Information Technology and Numeracy in HE

For further information about the Foundation Entry and the BA in Applied Sign Language Studies, and for further details on scholarship applications, please contact Sibaji Panda at spanda@uclan.ac.uk and click here to read the information sheet, or click here to download the application form (Word format, 144 Kb). See also www.def-intl.org and www.uclan.ac.uk/islands

Deaf students of all nationalities who fulfill the scholarship criteria are eligible. To apply, please email Claire Perdomo at CLPerdomo1@uclan.ac.uk and ask for an application pack to be sent to you. You may also email to request an information sheet to be posted on departmental notice boards etc.

THE APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 MAY 2009.

— Please distribute widely as you see fit —



I received this announcement through the Intl-Dev listserver. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to the Deaf Empowerment Foundation, NOT We Can Do. Thank you.

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Conference on Accessible Transportation and Tourism, March 24-25, 2009, New Delhi, India

Posted on 5 February 2009. Filed under: accessibility, Announcements, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Opportunities, South Asian Region, universal design, Urban Development | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Svayam — an initiative of SJ Charitable Trust, has the pleasure of inviting you to a Conference on Accessible Transportation and Tourism scheduled on the 24th & 25th March 2009 at New Delhi, where in besides Indian speakers & participants, renowned international experts on BRT and Accessibility issues like Mr. Tom Rickert, Mr. Jamie Osborne and Prof. Lalita Sen will share their expertise. [Note: Application deadline March 15, 2009.]

While Mr. Tom Rickert will shed light on International Trends and BRT Guidelines of the World Bank, Prof Lalita Sen takes you on Travel Chain, Pedestrian Infrastructure and Tourist Market. Jamie Osborne an engineer, transit planner and accessibility specialist by profession will take the participants through Obstacles as seen by a Tourist followed by case study of How San Francisco Provides Accessible Transit to Tourists. His keen interest in inclusion and structural inequality processes in transportation and urban planning in the developing world will be of great importance to the urban and transit planners.

Date & Venue:

24 & 25th March 2009 from 09.30 – 05.30 on both days

Casuarina Hall, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road, New Delhi, India

Intended participants:

The conference would be of special interest to Students of Architecture and Design, Town Planners, Key Officials from the Ministry of Transport and Tourism, Urban Development, Academic & Research Institutions/Organisations in Transport, Design & Tourism, DPOs from the Ageing and Disability Sector, Stake holders from private sectors like Transport Manufactures, Hotel Industry, Travel trade etc.

This would enable them to gain the right perspective of inclusive and universal design and incorporate it in their current & future projects/studies/ research and plan access strategies and advocacy initiatives.

Register Now
Participation is by invitation only, therefore; interested participants may register themselves at the earliest and latest by 15th March 2009 by filling the Registration Form, and sending a mail to subhash.vashishth@jindalsaw.com or kavita.agrawal@jindalsaw.com with a copy to svayam.jsw@gmail.com to get their confirmation. For any further inquiries, please contact: 9811125521 (Mr. Subhash C. Vashishth) or 9811736115 (Ms. Kavita Agrawal).

Registration Fee:
Rs. 100/- per participant, payable at the venue

Accommodation and Travel Arrangements: Participants will have to make their own arrangements.

Warm regards

Subhash Chandra Vashishth

Program Coordinator – Svayam
Jindal Centre, 12 Bhikaiji Cama Place, New Delhi – 110066
Board Numbers: +91 (11) 26188360-74, Direct: 41462323
Mobile: 9811125521, Fax: (+91 (11) 26161271, 26170691

email: subhash.vashishth@jindalsaw.com, subhashvashishth@gmail.com

Web: www.svayam.com



I received this announcement via the Asia Pacific Disability email discussion group, in which participants exchange information related to disability issues in the Asia Pacific region.

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NEWS: New Delhi, India, Aims to Improve Accessibility

Posted on 19 February 2008. Filed under: Inclusion, Mobility Impariments, News, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People with mobility impairments who live in, or plan to visit, New Delhi, India, are hoping the capital city will soon be easier for them to navigate.

The Rajiv Gandhi Foundation and the Samarthya National Centre for Promotion of Barrier Free Environment for Disabled Persons are collaborating with the aim of making Delhi more accessible for everyone. They have identified 20 sites and services, including 225 Delhi Transport Corporation bus queue shelters and the New Delhi railway station, that they plan to make “barrier free.” Their target is to make all of these sites accessible within two years.

The Rajiv Gandhi Foundation works in areas that were of deep concern to Rajiv Gandhi by promoting “effective, practical and sustainable programmes in areas of national development.” One of its several areas of focus includes helping people with disabilities become more self-reliant, including gaining equal opportunities for employment or self-employment. Their web site is at http://www.rgfindia.com

The mission of the Samarthya National Centre is to promote an “inclusive environment and universal design in the built environment and transportation,” including a focus on barrier-free tourism. Their web site is at http://www.samarthyam.org

A newspaper article about the New Delhi accessibility project was published in The Hindu last month; read the full story at:

http://www.hindu.com/2008/01/26/stories/2008012656540400.htm

More information about the New Delhi project can be found at the following web pages:

http://www.samarthyam.org/node/19
http://www.samarthyam.org/node/27

You can also download a PDF file about the project (232 Kb) at

http://www.samarthyam.org/files/Current%20projects%20of%20Samarthya.pdf

Please note that only the third page is in English. I was unable to read the other three pages on my screen. I am assuming that the rest of this document may be in Hindi, which I guess my computer isn’t able to handle in PDF. If someone can confirm or verify this, please post a comment in the comments area below. This would be helpful information for others to have. Thank you.



Thank you to Sanjeev Sachdeva at Samarthya for circulating the news article through which I learned of this project. We Can Do found additional information about the Rajiv Gandhi Foundation and Samarthya through their web sites.

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PAPER; NEWS: World Bank Report on Disabled in India

Posted on 1 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, News, Reports, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

New World Bank Report Finds People with Disabilities among the Most Excluded in Indian Society
Disabled adults have far lower employment rates than others – reduced from 43 % in 1991 to 38% in 2002

Contact : in New Delhi
Kiran Negiknegi@worldbank.org

New Delhi, November 20, 2007: A new World Bank report finds people with disabilities among the most excluded in Indian society Low literacy and employment rates and widespread social stigma are leaving disabled people behind. With better education and more access to jobs, India’s 40 to 90 million disabled people will generate higher growth which will benefit the country as a whole.

The report entitled People with Disabilities in India: From Commitments to Outcomes, says that as the country makes economic progress, the incidence of communicable disease-induced disabilities such as polio are likely to fall, whereas age and lifestyle-related disabilities and those due to traffic accidents are expected to rise sharply. For example, internationally, the lowest reported disability rates are in sub-Saharan Africa while the highest are in the Organization for Economic Development (OECD) countries. The report therefore highlights the need for a multi-faceted approach so that disabled people realize their full individual potential and maximize their social and economic contribution to society.

The report finds that people with disabilities are subject to multiple deprivations. Households with disabled members are significantly poorer than average, with lower consumption and fewer assets. Children living with disability are around 4 to 5 times less likely to be in school than Scheduled Tribe and Scheduled Caste children. Disabled adults also have far lower employment rates than the general population – and this fell from 43 % in 1991 to 38% in 2002, even in the midst of economic growth.

Social attitudes and stigma play an important role in limiting the opportunities of disabled people for full participation in social and economic life, often even within their own families. For example, in surveys carried out for the report, around 50 percent of households saw the cause of disability as a “curse of God”. Women with disabilities face numerous additional challenges.

“India has an impressive set of policy commitments to its citizens with disabilities”, said Isabel Guerrero, World Bank Country Director for India. “The challenge facing Indian society now is to translate those commitments into better lives for disabled people. This includes identifying disabilities in young children, getting more disabled children into school and preparing them for the workplace and family life, and most importantly working to reduce the social stigma which disabled people face”.

Despite the many challenges, concerted efforts by the Government, civil society, the private sector, and disabled people themselves, the untapped potential of this large group of citizens can be released for their own benefit as well as for society at large.

“Increasing the status and social and economic participation of people with disabilities would have positive effects on everyone, not just disabled people” said Philip O’Keefe, Lead Social Protection Specialist and main author of the report. “A simple example is increasing accessibility of public transport and buildings for disabled people – a measure which would benefit a wide range of people including the elderly, pregnant women and children. More broadly, people with disabilities who are better educated and more economically active will generate higher growth in which everyone will share,” he added.

India’s implementation capacity is generally weak in a number of areas of service delivery which are most critical to improving the situation of disabled people. It is thus not realistic to expect that all the actions needed by many public and non-public actors can be taken all at once. The report highlights the need for prioritization of the most critical interventions to maximize the benefit for people living with disability:

(i) Preventive care – both for mothers through nutritional interventions, and infants through nutrition and basic immunization coverage
(ii) Identifying people with disabilities as soon as possible after onset – the system needs major improvements in this most basic function
(iii) Major improvements in early intervention, which can cost-effectively transform the lives of disabled people, their families, and the communities they live and work in
(iv) Getting all children with special needs into school and giving them the skills to participate fully in family and economic life
(v) Expanding the under-developed efforts to improve societal attitudes to people with disabilities, relying on public-private partnerships that build on successful models already operating in India.

The study points out that it is neither possible nor desirable for the public sector to “do it all”. Instead, partnerships with NGOs, civil society, and the private sector are critical to achieve effective and lasting results. The key step in such partnerships is brining disabled people themselves into the policymaking process along with public and non-governmental institutions.

Some other findings of the report:

  • There are substantial differences in socio-economic outcomes, social stigma, and access to services by disability type, with those with mental illness and mental retardation in a particularly poor position. There are also major urban/rural differences in outcomes, Gender, class and regional variations are also significant in many cases
  • Estimates vary, there is growing evidence that people with disabilities comprise between 4 and 8 percent of the Indian population (around 40-90 million individuals)
  • Between 1990 and 2020, there is predicted to be a halving of disability due to communicable diseases, a doubling of disability due to injuries/accidents, and a more than 40 percent increase in the share of disability due to non-communicable diseases
  • Disabled people have much lower educational attainment rates, with 52 percent illiteracy against a 35 percent average for the general population.
  • Illiteracy is high among children across all categories, in even the best performing major states, a significant share of out of school children are those with disabilities – Kerala, 27 percent, in Tamil Nadu over 33 percent
  • Private sector employment incentives for hiring disabled people are few and piecemeal. In the late 1990s, employment of People with Disability (PWD) among large private firms was only 0.3 percent of their workforce. Among multinational companies, the situation was far worse, with only 0.05 percent being PWD
  • In early 2006, a National Policy on Persons with Disabilities was approved by Government of India. To date, the only states that have draft disability policies are Chhattisgarh and Karnataka. The Chhattisgarh draft state disability policy can be considered “best practice”, and could provide a model for future national and state-level policy development.

People can follow this link to learn more about the report, or download individual chapters, at:
http://go.worldbank.org/48NBTTBRJ0

Individual chapters include: Socio-Economic Profile of Persons with Disabilities; Attitudes; Health; Education; Employment; Social Protection; Policies and Institutions; and Access

Or follow this link to download the full report in PDF format (1.8Mb).


The text for this blog post is taken from a press release from the World Bank.


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