Intl Leadership Forum for Young Leaders, 1-9 August 2009

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Opportunities, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

International Leadership Forum Announcement – Call for Applications

[Note to We Can Do readers: This opportunity is not targeted at disability advocates, but young leaders with an interest in disability-related advocacy may wish to read the criteria below and consider whether their interests may usefully intersect.]

The UNESCO Chair & Institute of Comparative Human Rights at the University of Connecticut invites applications for the fifth annual International Leadership Programme: A Global Intergenerational Forum, to be held August 1 – 9, 2009 in Storrs, Connecticut, USA. Applications must be received by February 27, 2009.

The Forum seeks to empower young leaders by involving them in finding solutions to emerging human rights problems, and nurturing individuals to be effective leaders in the field of human rights.

To this end, the Forum will:

• Introduce participants to the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
• Build a network of solidarity among human rights leaders
• Expand the knowledge relevant to human rights practice
• Provide tools and a platform for open debates
• Provide programmes, activities and processes necessary for human rights leadership
• Promote the sharing of experiences and understanding
• Showcase speakers on such topics as: health and human rights, education, the environment, the plight of child soldiers, the use of media, fundraising, conflict resolution and transformation; litigation and advocacy

The UNESCO Chair will provide all conference participants with dormitory housing, meals, ground transportation in Connecticut, resource materials and a certificate of participation.

Young people between the ages of 18-30, with community service experience, and with demonstrated ability to work on solutions to human rights problems, should apply. Relevant issues include, but are not limited to, human trafficking, the plight of children, refugees, hunger, HIV/AIDs, gender discrimination, racism, classism, the environment and peace education.

Conference will be held in English only. Fluency in English is required. Applicants will be selected based on the strength of their application essay, demonstrated commitment to human rights (practical/hands-on experience), potential impact on the individual and their potential contribution to the Forum, regional and gender representation.

Programme details and application materials can be accessed by linking to www.unescochair.uconn.edu or http://www.unescochair.uconn.edu/upspecialevents.htm

Nana Amos
Program Manager
University of Connecticut
UNESCO Chair & Institute of Comparative Human Rights
UConn-ANC Partnership
233 Glenbrook Road, Unit 4124
Storrs, CT 06269-4124
860.486.3054 Phone
860.486.2545 Fax
www.unescochair.uconn.edu
–~–~———~–~—-~————~——-~–~—-~
Scholarship and Job are posted at
http://Cambodiajobs.blogspot.com



I received this announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability listserver. If you have inquiries about this opportunity or wish to apply for it, then please follow the relevant web links provided above and follow the instructions at the official web site. We Can Do is NOT able to assist you with your questions about this event–please contact the people organizing the forum directly. Thank you.

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[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

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FUNDING: Campaigns to Ratify, Implement Disability Rights Treaty (CRPD)

Posted on 1 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Are you a disability rights advocate working in a developing country? Is your organization trying to persuade your country’s government to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)? Or, has your country already ratified the CRPD–and you are now working on making sure the CRPD is fully implemented, so that all people with disabilities in your country have their rights respected and protected? Do you need funding support?

The grantmaking foundation, Open Society Institute, has now established the Disability Rights Initiative that supports the efforts of disability rights advocates working on ratification and implementation of the CRPD around the world. The initiative gives priority to efforts promoting the rights of people with intellectual and psycho-social disabilities. However, OSI is willing to support a range of programs and projects that advance the CRPD.

Learn more detail about this funding opportunity and how to apply for it at:

http://www.soros.org/initiatives/special/focus/disability/grants

This is an on-going funding opportunity.

Please note that all inquiries and funding applications should be directed to the Open Society Institute, NOT We Can Do.

Advocates working on issues related to implementing the CRPD in developing countries will also want to keep checking the Disability Rights Fund web site for announcements of future, additional funding opportunities there. The application deadline for their first round of grants passed in August 2008, but they will be offering more funding grants to more countries in the future. Also check the resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website for links to more possible funding sources in general.

New to the CRPD? Learn more about this international, legally-binding human rights treaty that protects the human rights of people with disabilities around the world at http://ratifynow.org/ratifynow-faq/



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for alerting me to the OSI funding opportunity.

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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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RESOURCE: How to Raise Funds for Your Organization

Posted on 18 March 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Funding, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Whenever I communicate with anyone involved with Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) in developing countries, the most common question they have is, “Where and how do I raise the money we need so we can help disabled people in our country?” The United Kingdom-based international disability and human rights network, Disability Awareness in Action (DAA), has some suggestions in their fund-raising resource kit, which advises DPOs on different strategies they can use to raise funds.

This fund-raising toolkit was written in 1996, but much of its information and advice is still very much relevant for DPOs in developing countries today.

The first section gives several broad ideas for what types of entities are likely to give money. Business companies, for example, may sometimes give cash, or in-kind donations (non-cash resources such as free photocopying services, food, etc.), or training workshops to non-profit organizations. Depending on their circumstances, organizations may also wish to consider asking for membership subscription fees, or soliciting donations from individual donors, approaching funding agencies, or starting their own income-generating activities.

The section on “effective fund-raising” emphasizes the importance of researching what funding agencies are available; understanding each funder’s exact criteria for funding proposals; and matching funding agencies to your project. (For example, don’t send a project proposal for an HIV/AIDS prevention project to a funder that only supports malaria-prevention projects.)

For organizations that are inexperienced with fund raising, it can be worthwhile to read the section entitled “It All Takes Time.” It can take months or even years to prepare a good-quality proposal, send it to a funding agency, answer all their questions, and be considered for their funding.

The section entitled “Funding Applications” gives advice on writing your first letter of inquiry to funding sources; what kind of information you should put into your funding proposal; and the best way to organize and present this information.

After your organization receives funding, it is important to submit regular “reports to funders. The agency funding your current project may pass along your reports, or a summary of them, to other funders seeking to learn more about your organization. Comprehensive, honest, accurate reports about your activities, and the results of these activities, can encourage funders to give to you again in the future.

The Disability Awareness in Action fund-raising toolkit may be helpful as a starting point for organizations that are relatively new to fund-raising. One helpful characteristic of this toolkit is that it is written in simple language that is easy to understand even for people who do not read English very well. It also explains basic concepts that similar guides for well-educated or more experienced readers may not cover.

However, DPOs that are serious about fund-raising will also want to read other guides or toolkits on related topics, such as how to plan projects, develop budgets, evaluate projects, etc. I hope to be able to post information about other resources helpful to DPOs seeking funds in the future. If you subscribe to We Can Do then you can learn about these resources within hours after they are posted.

In the mean time, read the full fund-raising toolkit by following the link to:

http://www.daa.org.uk/publications/Reskit5.htm



We Can Do found this toolkit by browsing the list of Disability Awareness in Action publications at the Disability Awareness in Action web site.

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Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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FUNDING for Small Community Foundations or Support Organizations

Posted on 19 November 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Funding, Opportunities, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

The Worldwide Initiative for Grantmaker Support (WINGS) Global Fund for Community Foundations makes grants of up to $50,000 USD to emerging and developing community foundations or support organizations in developing countries. Most grants are between $5,000 and $30,000. Grants are usually meant to develop the capacity of community foundations or other local philanthropic institutions that are grantmakers and that raise funds from local sources. The WINGS Global Fund focuses on developing countries.

WINGS Global Fund for Community Foundations indicates on their web site that, “The Fund recognizes that communities need not always be geographically defined” and lists women’s organizations and environmental groups as two examples of the types of grant-making foundations they would be willing to support. Although they do not list local disability-oriented grant-making foundations as an example, their concept of “community” seems to be defined in such a way that these, too, could be considered under their criteria.

The WINGS Global Fund for Community Foundations has three deadlines for funding applications each year. The last of these deadlines for 2007 has passed. The deadlines for 2008 will be February 29, June 13, and October 25.

See their web site to find out if your community foundation or support organization might be eligible for funding support. Review their “overview and eligibility“; descriptions of what they fund; instructions for “how to apply“; their “selection criteria“; “frequently asked questions“; and their list of “eligible regions and countries“, all accessible from their left-hand navigation bar.

Their web site is located at: http://www.wings-globalfund.org/apply-overview-eligibility.php

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Funding for Disabled Women NGOs

Posted on 3 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Funding, Opportunities, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A new resource has become available that may be able to help organizations focused on the rights of disabled women in developing countries seek out the funding they need to do their work.

Finding funds to start or maintain beneficial projects can be an enormous challenge for any NGO (non-governmental organization). Women with disabilities may face a special set of challenges because both women and disabled people may be devalued in their society. Also, due to lack of access to education and training, disabled women may lack awareness of how to locate funding sources or how to apply for funding.

A new report has been released that can instruct NGOs on where and how they can look for funding. Most funders, of course, do not specialize in supporting disability-related organizations. However, some do nevertheless include disability-run NGOs among the organizations they support. And most are willing to consider any well-developed project plan provided that the organization is trust-worthy, has the skills and capacity to carry out the activities they propose, and meets their criteria. It may take several tries to find the right match between funder and project, but for some organizations it can be well worth the effort.

We Can Do received the announcement below via my contacts at Mobility International USA (MIUSA). MIUSA, in turn, received this announcement by way of the Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID).

AWID: Where is the money for women’s rights? The 2007 Second Fundher Report “Financial Sustainability for Women’s Movements Worldwide”, Now Online!

Where is the money for women’s rights? The Second Fundher Report “Financial Sustainability for Women’s Movements Worldwide” By Joanna Kerr 2007

AWID is delighted to announce that our 2007 Second Fundher Report, “Financial Sustainability for Women’s Movement’s Worldwide”, is now available online for download either in sections or in its entirety. Building on the achievements/impact of our 1st Fundher Report, “Where is the Money for Women’s Rights? Assessing the resources and the role of
donors in the promotion of women’s rights and the support of women’s rights organizations”, this Report probes deeper into fundamental questions related to resource mobilization and movement-building. How are women’s organizations and movements growing worldwide? Why do we need strong women’s movements and organizations? Where is the money for women’s rights? How should we mobilize new resources to build stronger feminist movements in order to advance women’s rights worldwide?

The Report is second in a series of publications resulting from AWID’s multi-year action research initiative “Where is the Money for Women’s Rights”, set up to not only offer insights and strategies for achieving a significant increase in access to and amount of funding available to support women’ rights work, but also to improve the effectiveness of women’s organizations to raise more funds and utilize them to build stronger movements and progress gender equality globally.

For further information and to download the report, please visit http://www.awid.org/go.php?pg=fundher_2

Seeking funds? Then PLEASE note that We Can Do is NOT a funding agency. Leaving comments here will NOT help you apply for funding. Instead, please download the above report (click on the link) to learn of places where you CAN apply for funding for women’s NGOs. Thank you.

 


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