HIV and Disability Policy Brief Released

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Health, HIV/AIDS, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability advocates have long known from observation that people with disabilities around the world are often at higher risk for HIV/AIDS. The difficulty has been in persuading mainstream educators and service providers of this fact. A new policy brief on disability and HIV can help advocates educate governments, mainstream organizations, and agencies about the need to include people with disabilities in HIV-related programs and services.

Disabled people are routinely excluded, sometimes by accident and sometimes on purpose, from mainstream education outreach programs on HIV and from health care services meant for people with AIDS. But a growing body of evidence shows that people with disabilities have an active sex life and are as likely as anyone else in engage in risky behaviors. They also are far more likely to be targeted for sexual assault, particularly from men who have HIV. The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS), World Health Organization (WHO), and the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) have jointly released a new, 8-page policy brief on disability and HIV. This policy brief summarizes what is known about disabled people and their high risk level for being infected with HIV. It also summarizes some of the reasons why they have been excluded from mainstream programs meant to prevent HIV transmission. For example, many workers in the field mistakenly assume that people with disabilities don’t have sex or never abuse drugs. Or they may simply neglect to consider the needs of deaf people who need information delivered in sign language or highly visual materials; blind people who need materials in audio or Braille formats; people with intellectual disabilities who need information in plain language; or people with mobility impairments who may need to attend training workshops held in wheelchair accessible buildings.

The Disability and HIV Policy Brief includes a set of recommendations for governments, including suggestions such as ratifying the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); providing HIV information in different formats tailored for different disability groups; providing people with disabilities with the same range of HIV, sexual, and reproductive health services as the rest of the population; ensuring that people with disabilities are trained to provide HIV-related education and care; and more. The policy brief also includes a few recommendations for civil society (for example, Non-Governmental Organizations) as well as for international agencies. The last section of the policy brief describes an example of AIDS-related activities in South Africa.

Learn more about the new policy brief at http://www.unaids.org/en/KnowledgeCentre/Resources/FeatureStories/archive/2009/20090409_Disability_HIV.asp. Or download the 8-page policy brief in PDF format (207 Kb) at http://data.unaids.org/pub/Manual/2009/jc1632_policy_brief_disability_en.pdf.



We Can Do learned about this policy brief via a notice posted to the IDA CRPD Forum email discussion group. I then gathered additional information about the UNAIDS web site and from the policy brief in PDF format (207 Kb).

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Training Opportunity: Disability and Development Module, November 23 to December 19, 2009, VU University, Netherlands

Posted on 23 April 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Education and Training Opportunities, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Opportunities, Poverty, Rehabilitation, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability and Development Module at the VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Athena Institute, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University (Amsterdam), together with Enablement (Alphen aan den Rijn) and the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT, Amsterdam) are pleased to announce a 4-week module on Disability and Development to be held from November 23th to December 19th 2009 at the VU University. This course, a 4-week elective module, which is part of an academic Master degree programme, is open to external participants also. Students will learn in a highly participatory environment built around a problem-based learning approach. Lecturers have extensive international experience in disability and related fields. An overview of the course content can be found on the VU website: http://studiegids.vu.nl/ (type ‘disability’ as search term). The course was offered for the first time in 2008 and was very positively evaluated by the first batch of students.

The following topics will be covered in Module I:
Disability models and stereotypes, culture and disability, ICF conceptual framework, experience of having a disability, frequencies and distribution of disability, determinants of disability, including stigma and discrimination, poverty, gender and HIV/AIDS, rights of persons with disabilities, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, measurement of disability, disability-relevant research methods, survey methods, examples of disability research and an introduction to community-based rehabilitation.

In 2010, a second elective module will be offered on the subject of Disability & Development. This module will have the same duration as Module I

Module II will cover the following additional topics:
Project planning and management, monitoring and evaluation of community-based rehabilitation (CBR) programmes, management information systems, CBR as a preferred strategy for rehabilitation, organisational and institutional development, Disabled People’s Organisations, educational and economic empowerment of disabled people, the role of specific rehabilitation services, and sports and disability.

Interested candidates should apply well in advance and contact Huib Cornielje as soon as possible.

TARGET GROUP: rehabilitation professionals and professionals with an interest in disability and development.

REQUIREMENTS: good comprehension of the English language; bachelor degree or equivalent (in terms of experience and thinking capacity)

COURSE FEES: Euro 1,000 (excluding board & lodging); students who wish to gain official study credits (ETCS) will have to register as external students at the VU University. This will cost an additional €1,200 for 4 weeks, approximately.

DATES: November 23 to December 18, 2009

FURTHER INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED FROM:

Huib Cornielje
Langenhorst 36
2402PX Alphen aan den Rijn
The Netherlands
Tel: 0031-172-436953
Fax: 0031-172-244976
E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl



Thank you to Huib Cornielje for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do. All inquiries about this training opportunity should please be directed to Huib Cornielje at h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT to We Can Do. Thanks.

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JOB POST: Project Manager: Making HIV-AIDS Strategies Inclusive, Tanzania

Posted on 6 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

CCBRT is Seeking to Employ a Project Manager for a PEPFAR funded Project

“Making HIV/Aids Strategies Inclusive for People with Disabilities”

Application Deadline February 21, 2009

*Introduction*
Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation Tanzania (CCBRT) is a locally registered Non Governmental Organization (NGO) first established in 1994. It is the largest indigenous provider of disability rehabilitation services in the country. CCBRT aim is to improve the quality of life of people living with disabilities as well as their families and to enable them to claim and use their legitimate human rights.

*Objective*
The PEPFAR project is aimed to considerably increase access for people with disabilities and their care givers to appropriate HIV/AIDS prevention, care, treatment and support services in Tanzania. The project is funded by PEPFAR for the duration of 3 years beginning 2009. CCBRT will coordinate the project in collaboration with the Government of Tanzania, civil society and other stakeholders.

* *

*The Project Manager will have the following responsibilities*

· Setting up, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project.

· Recruitment of part time HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinators in consultation with the Community Program Director.

· Setting up of the National Platform in consultation with governmental, non-governmental and international stakeholders.

· Selection of target districts and partners in consultation with TACAIDS and NACP.

· Coordination and monitoring of the development of minimum guidelines (VCT, care and treatment), development and distribution of various Information Education and Communication (IEC) materials, and respective training manuals.

· Initiation, coordination and evaluation of trainings in collaboration with technical experts and target organizations.

· Further development of IEC, training materials and programs after lessons learnt in collaboration with technical experts.

· Establishment of follow up mechanisms to support trained experts.

· Establishment of collaborations and referral mechanisms between district authorities, disability and HIV/AIDS organizations.

· Provision and coordination of technical / advisory support to partners.

· Assessment and approval of small project proposals for infrastructure adjustments and campaigns in collaboration with CBM US and a representative of the National Platform.

· Development of public awareness programs on disability, equal right and HIV/AIDS.

· Generation of lessons learnt and continuous integration during the project implementation.

· Development of a reader on making HIV/Aids strategies inclusive in collaboration with technical experts.

· Development of annual work plans and setting of annual targets.

· Compilation of narrative / financial reports in collaboration with the CCBRT Finance Manager.

· Coordination and support of the work of the CCBRT Health, HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinator and three HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinators.

*Experience*
The project manager should have

· a minimum of 5 years working experience in HIV/AIDS

· In depth knowledge about HIV/AIDS strategy framework in Tanzania including HSHSP, NGPRS, NMSF as well as HIV/AIDS related working structures and relevant stakeholders in Tanzania.

· Experience in guideline and training programme development

· Proven working experience with vulnerable groups, preferably persons with disabilities

· Good analytic, report writing and presentation skills

· Experience in coordinating and managing larger teams

· Strong written and oral communication ability, both Kiswahili and English

CCBRT will offer an attractive salary package.

The Project manager is expected to start working latest 16th March 2009.

*How to apply*
If you believe you are the ideal candidate with the necessary background, please submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae detailing your experience, supportive documents as well as contact details of three referees to info@ccbrt.or.tz or by post to

CCBRT Executive Director/ P.O Box 23310, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Tel: +255 (0) 22 260 1543 / +255 (0) 22 260 2192 Fax: +255 (0) 22 2601544

Email: info@ccbrt.or.tz Website: http://www.ccbrt.or.tz

*People with disability are highly encouraged to apply.*

*Closing date for applications: 21st Feb* (only short listed candidates will be contacted)



I received this job post via the Intl-Dev news distribution service, which people can subscribe to via email for free.

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RESOURCE: Deaf Peers’ Education Manual on Sexuality, HIV & AIDS

Posted on 30 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Research tells us that people with disabilities, and Deaf people, are at higher risk for HIV/AIDS than the general population. But many HIV/AIDS education programs exclude people with disabilities from opportunities to learn how to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS. Sometimes this exclusion is deliberate: some program managers mistakenly assume that Deaf and disabled people don’t need sexuality education because they don’t have sex. In other cases, programs exclude because they don’t offer sign language interpreters, nor do they offer print materials that are accessible to people who are intelligent but who have lacked access to opportunities for an education.

A training manual has been developed that can be used to help trainers learn how to facilitate workshops on sexual health and HIV/AIDS, entitled the The Deaf Peers’ Education Manual (PDF format, 6.44 Mb). This manual is targeted at members of the Kenyan Deaf community. The signs described in the manual, for example, assume knowledge of Kenyan Sign Language, rather than the many other hundreds of signed languages and dialects used around the world. However, most of the content can be easily adapted for use in Deaf communities in other countries.

The manual offers guidance to facilitators on how they can sensitively handle frank discussion of sexuality; the physical and emotional implications of human sexual development; the difference between friendship, infatuation, and real love; how the HIV virus is transmitted; the difference between HIV and AIDS; and how the HIV virus is NOT transmitted. It suggests a range of activities that can be used with Deaf participants to help them understand these complex and sensitive topics.

The manual was first released in 2007. But the organization that initiated the manual, Sahaya International, is interested in revising and updating the manual based on the feedback of other people who use it around the world. At this time, print copies of the manual are not available, but individuals may print their own copy from the PDF file. Koen Van Rampay with Sahaya International invites feedback on the manual, as well as discussion on printing and distributing the manual, at: kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu

More information about Sahaya International; their manual; and their project to teach Deaf people in Kenya about Sexuality and HIV/AIDS is available at:

http://www.sahaya.org/deaf.html

Please note that the manual has some separate, companion materials that trainers can use in educating Deaf participants. One set of printed materials can be used to teach participants basic facts on human sexual anatomy and reproduction. The other teaches participants about common myths related to HIV/AIDS. Both use cartoons and are designed to be used by readers who may have had limited opportunity to pursue an education or acquire literacy skills. The link to the main Deaf Peers’ Education Manual is available near the top of http://www.sahaya.org/deaf.html, but people will need to scroll down to the very bottom of the page to download the other materials.

The linked web page also shows some videos about the Sahaya International project in Kenya. These videos are in Kenya Sign Language with a voice interpreter (presumably in English). Unfortunately, these videos do not have subtitles. This creates a barrier for Deaf people outside of Kenya who might know other signed languages, but not Kenyan Sign Language. This is a shame because some of the people who are likely to have the strongest interest in the Sahaya International project are other Deaf people in other countries who want to emulate their efforts within their own local Deaf communities.

I hope that Sahaya International will find some low-cost (or no-cost) manner for putting subtitles on their videos. A suggestion: Many vloggers (video bloggers) who post to http://www.deafread.com face similar challenges where they wish to subtitle without high tech skills or financial resources. Perhaps a keyword search there would lead to web pages that offer tips, suggestions, and possible resources. Or, if someone reading this at We Can Do can offer the appropriate expertise or technical guidance, perhaps you could contact Sahaya International directly at kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu.



We Can Do learned about the Sahaya International project and manual when Ghulam Nabi Nizamani widely circulated an email originating with Koen Van Rampay.

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Disability Awareness Action newsletter, Our Rights, Issue 2, August 2008

Posted on 3 September 2008. Filed under: Children, Cognitive Impairments, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Our Rights – issue 2, August 2008

DAA’s newsletter for Disability Lib.

In the interest of solidarity, this newsletter is sent around by email to disabled people and their organisations across the world, and we invite you to forward it freely. We have provided links to internet sites, web pages and video clips, but understand that not all links are technically accessible to all users. From October Our Rights will be available in electronic format and on our website. For our contact details follow this link http://www.daa.org.uk/

Contents
Welcome Hello from DAA
Disability LIB partners
• Central Office
ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth
Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Mind Politics
Stigma
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
Being an Un-Person
Sceptical about The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
60 years of UN Convention on Human Rights
Inclusion means … being given a £50 token?
International News
Canada says ‘go home’ to disabled child
Sex in the City, and world wide
From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
Sit-in at Nursing Home
And Finally …

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******************
Welcome Hello from DAA
Thank you to all of you who took the time to respond to our first issue. We are delighted to be back! We have had replies from around the world.

“I am very happy indeed to get the DAA Newsletter – this is one newsletter that I eagerly look forward to. The articles provided me with new insights and sharpen my understanding.”
“Great newsletter!”
“I access DAA website regularly and will disseminate DAA newsletter to all my contacts.”
“Have just read your first bulletin and I am impressed with its coverage.”
“thanks a lot for your nice news letter. Hope it can help my people in bangladesh.”

Thank you for all your comments. We have improved our technical set-up, so fewer newsletters should land in Junk or Spam email boxes. From October you can access the newsletter on our website. You can request picture supported and word versions. We continue to strive to make our articles interesting, relevant and accessible. Please let us know how we are doing. This edition has two main themes: the body politics of bio-ethics and inclusion. We will also tell you again who we are and what we hope to achieve. Enjoy!
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

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Disability LIB partners
The project has its own website and central office. www.disabilitylib.org.uk
Disability LIB
6 Market Road
London
N7 9PW
England UK
Telephone: 0844 800 4331
Email: contact@disabilitylib.org.uk

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ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
The Social Inclusion Campaign Award from the Sheila McKechnie Foundation was given to the director of ALLFIE, Tara Flood. Tara is also chair of DAA. Tara and the Alliance run a campaign ‘We know inclusion works’. This is in response to the negative reporting in the media. You are invited to send your stories about how inclusion works to info@allfie.org.uk

“Inclusion for me is about society, which respects the humanity of its people.” says a disabled young person in Nottinghamshire. “Inclusion happens when everyone feels appreciated and welcome to participate.”
Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education.

Inclusion is going to school with your friends. “I kept asking myself what words a mother would use to explain to her daughter why they did not want her at her school. Except that she was disabled. If my daughter had only been black, and not disabled too, would the school have been able to do the same?”
Preethi Manuel mother of Zahrah.

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Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth

The media reported that a nine-year-old girl called Lin was moving her lips, but did not actually sing at the opening of the Olympic Games in China. The beautiful voice we all heard was from a different girl, the seven year-old Yang Peiyi. Apparently Yang was not shown on stage nor on television, because she has crooked teeth. Her face and her smile were regarded as not photogenic enough, so she was hidden to avoid damaging China’s international image.

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Often we find disabled people are hidden, out-of-sight and at the margins of society. Society’s underlying cultural preferences in terms of the body and mind is for a particular image of beauty and health: a superficial one.

Our impairment difference is treated like a ‘stigma’, a characteristic that is deeply discredited within one’s society and for which we are rejected. Our difference, it seems, is challenging.

“I experienced a nervous breakdown 20 years ago. Despite recovering from that, then going on to achieve academically and build a good marriage, my family remain wary of me. My sister is bringing up her child to refer to me as “crazy”. She even considers it funny to do so. I have tried to express how hurtful I find this, but my feelings have been overlooked.”
7th August 2008, Guardian ‘Stigmatised by my own family’

In a unique research called ‘Shout’ almost 4,000 mental health service users were involved. The charity Rethink found that 87% of people said they had direct personal experience of stigma and discrimination and reported the negative impact of stigma on their lives.

The damage caused was wide-ranging; the areas affected include employment, family, friendships, neighbours, accessing education, reporting crime, relationships with health professionals, and feeling confident enough to visit the shops, go to the pub or take part in activities in the community, it says.
The Stigma Shout report can be found at http://www.rethink.org/how_we_can_help/campaigning_for_change/moving_people/stigma_shout.html

But this problem goes deeper. If a girl can be excluded for crooked teeth, where does it end? Our society allows science and law to de-select disabled lives.
For impairment reasons they tamper with genetics in an attempt to screen out difference. We have laws that allow late abortion because of so called ‘defects’.We allow bio-ethics to de-select impairment.

In 2004, UKCPD (formerly the British Council of Disabled People) asked “Can human rights apply if we select children or value people’s quality of life on the basis of their genetic make-up or impairment?” http://www.bcodp.org.uk/library/genetics/3disabhr.pdf
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/06/mentalhealth
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/07/mentalhealth.familyandrelationships

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Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
on last month’s theme: Forced Interventions
Being an Un-Person… (8’47’’)
“This is from a handout I gave while speaking at training for staff who work with people who have developmental disabilities. It is about what it means to be dehumanized and it applies to a far greater group of people than the original audience. It is, to make it clear, something that is done to us by other people, not something intrinsic to who we are.

Being an Un-person means that people talk in front of you as if you aren’t there… It means that your existence seems to fill people with disgust and fear. … If you communicate with behaviour, you will be punished, restrained, drugged or put in a behaviour program.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c5_3wqZ3Lk

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Sceptical
A sceptical view was expressed about the usefulness of the Convention. How does it protect the rights of people with mental health issues?

“My organization are skeptical on the UN Convention re Legal Intervention for people with mental health issues and the sense of disabled people being able to join the armed forces.”

For a discussion of how different Articles in the Convention can work together, go to page 47 in this 2007 publication: http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_WORDversion.doc
The text of Article 12 can be accessed at http://www.mindfreedom.org/kb/mental-health-global/united-nations/article-12-un

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The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
This year (2008) we celebrate 60 years of the United Nations Convention on Human Rights, the first international commitment on human rights.

A web campaign http://www.everyhumanhasrights.org/ urges us to embrace the values and goals of the Declaration. To protect the rights of our fellow global villagers and to encourage others to do the same in our communities, workplaces and schools. We are asked to affirm these principles:

“Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, lanaguage, relition, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.” Every Human has Rights

However, our rights as disabled people are not spelled out specifically. It makes no specific mention of the meaning of rights as disabled people. Our experience is that we are often invisible, excluded or forgotten. We are not always included into the general phrase of ‘human’ inhuman rights.

That is why we needed a specific convention and why we are campaigning for our countries to ratify the Convention of the Rights of Disabled Persons.

UN Convention text resources:
Details of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People can be found at
http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=12&pid=150
http://www.un.org/disabilities/convention/conventionfull.shtml
Easy Read version of the Convention
http://www.officefordisability.gov.uk/docs/international-agreement-rights-disabled-people.pdf
For Easy Read versions of the Convention’s extra agreements (Optional Protocols) go to
http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/convention/nz.htm
A child-friendly text of the Convention can be accessed at
http://www.unicef.org/Child_friendly_CRPD.pdf

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Inclusion means … being given a £50 gift token?
A grammar school in Lincolnshire, England, did not listen to a boy with Autism when planning and arranging the 11-plus entrance exam. Under the Disability Discrimination Act any barriers to learning have to be removed, for example by making alternative arrangements or providing reasonable adjustments.

His mother said: “We knew he would struggle with the change in surroundings. Our primary school head teacher suggested we ask if he could sit the test there, or at least in a room on his own. But when I went to the school I was told, ‘No, we don’t make any allowances’.”

As the barriers of unfamiliar surroundings, a crowded room full with unfamiliar people were not removed, the boy was extremely distressed and failed the exam.

The ombudsman Anne Seex said the school had not considered its duties under the Disability Discrimination Act.

The boy was admitted to another grammar school on the basis of his exam results at the end of primary school (called SATs) and his junior school’s recommendation.

The school has apologised, has given the boy a £50 gift token and agreed to handle future cases differently.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/lincolnshire/7542948.stm
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/article4460621.ece

International News

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Canada
Paul and Barbara-Anne Chapman had sold their home in Britain and bought a farmhouse in Nova Scotia, Canada. The local authorities supported and welcomed them.

However, when the family arrived at the airport a border guard refused them entry. Several questions were raised about their work permit, clearance for their black Labrador and about their daughter Lucy, who has Angelman syndrome.

The family claim they were told by a border guard that because Lucy is disabled she would never be allowed into the country, and that she had a lifetime ban.

Mrs Chapman said: “My dog was allowed to stay. My dog has a higher status than my daughter in Canada, just because she is disabled.”

Canada’s immigration rules in section 38 do have a clause that states that you are not eligible for immigration if you would make an excessive demand on health and social services. Presently, “excessive demand” is usually defined as exceeding $15,000 of publicly funded health care costs over the next 5 years. However, in certain family applications, children are exempt from this rule of no entry due to health care costs.

The Convention on the Rights of Disabled People places obligations on countries to protect disabled people’s rights and freedoms. This includes the right to free movement and residency.

Entry to one’s own country is specifically mentioned in Article 18 of the Convention: “Are not deprived, arbitrarily or on the basis of disability, of the right to enter their own country.”

Entry into another country is protected in Article 18, where it says that disabled people should “not be deprived, on the basis of disability, of their ability to obtain, possess and utilize … relevant processes such as immigration proceedings, that may be needed to facilitate exercise of the right to liberty of movement.”

Mr and Mrs Chapman hired a Canadian lawyer to fight the decision.

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=278
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/canada/2519496/Canada-refuses-entry-to-disabled-girl.html

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Sex in the City… and world-wide.
Research has shown that disabled people are being denied the choice to full sexual relationships.

“I want to meet a girl I can become friends with, take to the pub and the cinema and then after a couple of months see where it goes,” Joseph Greene, 23.

The national charity Family Planning Association FPA has organised an information and poster campaign about the right to have sex and relationships. FPA gives people information and advice about sexual health. This is particularly important in view of the continuing rise and impact of HIV (see reports below).

Easy Read, posters and campaign info at
http://www.fpa.org.uk/news/campaigns/current%5Fcampaigns/detail.cfm?contentid=1021
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7540103.stm
http://www.fpa.org.uk/products/learning_disabilities_publications/detail.cfm?contentid=1037

‘Let’s talk About Sex’ was launched in June 2008 for young people with life-limiting health conditions, in a bid to open up a taboo subject and to better support these young people to have the opportunity to experience relationships and explore their sexuality, in a safe, supportive and empathetic environment.
http://www.act.org.uk/content/view/153/1/

Our rights and dignity in connection with these personal areas are protected in the Convention. Article 23 of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People specifically refers to forming relationships and accessing age-appropriate information, reproductive and family planning education.

As part of their obligations, countries who have ratified the Convention, have a duty to develop and change customs or practices. This includes working towards a change in attitude towards disabled people and sex.

Article 4 of the Convention asks governments to develop or change customs and practices which contradict the rights. Community norms, customs and practices of what people believe or how professionals deal with disabled people may go against the ideals laid down in the Convention.

“What is acceptable in the community is for a disabled person to marry another disabled person so that together they share their curse”, says a disabled local councillor in Uganda.
http://www.disabilitykar.net/docs/stories_women.doc

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From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
On August 6th a very important international panel discussion took place. ‘Beyond Barriers: Disability and HIV/AIDS’ gave information about studies from across the world – Brazil, South Africa, Cameroon, and Canada.

Disabled people were found to be consistently more vulnerable to infection. People with learning difficulties and disabled women are often exposed to riskier situations; women in particular experience more unprotected sex than the general population, often as a result of sexual violence.

A researcher in Kwa Zulu-Natal, where there is no disability-specific sex education, encountered a “let sleeping dogs lie” attitude in schools. As a result, she found that disabled children had little access to education or legal protection and were more vulnerable to abuse and infection.

n Cameroon, a study focused on a young deaf population, found that sexual debut was on the whole earlier and riskier than in the general population.
http://eliminateaids.blogspot.com/2008/08/beyond-barriers-disability-and-hivaids.html

The Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV/AIDS is an advocacy tool for all Campaign partners and supporters. We invite you to download this printer-ready version in English, French and Portuguese to disseminate at your various meetings and conferences!
http://www.africacampaign.info/a-nos-lecteurs-francais/index.html
http://www.africacampaign.info/recent-publication/index.html
http://www.dcdd.nl/data/1208782834413_Kampala%20Declaration%20on%20Disability%20and%20HIVAIDS.pdf

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
This article argues that despite national laws and certain improvements towards disability rights, El Salvador has only made nominal progress in implementing disability legislation and awareness.

In the context of El Salvador’s twelve-year armed conflict, 70,000 individuals were killed and another 300,000 people were disabled as a result of war.

However, this estimate conflicts with official statistics released by the Ministry of Economy in August 2008. Jesus Martinez, Director of the Landmine Survivors Network-El Salvador is extremely uncomfortable with the results of this 2008 Census.

“It should include accurate and trustworthy statistics about all of the disabled individuals living in this country.” he says.

Disabled people need to be counted in order to be visible in policy action, planning and prioritisation. Article 31 asks countries to find out about disabled people. State parties need collect appropriate information, including statistical and research data, to enable them to formulate and implement policies, which make a reality of the rights in the Convention.

If the Convention marks “a paradigm shift” in attitudes and approaches, then disabled people are not objects that are being counted, but subjects, who have rights and freedoms. As a result of this shift in thinking, ratification of the Convention should also mark a shift in creating a more inclusive society in El Salvador.
http://upsidedownworld.org/main/content/view/1384/74/

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Sit-in at Nursing Home
Demonstrators organised a sit-in and called for closure of a nursing home in Philadelphia. “There is no justice for someone in a nursing home,” read a sign held by one of the demonstrators.

The group’s goal was to persuade Mayor Nutter to help find homes for 50 or so disabled residents over the next six months, then get out of the nursing-home business. They were successful! Details at:
http://www.adapt.org/ http://www.philly.com/philly/hp/news_update/20080818_Protesters_seek_to_close_Phila__nursing_home.html

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

And Finally …
Discrimination is a putrid shade of yellow
It tastes like stale vomit
It smells like rancid fish
Discrimination reminds me of corruption, anger and despair
And sounds like a hooded coward running scared
Discrimination feels like nobody cares …
Extract from Bipolar works blog, 2007

Thank you for your time.
We are pleased to hear from you.
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

Supported by the National Lottery through the Big Lottery Fund.



Thank you to Disability Awareness Action for giving open permission to disseminate and re-publish their newsletter.

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CONFERENCE: 3rd LAC Technical Meeting on STD, HIV-AIDS and Disability

Posted on 30 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

3rd Latin American/Caribbean (LAC) Technical Meeting on STD, HIV-AIDS & Disability
August 1st and 2nd, 2008
City of Mexico
Organized by the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI) and the World Bank With support from the National Council to Prevent Discrimination (CONAPRED, Mexico), the Central American Social Integration System (SISCA), the National Program of STI and AIDS (Brazil) and the Pan American Health Organization

XVII International Conference on AIDS (Mexico August 3rd to 8th 2008)
http://www.aids2008.org

Introduction
People with disability have often been and remained excluded from HIV prevention as well as AIDS care efforts as a result of an aggregation of various taboos and coordination miss opportunities. On one hand, it is often presumed that people with disability are not sexually active and at no risk of infection. Simultaneously, the fact that they have less access to education and social opportunities prevents them from being in touch with preventive information and resources. On the other hand, the organizations of people with disability are generally unknown and themselves unaware of the health and prevention policy making and programming opportunities.

The result of all this is that the exposure of men and women with disabilities to the main risk factors of HIV-AIDS are higher compared to non-disabled population. At the same time, while people living with AIDS have a higher survival rate due to medical advances, a frequent consequence is that there are an increasing number of disabilities (mainly physical and sensorial limitations) secondary to the disease itself or its pharmacologic treatment, indicating emerging needs and services to respond and coordinate.

Over the past two years, sponsored by the World Bank, the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI), in collaboration with several international organizations working in the HIV-AIDS and Disability areas has organized two Technical Meetings (Chile 2006 and Argentina 2007) on STDs, HIV-AIDS and Disability. The main purpose of these meetings has been to facilitate knowledge shearing amongst specialists and encourage policy development to address the increasing interrelation amongst AIDS and Disability.

The main axes of this work have been on

a. Documenting the interface between aids and disability and compiling evidence of emerging needs and responses

b. Identifying opportunities for active collaboration between organizations working in the AIDS and the inclusion fields, to optimise use of existing resources and promote inter-institutional approaches to inclusive aids prevention and rehabilitation services delivery to people living with AIDS.

In 2008, with the support of CONAPRED (in Spanish Consejo Nacional para Prevenir la Discriminación, México), the World Bank and PAHO-WHO the 3rd Technical Meeting will be held in Mexico, on August 1-2, to coincide with the AIDS International Conference (August 3-8, 2008). It will continue working on recommendations for crosscutting and inclusive approaches HIV-AIDS Prevention and Care.

Objectives
The 3rd Experts Meeting on STDs, HIV-AIDS and Disability, seeks to advance the discussion on “Evidence-based Research on the inter connections between AIDS and Disability” and on “Care for people living with AIDS and Disabilities: effective approaches and services”.

Expected Outcomes
The expected outcomes of the meeting are:

o Review of new developments in LAC National AIDS Programs;
o Update bibliographical and research review on the topic;
o Review of new materials and initiatives of international agencies, Civil Society and Academia;
o Review of new content and tools for the LAC HIV-AIDS site on the issue;
o Development of a new set of recommendations for a cross-cutting and inclusive approaches in the area of STD, HIV-AIDS Prevention and Care, with special focus in “Monitoring & Evaluation and Evidence-based Research and on Care Attention for people living with AIDS and Disabilities, as a consequence of the treatment;
o Establishment of a LAC Permanent Working Group, with interagency involvement, south-to-south knowledge sharing and a joint research and implementation agenda;

Participants: Program Managers, Researchers, Practitioner and AIDS and Disability specialists from Latin American and the Caribbean

Venue: National Council to Prevent Discrimination (CONAPRED, Mexico), Dante 14 – 8o piso, Colonia Anzures, Ciudad de México

PROGRAM
Friday August 1st
08.30 Registration
09.00 Opening
09.30 Challenges on AIDS Prevention and Care and Disability
10. 00 Conclusions from the 1st Brazilian and Central American Forums on AIDS and Disability – Discussion
11.00 Coffee
11.30 Services for people living with HIV AIDS and Disabilities
12.30 Lunch
14.00 Working groups
16.30 Plenary
17.00 Closure

Saturday August 2nd
09.00 AIDS and Disability: from taboo to collaboration
09.30 Implementation experiences / Questions and answers
10.30 Coffee
11.00 Emerging topics
o Services development (diagnosis, care, prevention)
o Research and evidences: people living with aids and disabilities secondary to the disease itself or its pharmacological treatment
o Vulnerability of PWD to STI and AIDS
o Discussion
12.30 Lunch and meeting with Ministries of Health and Education*

14.00 Approaches and future strategies
o Research
o Monitoring and Evaluation
o Regional Collaboration
o Dissemination
16.00 Plenary – Strategic collaboration
17.00 Closure
* To be confirmed

Other related activities in Mexico

o “Satellite Session on AIDS and Disability”, organized by Disabled People International (DPI). August 5th 7:00 to 8.30 am (in English)
o “AIDS and Disability: a relationship to be taken into account”, organized by the Inter American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI) August 5th 6:30 to 8:30pm (in Spanish)
o “AIDS and Disability: a relationship to be taken into account”, Poster session, (daily, August 3-8) between 12:00-14:00h

Unfortunately, we have not resources to cover flight or other expenses for participants. We hope that participants can gather support from their organizations to travel to Mexico. Please confirm ASAP your willingness to participate. Your participation is extremely important to us and to ensure the inclusion of disability issues amongst the STD and HIV-AIDS agenda in the Latin American and Caribbean Region.



We Can Do received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) email discussion group.

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RESOURCE: HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey

Posted on 14 July 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Learn about HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities and find resources that can help at the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

A few years ago, the World Bank and Yale University worked together to conduct a global survey on HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities. The findings from this global survey are available in PDF format (about 500 Kb each) in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. People who are serious about learning all that is known about HIV/AIDS among disabled people will also want to browse the many other research articles available on the topic within the “Research” section of the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

People who are more interested in the pragmatic side of how to address the challenge of HIV/AIDS may find it helpful to browse through the materials available within Resources section of the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

Start exploring the website at:

http://cira.med.yale.edu/globalsurvey/

People who wish to gather more information or resources related to HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities around the world will also want to explore the reports, training materials, and other resources at the AskSource.info listing of resources on HIV/AIDS and disability.

You may also wish to browse through previous We Can Do posts on HIV/AIDS for more leads to follow.



I have been familiar with this resource since the World Bank and Yale University released its global survey in 2004. I’ve mentioned the website in passing before at We Can Do, but I thought this resource was important enough to warrant a blog post all to itself.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV/AIDS Seeks Health Care Stories

Posted on 16 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This email was recently circulated by Gouwah Samuels.

version française dessous

Dear friends, colleagues and supporters

The time has come! As promised during our last meeting in Kampala the Communications Working Group is working on compiling the inaugural newsletter for the Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV/AIDS. We are hoping to get all submissions this month in order to distribute it via email in July.

The first issues will focus on access to health care. We invite each of you to read through the following questions and send back answers to Myroslava Tataryn: myroslavat@gmail.com by Friday, 27th June at the latest.

Questions for this edition are as follows:

1. How have you involved health care workers in your disability and AIDS initiatives?

2. Have you and/or your organizations engaged in any activities or initiatives promoting Disability and AIDS at local health care centres or hospitals? Please explain.

3. Do you have an statistics regarding people with disabilities accessing HIV/AIDS and/or reproductive health care services? If you do, please share them with us.

Please share your stories and pictures with us! Even though we may not be able to use all of the stories/pictures collected for this first edition of the newsletter. We will be keeping them on our Africa Campaign Databank! Also, please make sure you have secured necessary permission of people in the photos you are sharing.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact one of us:
Gouwah Samuels: gouwah@africandecade.co.za
Grace Musoke: gracejusta@yahoo.co.uk
Myroslava Tataryn: myroslavat@gmail.com

Looking forward to hearing from you soon!

With warm regards,
Myroslava Tataryn: and Gouwah Samuels
For the Africa Campaign Communications Working Group

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Cheres amis, collegues et patrons,

Finalement, comme etait promis a la derniere reunion a Kampala, la group de travail de communication est en train d’assembler le premier bulletin pour la Campagne Africaine du VIH/SIDA et les handicaps. Nous esperons d’obtenir tous vous contributions ce mois-ci enfin de nous permetre de distribuer le bulletin final par email au mois de juillet.

La premier numero de notre bulletin est consacre aux questions concernant l’access aux soins medicaux. Nous vous invitons de lire les questions qui suivent et de repondre a Myroslava Tataryn (myroslavat@gmail.com) avec vos reponses par vendredi, le 27 juin, au plus tard.

Questions pour ce numero:

1. Comment est ce que vous avez implique les travailleurs medicaux dans vous activites du SIDA et l’incapacite?

2. Est ce que vous ou vos organismes sont engages dans des activites ou initiatives qui font la promotion des questions du SIDA et l’incapacites dans des hopitaux ou des centres medicaux dans vos localites? Expliquez s’il vous plait.

3. st ce que vous avez des statistiques selons les persons avec incapacites qui accessent les services de VIH/SIDA ou la sante reproductif? Si oui, s’il vous plait, partagez-les avec nous.

S’il vous plait, partagez vos histoires et vos photos avec nous! Meme si nous ne serons pas capable de publier chacun dans cet premier numro du bulletin nous allons les garder dans la base de donnees de la campagne. Aussi, s’il vous plait, assurez-vous que vous avez les propres authorizations des personnes dans les photos que vous nous envoyez.

Si vous avez n’emporte quelles questions, n’hesitez pas a nous contacter:

Gouwah Samuels: gouwah@africandecade.co.za
Grace Musoke: gracejusta@yahoo.co.uk
Myroslava Tataryn: myroslavat@gmail.com

Nous esperons vous reponses bientot!

Avec sinceres salutations,
Myroslava Tataryn: and Gouwah Samuels
Pour la groupe de travialle de la communication pour la Campagne Africaine



Thank you to Gouwah Samuels for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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SURVEY: HIV/AIDS Among Jamaicans with Disabilities

Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Latin America & Caribbean | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Graduate student Nalini Asha Reyes at San Diego State University in California, USA, is conducting a survey about HIV/AIDS among people with disability in Jamaica. Her survey is based on an earlier, similar global survey by researcher Dr. Nora Groce at Yale University.

Nalini Asha Reyes is looking for people to participate in her survey. She is particularly looking for people in or from Jamaica but will also welcome survey results from elsewhere in the Caribbean. If interested in participating, please read her letter below then contact her at naliniasha@gmail.com to request a copy of the survey. She can send it to you in Word document or PDF format.

HIV/AIDS and Disability in Jamaica Survey

Please help:

Today, little is known about HIV/AIDS among people with disability. We would like to know how the epidemic is affecting individuals and groups with all types of disability in Jamaica and we ask you to help. We are interested in disabled people of all ages, and disabled people living with their families, on their, own, or in institutions.

We send this survey with the request that you fill it out on behalf of the organization or advocacy group you work with. (If you think someone else in your organization would know more about these questions, please give it to them to fill out). Your information has been provided either through the public website of the National Aids Committee of Jamaica, or by an Internet search using the words, “HIV/AIDS,” “Jamaica,” and “Disability.”

We are interested in hearing both from organizations that are working on HIV/AIDS issues and from organizations that are not currently involved in HIV/AIDS issues.

We will be looking for information about programs that provide HIV/AIDS education, interventions and services to disabled people and communities. We would also welcome stories from Disability advocates about attempts to get help for HIV/AIDS in one’s community, examples about not being able to get help for one’s community, stories about governments and HIV/AIDS voluntary organizations that have tried to reach disabled people and so forth.

You must be over the age of 18 to complete and return this survey.

This survey should require less than 30 minutes of your time, and can be saved and emailed back as a PDF or MS Word document. Please note that there are no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers to any of these questions. Also, feel free to leave blank any questions for which you may not know the answer or which you may not feel comfortable answering. However, keep in mind we realize there is often little information available on this topic and so we are also interested in people’s ideas, impressions, knowledge, practices and attitudes. All information submitted will be kept completely confidential and will never be linked to your organization or team. Also, please note that we are not asking (and do not want) personal information or names of individuals who might have HIV/AIDS – we feel it is very important that we do not invade anyone’s privacy.

If you already have information about HIV/AIDS and Disability from your own organization or educational materials, information on training, studies, meetings, newspaper articles, or other materials relating to HIV/AIDS that you would like to share with us, we would appreciate it. If you know of a program or project that you think we should learn more about, please let us know. Finally, if you know of other Disability organizations, advocates, or government agencies who might have information about HIV/AIDS and Disability, we would appreciate it if you would forward this announcement on to them.

Language: If it is easier for you to write in a language other than English, please fill out the form in whatever language is easiest for you.

Sincerest thanks,

Nalini Asha Reyes
Graduate Student and Special Education Teacher
San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego, CA 92182-1170, USA
Phone: + 858.531.0847
e-mail: naliniasha@gmail.com

John R. Johnson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
San Diego State University
College of Education; Department of Special Education
5500 Campanile Dr., San Diego, CA 92182-1170
Phone: +619.594.3841; Fax: +619.594.6628
Email: johnson7@mail.sdsu.edu

Again, people interested in participating in the survey should send an email to Nalini Asha Reyes at naliniasha@gmail.com to request a copy of the survey.



Thank you to Nalini Asha Reyes for alerting me to this survey. I hope to be able to eventually post or link to the results of this survey.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



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JOURNAL: The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal

Posted on 17 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Rehabilitation, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/2gkrzx]

Skip to list of articles

Researchers and students, but especially people new to their field, can find it challenging to locate research, essays, and other academic literature about people with disabilities in developing countries. This may be in part because there are few international, disability-oriented journals available to publish such literature. One of the few exceptions is The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal (RDS).

The RDS journal publishes research articles, essays, and bibliographies on the culture of disability and people with disabilities. On occasion, it also publishes poetry, short stories, creative essays, photographs, and art work related to disability. It publishes four times a year, with approximately 50 pages in each issue. People can subscribe to RDS for a fee, or people can download past issues of RDS for free. Issues from 2006 onward are available in either Word format or PDF format; older issues are available in text-only format.

This publication is not focused solely on developing countries. In fact, many of its articles are written by researchers and writers in industrialized countries, particularly the United States. But some of its articles may be of interest to We Can Do readers. Some examples are listed further below. I chose some of these articles because they deal specifically with disabled people in developing countries; I list others because they deal with broader themes, such as exclusion, that transcend national and income boundaries.

Please note that it is not possible to download separate articles. To read a specific article that interests you, you will need to download the full issue it is in and then skip ahead to the correct page. Page numbers given are based on the PDF version where applicable. Page numbers will be slightly different in the Word version. Or click on the hyperlink within the Word file to be taken directly to the article you select.

Please also note that this is not a comprehensive listing of all articles in past issues of RDS. For example, I usually skipped over book reviews–but I did see a few for books that would be relevant to disabled people in developing countries. You may wish to explore the RDS on your own by following this link.

Selected RDS Articles

A Little Story to Share

A Little Story to Share” by Lee-chin Heng, Volume 1, Issue 2, 2004, page 109-111. Abstract: An autobiographical story of a person from Malaysia with physical disabilities who possesses an associate diploma in music. Download in text-only format (2.1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSissue012004.pdf .

Who is Disabled?

Who is Disabled? Who is Not? Teachers Perceptions of Disability in Lesotho” by Christopher Johnstone, Ph.D. Candidate Educational Policy and Administration University of Minnesota, Volume 1, Issue 3, 2005, starting on page 13. Abstract: This paper reports on educational research conducted in Lesotho, Southern Africa. Mixed methods of research were used to elicit and describe teachers’ attitudes toward children they perceived as disabled. The study took place in a country where discussions on ‘the Continuum’ of services, specialist diagnoses, and Western notions of assistive technology are largely irrelevant. Over-arching themes are compared to themes that have emerged from special education and Disability Studies literature over the past decade. Download in text-only format (715 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01032005.pdf

Evaluation of MA Program in Rehabilitation Counseling

Evaluation of Master of Arts Program in Rehabilitation Counseling and Guidance Service for Persons with Disabilities in Thailand” by Tavee Cheausuwantavee, M.Sc. Ratchasuda College, Mahidol University, Thailand, Volume 1, Issue 3, 2005, starting on page 66. Abstract: This research examines the positive and negative aspects of the Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and Guidance for persons with disabilities in Thailand, since it began in 1997. A CIPP model was utilized for the program evaluation. Multiple methods were used to collect the data, and both retrospective and prospective data collection were undertaken. The research results indicated many positive outcomes. They also indicated certain features of rehabilitation within the Thai context differed significantly from traditional rehabilitation counseling programs in Western countries. Download in text-only format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01032005.pdf

Leprosy in South India
Leprosy in South India: The Paradox of Disablement as Enablement” by James Staples, Ph.D., School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Volume 1, Issue 4, 2005, starting on page 13. Abstract: Rooted in ethnographic fieldwork with people affected by leprosy in India, this article argues that certain impairments, in certain social contexts, are simultaneously disabling and enabling. This paradox poses difficult challenges, not only for those working with individuals affected with leprosy, but for disability activists
andpolicy-makers. Download in text-only format (3 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01042005.pdf

Social and Economic Stress Related to HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Botswana
Social and Economic Stress Related to the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Botswana” by Thabo T. Fako, Ph.D. & Dolly Ntseane, Department of Sociology,University of Botswana & J. Gary Linn, Ph.D. & Lorna Kendrick, R.N., Ph.D. School of Nursing Tennessee State University, Volume 2, Issue 1, 2006, starting on p. 33. Abstract: The paper describes the consequences of HIV/AIDS in Botswana; the country with the highest HIV prevalence rate in Africa. In addition to frequently experienced trauma due to sickness and death, many households experience rising health expenditures and a sharp deterioration of incomes. High levels of morbidity and mortality among workers result in depressed returns on investment, reduced productivity and increased expenditure on training and replacement of workers. As the health care system finds it increasingly difficult to cope, home-based care provides an inadequate solution since the home infrastructure of many households is inadequate for proper care of seriously ill patients. The stigma associated with AIDS often isolates fragile households and provides an environment in which abuse of infected individuals and of orphans whose parents have died of AIDS is not uncommon. The quality of education also suffers, resulting in an ill prepared skilled manpower, with adverse consequences for social, economic, and political development as well as for good future governance of the country. Download in PDF format (3 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02012006.pdf or in Word format (800 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02012006.doc

Toward a Global History of Inclusive Travel
Toward a Global History of Inclusive Travel” by Laurel Van Horn, M.A., Open Doors Organization, USA; José Isola, President, Peruvian Polio Society, Peru, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting on page 5. Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the development of inclusive travel and tourism, from its origins in the United States and Europe following World War I and II to its current status as an increasingly important and viable movement worldwide. The paper investigates the key roles played by disability organizations, disability rights legislation, technological change, international organizations and pioneers within the travel and tourism industry. Developments are described sector by sector for air travel, ground transport, the cruise lines and the hospitality industry. While the primary historical focus is the U.S., the paper also highlights advances taking place in Dubai, Egypt, India, Japan, South Africa, Thailand and other countries. It concludes with a case study by José Isola of the development of inclusive travel in Peru. Mr. Isola also describes disability conferences that took place in South America in 2004. It is hoped others will begin to investigate the development of inclusive travel in their own countries and regions and contribute to a truly global history. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

Ethnobotany on a Roll!
Ethnobotany on a Roll! Access to Vietnam by My Lien T. Nguyen, Ph.D., Department of Botany, University of Hawai’i, at Mānoa, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting on page 36. Abstract: This article describes the research and experiences of an ethnobotanist with a physical disability working in Vietnam. Due to a spinal cord injury, the ethnobotanist uses a wheelchair and walking canes to explore the bustling food markets of Vietnam. Information and recommendations are provided for equipment and traveling to and in Vietnam, particularly for those interested in conducting scientific research and for travelers with physical disabilities. Success is largely due to the mutual respect and kindness shared by people along the way, and by accepting and accommodating to given situations. Appendices of resources for travel in Vietnam and educational granting sources for people with disabilities provided. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

The Benefits of Studying Abroad
Making an Impact: The Benefits of Studying Abroad” Michele Scheib, M.A., Project Initiatives Specialist, National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting page 50. Abstract: Qualitative interviews with ten individuals with disabilities who participated in a study abroad program within the past eight years, compared equally to long-term outcomes cited in studies with the general study abroad alumni population. Students reported increased self-confidence, independence and career or educational gains related to their study abroad experiences. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

Esau’s Mission
Esau’s Mission, or Trauma as Propaganda: Disability after the Intifada” by Marcy Epstein, University of Michigan, Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting on page 12. Abstract: Israelis and Palestinians, while sharing an I/Abrahamic root, many chapters of Semitic history, and common values of resourcefulness and valor, both have defended their cultural boundaries through the exchange of mutilating, annihilative blows upon the other. The intifada (an Arabic word meaning to shake off or shiver because of illness, fear, or weakness) of the millennium signify a trope of body and status among the fragmented population in the region; specifically, the propagandizing of traumatic events that suggest victimization and invalidation. The discursive nature of “unnatural” catastrophe–devastation of Palestinian communities by Israeli Defense Forces, blitzing of Israeli civilians in planned attacks–substitutes the propaganda of trauma for the reality of disability experienced in both cultures. Reflecting the duality of rhetorical positions seen in I/Abraham’s disposition of both Isaac and Esau, this essay links the root of trauma propaganda to the ideology of religious fitness and righteousness. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

Natural Hazards
Natural Hazards, Human Vulnerability and Disabling Societies: A Disaster for Disabled People?” by Laura Hemingway & Mark Priestley, Centre for Disability Studies, University of Leeds (UK), Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting on page 57. Abstract: The policy and research literature on disaster management constructs disabled people as a particularly “vulnerable group.” In this paper we combine concepts from disaster theory and disability theory to examine this assumption critically. Drawing on primary, secondary and tertiary sources, we assess the vulnerability of disabled people in two globally significant disasters: Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 and the Asian tsunami of December 2004. In both cases, disabled people were adversely affected in terms of their physical safety and access to immediate aid, shelter, evacuation and relief. Using a social model analysis we contest the view that this vulnerability arises from the physical, sensory or cognitive limitations of the individual and show how it may be attributed to forms of disadvantage and exclusion that are socially created. The paper concludes that “natural hazards” are realized disproportionately as “human disasters” for disabled people, and most notably for disabled people in poor communities. Social model approaches and strong disabled people’s organisations are key to building greater resilience to disaster amongst “vulnerable” communities in both high-income and low-income countries. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

Politics and the Pandemic
Politics and the Pandemic: HIV/AIDS, Africa, and the Discourse of Disability” by Laura L. Behling, Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota, Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting page 97. First Paragraph: In 2004, Africa News filed a report on then 12-year old William Msechu, a young African who lost both of his parents to AIDS in 1999. He, too, was HIV positive. Msechu is characterized as a “very bright boy,” although, the article reports, he is “yet to come to terms with his HIV status.” “I was told that I have tuberculosis and I am getting better,” the article quotes William as saying to journalists (“HIV-AIDS and STDs” 2004). William Msechu’s disbelief at having contracted HIV is unremarkable; persons diagnosed with severe diseases, including HIV/AIDS, often work through denial and incredulity.1 Just as unremarkable, however, is Msechu’s contention that he had not tested positive for HIV, but rather, had contracted tuberculosis, another widespread disease but not nearly as stigmatizing as HIV/AIDS. Substituting “tuberculosis” for “HIV” may be an affirming measure for Msechu, but it also provides one more example of the rhetorical slipperiness that historically, and still continues to accompany, the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

Seeing Through the Veil
Seeing Through the Veil: Auto-Ethnographic Reflections on Disabilities” by Heng-hao Chang PhD., Nanhua University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starting page 6. Abstract: This article is an auto-ethnography reflecting the interactions among society, my family and my brother who has Cerebral Palsy. The experiences of me and my family show the visible and invisible veils that segregate people with disabilities and their families from mainstream Taiwanese society.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

Building Familial Spaces
Building Familial Spaces for Transition and Work: From the Fantastic to the Normal” by Joakim Peter, MA, College of Micronesia—Federated States of Micronesia, Chuuk Campus, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starts page 14. Abstract: Transition for persons with disability is a process of negotiating difficult situations and barriers set by others and by systems. My strategies to overcome those barriers in my personal transitions through education systems and employment included the creations of familiar spaces in which group support plays a major role. This paper tracks my process through the familiar spaces and gives examples of encounters with barriers along my transition through hospital treatments to schools and then work.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

A Model for Learning from Children
Family Focused Learning: A Model for Learning from Children with Disabilities and Their Families via Technologies for Voice” by James R. Skouge, Kathy Ratliffe, Martha Guinan, & Marie Iding University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starting page 63 Abstract: In this paper, we describe a collaborative multidisciplinary model for faculty and students learning about culture and children with disabilities and their families in Pacific Island contexts. The model, Family Focused Learning, incorporates aspects of case-based and problem-based learning within the context of “consumer” and “professional” partnerships (Ratliffe, Stodden, & Robinson, 2000; Robinson, 1999).Children with disabilities and their families share the daily challenges and successes of their lives with graduate students and faculty at the University of Hawai‘i, via video letters, video mapping, cultural brokering and satellite videoconferencing. To illustrate this process, we present the story of “Tomasi,” a child with cerebral palsy in American Samoa, a US territory. Tomasi and his family are “given voice” and act as teachers for an interdisciplinary team of faculty and students from public health, social work, physical therapy, speech pathology, nursing, special education, nutrition, medicine, political science and law.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

Social Change and the Disability Rights Movement
Social Change and the Disability Rights Movement in Taiwan 1981-2002” by Chang, Heng-hao. Ph.D., Department of Sociology, Nanhua University of Chia-Yi, Volume 3, Issues 1 & 2, 2007, starting on page 3. Abstract: This paper provides a historical overview of the disability rights movement in Taiwan from 1981 to 2002. It shows the major events in Taiwanese disability history, legislation, and development of disability rights organizations, with a focus on two influential advocacy associations: the Parents’ Association for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities (PAPID) and the League of Enabling Associations (LEAs). It also demonstrates that the disability movement has developed in concert with Taiwan’s democratic transition.” Download in PDF format (780 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss01.pdf or in Word format (770 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss01.doc

Disability and Youth Suicide
Disability and Youth Suicide: A Focus Group Study of Disabled University Students” by Esra Burcu, Ph.D., Hacettepe University, Department of Sociology, Volume 3, Issues 1 & 2, 2007, starting page 33. Abstract: For young people thoughts of suicide are based on various social factors. The research literature in this area reveals that there are two important interrelated factors that correlate with suicide rates: being young and being disabled. This study was undertaken in order to explore possible reasons for this increased tendency for young disabled people to commit suicide. The study was carried out at a university in Turkey with a group of disabled students. All the members of the focus group had thoughts of suicide and felt that their disability played an important role in creating these thoughts. The basic premise of the research was that physical disability increases the young person’s isolation and social loneliness and this can generate ideas of suicide in the young person’s mind that may be acted upon.” Download in PDF format (780 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss01.pdf or in Word format (770 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss01.doc

Impact of the South Asian Earthquake
Impact of the South Asian Earthquake on Disabled People in the State of Jammu and Kashmir” by Parvinder Singh, Ph.D. Candidate, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Volume 3, Issue 3, starting page 36. Abstract: On the morning of October 8, 2005, a devastating earthquake, measuring 7.6 on the Richter scale, struck the Kashmir region with its epicentre near Muzzafarabad in Pakistan-administrated Kashmir. It took a while for both India and Pakistan to comprehend the scale of destruction that the quake had unleashed. In the two weeks following, the quake had left over 50,000 dead on the Pakistani side of the India-Pakistan border and claimed 1,300 lives on the Indian side. A second wave of deaths was expected with the onset of the region’s notorious winter. Download in PDF format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss03.pdf or in Word format (380 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss03.doc. Or, this article has also been published at We Can Do with permission of the author and RDS.

The Scale of Attitudes Toward Disabled Persons
The Scale of Attitudes Towards Disabled Persons (SADP): Cross-cultural Validation in a Middle Income Arab Country, Jordan” by Kozue Kay Nagata, Senior Economic Affairs Officer of the Development Cooperation Branch, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Volume 3, Issue 4, 2007, starting page 4. Abstract: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the level of the existing attitudinal barriers towards disabled persons in four communities of Jordan. Jordan is a middle income Arab country, with a PPP-adjusted GDP/capita of US$ 4320. The study attempted to determine the present level as a baseline of prejudice against people with a disability in Jordan, and to examine the relationship between the randomly selected participants’ attitudes and their previous exposure to and experience with disability. The Scale of Attitudes towards Disabled Persons (SADP) was selected as the instrument. An Arabic translated version of the Scale was used for 191 participants. The respondents showed overall negative attitudes towards disabled persons, as illustrated by previous documented materials. The result of this survey was highly correlated with the collective opinion expressed by the focus group that was conducted by the author in Amman in January, 2005. Thus, the cross-cultural validity of this instrument has been confirmed, and the major findings of this pilot study could inform future policy directions and public awareness raising strategies to foster positive public attitudes. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

Barriers to Education
Barriers to Education for People with Disabilities in Bekaa, Lebanon” by Samantha Wehbi, MSW, Ph.D., School of Social Work, Ryerson University, Volume 3, Issue 4, starting page 10. Abstract: This paper presents the findings of a recent study on the educational situation of people with disabilities in Lebanon. The main findings of a survey conducted with 200 participants in the impoverished rural Bekaa region illustrate the inadequate educational situation of people with disabilities. The focus of the paper is on a discussion of the barriers that people with disabilities face in pursuing their education. Participants identified the following difficulties in pursuing their education: educational system barriers, inadequate finances, health issues, transportation difficulties, and family pressures. Although the focus of the article is not on factors that can facilitate educational achievement, some of these supports are identified, including family support and personal motivation. The article concludes with a discussion of current and planned community responses such as the development of an interdisciplinary community action network (The Inclusion Network), the provision of literacy courses, and a pilot project to foster the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream schools. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

Jordan and Disability Rights
Jordan and Disability Rights: A Pioneering Leader in the Arab World” by Kenneth R. Rutherford, PhD, MBA, Missouri State University, Volume 3, Issue 4, 2007, starting page 23. Abstract: This article investigates Jordan’s rationale for assuming a leadership role on the disability rights issue in the Arab World. Tens of millions of people, including over ten percent of Arab families, are impacted and impoverished because of disability. To address this substantial challenge, the Jordan Royal family has leveraged Jordan’s tradition of openness and generosity coupled with one of the best educational systems in the Arab World to promote disability issues. As a result, Jordan is recognized by the international community as leading the Arab World in promoting disability rights. Jordan’s international and regional leadership on disability rights was recognized in 2005 when Jordan received the Franklin Delano Roosevelt International Disability Award. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

You can browse and download past issues of the Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/.

Or you can learn more about the RDS at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/about/.

The RDS is always looking for new authors to submit materials for publication.



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CONFERENCE: Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV & AIDS

Posted on 5 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

2nd General Meeting
Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV & AIDS

Kampala, Uganda
March 11-13, 2008

Preliminary agenda for the 3 days:

  • Overview of progress toward Campaign goals
  • Tools and Resources Exchange Fair : “Marketplace” for display and exchange of Guidelines, Toolkits, and experiences
  • Launching of Working Groups
    1. Communications Working Group
    2. Research Working Group
    3. International Conference Accessibility Working Group
    4. Access to HIV Services Working Group

More detailed information about the Africa Campaign and the Kampala meeting will soon be available on the Africa Campaign website (www.africacampaign.info) on the News page.



We Can Do first learned about this conference through the Disabled People International email newsletter. Thank you to the conference organizers at Africa Campaign for sending the details posted above.



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FUNDING for South Asian Projects on HIV/AIDS Stigma and Discrimination

Posted on 12 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Funding, Health, HIV/AIDS, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Reach this page at http://tinyurl.com/yv79vu

South Asia Regional Development Marketplace: Tackling HIV/AIDS Stigma and Discrimination
For further information please go to:
http://www.worldbank.org/sardm2008

On November 26, 2007 the South Asia Development Marketplace on AIDS related stigma and discrimination was launched. Proposals for innovative ideas to tackle stigma can be submitted until January 31, 2008 by community based organizations (CBOs), non-government organizations (NGOs), foundations, private sector groups, universities and schools, local municipal bodies and government institutions – in collaboration with (other) NGOs and CBOs. The 75 candidates who will be selected from India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Sri Lanka, will be invited to the regional Development Marketplace in Mumbai 15 May, 2008, and there 25 winners will be selected and awarded up to US$40,000 each for an 18 month implementation period.

To know about the South Asia Regional Development Marketplace: Tackling HIV/AIDS Stigma and Discrimination, please visit the website http://www.worldbank.org/sardm2008.


This annoucement was recently distributed on both the GPDD and the Intl-Dev email distribution lists.


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Report: 1st Africa Deaf HIV/AIDS Workshop

Posted on 20 October 2007. Filed under: Case Studies, Deaf, HIV/AIDS, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

No continent has been struck by HIV/AIDS more than sub-Saharan Africa: nearly two-thirds of all people living with HIV are in Africa, and so were three-quarters of those who died from AIDS in 2006 (see UNAIDS report). We also know that people with disabilities are at higher risk for becoming infected with HIV (see Nora Groce’s study). And Deaf/deaf and hard of hearing people are no exception.

Two years ago, people who shared a concern about HIV and AIDS within the Deaf communities of Africa gathered at a workshop to exchange their knowledge and raise awareness within the Deaf community and among government officials about the need to address HIV/AIDS. The report resulting from this workshop is now available in PDF format on-line.

REPORT ON THE CONTINENTAL-WIDE HIV/AIDS SENSITIZATION WORKSHOP FOR DEAF POPULATION IN AFRICA.
VENUE: PEACOCK HOTEL DAR ES SALAAM
DATES: 24 TH – 30TH AUGUST 2005
THEME: OUR FUTURE-OUR RIGHTS TO HIV/AIDS INFORMATION, CARE AND SUPPORT ______________________________________________________________________________ The objectives of the workshop were as follows:
• To provide HIV/AIDS awareness and life skills training to the representatives from the Deaf community in Africa.
• To sensitise the Deaf on their rights to HIV/AIDS information and to care and support when infected by HIV/AIDS.
• To provide a forum for the Deaf to exchange inter-country experience on HIV/AIDS among the Deaf population in Africa.
• To educate and raise awareness among the government officials, UN agencies and participants from institutions working on HIV/AIDS, on the specific problems face by Deaf people in accessing HIV/AIDS information, care and support.

The report summarizes the opening remarks which touched upon the challenges facing Deaf Africans in fighting HIV/AIDs and ideas for moving forward. It also summarizes some of the key presentations including:

“LINGUSITC AND ATTITUDINAL OBSTACLES FACED BY THE DEAF PEOPLE IN ACCESSING HIV/AIDS INFORMATION IN AFRICAN COUNTRIES: THE CASE OF TANZANIA.” By Dr. Mary Mboya, Lecturer Department of Education Psychology-University of Dar es Salaam.

“THE ROLES OF RSESA IN ADVOCATING THE LINGUISTIC RIGHTS OF THE DEAF PEOPLE IN EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA AND INITIATIVE TO ESTABLISH THE AFRICAN DEAF UNION.” By Dominic Majiwa-Regional Director, World Federation of the Deaf, Regional

“BARRIERS FACED BY DEAF WOMEN IN AFRICA THAT CONTRIBUTE TO VULNERABILITY TO HIV/AIDS” By Euphrasia Mbewe – Deaf Women Activist, Zambia.

“UGANDA NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THE DEAF STRUGGLE TO FIGHT HIV/AIDS AMONGST THE DEAF PEOPLE.” By Florence N. Mukasa – Gender and Theatre Coordinator, Uganda National Association of the Deaf.

“SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT HIV/AIDS” By Meena H. A. – UNAIDS Country Office – Dar es salaam.

“THE AFRICAN DECADE AND VISION TO COMBAT HIV/AIDS AMONG THE PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES IN AFRICA” By Thomas Ongolo – The Secretariat of African Decade of Disabled Persons in South Africa.

“LOBBYING AND ADVOCACY STRATEGIES FOR HIV/AIDS AND HEARING DISABILITY INFORMATION, CARE AND SUPPORT.” By Ananilea Nkya – Tanzania Women Media Association (TAMWA)

The report also describes how deaf participants were trained in preventing HIV/AIDS, and in advocating for more inclusion of deaf people in HIV/AIDS work carried out by their governments.

The report can be downloaded in PDF format (143 kilobytes) at http://siteresources.worldbank.org/DISABILITY/Resources/News—Events/BBLs/ADUReport.pdf


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