JOB POST: Capacity Builder, Intellectual Disabilities, Bolivia (Texto en ingles y español)

Posted on 11 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Education, Families, Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Texto en español

Capacity Builder in Intellectual Disabilities-Ricerca y Cooperazione, El Alto, Bolivia.

Ricerca y Cooperazione (RC) is an Italian based NGO, with an established development programme in Bolivia, mainly in the area of education for children and youth. Recognising the need for greater inclusion of disabled children in mainstream education, it is implementing an EU funded project entitled ‘Social Inclusion and Mutual Respect’, in coordination with the Municipality of El Alto, in order to educate children, teachers, families and authorities on how to incorporate disabled children into the classroom; a concept which is largely overlooked in Boliva.

Your role will be to compliment the small multidisciplinary technical team of the project, (1 specialist in physical disabilities, 1 in sensory, and you in intellectual) in order that all disabilities are represented. The work will include a diagnostic of children with disabilities in El Alto, designing and implementing training workshops to various beneficiaries, production of educational material, and assist in creating an integral centre – which will serve as a resource for families of disabled children, and also an area for activities with disabled and non-disabled youth.

Ideally educated to Masters level, in a discipline related to intellectual disabilities, you should be experienced in designing and facilitating workshops with participatory methods. Preferably with knowledge and experience in Latin America; of the idiosyncrasies of the disability field in a developing country. Good Spanish and a highly flexible working approach.

Applications can be made in English, Spanish or Italian. Follow this link to view or download a full Job Description. Please send completed applications using the format found here to: feliza@isbolivia.org and e.cipollini@ongrc.org

Deadline for applications: Friday 22nd May 2009.

http://isbolivia.org/blog/?page_id=5


Ricerca y Cooperazione (RC) es una ONG italiana, que cuenta con un programa de desarrollo establecido en Bolivia, principalmente en el área de la educación para jóvenes y niños. Reconociendo la necesidad de una mayor inclusión de los niños con discapacidad en la educación transversal, actualmente se encuentra implementando un proyecto financiado por la UE llamado “Inclusión social y respeto mutuo” en coordinación con el municipio de El Alto, a fin de educar a los niños, maestros, familias y autoridades en cómo incorporar a los niños con discapacidad en las aulas; concepto que es pasado por alto en Bolivia.

Su rol será complementar el equipo técnico multidisciplinario del proyecto. (1 especialista en discapacidad física, 1 en discapacidad sensorial y usted en discapacidad intelectual) para que estén representadas todos los tipos de discapacidad. El trabajo incluirá un diagnóstico de los niños con discapacidad en El Alto, diseñando e implementando talleres de capacitación para varios beneficiarios, producción de materiales educativos y asistir en la creación de un centro integral, el cual servirá como recurso para las familias de los niños con discapacidad como también será un área para las actividades de los jóvenes con o sin discapacidad.

Se requiere una formación universitaria a nivel de Maestría en disciplinas relacionadas con la discapacidad intelectual, con experiencia en diseño y facilitación de talleres con métodos participativos. Preferentemente con conocimientos y experiencia en Latinoamérica en relación a las idiosincrasias en el campo de la discapacidad en un país en desarrollo. Buen conocimiento del castellano y un enfoque de trabajo flexible. Para una Descripcion mas Completa, vea abajo (solo en ingles).

Las solicitudes pueden ser realizadas en idioma inglés, castellano o italiano italiano y enviadas a los siguientes correos electrónicos: feliza@isbolivia.org y e.cipollini@ongrc.org utilizando el formulario encontrado en la siguiente página Web.

Fecha límite para las solicitudes: Viernes 22 de mayo de 2009.



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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24, 2009

Posted on 9 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I am re-posting the following announcement, partly as a reminder for people who wish to register but also to correct and clarify the instructions for registration:

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24

Posted on 4 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, accessibility, Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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4th Annual International Shafallah Forum, April 20-22, 2009, in Doha, Qatar

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that the deadline to submit abstracts is January 23, 2009, at 5 pm EST.

On behalf of the Shafallah Center for Children with Special Needs, I would like to extend a warm invitation for you to submit abstracts for the 4th Annual International Shafallah Forum in Doha, Qatar from April 20th – April 22nd , 2009. For the past three years our Center has been delighted to welcome more than 250 experts in the field and Wives of Heads of State from all over the world to our Forum and we anticipate that this year’s Forum will be no exception.

The 4th Annual International Forum will bring together advocates, family members, scholars, members of government, and professionals from a variety of perspectives to explore the theme of /Achieving Independence/. Together we will explore how to overcome factors that perpetuate disability marginalization, including widespread poverty due to lack of access to education, opportunity, and unfair labor practices. We look to our work, cutting-edge research and programs, to promote independence through universal access to education, inclusive societies, innovative technologies, and poverty-reduction strategies – including micro-enterprise and encouragement of the corporate sector to value and include the disabled in the workforce.

The Forum will feature keynote addresses by global leaders, roundtable discussions, symposia, paper presentations, and exhibits. We welcome the submission of such presentations and have included more detailed information on the following pages.

An accepted presentation to the Shafallah Forum includes complimentary airfare, meals, and accommodation. We hope that you will join us this April in Doha and participate in international dialogue among your peers. Please visit our website at www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org

Abstracts are *due by 5pm EST January 23rd, 2009. *

Sincerely,

*I. Modes of Presentation*

Delegates can present their programs and research in several different formats:

*Symposia *(1 hour – 3 x 15 minute presentations, plus 15 minutes discussion)

A collection of 3 papers presenting the results of different programs/studies/experiences relating to a common research theme. Each should be presented by a different person. The symposium coordinator should provide details for the three papers following the instructions below.

*Individual Papers *(15 minute presentation, plus 5 minutes discussion)

A paper presenting the results of a program/study/experience on a particular topic. Papers will be grouped into symposia according to an identified theme. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each paper offered following the instructions below.

* *

*Posters*

Individuals may present their research on the form of a poster. Posters allow for more extended discussion with delegates interested in the content area of the poster. Posters should be attended by at least one author/director who can address questions related to the poster’s content. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each poster presentation offered following the instructions below. Submission of poster collectives (related research) is encouraged.

* *

*Roundtable Discussions or Debates *

(1 hour)

Discussion about the interpretation of existing research, the state of knowledge in a particular area or the need for more or different kinds of research/programming/policies, can be as important as presenting the results of new studies. Individuals wishing to organize such roundtable discussions or debates should identify three or four speakers, who can each present a point of view. Where discussion and audience participation is the purpose, speakers’ presentations might be limited to 5 minutes. Where debate between the speakers is the purpose, presentations may be longer (10 minutes). Organizers should submit the details of the discussion or debate following the instructions below.

*Exhibit *

Individuals or groups that have a demonstration, specialized equipment, and/or materials that they would like to exhibit are invited to submit a proposal. Exhibits will be given a table with specific presentation time, where they will be asked to be present and are encouraged to leave materials/equipment out for attendees to peruse throughout the Forum.

*II. Abstracts*

Abstracts must be in English. Abstracts longer than permissible will be abridged at the discretion of the program planning committee.

*Theme & Topic:* The conference is to be organized into themes and include general and break-out sessions. Please specify which theme that best fits your session. All abstracts should be prepared using the following headings:

*Instructions for Submitting Paper/Poster Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of authors. Give the email address of person(s) presenting the paper

*Contact details:* Type an asterisk after the presenter’s name and give the affiliation address of the presenting author only

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Preferred mode: *State whether: (a) individual paper or (b) poster

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

*Instructions for Submitting Symposia Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*List:* Authors, affiliations, e-mail addresses and titles of papers to be included in the symposium.

*Moderator: *Give the name and affiliation of the person who has agreed to moderate the symposium. Give the contact details for moderator (email, phone & address).

*Abstract:* Each paper should submit an abstract. This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Roundtable Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of each participant noting the moderator with an asterisk.

*Contact details:* Give the full contact information (email, phone, & address) of all participants

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 400 words and describe the background behind the issue to be discussed or debated and the views to be put forth by each speaker.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Exhibits*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Host: *Give the name, affiliation, e-mail, and phone of the person hosting the exhibit.

*Abstract:* Submit a description of the demonstration/exhibit, its intent, and space requirements

*III. Submission Deadline: 5pm EST, January 23, 2009*

Kindly submit abstracts to: Valerie Karr @ valeriek@brownlloydjames.com

Please label the subject line: _Shafallah Forum Abstract_. Failure to do so may result in abstract not being viewed.

Information about the Shafallah Center and Previous International Forums please visit:

http://www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org



We Can Do received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email news list. All queries and applications should be emailed to Valerie Karr at the Shafallah Center, NOT to We Can Do.

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MIUSA International Leadership Employment and Disability Professional exchange program, March 15-April 5, 2009 (English and Espanol)

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Employment, Events and Conferences, Latin America & Caribbean, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

YES, late applications are being accepted after the application deadline. , se puede presentar su solicitud despues 16 de enero, 2009.

En español

In English
MIUSA is currently accepting applications from professionals with disabilities from Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, and Guatemala for MIUSA’s International Leadership, Employment, and Disability (I-LEAD) Professional exchange program in Eugene, Oregon USA, March 15 – April 5, 2009.

MIUSA strongly encourages professionals with all types of disabilities to apply, including people who have hearing, visual, psychiatric, learning and health related disabilities.

Applications and two references are due by January 16, 2009. However, late applications will be accepted.

The 2009 I-LEAD Professional exchange program will bring together influential leaders in government, business, education, community development, and disability rights organizations who demonstrate the capacity and commitment to expand employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Latin America.

Spanish-English translation and American Sign Language interpretation will be provided during formal program activities.

Partial scholarships are available for this program.

Completed applications should be submitted to apply@miusa.org, or via fax at +1-541-343-6812.

Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact lshula@miusa.org or sygall@miusa.org.

Thank you so much, and we look forward to collaborating with you and your team, to increase employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Latin America.

Warmly,

Lydia Shula
Executive Project Specialist / Executive Assistant to the CEO
Mobility International USA
132 East Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Tel/TTY: +1 (541) 343-1284
Fax: +1 (541) 343-6812
Email: lshula@miusa.org
Web: http://www.miusa.org

Empowering people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

En español
PARA DISTRIBUCIÓN INMEDIATA
Diciembre 2008

EMAIL: apply@miusa.org
SITIO WEB: www.miusa.org
Programa de Intercambio sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad I-LEAD Profesional: Eugene, Oregón, EE.UU.

Diciembre 10, 2008 — Mobility International USA (MIUSA) se encuentra aceptando solicitudes de profesionales con discapacidad de Argentina, Brasil, Costa Rica, y Guatemala para el Programa de Intercambio Profesional de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD por sus siglas en inglés) en Eugene, Oregón, EE.UU., del 15 de marzo al 5 de abril, 2009.

MIUSA alienta a los profesionales con todo tipo de discapacidad a presentar su solicitud, incluyendo personas con discapacidad auditiva, visual, psiquiátrica, de aprendizaje y relacionada con la salud.

Las solicitudes junto con dos referencias deben entregarse hasta el 16 de enero, 2009. Por favor ver solicitud adjunta.

El programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009 congregará a líderes influyentes de organizaciones gubernamentales, educativas, de desarrollo comunitario, negocios y de organizaciones que trabajan por los derechos de las personas con discapacidad que hayan demostrado capacidad y compromiso en la expansión de las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

Los líderes seleccionados para este programa intensivo participarán en talleres interactivos, seminarios, visitas a instalaciones, y paneles de discusión para examinar temas críticos que enfrentan las personas con discapacidad en el área laboral. Como resultado del programa, los líderes desarrollarán estrategias prácticas y crearan planes de acción conjuntos para impulsar sus esfuerzos y compromiso por incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad a nivel local, nacional, y/o regional.

Únicamente las actividades formales del programa contarán con traducción español-inglés y al lenguaje de señas estadounidense. Se facilitará materiales en formatos alternativos y podrán negociarse otras adecuaciones de accesibilidad que aseguren una completa participación.

MIUSA, una organización sin fines de lucro, se dedica a empoderar a las personas con discapacidad alrededor del mundo a alcanzar sus derechos humanos mediante los intercambios internacionales y el desarrollo internacional. Desde 1981 MIUSA ha liderado programas intercambio internacional para personas con y sin discapacidad en más de 90 países, incluyendo Australia, Azerbaiyán, China, Costa Rica, Inglaterra, Alemania, Japón, México, Rusia y Uzbekistán.

Los co-patrocinadores del programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009 incluyen a Wal-Mart y el Fondo de Becas Lisa y Mike Sygall. Habrá disponibles becas parciales para este programa.

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)

Programa de Intercambio Profesional sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad
(I-LEAD por sus siglas en inglés)

Marzo 15 a Abril 5, 2009 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

En el programa de Intercambio I-LEAD Profesional de MIUSA, tanto mujeres como hombres con y sin discapacidad de seis distintos países de América Latina que son líderes en el gobierno, en empresas, en el sector educativo, y en organizaciones de desarrollo comunitario y de defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, edificarán redes de contactos, desarrollarán estrategias prácticas, y generarán planes de acción conjuntos que incrementen las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

QUIÉN PUEDE PRESENTAR SU SOLICITUD:
Mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad provenientes de Argentina, Brasil, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala y México.

MIUSA seleccionará individuos que demuestren capacidad y compromiso en la realización de cambios que expandan las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad a nivel local o regional o a nivel nacional. Por ejemplo:

• Líderes de coaliciones de Organizaciones de Personas con Discapacidad (OPDs), a nivel municipal o nacional, u OPDs que incluyan diversas discapacidades que sean influyentes.

• Líderes del gobierno, incluyendo alcaldes o ministros u otros funcionarios clave en agencias de Servicios Sociales, Ministerios de Educación o Transporte, u otros.

• Educadores influyentes, tales como directores de escuelas, programas vocacionales, o universidades.

• Empresarios líderes que empleen o faciliten capacitación a personas con discapacidad, o que estén interesados en expandir su inclusión de personas con discapacidad como parte de su fuerza laboral.

• Profesionales y líderes de organizaciones comunitarias que promuevan la microempresa y el empleo, incluyendo adiestradores empresariales, formadores vocacionales, micro-prestamistas.

LENGUAJE:
Los lenguajes oficiales de I-LEAD Profesional son el español, el inglés y el lenguaje de señas estadounidense.

Se facilitará traducción español-inglés e interpretación en lenguaje de señas únicamente durante los talleres formales del programa, los seminarios y las visitas a instalaciones.

DETALLES GENERALES DEL PROGRAMA:
El programa I-LEAD incluirá talleres, visitas a instalaciones y actividades prácticas sobre temas que incluyan:

• Estrategias de empleo para mujeres y hombres con discapacidad incluyendo educación, capacitación, empleo asistido, rehabilitación vocacional.
• Políticas y legislación para oportunidades de trabajo.
• Oportunidades igualitarias en la educación, incluyendo escuelas inclusivas y escuelas específicas para discapacidad, legislación y servicios y adecuaciones de accesibilidad.
• Planificación profesional y educación superior incluyendo políticas y sistemas de apoyo para personas con discapacidad.
• Transporte y comunidades accesibles: políticas y modelos de sistemas de transporte accesibles y acceso público.
• Asociaciones entre microempresa y sector privado.
• Estrategias de liderazgo para empleo, incluyendo formulación de proyectos, uso de medios de comunicación, generación de coaliciones.
• Experiencias multiculturales y de formación de grupos de trabajo.
• Metas y planes de acción para el empleo de las mujeres y los hombres con discapacidad.
ALOJAMIENTO Y TRANSPORTE:
• Se proveerá alojamiento simple pero cómodo con habitaciones y baños compartidos.
• Se ofrecerán el desayuno, el almuerzo y una cena ligera al día. Todas las comidas adicionales, aperitivos, o gastos varios (incluyendo lavandería) serán responsabilidad de cada delegado.
• Se proveerá transporte público accesible.

COSTO DEL PROGRAMA:
• El costo total del programa es USD $250. Es posible que hayan becas limitadas en base a la necesidad que haya demostrado el solicitante.

• MIUSA proporcionará: los boletos de avión ida y vuelta para que los participantes viajen desde sus países hasta Eugene, Oregón, EEUU; comida, alojamiento y transporte local para todas las actividades del programa I-LEAD Profesional.

• Los participantes del programa serán responsables por obtener sus pasaportes y visas estadounidenses vigentes y todos costos relacionados.

PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN CONTACTARSE CON:
Mobility International USA
Programa de Intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) es una organización cuya misión es empoderar a las personas con discapacidad alrededor del mundo para que alcancen sus derechos humanos mediante los intercambios internacionales y el desarrollo internacional.

Mobility International USA
Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional
Marzo 15 a Abril 5 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

SOLICITUD e INSTRUCCIONES

1. Por favor llene TODAS LAS SECCIONES de esta solicitud, incluyendo:
_____ Formulario de Información de Solicitud (Sección 1 a 3)
_____ Preguntas de Redacción (usar hojas adicionales para sus respuestas)
_____ Dos Formularios de Recomendación Completos

IMPORTANTE: LAS SOLICITUDES NO SERÁN REVISADAS HASTA QUE ESTÉN COMLETAS.

2. Se aceptarán solicitudes en inglés y en español. ¡NO se tendrá en cuenta la ortografía, el vocabulario o la gramática en inglés de lo solicitantes!

3. Dos Formularios de Recomendación: DEBEN completarse por dos personas familiarizadas con su trabajo y cualidades de líder. Miembros de la familia no pueden completar sus recomendaciones.
• Al menos una referencia debería venir de la organización, institución o empresa a la que usted representará en I-LEAD Profesional.
• Las personas de referencia deberían completar y firmar el Formulario de Recomendación y enviarlo a MIUSA vía e-mail (de preferencia) o vía fax. (E-mail a: apply@miusa.org, Fax: +1-541-343-6812.)

4. ¡ENVÍE SU SOLICITUD PRONTO! Esperamos revisar un gran número de solicitudes para un número limitado de cupos.

Fecha límite de solicitud: enero 16, 2009.

Envíe su solicitud vía e-mail (de preferencia), vía fax o por correo postal a:

Mobility International USA
I-LEAD Professional 2009
apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Website: www.miusa.org

FORMULARIO DE INFORMACIÓN DE SOLICITUD:

SECCIÓN 1: Información del Solicitante

Apellido del solicitante: _________________________________________________________
Nombre del solicitante: _________________________________________________________

Fecha de nacimiento: Mes: ________ Día: ________ Año: ____________

Dirección de e-mail 1: _________________________________________________________
Dirección de e-mail 2: _________________________________________________________

Dirección residencial: _________________________________________________________
Ciudad: Provincia/Estado:
País: Código postal:

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

¿Tiene un pasaporte vigente? NO SÍ País del pasaporte ___________________

Número de pasaporte: _________________________________________________________

Fecha de expiración de pasaporte: Mes: ________ Día: ________ Año: ____________

Idioma materno (hablado o de señas):_______________________________________________

Nivel de Idioma Inglés: Principiante _______ Lento ________ Rápido ________ Fluido ________

Nivel de Idioma Español: Principiante _______ Lento ________ Rápido _______ Fluido _______

Nivel de Lenguaje de Señas (EEUU): Principiante _____ Lento _____ Rápido _____ Fluido _____

Otros idiomas (hablados o de señas): _______________________________________________

¿Cuál es su ocupación?: _________________________________________________________

Por favor liste una persona que podría contactarse con usted si nosotros no logramos contactarnos con usted:
Nombre:___________________________________ Relación con usted:__________________

Direcciones de e-mail:__________________________________________________________

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

SECCIÓN 2:

Organización/ONG/Negocio que usted representará: __________________________________

Su Posición/Título de su Cargo en esta Organización/Institución/Empresa:
____________________________________________________________________________

Persona de Contacto en la Organización: ___________________________________________
E-mail:_______________________________________________________________________

Dirección residencial: _________________________________________________________
Ciudad: Provincia/Estado:
País: Código postal:

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

SECCIÓN 3:

INFORMACIÓN DE DISCAPACIDAD
El programa de intercambio de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional tendrá un equilibrio de mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad. MIUSA realizará los arreglos adecuados para asegurar que cada delegado con discapacidad pueda participar de forma completa e igualitaria. Para ayudarnos a cumplir esta meta, por favor complete la siguiente información:

¿Tiene usted una discapacidad? NO SÍ

De ser así, por favor describa su discapacidad: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mobility International USA

1. Organización/ONG/Empresa a la que representará:
a) ¿Cuál es el nombre de la organización, ONG o empresa al cuál usted representará?

b) ¿Cuál es su posición en la organización, ONG o empresa? Por favor resuma sus responsabilidades.

c) ¿Cuál es el propósito, misión u objetivo de la organización, institución o empresa? (Límite 100 palabras)

d) ¿En qué forma están involucradas, incluidas o beneficiadas las personas con discapacidad a través de su organización, institución o empresa?

2. Participación Comunitaria:
a) Por favor liste otras organizaciones a las cuales pertenece, y las actividades de servicio comunitario en las que esté involucrado a nivel local o nacional.

3. Empleo para personas con discapacidad:
a) Por favor liste los tres problemas más críticos (en su opinión) que limiten las oportunidades de trabajo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad.

b) ¿Qué ha hecho usted o su organización para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad?

c) Por favor liste otras organizaciones o individuos con quienes su organización haya colaborado para promover las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad.

4. Ideas de proyectos o acciones
a) Por favor describa un proyecto, una iniciativa o acción(es) que usted o su organización podrían implementar para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las mujeres y hombres con discapacidad en su comunidad.

b) ¿Cuál sería el resultado del proyecto, iniciativa o acción(es)? ¿Cuántas personas con discapacidad se beneficiarían?

c) Liste cinco socios comunitarios y describa cómo estarían involucrados en este proyecto, iniciativa o acción(es).

5. ¿Por qué y en qué forma su participación en I-LEAD Profesional 2009 resultaría en la expansión de las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad? Por favor sea específico/a.

6. Por favor liste:
a.) Cualquier experiencia previa en programas de intercambio o conferencias internacionales (dónde, por qué y cuándo).

b.) Cualquier viaje previo a los EEUU (dónde, por qué y cuándo).

7. Por favor añada cualquier otro comentario relevante respecto a su participación en este intercambio.

Fecha límite de solicitud: enero 16, 2009. (O depues)

Envíe su solicitud vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal mail a:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
I-LEAD Professional 2009
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Página Web: www.miusa.org

Mobility International USA
Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional
Marzo 15 a Abril 5, 2009 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

Apellido del Solicitante: _________________________________________________________
Nombre del Solicitante: _________________________________________________________

Dirección(es) de e-mail: ____________________________________ País:

FORMULARIO DE RECOMENDACIÓN

Nota para la Persona de Referencia: La persona mencionada a continuación está solicitando participar en el programa de intercambio de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional, en el que mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad que son líderes en el gobierno, en empresas, en el sector de la educación, en organizaciones de desarrollo comunitario y de defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, desarrollarán estrategias prácticas y planes de acción conjuntos para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

Por favor envíe el formulario completo vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal a MIUSA (ver abajo) o devuélvaselo al solicitante para que lo entregue conjuntamente con su solicitud TAN PRONTO COMO SEA POSIBLE. (Use hojas de papel adicionales si es necesario). Gracias.

Por favor escriba a máquina o claramente en letra imprenta. Use papel adicional si es necesario.

Nombre de la persona que facilita la referencia: _____________________________________
Organización: _________________________________________________________________
E-mail:_______________________________________________________________________

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

1.) ¿Por qué recomienda al/la solicitante para el Programa de Intercambio de MIUSA I-LEAD Profesional?

2.) Por favor mencione brevemente las metas u objetivos de su organización (100 palabras o menos).

3.) ¿Qué rol(es) tiene el/la solicitante en su organización?

4.) De ser seleccionado/a, ¿en qué forma ayudaría la participación del/la solicitante en el programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional para que su organización incremente las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad?

5.) Por favor describa el apoyo que su organización puede ofrecer a proyectos y actividades para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad.

Firma de la Persona de Referencia: ___________________________ Fecha: ____________

Por favor devolver al solicitante o enviar vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal a:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
I-LEAD Professional
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Página Web: www.miusa.org



I received this announcement via Joan Durocher and also via the Intl-Dev email news distribution list.

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Give One, Get One XO Laptop Per Child

Posted on 25 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Education, News, Opportunities, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

They’re simple, rugged, and low-cost. And their more ardent fans think they can transform the world–one educated child at a time. Since the first XO laptops rolled off the assembly line in November 2006, hundreds of thousands of children in low-income countries have been using them in the classroom and at home. If you haven’t heard the hype yet, you can explore the website for the new, but increasingly famous One Laptop Per Child project at http://www.laptop.org/.

The latest news is:, people in the US, Canada, and Europe are now able to purchase an XO laptop for a child at home–if they will agree to also buy a laptop for a child they have never met somewhere abroad. From now until December 26, 2008, people in the US, Canada, and Europe may go to amazon.com/XO. A total of $399 in US dollars (or £275 in UK pounds) buys one XO laptop that can be shipped to your child and a second laptop to be shipped to a child in a developing country.

Because they are cheaper than most computers, XO laptops fit a little more easily into the education budgets of developing countries, especially if donors step in to help. Do they really enhance children’s learning experience as dramatically as the XO’s most earnest supporters believe? Some critics are not so sure. But others remain enthusiastic. I’ll let We Can Do readers google for more competing opinions at news.google.com and blogsearch.google.com on their own. But as a small sampling: various articles report that Microsoft and Intel don’t like the competition, and even some former employees of the One Laptop Per Child project are critics of the way the head of the company, Nicolas Negroponte, runs the business. But they seem to like the XO in Peru. And one US blogger with an XO shares his own thoughts on the subject.

What of children with disabilities? The XO is a bit of a mixed bag. Some features are good for some children with some disabilities (eg, built-in camera, good for signing deaf kids). But others are not so great for other children (eg, the interface is very visual–not so great for blind kids). I wrote some more thoughts on the topic last year at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2007/11/16/opinion-one-laptop-per-child—but-is-it-inclusive/.

I remain disappointed now, as I was then, that the people who developed the XO don’t seem to be as proactively inclusive of the needs of people with disabilities as I think they could be and should be. But some independent XO fans and programmers are working on solutions. If you want to join their on-line discussions on the topic, you can sign up for their free email-based discussion group at http://lists.laptop.org/listinfo/accessibility. Or, if you want to learn more about the accessibility issues for XO laptops, you can explore the online “Wiki” community on the topic at http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Accessibility.

What of adults who simply want a cheap, portable laptop for their own use? If you’re in the US, Canada, or Europe, then nothing would stop you from buying one for yourself. But be aware that the keyboard is designed for the small hands of primary school-aged children. If your hands are the same size as most adults, you will find it hard to touch type on the cramped keyboard. You might have to resort to two-fingered (or possibly four-fingered) typing. Also, the interface is geared toward young, creative children who might never have seen a computer before. An adult who has spent too many years using more boring, typical computers for “grown-ups” in developed countries might initially be confused about how to access its most basic programs.

Learn more about its software and hardware at http://www.laptop.org/en/laptop/index.shtml. There is an on-line forum where people who are bewildered by their XOs can ask for help from other users: http://en.forum.laptop.org/. People with more disability-specific questions will probably want to join the accessibility mailing list I mentioned above, at http://lists.laptop.org/listinfo/accessibility so they can exchange ideas, information, and solutions with other list members.

Or if all else fails, give your new XO to a young child you know and ask them to teach you how to use it. That is, if you decide to buy one.



I learned about this year’s “Give One, Get One” project through a mailing from the One Laptop Per Child project.

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UNESCO Flagship to Promote Education Access for Disabled Children

Posted on 12 November 2008. Filed under: Children, Education, Inclusion, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has created a Flagship devoted to improving the reach and quality of inclusive education for students with disabilities in developing countries. As many as 90 percent of children with disabilities in developing countries are denied the opportunity to obtain an education. The Flagship program works in partnership with other United Nations agencies, international and national disability organizations, and donors. It promotes the need for policy makers and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to work in partnership with organizations of, or representing, people with disabilities and their families. The Flagship also promotes the inclusion of education rights for people with disabilities in National Education Plans.

Read more about the Flagship at
http://www.unesco.org/education/efa/know_sharing/flagship_initiatives/disability_last_version.shtml

Read more about inclusive education at
http://portal.unesco.org/education/en/ev.php-URL_ID=56205&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

Download a brochure on the Flagship program (PDF format, 432 Kb) at
http://www.unesco.org/education/efa/know_sharing/flagship_initiatives/depliant_flagship.pdf

People who are interested in promoting educational opportunities for people with disabilities in developing countries will also want to explore the web site for the Enabling Education Network (EENET), an information-sharing resource on inclusive education.

If you have a specific interest in Eastern Africa, then you might wish to learn about an on-line discussion group on inclusive education in Eastern Africa. Select the category education from the pull-down menu under “Categories” to see more We Can Do posts related to education for people with disabilities.



I first learned of the Flagship via the mailing list for the Centre for Services and Information on Disability.

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NEWS: African Decade of Persons with Disabilities Extended to 2019

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ANNOUNCEMENT:

AFRICAN DECADE OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES EXTENDED TO DECEMBER 2019

A. CONGRATULATIONS AND GOOD NEWS!

We are ecstatic!

This is to announce that the AU Continental Decade of Persons with Disabilities has been extended to December 2019.

The Windhoek Declaration on Social Development adopted by Ministers in Charge of Social Development on 31 October 2008, adopted Resolution 6, which reads as follows:

‘6. ADOPT the extension of the Continental Decade of Persons with Disabilities for the period 2010-2019; CALL for the evaluation of the existing Decade and its Plan of Action (1999-2009) and the speedy conclusion of the evaluation and restructuring of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)’

In addition to the resolution extending the Decade, the Windhoek Declaration also adopted resolution 5(x) which reads as follows:

‘5. Further commit ourselves to implement the priority strategies under the key thematic social issues spelt out in the Social Policy Framework for Africa, through the following:

(x) Empowering and providing persons with disabilities with equal opportunities, safeguarding their rights and enlisting their participation and mainstreaming them in all development programmes’

The new Social Development Policy adopted by the Ministers in Windhoek Namibia has detailed coverage of disability work. We encourage organisations to get a copy of this policy and apply its contents in your programming processes.

We would like to thank all organisations (notably Pan African Federation Of the Disabled (PAFOD), African Union of the Blind (AFUB), and others), Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) Staff and leaders, Panel of Experts/Parliamentarians, Pan African Parliament, African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI), the African Union Social Affairs Commission, our Development Partners (Disabled Persons Organizations Denmark [DPOD], Sida, UK Department for International Development [DFID], and Southern Africa Trust), Christian Blind Mission (CBM) and those that supported our down-line networks and DPOs for their support during the first Decade and the campaign towards extension.

We look forward to hard work during the next ten years. We now have the benefit of learning from the mistakes that we made and the experience of managing an initiative of this nature.

B. MORE INFORMATION ON THE FIRST DECADE

The African Union declared the first decade of the new millennium (1999-2009) as the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities. In 2001 the African Union’s Labour and Social Affairs Commission along with its African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI) and the ILO held a meeting in Addis Ababa. In this meeting they designed a Continental Plan of Action (CPOA) to guide the member states of the African Union on how to implement the African Decade. The adoption of the African Decade of Disabled Persons (ADDP) placed responsibility on African States to implement Decade Programme activities.

With this declaration, the African Union adopted a Continental Plan of Action (CPOA) with twelve objectives that African States were to implement over the period.

The twelve objectives cover a wide range of themes that are of critical importance to improvement in the lives of persons with disabilities in Africa. These themes include ideas and strategies to:
1. Formulate and implement national policies, programmes and legislation to promote the full and equal participation of persons with disabilities.
2. Promote the participation of persons with disabilities in the process of economic and social development
3. Promote the self-representation of people with disabilities in all public decision-making structures.
4. To enhance support services for disabled persons.
5. Promote special measures for children, youth, women and elderly persons with disabilities.
6. Ensure and improve access to rehabilitation, education, training, employment, sports, the cultural and physical environment.
7. To promote and protect disability rights as human rights
8. To support the development of and strengthen Disabled Persons’ Organizations
9. Mobilize resources

These objectives where meant to be implemented by Africa States, with the cooperation of civil society organisations.
Prepared By:

Kudakwashe A.K. Dube, CEO
SADPD



This announcement is being circulated by The Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD). Their website is at http://www.africandecade.org.za and is worth exploring for anyone with an interest in human rights or social and economic development for people with disabilities in Africa. I modified this announcement to spell out most of the acronyms.

I received this announcement via the mailing list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development.

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Including Everybody: Website on Disability and MDGs Launched

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), News, Opinion, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
End poverty and hunger. Put all children in school. Empower women. Stop children from dying. Keep pregnant and birthing mothers healthy. Fight AIDS, malaria, and other disease. Create a sustainable environment. And promote global cooperation. These are the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)–an important set of goals agreed upon by key leaders and heads of state from around the world in September 2000. No, they don’t mention people with disabilities at all–and I will come back to this point in a few paragraphs. Or you can ignore me and go straight to the new website on disability and the MDGs. But in theory, the MDGs are meant to help everyone.

Each goal has a set of specific targets to be achieved, most with the deadline set for 2015. For example, the poverty goal includes a target to cut the number of people living on less than $1 a day in half by 2015. And the goal on child mortality includes a target to cut the child mortality rate by two-thirds among children below age 5. Many country governments, multi-lateral development banks, international development organizations, and donors have invested billions of dollars into projects meant to help more countries and regions meet the Millennium Development Goals.

What has the results been? Mixed. Some of the goals, such as the targets for reducing poverty and hunger, or in putting all children in primary school, have been met–and exceeded in many countries particularly in eastern Asia. Progress in southern Asia has helped also. But many countries in sub-Saharan Africa lag far behind in meeting many of the MDGs.

You can read more about the overall progress–or lack of it–at http://www.undp.org/mdg/basics_ontrack.shtml. Or if you only want to look up the progress in the country where you live, work, or care about the most, go to http://www.undp.org/mdg/tracking_countryreports2.shtml.

People with Disabilities and the MDGs
But what about people with disabilities? Unfortunately, they have been so invisible that most programs and governments don’t even count them. That means it’s hard to find reliable numbers that measure whether people with disabilities are included–or left behind–in the haphazard progress that has been made toward the MDGs. But, we can make some educated guesses.

For example, what limited numbers do exist estimate that possibly as many as 98% of children with disabilities in some developing countries never go to school. Personally, I doubt this number is universally true. For one thing, there is a great deal of variation from country to country in how proactive they are about finding creative ways to include children with disabilities in school. Read Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience (PDF format, 4.14 Mb) for examples of progress.

Then, there is probably some variation depending on the disability. A child with a relatively mild walking-related disability, for example, might have only minor difficulty reaching school if it is not too far. Or a child with undiagnosed and unaccommodated dyslexia might sometimes make it through a few years of school, and even learn a little, before they quit in frustration.

But if that 98% figure is anywhere close to the mark, then it is safe to say that the MDG target on universal primary education has failed disabled children miserably. We do know that they are very disproportionately left behind: the UK Department of International Development (DFID) says that one-third of the 72 million children who are out of school have disabilities, even though people with disabilities are only an estimated 10 percent of the world population in general. And this only covers the education-related target of the MDGs; the new website on disability and the MDGs points out gaps in all the rest.

Disability Inclusion is Everyone’s Business
So what’s the answer to this problem? A thorough response to this question would fill a book. One thing, however, is clear: It will not be resolved by any one government or organization working in isolation. And it certainly will not happen if resource-strapped disability-oriented organizations are left to tackle the problem alone. It will take many governments, agencies, and organizations working together–including those that do not normally specialize in disability issues. In short, everybody who is doing anything to address the MDGs needs to identify better ways to include people with disabilities in the work they’re already doing.

This begins by increasing everyone’s awareness of the complex relationship between disability and the MDGs. By “everyone” I mean both disability advocates (so they can help advocate the issue) and also mainstream international development professionals (so they can find ways to ensure their programs are not inadvertently leaving disabled people behind). Either way, you can start learning at the new website on disability and the Millennium Development Goals, Include Everybody, at:

http://www.includeeverybody.org/

What Do I Think of “Include Everybody”?
When you consider that this website is brand new, I think it makes an excellent start at covering the issues. In the long run, as with any new endeavor, I see room for them to expand. For example, their page on achieving universal primary school education or the page on promoting gender equality and empowering women could usefully link to publications such as Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb). Or their page on combating HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases could link to the on-line global survey on disability and HIV/AIDS.

They also could consider eventually developing a one to two page, attractive looking, factsheet on disability and the MDGs that advocates could print out and disseminate when educating others about the topic. They also could consider developing a similarly attractive, one-page factsheet for each of the MDGs individually. The latter could be useful, for example, for passing along to a specialist who only wants to read the information on child mortality without also having to wade through a lot of detail on environmental sustainability. Or vice versa.

But, for now, this web site is a good place to start learning.

http://www.includeeverybody.org/links.php



The Include Everybody website has been publicized in several different locations by now, including the GPDD mailing list, the Intl-Dev mailing list, Joan Durocher’s mailing list, and others.

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Statement on the Millennium Development Goals and Disability, from the Africa Regional Conference

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

THE STATEMENT OF THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE, HELD AT THE PANAFRIC HOTEL, NAIROBI, KENYA 15TH TO 17TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

We, the 200 delegates of the Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference from the, Central, Eastern, Northern, Western and Southern sub regions of Africa met in Nairobi, Kenya, at the Panafric Hotel on 15th to 17th September 2008, to examine the status of MDGs in respect to the inclusion and mainstreaming of disability;

And further to enhance the capacity of leaders from the disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in African countries;

Noting that MDGs have no specific reference to persons with disabilities and therefore their continued exclusion in the campaign processes, policies, planning, programmes and implementation;

Concerned also that disability has not been mentioned in the midway Millennium Development Goals Report;

Further acknowledging that the convention on the rights of PWDs has recently come into effect, to among other things strengthen the resolve for inclusion of people with disabilities;
We note with dismay the continued categorisation of people with disabilities as vulnerable which further marginalises us and consigns us to invisibility, we state that we wish to be recognised as actors in the development processes;

We Resolve As Delegates That We Shall;
• Communicate the outcome of this conference to our governments to review, prioritise and include issues of disability in their Country Statements during their high level meetings on MDGs in New York, in the September 2008 Summit
• Call on our Governments to move and support a motion during the UN General Assembly, calling for the establishment of a new UN Special Agency on Disability; to provide leadership, coordination, harmonisation and enhanced monitoring and reporting.
• Engage our Governments to ensure that People with Disabilities are protected from adverse effects from rising costs and related vulnerabilities and participate and benefit from existing social protection schemes
• Lobby Governments through the African Development Bank and related partners to establish an African Disability Equity Fund to support economic empowerment, entrepreneurship and business of people with disabilities
• Encourage the use of professional campaigners including goodwill ambassadors in promoting disability inclusion
• Recognise the efforts of parents, friends and guardians of people with disabilities and recognise them as part of the wider disability movement
• Uphold the principle of gender equity in disability
• Promote the use of positive language in reference to people with disabilities
We Urge The UN Through Member States;
• To establish a Specialist Agency on Disability in the league of UNICEF and UNIFEM to provide leadership and global accountability on matters related to the disabled people
• To prioritise include and partner with the disability movement in its entire millennium campaign initiatives and develop the strategies for doing so in the September summit
We Urge The AU And Related Bodies To;
• Set up a Disability Desk within all African regional bodies to monitor the implementation of both the convention and human rights violation of people with disabilities within the respective regions.
• Mainstream disability into their programmes and performance management systems
• Establish peer review mechanism and performance management system for disability in Africa
• Ensure political and social economic representation of people with disabilities in NEPAD and develop terms of reference for their participation.
• Work with DPOs to urgently review the structure and mandate of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)
• Extend the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities for another ten years by means of a proclamation by the meeting of the African Heads of State planned for January 2009
• Facilitate self- representation of PWDs in all commissions, Pan Africa Parliament and other structures

We Call On The Secretariat Of African Decade Of Persons With Disability to;
• Establish a programme to develop human resource capacity for policy analysis to act as a watch dog in monitoring disability inclusion
• Allocate responsibilities, roles and duties to the regional federations and other partners in order to ensure effective, well – monitored follow up and implementation strategies
We urge all Government to;
• Ratify, domesticate and implement the UN convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
• Work with DPOs in nominating the members of the panel of experts in convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
• Recognise DPOs as agents of change and therefore as partners in development planning and programmes
• Include people with disabilities and disability into their poverty reduction and development programmes
• Put into place affirmative action to enhance participation in political social and economic sectors
• Include disability data collection within the general national data collection systems recognising diversity in disability
• Use data to inform planning and service delivery and monitoring and evaluation
• Highlight and include disability in the existing MDG indicators in partnership with the disability movement.

We Call On Development Partners To;
• Prioritise disability as a tool for planning and analysis for development assistance and international cooperation in all their international cooperation and assistance (aid, debt relieve and trade)
• Include and consult people with disabilities and their respective organisations in planning, implementation, monitoring and reporting
• Include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes

We Resolve That As Disabled Peoples Organisations We Shall;
• Advocate to ensure that disability issues are mainstreamed in all government, UN agencies and development partners policies, plans and programmes particularly those related to MDGs
• Endeavour to understand the structures of various government, UN agencies and development partners with a view to engaging with them more effectively for full inclusion of people with disabilities
• Advocate development partners to include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes
• Engage and influence the social development process
• Participate in the Social Protection processes to ensure people with disabilities are included
• Advocate and lobby to be included in national poverty reduction strategies and other national development plans and initiatives
• Explore avenues of partnership with private sector in their economic empowerment programes
• Utilize our individual and collective capacity to cause the implementation of programmes related to the MDGs for the benefit of people with disabilities
• Build our own capacity to engage with our government on their commitments and agreement at national and international levels
• Ensure that whatever is agreed at regional or national workshops cascades downward to people with disabilities at the grassroots and rural areas
• Familiarise ourselves with the disability policies of different development agencies and ensure that they benefit us
• Strengthen our unity and common voice in planning, implementation and monitoring processes whilst at the same time recognising diversity in disability
• Restructure and reform our internal governance structures to adopt modern management and good governance systems and increase transparency and accountability to our members
• Nurture and mentor youth with disabilities into leadership succession plans and support them towards social economic empowerment
• Make a paradigm shift from the charity model to the human rights and social development model
• Strategically engage with media for both awareness and advocacy and built our capacity to engage with media
• Sensitise and capacitate the media to various disability needs and to urge them to be inclusive in their presentation and reporting
• Link with African Universities to promote evidence based disability research and to promote disability inclusive academic programmes
• Review through our Governments the Accra Development Plan of Action and cause its implementation for the benefit of PWDs in Africa

These resolutions are the outcomes of the conference, formulated and spoken by the delegates at this esteemed Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference.



This statement from the Africa Regional Conference was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

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Good Practice AWARD COMPETITION for Service Providers in Middle East: Chance to Win 1500 Euro for Organization

Posted on 25 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Education, Funding, Health, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that the application deadline is October 18, 2008.

Funded by:
DISABILITY MONITOR INITIATIVE- MIDDLE EAST
Good Practice Award

The identification and sharing of good practices helps service providers to improve their performance and ultimately provide enhanced services for persons with disabilities. The Disability Monitor Initiative (DMI-ME) is conducting a Good Practice Awards program to recognize good practices in service delivery.

Who can apply:

  • Service providers in Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Palestine and Yemen working in the areas of healthcare, education, livelihood opportunities and social protection – for persons with disabilities
  • Service providers with no more than 40 salaried staff or an annual budget less than $300,000

What is the process:
1. Download the application form from this website www.disabilitymonitor-me.org
2. Complete the application and email to editor@disabilitymonitor-me.org
3. Applications can be submitted until Saturday 18 October 2008
4. The finalists from the region will be shortlisted and notified to arrange a face-to-face meeting to allow gathering of more in-depth information about the good practice
5. Face-to-face meetings will occur during October, November and December 2008, with the final winners notified shortly after all the assessments are completed

What is the prize:
For shortlisted service providers

  • their organization will be listed in the DMI-ME report themed around access to services for persons with disabilities in the Middle East due out in mid 2009
  • will receive a free flight and accommodation for a member of the organization to attend a major Regional Disability Conference for the Middle East scheduled to take place in mid 2009
  • For winning service providers

  • in addition to the above prizes, the organization will ultimately receive €1,500
  • a commemorative plaque presented before the media, recognizing their achievements in demonstrating a good practice for the delivery of social services for persons with disabilities in the Middle East

For more information please visit the DMI-ME website www.disabilitymonitor-me.org or email the team at the DMI-ME on editor@disabilitymonitor-me.org

Unsuccessful applicants will be informed why they were not considered as a winner and the judges’ decision is considered final.

This Good Practice Award competition is being funded by the Christian Blind Mission and Handicap International.



I received this notice via the GPDD mailing list.

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Stories of People with Disabilities in Developing Countries from Around the World

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Democratic Participation, Education, Human Rights, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, Mobility Impariments, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Too often, the voices of people with disabilities are simply not heard–within their country, within their community, or sometimes even within families. The voices of disabled people in developing countries are even more suppressed.

One special issue of the New Internationalist, released in 2005, brings us the voices of people with disabilities from India … Zimbabwe … Sri Lanka … Colombia … Bangladesh … and elsewhere.

The stories and interviews published in their magazine, available for free on-line, share the experiences of people with disabilities in developing countries in their struggle for sexual expression … the harrowing experience of rape … the push to achieve recognition for their human rights … the battle against severe poverty and starvation … success at becoming a blind teacher … getting involved with politics … and overcoming discrimination in the work force.

Browse the stories at the New Internationalist website at:

http://www.newint.org/issue384/index.htm

Each story can be read on-line in html format; they do not need to be downloaded.



I learned of this magazine issue when several of its stories were recently circulated via email on the Disability Information Dissemination Network, which is managed by the Centre for Services and Information on Disability (CSID), Bangladesh, and currently sponsored by Handicap International. People may subscribe directly to the CSID mailing list by sending an email to csid@bdmail.net, csid@bdonline.com, or info@csididnet.org, with the word “join” in the subject line.

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NEWS: Invisible in Russia

Posted on 12 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Employment, Human Rights, Inclusion, News | Tags: , , , , |

Individuals with disabilities, and organizations that represent them, recently told Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty that they are still largely invisible in Russian society. They face challenges in education; finding employment; living in the community; and finding accessible services. However, there also has been some progress over time. Children who once would have been kept home from school now receive an education; and people with disabilities are, slowly, becoming integrated into society.

Read the full story about the situation that confronts people with disabilities in Russia at:

http://archive.rferl.org/reports/FullReport.aspx?report=577#736738



I learned about this news story when Ghulam Nabi Nizamani circulated it via email.

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CONFERENCE: Global Alliance for ICT and Development, Oct 21-24, 2008, Yerevan, Armenia

Posted on 11 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Opportunities, technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

[Note: this is not a disability-specific conference. However, it could be an opportunity to introduce a disability perspective to non-disabled participants. Inquire directly with the conference organizers, NOT We Can Do, regarding options for making the conference accessible to people with disabilities or other inquiries.]

Title: Global Innovation Forum for Education and Development
Organized by: UN GAID, UN e-Leaders Committee, Athgo International, Ministry of Economy – the Republic of Armenia

Location: Yerevan, Armenia

Focus: ICT innovation in the areas of access, connectivity, and relevant local content development

Dates: October 21-24, 2008

SUMMARY
The Global Innovation Forum for Education and Development provides a platform for several hundred young people across the globe to advance their causes toward achieving the MDGs through ICT. Area experts from the private and public sectors and selected young participants are invited to showcase their successful ICT practices and highlight new innovations and new ground-breaking business models and methods that successfully address the development needs in different societies.

The forum is set to encourage young people to get engaged in, and develop and propose new ICT initiatives that innovatively advance local communities in various emerging regions.

First, the forum will concentrate on the basic tools that facilitate the creation of innovative solutions, particularly, systematic and quality educational opportunities. Currently, proper education is not widely available in developing regions, thus slowing innovation and hampering the implementation of existing ICT. Consequently, the forum will focus on ways to improve educational opportunities and quality through ICT, specifically focusing on building ICT skills among young people. To this end the impact of access, connectivity and relevant local content in meeting educational and analytical needs will be examined and methods to overcome the obstacles discussed and presented.

The second part of the forum will highlight some of the best practices in the areas of ICT access and connectivity with a special attention on the impact of appropriate local content to ensure sustainable development.

Each participant will have the opportunity to engage policy makers, experts and his/her peers to draft innovative solutions to ICT development and implementation challenges. On the final day, the young participants will showcase their plans in innovation panels. The proposals will be evaluated by leaders in government, the private sector, and civil society, and will be showcased at the conference closing ceremonies.

Panel focus and objectives
Panels will focus on three ICT elements (access, connectivity and local content) in two different contexts:
1. Education for Innovation in the 3 ICT elements
2. Innovation for Development in the 3 ICT elements
The panels will also include discussions about innovative financing for new innovations and demonstrate creative ways of including young people in the process of innovation and implementation.

Expert Panels: in each of the panels, the discussions should include and highlight the benefits that ICT brings to the educational sector (examples: access to global databases for new ideas and existing best practices, complex problem solving, group project collaborations, extensive teacher training through simulations, education system management, etc.), which in return heightens the innovation (more talented ICT professionals, increased demand, modernization) that ultimately leads to sustainable development (ICT adaptation and systematic usage, simplification of economic complexities, diffusion of new tools in various sectors of economy, new partnerships, entrepreneurial developments)
1. Access: Education – Innovation – Development
2. Connectivity: Education – Innovation – Development
3. Local Content: Education – Innovation – Development

Broad questions to address:
Education
• What are the biggest challenges to building capacity in LDCs, especially for young people?
• How do you encourage human capital investment in ICT, without guaranteeing job growth?
• How can we ensure that ICT education is continual and does not become obsolete in a world where technology changes weekly?
• How is the educational process improved by ensuring access/connectivity/local content to ICT? Is the efficiency element the biggest winner or is it the enhancement in knowledge sharing that takes the prize home?
Innovation
• How do we bring the richness of Web 2.0 to LDCs in a cost effective way?
• What are the missing resources to translating innovation in access, content and connectivity into results?
• How best developed integrated ICT networks in areas that lack the basic infrastructure, namely power resources and skilled human capital?
• How can we, using existing and already deployed hardware in LDCs, SIDS, and rural areas, improve ICT access?
• What are the latest developments in ICT connectivity that allow for wider areas of coverage?
• In areas impacted by natural disasters, how does content help the recovery process?
• How can we improve access and connectivity in areas where infrastructure has been damaged by disaster?
Development
• How does devoting more resources to ICT4D help solve development issues such as governance, health, and climate change?
• How does advancement in ICT translate into development progress in the above areas?
• How do we encourage and promote innovation in LDCs, especially where the benefits of education are diminished by brain drain?
• How do we address problems like brain drain and other barriers to encouraging and supporting human capital investment in ICT fields?
• How do we increase absorption capacity, especially in LDCs where other development challenges have yet to be resolved?

GLOBAL ALLIANCE FOR ICT AND DEVELOPMENT SECRETARIAT
Room DC1-1464, One United Nations Plaza, New York, N.Y., 10017
Telephone: (1-212) 963-5796 Fax: (1-917) 367-4340
e-mail address: gaid@un-gaid.org Website address: www.un-gaid.org



We Can Do received this conference announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development email discussion list.

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RESOURCE: Refugees with Disabilities: Facts and Solutions

Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Inclusion, Resources, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

What population in the world is the most excluded, marginalized, or simply forgotten? Many readers of this blog probably would immediately say, “people with disabilities.” But if you were to talk with someone who is a refugee from war, or someone who works with them, they might immediately say, “refugees.” So who is right? I suspect probably both. So what then of refugees with disabilities–forgotten both by people in the wider disability community and by people who work with refugees? Even this blog, in more than 300 posts, has only barely mentioned them before.

The Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children in June 2008 released two publications highly relevant to this community. The first is a report, Disabilities Among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations (PDF format, 1.81 Mb, 76 pages), that provides an overview of the situation facing disabled refugees. The second publication is meant to give workers some guidance in how they can ensure that refugees with disabilities are fully included in their programs: Disabilities Among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations: Resource Kit for Fieldworkers (PDF format, 328 Kb, 32 pages).

The report estimates that there are about 2.5 to 3.5 million refugees with disabilities around the world–enough, I would point out, to fill a small country. Not surprisingly, the report finds enormous challenges: shelters, food and water distribution centers, latrines, schools, health centers, and other vital services are often inaccessible. Refugees with disabilities are sometimes actively excluded from vocational training programs. Or, if they’re not intentially denied the right to participate, then they are often inherently excluded by the lack of appropriate accommodations.

Refugees dispersed in urban centers, away from refugee camps, often are even worse off. In concentrated refugee populations, at least it becomes easier to identify people with disabilities and thus to tailor services for them. But refugees living in the community, because they may be undocumented, are reluctant to identify themselves to receive services, whether or not they have disabilities. Furthermore, refugees with disabilities in urban settings are often ignored both by services for refugees generally and also by local Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs): in short, they often are being served by no one.

The good news is, some services do exist, including efforts to provide education to children with disabilities at least in refugee settlements. In some locations, refugees with disabilities and their families have organized their own self-help groups.

The accompanying resource kit is targeted at United Nations, nongovernmental organization (NGOs), and Disabled persons’ organization field staff who work with refugees, asylum seekers, and internationally displaced people with disabilities. Readers can consult this kit for ideas on improving services and protection for people with disabilities so they can participate more fully in their communities. If you’re looking for concrete, prescriptive guidelines and checklists, you won’t find that here. What you will find are questions that planners and decision makers should know the answers to, or find the solutions for. These offer broad guidelines as to the kinds of problem areas they should be on the look out for, with suggestions for how to address them.

At first glance, it seems an excellent start–with plenty of room for improvement. The Women’s Commission seems to be highly conscious of this: the introduction indicates they hope to build upon this publication in the future with input from, among others, DPOs and displaced people with disabilities themselves.

Download the report (PDF format, 1.81 Mb) at:

http://www.womenscommission.org/pdf/disab_fulll_report.pdf

Download the resource kit for fieldworkers (PDF format, 328 Kb), at:

http://www.womenscommission.org/pdf/disab_res_kit.pdf



We Can Do found this resource via the Disabled People International electronic newsletter and also during the course of assembling resources to go up on the Resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website. (The latter is still being constructed, but check back in late August or early September.)

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Disabled Girls in the Classroom: Finding What We Don’t Know

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Reports, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

A report entitled Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) discusses what we don’t know about girls with disabilities in relation to education, and what ought to be done about it.

Readers familiar with gender issues within education know that, in many countries, girls are still more likely to drop out of school–if they ever attend at all. They may be needed at home to fetch the water; they may be afraid of being sexually assaulted on the way to school; or they may be embarrassed about managing their menustration at schools where there is no separate bathroom for girls–or perhaps no bathrooms at all.

Regular We Can Do readers and others familiar with the education field may also recall that about 77 million primary school-aged children today are not enrolled in school–and about one-third of them have disabilities. Schools are reluctant to enroll disabled students; parents may fear subjecting children with disabilities to bullying from the community and thus keep them at home; or decision makers may simply assume that disabled students either cannot learn or would be unable to use their educational degree later on because “no one wants to hire disabled workers.”

But what of girls with disabilities? Being a double minority does tend to come with a triple whammy. Disabled girls are excluded because they have disabilities; they are excluded because they are girls; and then they are excluded yet again when programs might target girls without including disabled girls, or when programs might target children with disabilities without considering the impact of gender.

This would seem to imply that girls with disabilities may face a unique set of barriers when pursuing an education–barriers that neither non-disabled girls nor disabled boys need to consider. If a unique set of barriers, then surely a unique set of solutions would also be needed to ensure that the push to put the last 77 million children into school does not leave behind girls with disabilities. But, how can we tackle these barriers if we don’t have a clear picture of what they are?

The 35-page paper, Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb), is an attempt to pull together what is known about girls in education with what is known about disability in education, coupled with anecdotcal information about how girls with disabilities are affected differently. It provides recommendations for areas researchers should be focusing on and gives a few ideas for things that can help.

This paper was published in 2003. But, unfortunately, I doubt it is significantly dated. I don’t pretend to be intensively familiar with the literature on education among students with disabilities internationally. But a quick skim through a more recent report on disability in education, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), suggests that advancements since 2003 have been far from dramatic.

Perhaps one of the most important purposes of Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) is to help remind gender specialists that girls with disabilities are first and foremost, girls–but will be inherently excluded if not consciously targeted. For We Can Do readers already working on disability issues in education, another purpose is to remind that barriers excluding women and girls from full participation in society impact disabled girls and women just as much–if not more so.

If issues impacting girls with disabilities interests you, then you might also be interested in some of the following We Can Do posts:

Equalizing Educational Opportunity for the Nigerian-Ghanaian Blind Girl Child
Violence Against Blind/VI Girls in Malawi
Report on Violence Against Disabled Children (which I include in this list because violence against girls is often cited as a reason why some girls quit school)
Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children
Report on Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities (the referenced report includes brief references throughout to girls, including in the context of education)
Online discussion of inclusive education in Eastern Africa

Advocates working to promote more educational opportunities for girls with disabilities also may wish to consult, and cite, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), with particular attention to Article 6 (Women with Disabilities); Article 7 (Children with Disabilities); and Article 24 (Education).



I found this report by browsing the AskSource.info database.

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CONFERENCE: Africa Regional Conference on MDGs and Disability

Posted on 21 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Africa Regional Conference on MDGs and Disability
Regional Conference to be held on September 14th to 19th 2008, in Nairobi, Kenya
AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY
Pan Afric Hotel, Nairobi Kenya
14th to 19th September 2008.
Organizers:
ECUMENICAL DISABILITY ADVOCATES NETWORK (EDAN), SECRETARIAT OF THE AFRICAN DECADE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (SADPD), AFRICAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION (ACDF) AND THE UN MDG CAMPAIGN OFFICE FOR AFRICA

AIM: To enhance the capacity of leaders from disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in MDGs in African countries and to provide knowledge, increase competence and strengthen organizational advocacy strategies and networking skills.

We would like to announce and to invite participants to the above Conference which will bring together leaders of the disability movement, professionals and service providers together to interact in discussion on the MDG campaign, implementation and the implication to persons with Disabilities. The Conference is organized on the backdrop of the fact that 2007-2008 marks the halfway point to 2015, the year set for the achievement of the MDGs and the observation that the campaign and implementation work going on is yet to recognize Disability as a sector that need specific attention.

2007-2008 also marks the coming into force of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). It has been widely acknowledged that one of the shortcomings of the MDGs has been the exclusion of persons with disabilities. Taking this into account, the UNCRPD was drafted to ensure the inclusion of persons with disabilities into the development agenda. In the light of this, there are consistent referrals to the combating of conditions of poverty affecting persons with disabilities and especially their situation in the context of developing countries. Over 80%% of the 650 million persons with disabilities live in the poorest parts of the world. This means that over 20% of the poorest people globally are persons with disabilities.

For the MDGs to have real significance, they cannot ignore those living with disabilities. As James Wolfensohn, the former president of the World Bank has pointed out: “Unless disabled people are brought into the development mainstream, it will be impossible to cut poverty in half by 2015 or to give every girl and boy the chance to achieve a primary education by the same date.

Although persons with disabilities have organized groups which are involved in disability advocacy, awareness and lobbying on other pertinent issues of concern to them, there has been very little interaction with the MDGs campaign and many of them are not aware of it. They are not a consideration in the regional strategies as currently spelt out and implemented. They have continued to be left out of the Campaign relegating them further to marginalization. They therefore cannot engage their governments in this regard. It is necessary that they get involved.

This reality has brought about the need for the Secretariat of African Decade of Persons with Disability (SADPD), Ecumenical disability advocates network EDAN, African Community Development Foundation (ACDF) and UN Millennium Campaign office to partner in a project to facilitate an engagement to bring about the disability factor in all aspects of the MDG Work. This project has among other things the purpose to set in motion capacity building as well as inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities and their organizations in the mainstream campaign activities. The ultimate purpose is to facilitate a process to build a strong disabled person’s organisation DPOs to ensure that the voice of disabled persons will be heard and taken into account in all sectors of national MDG development.

The continental conference was originally expected to bring together a limited number of disability leaders from all over Africa associated with the work of the Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities and the Ecumenical Disability Advocates Network. The number was limited due to resources but we have received recommendations that the conference should be opened up for a wider participation. This announcement is therefore an invitation to persons with disabilities, DPO’s, Service providers and professionals especially those involved in development and issues of MDGs in various Regional Network to this conference. It is also an appeal to individuals and all regional organizations to sponsor those in their networks who can ably take the information back to their countries. Anticipated expenses within Kenya including airport transfers, Conference facilities, accommodation and full board for five days per person is 1,000 US Dollars. This figure does not include the air fare from the port of departure to Nairobi.

The organizing Committee has very limited scholarships to go to a few leaders in the Disability movement as this will facilitate key leadership meetings that will take place alongside and after the MDG Conference. Those in this category are requested to make their applications which will be considered on need basis and early application.

The Conference is as indicated above planned to take place at the Pan Afric Hotel Nairobi, Kenya between 14th and 19th September 2008. The first three business days programme beginning in the morning of Monday, 15th September will be devoted to knowledge dissemination, interactive discussions through workshops and development of advocacy strategies for inclusion in the MDG campaigns and implementation. The last two days will be devoted to the work of the Decade for persons with Disabilities and its relationship to development in the Region. A programme and other information materials will be sent later but those interested are requested to fill in the attached registration form and send it back to facilitate further planning.

Participants who are not in the Decade network and would like to experience a little of the Kenya tourism including group organized game drive may take this option provided there will be enough of them to make a group and that they will have informed us in good time. These arrangements are not part of the conference and their expenses are not included in the figures given for acommodation and board during the conference. Those interested may request for separate information in that connection.

AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY

Pan Afric Hotel, Nairobi Kenya

14th to 19th September 2008.

Organizers:
ECUMENICAL DISABILITY ADVOCATES NETWORK (EDAN), SECRETARIAT OF THE AFRICAN DECADE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (SADPD), AFRICAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION (ACDF) AND THE UN MDG CAMPAIGN OFFICE FOR AFRICA
AIM: To enhance the capacity of leaders from disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in MDGs in African countries and to provide knowledge, increase competence and strengthen organizational advocacy strategies and networking skills.

REGISTRATION FORM
Please type or write clearly in English. Complete registration form may be sent by e-mail (to info@edan.or.ke) or printed and sent by fax. Deadline: August 11th 2008

Surname(s)(as in passport)………………………………………………………………………….
First name(s) (as in passport)…..…………………………………………………………………..
Address …………………………..…………………………………..……………………………
Postal Code …………………………………… Town ………………………………………….
Country …………………………………………………………………………………………..
Home telephone……………………………. Office telephone ………………………………
(Country code/area code/number) (Country code/area code/number)
Fax ……………………………………………. E-mail …………………………………………
(Please provide at least one fax number or one e-mail address for quick communication)
Gender […..] Male […..] Female
Date of birth (day/month/year) …………………………………………………………………..
Your Disability ……………………………………………………………………………………
Profession or occupation .………………………………………………………………………
Organization ……………………………………………………………………………………..
Position in the organisation ……………………………………………………………………
Nationality (country issuing your passport) ……………… Passport number ……………………
Date and place of issue of the passport ……………… Passport valid until ………………..
(day/month/year) (day/month/year)
Sponsoring organization…………………………………………………………………….…..
Special need……………………………………………………………………………………….

Give details of your travel Itinerary:
The Conference Planning Committee will organize accommodation and board and meet the airfare expenses from the port of departure to Nairobi for those it will sponsor. Any other personal expenses, including passport costs, local travel related expenses such as vaccinations, luggage insurance or telecommunication costs are the participants own responsibility.

The planning Committee will organize hotel accommodation and airport pick up on request for the self sponsored participants.

Place……………………….Date…………………………. Signature …………………………

Send your registration to: Samuel Kabue
Executive Secretary
Ecumenical Disability Advocates Network (EDAN)
P.O. Box 22
00200 Nairobi
KENYA
Tel: +254-20-4445837
Fax: +254-20-4445835
E-mail: info@edan.or.ke



We Can Do received this announcement via the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities email news distribution list. Please note that any inquires relating to this conference should please be directed to info@edan.or.ke, or to the contact information given above, NOT to We Can Do.

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that, although abstracts are due by August 1, 2008, completed papers will not be due until 2009. This same announcement was posted at We Can Do in April, but the editors are circulating this notice again in an attempt to collect more abstracts for them to choose among.

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies
Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

  • What is the relationship between disability and poverty?
  • How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?
  • What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?
  • What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?
  • What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1st.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



This announcement was circulated by Daniel Mont via email. Any inquiries and abstracts should please be directed to Daniel Mont or to Rosangela Berman Bieler as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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RESOURCE: Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Children, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Less than a decade ago, more than 100 million primary-school aged children still had never entered a classroom. Today, that number has dropped below 80 million, even though the world’s population has grown in that time. Clearly progress has been made. But children with disabilities are being left behind: one-third of the world’s children out of school are disabled. Many of the rest are excluded for other reasons that pose their own set of challenges: some are left behind because they are girls; or because they don’t speak the dominant language of their country; or because they experience discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity.

How can Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and other Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) help schools in their country be more inclusive of students who have commonly been excluded? Save the Children UK has released a new report that offers guidance: “Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience” (PDF format, 4.14 Mb). This report describes successful projects, and the lessons learned, from countries as diverse as Vietnam, Kyrgyzstan, Peru, Bangladesh, China, Somalia, Brazil, Western Balkans, Mongolia, Nepal, Tajikistan, Serbia, India, and Morocco. Children with disabilities are targeted for many of these projects.

The report begins by describing both the conditions that prevent inclusive education and the conditions that can help make it possible. It also analyzes projects that have made it possible for linguistic minority students–and Deaf students–to obtain a bilingual education. Teacher training programs have helped encourage teachers to create more inclusive classrooms for children with disabilities and other students who have historically been excluded. Several countries have used Community-based Education Management Information Systems (C-EMIS) to draw upon the knowledge and motivation of local community members in making education more inclusive. Each chapter ends by discussing what lessons other communities in other countries may find helpful in implementing their own projects.

Advocates who tire of hearing governments complain there isn’t enough money will especially wish to read the 6th chapter on “Addressing financial barriers to inclusive education.” Funding issues are also discussed briefly throughout earlier chapters of Making Schools Inclusive (PDF format, 4.14 Mb).

The 8th chapter points readers to further materials and resources that may be helpful to them in advocating for more inclusive education in their countries.

The full 64-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (4.14 Mb) at http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Making%20schools%20inclusive%20SCUK.pdf.



We Can Do learned of this report through an announcement posted on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. The discussion group is devoted to issues relating to inclusive education in Eastern Africa.

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RESOURCES: Making Sanitation and Water Accessible for Disabled People

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Mobility Impariments, Reports, Resources, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The World Bank tells us that 2.6 billion of the world’s population do not have access to basic sanitation and hygiene. In rural areas, that means people may defecate in open fields. In cities, they may defecate into plastic bags and throw them into street. The result? Disease and sometimes death. But access to sanitation isn’t only a health issue. It is also an education issue. When girls don’t have a sanitary, private place to take care of their needs during menustration they skip school.

The World Bank also tells us that a billion of the world’s population lack access to a clean source of water. This is again both a health issue and an education issue. Dirty water makes people sick. And children who must spend upwards of two hours a day simply fetching water from the nearest water source may have no time left to attend school or study.

Data on sanitation and water access for people with disabilities is hard to find. But the little literature I have seen on the topic suggests that their needs are often left out when projects strive to bring either to a new village or neighborhood. This means they are left more vulnerable to disease than their neighbors. This situation also unequally deprives disabled people of their right to dignity.

So what can be done?

No single answer will suit all cases. First of all, the facilities themselves vary widely: a toilet, for example, might be a Western-style seat in some countries but an Asian-style porcelain bowl in the ground in other countries. Second of all, a person who walks on crutches due to the after-effects of polio may have different needs than a person who walks without aid but who cannot bend easily. Both of these individuals may have different needs still from the person who uses a wheelchair due to spinal cord injury, whose needs will also differ from those of another wheelchair rider who has cerebral palsy. Creativity and resourcefulness will always need to be key components of any plan to make water and sanitation services accessible for all.

The Water, Engingeering, and Development Center at Loughborough University has gathered a list of links to articles and resources related to water and sanitation access for disabled people. Here, you can find a briefing note on why the East African water and sanitation sector needs to consider the needs of disabled people. Or scroll further down their web page to find links to reports about water and sanitation projects for people with disabilities in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Uganda, and elsewhere.

Start exploring at:

http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk/projects/new_projects3.php?id=60

Author Mahesh Chandrasekar in India has also written an article based on his own experience in making sanitation more accessible for himself, entitled “Water and Sanitation for All,” available at http://www.geocities.com/mahesh_mobility/water_sanitation.htm

People interested in on-going discussion about the topics of disability, water, and sanitation may be interested in joining the Disability, Water, and Sanitation listserv. More information is available on the listserv at http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DWS.html. You will note from a quick glance at the archives that discussion on this list seems to be somewhat slow and sporadic. But many lists do revive once new members join them, so it may be worth a try.

Another We Can Do post related to water and sanitation includes one about a handbook on how to make water ans sanitation accessible to disabled people, also from the Water, Engineering, and Development Centre of Loughborough University.



I learned about the literature at the Water, Engineering, and Development Centre of Loughborough University after browsing some links from the World Bank web page on rural development and disability. I learned about Mahesh Chandrasekar’s article through email correspondence with the author. We Can Do readers might be interested in browsing some of Mahesh Candrasekar’s other articles on disability and human rights; disability and discrimination; universal access/barrier free environment; disability and development; and access to education.

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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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NEWS: Sign Language Training Program Launches in Guyana

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Deaf, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Guyana Ministry of Education, in partnership with the Guyana Community Based Rehabilitation Programme (GCBRP), has initiated a sign language training program targeted at improving the quality of education for deaf children, the Kaieteur News has reported. The program will provide sign language training to teachers so they can better accommodate the communicate need of deaf children in their classrooms. It is being offered through the St. Stanislaus College in Brickdam.

Read the original Kaieteur News story entitled “Education Ministry launches sign language training” for more detail at:

http://www.kaieteurnews.com/?p=782



Thank you to Monty Chester for alerting me to this news item.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 26 April 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Education, Employment, Health, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies

Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

 
The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

What is the relationship between disability and poverty?

How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?

What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?

What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?

What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1, 2008.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



Daniel Mont recently circulated this announcement on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

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RESOURCE, FUNDING: Network to Exchange Success Stories

Posted on 6 March 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Funding, News, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Organizations that have “success stories” to share now have a way to reach a wider audience. And organizations that wish to learn from other successful projects now have a resource to which they can turn.

A few of the very best, most innovative participating projects might also obtain funding. (If interested in funding, submit stories to IFAP by March 31, 2008.)

The United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has launched an Information for All Programme (IFAP) whose purpose is to encourage communities to share their success stories with each other. All organizations are invited to submit their stories about successful projects to its online platform. Others can then read about these projects and perhaps replicate them or adapt them to their own local situations.

The IFAP is particularly interested in stories that involve using information to support development. The aim of IFAP is to promote good practices in using information for development in all parts of the world.

If you submit your story before March 31, 2008, then it may be considered for grant funding. IFAP will choose up to five of the most innovative success stories to receive funding support of $5,000.

Stories may be submitted at any time, including after March 31, to be shared with others. But late submissions cannot be considered for the grant funding competition. Instead, they will simply be made available for others to read and learn from. Submitting your stories, even if you do not win funding support, can be a way to help make more people aware about your organization and your projects.

IFAP wants stories in the following thematic areas:

  • Poverty reduction,
  • Health,
  • Education,
  • Disaster prevention,
  • Governance,
  • and Human Development.

IFAP asks that each story submitted to their database should include the following information (note that the last one specifically references people with disabilities):

  • identify the community that has benefitted from the use of information
  • explain what difference access to information has made for this community
  • focus on content and not on technology
  • describe how the initiative could be replicated
  • take account of any gender issues, noting that UNESCO’s priority focus is on women
  • identify any benefits for disadvantaged groups such as people with disabilities

IFAP also wants stories to follow a standard format:

  • Between 250 and 500 words in English or French
  • Respond to the questions: who, when, where, what, how and why?
  • Upload up to 3 photos of at least 300 dpi in .jpg format
  • Upload a short (5 minutes) video clip if available
  • Provide links to any related web sites

Learn more about the IFAP initiative at:

http://www.unesco-ci.org/cgi-bin/ifapstories/page.cgi?g=;d=1

At the IFAP website, you can register your organization; submit your own story for the IFAP database (after registration); and read, rate, and comment on other people’s stories.

IFAP Accessibility for blind people
Blind people will need to note that, unfortunately, the IFAP site does not seem to be fully accessible. It might be possible to at least read their information, including the stories that other people have left there. However, in order to register your organization, submit a story, or contact IFAP through their contact form, you need to fill out a “visual captcha.” This means they want people to prove they are human beings (not automated robots) by reading a visual image and typing the letters they see in the image. The image is not accessible to screen readers.

If you are blind, you may need to recruit a sighted person to assist you in filling out the IFAP registration form. If you do this, you may also wish to ask the sighted person to help you submit an email to IFAP urging them to make their web site more accessible to you.

I have already submitted two complaints of my own (one using the “support” button and the “contact” button). But they might listen harder if they realize that there are actual blind people out there who are trying to use their site. (Yes. Blind people with ideas to offer. Imagine that. Please read this in a scarcastic tone of voice.) Unfortunately, both the “support” button and the “contact” button also use visual captchas, so those aren’t directly accessible to blind people either.

Further comments about accessibility at the <a href=”IFAP website“>IFAP web site are invited in the comments area below. I will try to pass along any additional concerns I receive here to IFAP, especially if you have trouble submitting your own comments to them.




We Can Do learned about the IFAP intiative through the Disabled People International (DPI) email newsletter.

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JOURNAL: The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal

Posted on 17 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Rehabilitation, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/2gkrzx]

Skip to list of articles

Researchers and students, but especially people new to their field, can find it challenging to locate research, essays, and other academic literature about people with disabilities in developing countries. This may be in part because there are few international, disability-oriented journals available to publish such literature. One of the few exceptions is The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal (RDS).

The RDS journal publishes research articles, essays, and bibliographies on the culture of disability and people with disabilities. On occasion, it also publishes poetry, short stories, creative essays, photographs, and art work related to disability. It publishes four times a year, with approximately 50 pages in each issue. People can subscribe to RDS for a fee, or people can download past issues of RDS for free. Issues from 2006 onward are available in either Word format or PDF format; older issues are available in text-only format.

This publication is not focused solely on developing countries. In fact, many of its articles are written by researchers and writers in industrialized countries, particularly the United States. But some of its articles may be of interest to We Can Do readers. Some examples are listed further below. I chose some of these articles because they deal specifically with disabled people in developing countries; I list others because they deal with broader themes, such as exclusion, that transcend national and income boundaries.

Please note that it is not possible to download separate articles. To read a specific article that interests you, you will need to download the full issue it is in and then skip ahead to the correct page. Page numbers given are based on the PDF version where applicable. Page numbers will be slightly different in the Word version. Or click on the hyperlink within the Word file to be taken directly to the article you select.

Please also note that this is not a comprehensive listing of all articles in past issues of RDS. For example, I usually skipped over book reviews–but I did see a few for books that would be relevant to disabled people in developing countries. You may wish to explore the RDS on your own by following this link.


Selected RDS Articles

A Little Story to Share

A Little Story to Share” by Lee-chin Heng, Volume 1, Issue 2, 2004, page 109-111. Abstract: An autobiographical story of a person from Malaysia with physical disabilities who possesses an associate diploma in music. Download in text-only format (2.1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSissue012004.pdf .

Who is Disabled?

Who is Disabled? Who is Not? Teachers Perceptions of Disability in Lesotho” by Christopher Johnstone, Ph.D. Candidate Educational Policy and Administration University of Minnesota, Volume 1, Issue 3, 2005, starting on page 13. Abstract: This paper reports on educational research conducted in Lesotho, Southern Africa. Mixed methods of research were used to elicit and describe teachers’ attitudes toward children they perceived as disabled. The study took place in a country where discussions on ‘the Continuum’ of services, specialist diagnoses, and Western notions of assistive technology are largely irrelevant. Over-arching themes are compared to themes that have emerged from special education and Disability Studies literature over the past decade. Download in text-only format (715 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01032005.pdf

Evaluation of MA Program in Rehabilitation Counseling

Evaluation of Master of Arts Program in Rehabilitation Counseling and Guidance Service for Persons with Disabilities in Thailand” by Tavee Cheausuwantavee, M.Sc. Ratchasuda College, Mahidol University, Thailand, Volume 1, Issue 3, 2005, starting on page 66. Abstract: This research examines the positive and negative aspects of the Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and Guidance for persons with disabilities in Thailand, since it began in 1997. A CIPP model was utilized for the program evaluation. Multiple methods were used to collect the data, and both retrospective and prospective data collection were undertaken. The research results indicated many positive outcomes. They also indicated certain features of rehabilitation within the Thai context differed significantly from traditional rehabilitation counseling programs in Western countries. Download in text-only format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01032005.pdf

Leprosy in South India
Leprosy in South India: The Paradox of Disablement as Enablement” by James Staples, Ph.D., School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Volume 1, Issue 4, 2005, starting on page 13. Abstract: Rooted in ethnographic fieldwork with people affected by leprosy in India, this article argues that certain impairments, in certain social contexts, are simultaneously disabling and enabling. This paradox poses difficult challenges, not only for those working with individuals affected with leprosy, but for disability activists
andpolicy-makers. Download in text-only format (3 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01042005.pdf

Social and Economic Stress Related to HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Botswana
Social and Economic Stress Related to the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Botswana” by Thabo T. Fako, Ph.D. & Dolly Ntseane, Department of Sociology,University of Botswana & J. Gary Linn, Ph.D. & Lorna Kendrick, R.N., Ph.D. School of Nursing Tennessee State University, Volume 2, Issue 1, 2006, starting on p. 33. Abstract: The paper describes the consequences of HIV/AIDS in Botswana; the country with the highest HIV prevalence rate in Africa. In addition to frequently experienced trauma due to sickness and death, many households experience rising health expenditures and a sharp deterioration of incomes. High levels of morbidity and mortality among workers result in depressed returns on investment, reduced productivity and increased expenditure on training and replacement of workers. As the health care system finds it increasingly difficult to cope, home-based care provides an inadequate solution since the home infrastructure of many households is inadequate for proper care of seriously ill patients. The stigma associated with AIDS often isolates fragile households and provides an environment in which abuse of infected individuals and of orphans whose parents have died of AIDS is not uncommon. The quality of education also suffers, resulting in an ill prepared skilled manpower, with adverse consequences for social, economic, and political development as well as for good future governance of the country. Download in PDF format (3 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02012006.pdf or in Word format (800 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02012006.doc

Toward a Global History of Inclusive Travel
Toward a Global History of Inclusive Travel” by Laurel Van Horn, M.A., Open Doors Organization, USA; José Isola, President, Peruvian Polio Society, Peru, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting on page 5. Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the development of inclusive travel and tourism, from its origins in the United States and Europe following World War I and II to its current status as an increasingly important and viable movement worldwide. The paper investigates the key roles played by disability organizations, disability rights legislation, technological change, international organizations and pioneers within the travel and tourism industry. Developments are described sector by sector for air travel, ground transport, the cruise lines and the hospitality industry. While the primary historical focus is the U.S., the paper also highlights advances taking place in Dubai, Egypt, India, Japan, South Africa, Thailand and other countries. It concludes with a case study by José Isola of the development of inclusive travel in Peru. Mr. Isola also describes disability conferences that took place in South America in 2004. It is hoped others will begin to investigate the development of inclusive travel in their own countries and regions and contribute to a truly global history. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

Ethnobotany on a Roll!
Ethnobotany on a Roll! Access to Vietnam by My Lien T. Nguyen, Ph.D., Department of Botany, University of Hawai’i, at Mānoa, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting on page 36. Abstract: This article describes the research and experiences of an ethnobotanist with a physical disability working in Vietnam. Due to a spinal cord injury, the ethnobotanist uses a wheelchair and walking canes to explore the bustling food markets of Vietnam. Information and recommendations are provided for equipment and traveling to and in Vietnam, particularly for those interested in conducting scientific research and for travelers with physical disabilities. Success is largely due to the mutual respect and kindness shared by people along the way, and by accepting and accommodating to given situations. Appendices of resources for travel in Vietnam and educational granting sources for people with disabilities provided. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

The Benefits of Studying Abroad
Making an Impact: The Benefits of Studying Abroad” Michele Scheib, M.A., Project Initiatives Specialist, National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting page 50. Abstract: Qualitative interviews with ten individuals with disabilities who participated in a study abroad program within the past eight years, compared equally to long-term outcomes cited in studies with the general study abroad alumni population. Students reported increased self-confidence, independence and career or educational gains related to their study abroad experiences. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

Esau’s Mission
Esau’s Mission, or Trauma as Propaganda: Disability after the Intifada” by Marcy Epstein, University of Michigan, Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting on page 12. Abstract: Israelis and Palestinians, while sharing an I/Abrahamic root, many chapters of Semitic history, and common values of resourcefulness and valor, both have defended their cultural boundaries through the exchange of mutilating, annihilative blows upon the other. The intifada (an Arabic word meaning to shake off or shiver because of illness, fear, or weakness) of the millennium signify a trope of body and status among the fragmented population in the region; specifically, the propagandizing of traumatic events that suggest victimization and invalidation. The discursive nature of “unnatural” catastrophe–devastation of Palestinian communities by Israeli Defense Forces, blitzing of Israeli civilians in planned attacks–substitutes the propaganda of trauma for the reality of disability experienced in both cultures. Reflecting the duality of rhetorical positions seen in I/Abraham’s disposition of both Isaac and Esau, this essay links the root of trauma propaganda to the ideology of religious fitness and righteousness. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

Natural Hazards
Natural Hazards, Human Vulnerability and Disabling Societies: A Disaster for Disabled People?” by Laura Hemingway & Mark Priestley, Centre for Disability Studies, University of Leeds (UK), Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting on page 57. Abstract: The policy and research literature on disaster management constructs disabled people as a particularly “vulnerable group.” In this paper we combine concepts from disaster theory and disability theory to examine this assumption critically. Drawing on primary, secondary and tertiary sources, we assess the vulnerability of disabled people in two globally significant disasters: Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 and the Asian tsunami of December 2004. In both cases, disabled people were adversely affected in terms of their physical safety and access to immediate aid, shelter, evacuation and relief. Using a social model analysis we contest the view that this vulnerability arises from the physical, sensory or cognitive limitations of the individual and show how it may be attributed to forms of disadvantage and exclusion that are socially created. The paper concludes that “natural hazards” are realized disproportionately as “human disasters” for disabled people, and most notably for disabled people in poor communities. Social model approaches and strong disabled people’s organisations are key to building greater resilience to disaster amongst “vulnerable” communities in both high-income and low-income countries. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

Politics and the Pandemic
Politics and the Pandemic: HIV/AIDS, Africa, and the Discourse of Disability” by Laura L. Behling, Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota, Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting page 97. First Paragraph: In 2004, Africa News filed a report on then 12-year old William Msechu, a young African who lost both of his parents to AIDS in 1999. He, too, was HIV positive. Msechu is characterized as a “very bright boy,” although, the article reports, he is “yet to come to terms with his HIV status.” “I was told that I have tuberculosis and I am getting better,” the article quotes William as saying to journalists (“HIV-AIDS and STDs” 2004). William Msechu’s disbelief at having contracted HIV is unremarkable; persons diagnosed with severe diseases, including HIV/AIDS, often work through denial and incredulity.1 Just as unremarkable, however, is Msechu’s contention that he had not tested positive for HIV, but rather, had contracted tuberculosis, another widespread disease but not nearly as stigmatizing as HIV/AIDS. Substituting “tuberculosis” for “HIV” may be an affirming measure for Msechu, but it also provides one more example of the rhetorical slipperiness that historically, and still continues to accompany, the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

Seeing Through the Veil
Seeing Through the Veil: Auto-Ethnographic Reflections on Disabilities” by Heng-hao Chang PhD., Nanhua University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starting page 6. Abstract: This article is an auto-ethnography reflecting the interactions among society, my family and my brother who has Cerebral Palsy. The experiences of me and my family show the visible and invisible veils that segregate people with disabilities and their families from mainstream Taiwanese society.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

Building Familial Spaces
Building Familial Spaces for Transition and Work: From the Fantastic to the Normal” by Joakim Peter, MA, College of Micronesia—Federated States of Micronesia, Chuuk Campus, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starts page 14. Abstract: Transition for persons with disability is a process of negotiating difficult situations and barriers set by others and by systems. My strategies to overcome those barriers in my personal transitions through education systems and employment included the creations of familiar spaces in which group support plays a major role. This paper tracks my process through the familiar spaces and gives examples of encounters with barriers along my transition through hospital treatments to schools and then work.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

A Model for Learning from Children
Family Focused Learning: A Model for Learning from Children with Disabilities and Their Families via Technologies for Voice” by James R. Skouge, Kathy Ratliffe, Martha Guinan, & Marie Iding University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starting page 63 Abstract: In this paper, we describe a collaborative multidisciplinary model for faculty and students learning about culture and children with disabilities and their families in Pacific Island contexts. The model, Family Focused Learning, incorporates aspects of case-based and problem-based learning within the context of “consumer” and “professional” partnerships (Ratliffe, Stodden, & Robinson, 2000; Robinson, 1999).Children with disabilities and their families share the daily challenges and successes of their lives with graduate students and faculty at the University of Hawai‘i, via video letters, video mapping, cultural brokering and satellite videoconferencing. To illustrate this process, we present the story of “Tomasi,” a child with cerebral palsy in American Samoa, a US territory. Tomasi and his family are “given voice” and act as teachers for an interdisciplinary team of faculty and students from public health, social work, physical therapy, speech pathology, nursing, special education, nutrition, medicine, political science and law.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

Social Change and the Disability Rights Movement
Social Change and the Disability Rights Movement in Taiwan 1981-2002” by Chang, Heng-hao. Ph.D., Department of Sociology, Nanhua University of Chia-Yi, Volume 3, Issues 1 & 2, 2007, starting on page 3. Abstract: This paper provides a historical overview of the disability rights movement in Taiwan from 1981 to 2002. It shows the major events in Taiwanese disability history, legislation, and development of disability rights organizations, with a focus on two influential advocacy associations: the Parents’ Association for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities (PAPID) and the League of Enabling Associations (LEAs). It also demonstrates that the disability movement has developed in concert with Taiwan’s democratic transition.” Download in PDF format (780 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss01.pdf or in Word format (770 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss01.doc

Disability and Youth Suicide
Disability and Youth Suicide: A Focus Group Study of Disabled University Students” by Esra Burcu, Ph.D., Hacettepe University, Department of Sociology, Volume 3, Issues 1 & 2, 2007, starting page 33. Abstract: For young people thoughts of suicide are based on various social factors. The research literature in this area reveals that there are two important interrelated factors that correlate with suicide rates: being young and being disabled. This study was undertaken in order to explore possible reasons for this increased tendency for young disabled people to commit suicide. The study was carried out at a university in Turkey with a group of disabled students. All the members of the focus group had thoughts of suicide and felt that their disability played an important role in creating these thoughts. The basic premise of the research was that physical disability increases the young person’s isolation and social loneliness and this can generate ideas of suicide in the young person’s mind that may be acted upon.” Download in PDF format (780 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss01.pdf or in Word format (770 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss01.doc

Impact of the South Asian Earthquake
Impact of the South Asian Earthquake on Disabled People in the State of Jammu and Kashmir” by Parvinder Singh, Ph.D. Candidate, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Volume 3, Issue 3, starting page 36. Abstract: On the morning of October 8, 2005, a devastating earthquake, measuring 7.6 on the Richter scale, struck the Kashmir region with its epicentre near Muzzafarabad in Pakistan-administrated Kashmir. It took a while for both India and Pakistan to comprehend the scale of destruction that the quake had unleashed. In the two weeks following, the quake had left over 50,000 dead on the Pakistani side of the India-Pakistan border and claimed 1,300 lives on the Indian side. A second wave of deaths was expected with the onset of the region’s notorious winter. Download in PDF format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss03.pdf or in Word format (380 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss03.doc. Or, this article has also been published at We Can Do with permission of the author and RDS.

The Scale of Attitudes Toward Disabled Persons
The Scale of Attitudes Towards Disabled Persons (SADP): Cross-cultural Validation in a Middle Income Arab Country, Jordan” by Kozue Kay Nagata, Senior Economic Affairs Officer of the Development Cooperation Branch, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Volume 3, Issue 4, 2007, starting page 4. Abstract: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the level of the existing attitudinal barriers towards disabled persons in four communities of Jordan. Jordan is a middle income Arab country, with a PPP-adjusted GDP/capita of US$ 4320. The study attempted to determine the present level as a baseline of prejudice against people with a disability in Jordan, and to examine the relationship between the randomly selected participants’ attitudes and their previous exposure to and experience with disability. The Scale of Attitudes towards Disabled Persons (SADP) was selected as the instrument. An Arabic translated version of the Scale was used for 191 participants. The respondents showed overall negative attitudes towards disabled persons, as illustrated by previous documented materials. The result of this survey was highly correlated with the collective opinion expressed by the focus group that was conducted by the author in Amman in January, 2005. Thus, the cross-cultural validity of this instrument has been confirmed, and the major findings of this pilot study could inform future policy directions and public awareness raising strategies to foster positive public attitudes. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

Barriers to Education
Barriers to Education for People with Disabilities in Bekaa, Lebanon” by Samantha Wehbi, MSW, Ph.D., School of Social Work, Ryerson University, Volume 3, Issue 4, starting page 10. Abstract: This paper presents the findings of a recent study on the educational situation of people with disabilities in Lebanon. The main findings of a survey conducted with 200 participants in the impoverished rural Bekaa region illustrate the inadequate educational situation of people with disabilities. The focus of the paper is on a discussion of the barriers that people with disabilities face in pursuing their education. Participants identified the following difficulties in pursuing their education: educational system barriers, inadequate finances, health issues, transportation difficulties, and family pressures. Although the focus of the article is not on factors that can facilitate educational achievement, some of these supports are identified, including family support and personal motivation. The article concludes with a discussion of current and planned community responses such as the development of an interdisciplinary community action network (The Inclusion Network), the provision of literacy courses, and a pilot project to foster the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream schools. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

Jordan and Disability Rights
Jordan and Disability Rights: A Pioneering Leader in the Arab World” by Kenneth R. Rutherford, PhD, MBA, Missouri State University, Volume 3, Issue 4, 2007, starting page 23. Abstract: This article investigates Jordan’s rationale for assuming a leadership role on the disability rights issue in the Arab World. Tens of millions of people, including over ten percent of Arab families, are impacted and impoverished because of disability. To address this substantial challenge, the Jordan Royal family has leveraged Jordan’s tradition of openness and generosity coupled with one of the best educational systems in the Arab World to promote disability issues. As a result, Jordan is recognized by the international community as leading the Arab World in promoting disability rights. Jordan’s international and regional leadership on disability rights was recognized in 2005 when Jordan received the Franklin Delano Roosevelt International Disability Award. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

You can browse and download past issues of the Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/.

Or you can learn more about the RDS at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/about/.

The RDS is always looking for new authors to submit materials for publication.



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TRAINING for Program Coordinators in Bangalore

Posted on 3 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, HIV/AIDS, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Action on Disability and Development (ADD) India
Training for Project Coordinators

Action on Disability and Development (ADD) India is a development organization working with persons with disability in rural areas in South India.

ADD India is conducting a Training in Bangalore for Programme Coordinators. This is aimed at developing the skills of Coordinators working in the development sector to incorporate and manage teamwork and their role as leaders and to strengthen their field based functions.

Training CBR Workers and Project Coordinators has been an integral part of ADD India for almost two decades. ADD’s training focuses on increasing the knowledge, building skills and developing a positive attitude to working in the field. There is also an emphasis on practical exposure with information and knowledge. The main resource persons is Mr. Ramakrishna from Anweshana in Bhubaneshwar, who has 20 years experience in training in the development sector.

The main resource persons is Mr. Ramakrishna from Anweshana in Bhubaneshwar, who has 20 years experience in training in the development sector.

Training Components will Include

  • Facilitating the Community Worker to implement the project.
  • Clarifying the role and responsibilities of the Project Coordinator.
  • Setting goal and task accomplishment
  • Understanding Group Processes
  • Sanghas and their management
  • Federation Vision, Values and leadership Development
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Resource mobilization from the community
  • Exposure visit to a Sangha and / or Federation.

It is anticipated that candidates selected for this training would have some knowledge of disability work. Therefore, this training, while examining the fundamental principles behind work of this kind, aims primarily to develop skills in the areas of programme development, monitoring and capacity building of people.

Recommended Programme participants

  • Coordinators and managers of Community Based programmes in the development sector.
  • Professionals working with vulnerable groups like People with Disabilities, Women’s Development, Community Work and Education and Disabled peoples organizations, HIV/AIDS, Children’s programmes.
  • Individuals who wish to develop the skills to become involved in community development programmes.
  • Training Methodology
    This training is residential and would be conducted with simple facilities. The method of training will include lectures, discussions, group work, practical sessions and field visit.

    Language
    The language of training will be English. Participants must understand English but could express themselves in other languages ie. Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam, Bengali, Oriya, Hindi etc. All reading materials will be in English.

    Fee, Duration and Venue of training
    The fee is Rs.7000/- per person, which includes the training fee, meals, tea/coffee, accommodation for 6 days, training materials and exposure visit.

    Participants will have to make their own travel arrangements to reach Bangalore.

    Duration: March 3-7, 2008
    Venue: In Bangalore. Exact venue will be informed to the selected participants.

    Please send the completed application form to ADD India by 20th January 2008 either by email or by post.

    Action on Disability and Development India
    4005, 19th Cross, Banashankari 2nd Stage
    Bangalore – 560 070 India
    Phone: 080 – 2676 5881, 2676 2097
    Email: addindia@vsnl.net

    Selection will be confirmed by January 30th. The selected participants should pay the full fee by way of bank draft favouring ‘Action on Disability and Development India’, payable at Bangalore.

    For further details please contact Mrs. Nisha Printer at addindia@vsnl.net




    I learned about this opportunity via Ghulam Nabi Nazimani.




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    RESOURCE: Atlas on Country Resources in Intellectual Disabilities

    Posted on 27 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cognitive Impairments, Education, Employment, Families, Health, Human Rights, News, Reports, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Montreal PAHO/WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health have released an atlas that presents global data on intellectual disabilities. The Atlas: Global Resources for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: 2007 (PDF format, 5.6 Mb) was launched during the Second International Conference on Intellectual Disabilities held in November 2007 in Bangkok, Thailand.

    WHO initiated the Atlas in recognition that “global data collection in the field of intellectual disabilities has long been neglected” (Preface, p. 11). The Atlas gives an overview of the extent to which resources and services for children, adolescents, and adults with intellectual disabilities are available throughout all the member states of WHO. This includes information on health services; education; services specific to intellectual disabilities; work-related services such as sheltered or supported employment and vocational training; services to families; and other types of services such as leisure activities, transportation, assistive technology, rights or advocacy support, or food/meal supplies. Data is also given for how these resources and services are distributed by region and by income level.

    This information was gathered in the hope that it can be used to help stimulate advocacy and planning efforts in support of people with intellectual disabilities and their families. Specifically, it helps identify specific gaps and needs in the resources and services available for people with intellectual disabilities and their families throughout the world. This information could be used to advocate with governments or foundations for the resources needed to fill these gaps. The Atlas also has developed two instruments that can be used at the country or the regional level to help map where intellectual disability services are available (in Appendix III and IV of the Atlas). Furthermore, the Atlas has helped produce a network of contacts in the intellectual disability field (in Appendix II of the Atlas).

    The Atlas also was developed in acknowledgment that disability is increasingly recognized as a human rights issue. Health and other public services for people with intellectual disabilities are a human right, as recognized by the new international disabilities rights treaty. The Atlas was enabled by a new linkage between WHO and the intellectual disability field, via the Montreal PAHO/WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research in Mental Health and its associated partners, the Lisette-Dupras and the West Montreal Readaptation centres for persons with intellectual disabilities.

    This new resource is primarily targeted at individuals and agencies responsible for planning health and social policy and services within countries. However, it also is meant for those who provide services to people with intellectual disabilities; for international and national NGOs active in the intellectual disability field; human rights advocates and activists; public health professionals and students; and for civil society in general.

    The entire Atlas is available for free in PDF format (5.6 Mb). You can download it by clicking on the link to:

    http://www.who.int/entity/mental_health/evidence/atlas_id_2007.pdf

    You can also read more background information on the Atlas, including the contact person at WHO, at:

    http://bangkok-id-conference.org/program-documentation-ressources/project-atlas



    We Can Do first learned of this resource through the web site for the International Conference on Intellectual Disabilities/Mental Retardation. The information in this blog post was gathered partly from



    What other resources are available via We Can Do that you might have overlooked? See the We Can Do Retrospective: The First 100 Posts (and Then Some) for an overview.

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    NEWS: El Salvador, Mexico Ratify Disability Rights Treaty

    Posted on 21 December 2007. Filed under: Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Press Release from Rehabilitation International (RI)
    Mexico, El Salvador and Nicaragua Ratify the UN Disability Rights Convention
    RI Calls on Governments to Recognize the Human Rights of All by Ratifying the CRPD

    (United Nations, New York, USA, 17 December 2007): RI congratulates the Governments of Mexico, El Salvador and Nicaragua for ratifying the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), bringing the number to 14 States Parties. Mexico also ratified the Optional Protocol. RI calls on all governments which have not yet ratified the CRPD and its Optional Protocol to do so as a matter of priority and without reservations and declarations. Furthermore, RI urges all States Parties to begin the process of implementation by developing laws, programs and policies to ensure that ALL persons with disabilities, regardless of the type of disability, enjoy all of the rights in the Convention.

    Libre Acceso President Federico Fleischmann said, “We recognize the great efforts of the Government of Mexico for being a leader in promoting the human rights of persons with disabilities, as embodied in the Convention. RI and its member in Mexico, Libre Acceso, are committed to working within its broad network to ensure that Mexican laws are strengthened to comply with the high standards set by the Convention.”

    As part of its Global Advocacy Campaign, RI partnered with Libre Acceso, representatives of the Mexican government, the Mexican law firm Barrera, Siqueiros y Torres Landa, S.C., the international law firm Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP and local disability experts to develop recommendations on how Mexico’s National Disability Law can comply with the Convention. These recommendations, presented to the Mexican Government on October 18, 2007, were formally adopted by Partido Accion Nacional (PAN), the political party of the Mexican President, as the official proposed amendments to this national law. The Senate and Chamber of Deputies will now discuss the amendments, which may be adopted as early as next year. This RI project has been made possible because of the generous support of an anonymous donor and Irish Aid.

    “We are very happy today to deposit the instrument of ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Setting up the legal framework is only the first step. The real challenge is to build a culture where the human rights of every person are fully respected,” said Senator Guillermo Tamborrel, President of the Commission on Vulnerable

    Groups and a member of PAN. Senator Tamborrel, together with Senator Maria los Angeles Moreno Uriegas of Partido Revolucionario Institutional (PRI), were present when Mexico deposited its ratification instrument today.

    The CRPD, the first human rights treaty of the 21st century, represents an essential legal instrument prohibiting discrimination against persons with disabilities in all areas of life, and includes specific provisions related to rehabilitation, habilitation, education, employment, health and access to information, public facilities and services, among others. The Optional Protocol concerns how individuals or groups can seek redress for violations of the CRPD once national remedies are exhausted. The Convention will become international law after 20 ratifications.

    For more information, also consult the recent We Can Do post entitled “12 Countries Ratify International Disability Rights Treaty. Background information on the CRPD, a list of signatories, and a visual map of ratifying countries, can also be found at the United Nations Enable web site. Resources and ideas for how to become involved with the global campaign to ratify the treaty can be found at the RatifyNow organization web site.

    # # #

    For more information on the UN Convention and contact details of experts within the RI membership, please contact Tomas Lagerwall (sg@riglobal.org), RI Secretary General, or Shantha Rau (shantha@riglobal.org), Senior Program Officer, at +1-212-420-1500.

    About RI
    Founded in 1922, RI is a global and diverse organization bringing together expertise from different sectors in the disability field, to advance and implement the rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities. RI is currently composed of over 700 members and affiliated organizations in 93 nations, in all regions of the world.

    RI works closely with other disability organizations, actively participating in the International Disability Alliance (IDA) – a network of eight global, democratic organizations of persons with disabilities – and was an active member of the International Disability Caucus (IDC) – a coalition of disability organizations and NGOs that participated in the negotiations toward the Convention. RI also maintains official relations with the United Nations and its agencies and institutions as well as with other international organizations, NGOs and universities.

    For more information about RI, please visit their accessible website: http://www.riglobal.org



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    South Asian CONFERENCE on Autism

    Posted on 1 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, autism, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Invitation for Participation in Conference & Training on Autism

    SOUTH ASIAN REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON AUTISM: BUILDING BRIDGES
    TRAINING WORKSHOP IN STRUCTURED TEACHING

    15 – 18 Janaury 2008 NEW DELHI

    Action For Autism with support from the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment is proud to host the South Asian Conference on Autism in New Delhi over 15 and 16 January 2008. This will be followed by a two-day practical hands-on training workshop in Structured Teaching on the TEACCH approach over 17 and 18 January 2008.

    THE CONFERENCE will have a number of speakers who have Autism and who will speak on growing up and living with autism. There will be national and international presenters on Social Understanding, Adolescent Issues, Employment, Communication, Education, Marriage and Sexuality, among others.

    The conference will also provide a professional platform to share and exchange knowledge and learning about various issues affecting the Autism community in South Asia. Academicians, researchers, professionals from the UK, USA, Denmark, Germany and India and SAARC countries from a range of fields have been invited to share and exchange the latest in research and practice.

    THE WORKSHOP following the conference will aim to train mainstream teachers, special needs teachers, OTs, SLPs, vocational trainers, Parents, and anyone involved in helping individuals with autism receive an education and life skills training. The training on the TEACCH approach out of North Carolina will address the need for structure in a lifespan perspective, from the classroom right up to employment and future life.

    The training workshop only has space for 40 participants.

    We would like to invite all of you, researchers, professionals, parents, students, as well as anybody interested in knowing more about the field of Autism to attend the conference and the post conference workshop in Structured Methods.

    Details about the conference and the post conference workshop can be viewed at our website www.autism-india.org as well as the August 2007 issue of our journal ‘Autism Network.’ Registration forms may be downloaded from the website.

    The list of presenters along with their topics will be posted on our website shortly. For outstation participants, January is a busy season in Delhi, so please book your accommodation well in advance.

    Looking forward to welcoming you to Delhi in January!

    Warm regards
    The Conference Coordination Team
    Action For Autism (AFA)
    Sector 5 Jasola Vihar, Behind Sai Niketan
    New Delhi 110025 Tel: 91 11 40540991, 91 11 40540992, 91 11 65347422
    Email: actionforautism@gmail.com autism@vsnl.com
    Website: http://www.autism-india.org

    Even those unable to attend the conference may wish to follow the link to the Action for Autism web site to explore their information and resources related to autism in India, including links to material in Hindi, Tamil, and other Indian languages.



    We Can Do learned about this conference through the Intl-Dev email news distribution service, which people can subscribe to for free by following the link.



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    PAPER; NEWS: World Bank Report on Disabled in India

    Posted on 1 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, News, Reports, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    New World Bank Report Finds People with Disabilities among the Most Excluded in Indian Society
    Disabled adults have far lower employment rates than others – reduced from 43 % in 1991 to 38% in 2002

    Contact : in New Delhi
    Kiran Negiknegi@worldbank.org

    New Delhi, November 20, 2007: A new World Bank report finds people with disabilities among the most excluded in Indian society Low literacy and employment rates and widespread social stigma are leaving disabled people behind. With better education and more access to jobs, India’s 40 to 90 million disabled people will generate higher growth which will benefit the country as a whole.

    The report entitled People with Disabilities in India: From Commitments to Outcomes, says that as the country makes economic progress, the incidence of communicable disease-induced disabilities such as polio are likely to fall, whereas age and lifestyle-related disabilities and those due to traffic accidents are expected to rise sharply. For example, internationally, the lowest reported disability rates are in sub-Saharan Africa while the highest are in the Organization for Economic Development (OECD) countries. The report therefore highlights the need for a multi-faceted approach so that disabled people realize their full individual potential and maximize their social and economic contribution to society.

    The report finds that people with disabilities are subject to multiple deprivations. Households with disabled members are significantly poorer than average, with lower consumption and fewer assets. Children living with disability are around 4 to 5 times less likely to be in school than Scheduled Tribe and Scheduled Caste children. Disabled adults also have far lower employment rates than the general population – and this fell from 43 % in 1991 to 38% in 2002, even in the midst of economic growth.

    Social attitudes and stigma play an important role in limiting the opportunities of disabled people for full participation in social and economic life, often even within their own families. For example, in surveys carried out for the report, around 50 percent of households saw the cause of disability as a “curse of God”. Women with disabilities face numerous additional challenges.

    “India has an impressive set of policy commitments to its citizens with disabilities”, said Isabel Guerrero, World Bank Country Director for India. “The challenge facing Indian society now is to translate those commitments into better lives for disabled people. This includes identifying disabilities in young children, getting more disabled children into school and preparing them for the workplace and family life, and most importantly working to reduce the social stigma which disabled people face”.

    Despite the many challenges, concerted efforts by the Government, civil society, the private sector, and disabled people themselves, the untapped potential of this large group of citizens can be released for their own benefit as well as for society at large.

    “Increasing the status and social and economic participation of people with disabilities would have positive effects on everyone, not just disabled people” said Philip O’Keefe, Lead Social Protection Specialist and main author of the report. “A simple example is increasing accessibility of public transport and buildings for disabled people – a measure which would benefit a wide range of people including the elderly, pregnant women and children. More broadly, people with disabilities who are better educated and more economically active will generate higher growth in which everyone will share,” he added.

    India’s implementation capacity is generally weak in a number of areas of service delivery which are most critical to improving the situation of disabled people. It is thus not realistic to expect that all the actions needed by many public and non-public actors can be taken all at once. The report highlights the need for prioritization of the most critical interventions to maximize the benefit for people living with disability:

    (i) Preventive care – both for mothers through nutritional interventions, and infants through nutrition and basic immunization coverage
    (ii) Identifying people with disabilities as soon as possible after onset – the system needs major improvements in this most basic function
    (iii) Major improvements in early intervention, which can cost-effectively transform the lives of disabled people, their families, and the communities they live and work in
    (iv) Getting all children with special needs into school and giving them the skills to participate fully in family and economic life
    (v) Expanding the under-developed efforts to improve societal attitudes to people with disabilities, relying on public-private partnerships that build on successful models already operating in India.

    The study points out that it is neither possible nor desirable for the public sector to “do it all”. Instead, partnerships with NGOs, civil society, and the private sector are critical to achieve effective and lasting results. The key step in such partnerships is brining disabled people themselves into the policymaking process along with public and non-governmental institutions.

    Some other findings of the report:

    • There are substantial differences in socio-economic outcomes, social stigma, and access to services by disability type, with those with mental illness and mental retardation in a particularly poor position. There are also major urban/rural differences in outcomes, Gender, class and regional variations are also significant in many cases
    • Estimates vary, there is growing evidence that people with disabilities comprise between 4 and 8 percent of the Indian population (around 40-90 million individuals)
    • Between 1990 and 2020, there is predicted to be a halving of disability due to communicable diseases, a doubling of disability due to injuries/accidents, and a more than 40 percent increase in the share of disability due to non-communicable diseases
    • Disabled people have much lower educational attainment rates, with 52 percent illiteracy against a 35 percent average for the general population.
    • Illiteracy is high among children across all categories, in even the best performing major states, a significant share of out of school children are those with disabilities – Kerala, 27 percent, in Tamil Nadu over 33 percent
    • Private sector employment incentives for hiring disabled people are few and piecemeal. In the late 1990s, employment of People with Disability (PWD) among large private firms was only 0.3 percent of their workforce. Among multinational companies, the situation was far worse, with only 0.05 percent being PWD
    • In early 2006, a National Policy on Persons with Disabilities was approved by Government of India. To date, the only states that have draft disability policies are Chhattisgarh and Karnataka. The Chhattisgarh draft state disability policy can be considered “best practice”, and could provide a model for future national and state-level policy development.

    People can follow this link to learn more about the report, or download individual chapters, at:
    http://go.worldbank.org/48NBTTBRJ0

    Individual chapters include: Socio-Economic Profile of Persons with Disabilities; Attitudes; Health; Education; Employment; Social Protection; Policies and Institutions; and Access

    Or follow this link to download the full report in PDF format (1.8Mb).


    The text for this blog post is taken from a press release from the World Bank.



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    CONFERENCE: Unite for Sight Int’l Health Conference

    Posted on 27 November 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Events and Conferences, Health | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Unite For Sight 5th Annual International Health Conference: Building Global Health For Today & Tomorrow

    This conference, to be held April 12 & 13, 2008, at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, is targeted at people interested in in public health, medicine, social entrepreneurship, nonprofits, philanthropy, anthropology, eye care, and international development. Other interested individuals may include students, doctors, nurses, Peace Corps volunteers, public health, business and nonprofit professionals, anthropologists, policy makers, philanthropists, educators, and others.

    There will be 150 expert speakers in international health and development, public health, eye care, medicine, social entrepreneurship, nonprofits, philanthropy, microfinance, human righs, anthropology, health policy, advocacy, public service, environmental health, and education. These will include keynote addresses by Dr. Jeffrey Sachs, Dr. Sonia Sachs, Dr. Susan Blumenthal, and Dr. Jim Yong Kim.

    Registration for the conferences ranges from $65 to $150 depending on how promptly you register (the earlier, the cheaper) and on whether you are a student (in which case, it is cheaper). Several hotels are located near the conference, but a special rate has been arranged at the Courtyard by Marriot for $129 per night. I could not locate information on the Unite for Sight website regarding whether there is any assistance for lodging, travel, or other expenses for participants traveling from developing nations.

    For more information, including how to register, follow the link to the conference website.



    The information for this blog post, and part of the text, was harvested from the conference website. We Can Do learned about this conference through the Poverty Reduction and Disability List (PRD-L).



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    CONFERENCE: Improving Education, Rehabilitation for Deaf

    Posted on 19 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education, Events and Conferences, Middle East and North Africa, Rehabilitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The 8th Symposium of the Arab Federation of the Organs of the Deaf

    “Improving Education and Rehabilitation of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing People”

    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    April 28 – 30, 2008

    The Arab Federation of the Organs of the Deaf will hold its 8th symposium in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The title of the symposium is: “Improving Education and Rehabilitation of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing People”.

    Call for papers:

    The scientific committee is seeking papers about (but not limited to) :

    * The latest method in Deaf education Bilingual/Bicultural approach.
    * Latest method in teaching Math, science, reading and writing.. etc.
    * Deaf education at college level.
    * Inclussion of the Deaf and hard of hearing in mainstream schools.
    * Latest methods in training teachers of the Deaf.
    * Cochlear Implants.
    * Early intervention in Deaf and hard of hearing education.
    * Speech therapy.
    * Hearing aids and assesstive devices.

    Languages of the symposium:

    1. Arabic language.
    2. Sign language.
    If needed:
    3. English language (upon request)
    4. International Sign Language (upon request).

    Important dates:

    Deadline for submitting abstracts: December 25th, 2007.
    Deadline for submitting full papers: February, 22, 2008.

    All papers should be sent by the email or by air mail on a CD to Dr. Zaid Al Muslat Al Meshari, Vice president of the Arab Federation of the Organs of the Deaf and the president of the scientific committee.

    This event is organized by the Saudi Deaf Sport Committee. Its address is:

    P.O. Box 154311
    Riyadh 11736
    Saudi Arabia

    Tell: +966 (1) 4784198
    Fax: +966 (1) 4761665
    sma20006 at hotmail dot com
    www.deafsp-sa.com

    The symposium organizers will provide free tickets and accommodations for those who present a paper.



    I obtained this announcement via the Intl-Dev mailing list. However, neither We Can Do nor Intl-Dev are associated with this conference.



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