NEWS: Disability Inclusion in Poverty Reduction Strategy in Mozambique

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Case Studies, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note from We Can Do editor: Many developing countries are required to develop a “Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper” (PRSP) as a condition for receiving debt relief from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). This strategy paper is meant to describe how the country will reduce poverty among its citizens. A country’s PRSP can have a profound impact on the policies and programs it implements to fight poverty. But not all PRSPs are fully inclusive of people with disabilities. This can mean they are left behind while others are gaining new opportunities to lift themselves out of poverty. Rosangela Berman Bieler, at the Inter-American Institute on Disability recently circulated the following email on the mailing list for the Global Partnership on Disability and Development describing how people with disabilities were included in the process of developing the PRSP in Mozambique.]

by Rosangela Berman Bieler

Dear Colleagues:

This message is to share a brief report on the Inclusive Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper project in Mozambique, launched in January in Maputo. Our civil society counterparts in Mozambique are FAMOD (Forum of Disability Organizations) and Handicap International. Maria Reina and Deepti Samant of the Global Partnership on Disability and Development Secretariat also joint us for part of the mission.

During the mission, we could establish many alliances with local and international agencies and government officials. Among the various activities that we were involved, we had a very good and participatory DPO training with 25 leaders of FAMOD. Following the meeting, FAMOD is constituting a working group, composed by civil society organizations, to follow up on country Projects like the FTI on Education for All, the Mozambique Tourism Anchor Program (IFC), School Health (MoE), HIV-AIDS and other possible entry points.

We also had a presentation meeting for general stakeholders, held at the World Bank Office in MZ. The activity was a success – full house and many potential partners from all sectors, very interested in working with inclusive approaches for the next cycle of the Country’s poverty reduction plan that may follow the current PARPA, finishing in 2009.

Besides other Inclusive PRSP training and activities to be held in MZ during 2009, we are also planning with GPDD, an International Seminar on Accessibility and Inclusive Tourism in Maputo, in June, and we are looking forward to be able to work in alliance with all the agencies working in the field as well. Inclusive approaches in Tourism can generate local accessibility and development for those who live in the country. Mozambique can really benefit from such an initiative.

In the field of Education, we are very excited with the possibility of having the local NGOs and Networks – such as the Education for All Network that accompanied us during the events – to interact and influence the school construction that will happen now, for the FTI, to make sure they are built accessible.

We are also working in synchrony with the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities, that will go on until 2019. It is possible that MZ hosts the launching of the African Campaign on HIV-AIDS and Disability in October. There are two major FAMOD projects going on in the field and hopefully this can also generate good mainstreaming opportunities.

Our plan is to involve other Portuguese Speaking Countries in most of these activities, as language is on other important cause of exclusion from participation. Hopefully Development Agencies working in other Lusophone countries in Africa (Angola, Cape Verde, Guiné Bissau, Sao Tomé and Prince), and also in East Timor, will be able to partner with this initiative and facilitate this process as well.

All the best,

Rosangela Berman Bieler
Inclusive Development Specialist

Inter-American Institute on Disability & Inclusive Development
– Doing our part on the construction of a society for all –

Rosangela Berman Bieler
Executive Director
Inter-American Institute on Disability & Inclusive Development
Website: www.iidi.org

[Another Note from We Can Do editor: People who wish to learn more about the PRSP process, and how it can be more inclusive of people with disabilities, are encouraged to consult the on-line manual, “Making PRSP Inclusive” at http://www.making-prsp-inclusive.org/]



I received Rosangela Berman Bieler’s note via the GPDD mailing list.

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Filipino Women with Disabilities Wishes to Network

Posted on 30 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Poverty, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Hello,
I’m sharing the website of WOWLEAP- Women With Disabilities Leap to Social and Economic Progress- an organization organized by Filipino Women with disabilities and working towards the empowerment of women with disabilities since 2000. We are slowly getting the participation of women with disability leaders in creating our voice to be heard and be a part of the national advocacy movement for persons with disabilities. Please visit our page http://wowleap2000.tripod.com/index.html and we will be happy to establish network with organizations who are willing to help us in achieving our vision.
Thank you,
Carmen Zubiaga



Carmen Zubiaga recently circulated the above email on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion list.

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Raising Funds from Foundations New to Disability

Posted on 26 August 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Funding, Inclusion, Opportunities, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

If you work with a Disabled People’s Organization (DPO), chances are, your organization never has enough cash. And foundations that specialize in supporting DPOs are hard to find.

Often, the answer is to look for funding from foundations that do not necessarily advertise themselves as having a disability focus. But if the funder has limited prior experience with supporting projects run by DPOs, or otherwise targeted at the disability community, then your worry becomes, How do you convince them that your project is exactly the kind of project they’re seeking to support? How do you overcome any misconceptions they might have about the true needs of people with disabilities or their relevance to the kinds of projects they normally support?

Fundseekers wrestling with these kinds of questions can turn to a 2-page handout from the Disability Funders Network entitled “Bridging the Knowledge Gap: Working with Foundations to Attract Disability Funding” (PDF format, 110 Kb) for some of their answers.

This guide is targeted at DPOs in the United States, but many of the broad principles are applicable anywhere. For example, some foundations support projects targeted at “diverse” or “vulnerable” communities. This means it can be helpful to make the case for why disability fits in perfectly with their desire to be supportive of diversity. Also, foundations usually value demographic statistics about the community that a project is meant to support. (For example, how many people with disabilities are there in the area where you want to do your project?)

Download the handout for yourself at:

http://www.disabilityfunders.org/system/files/attractdisfund.pdf

And also be sure to read Disability Funder’s “Recommendations for Grantseekers“; some of the advice is similar, but with added nuances.

Having trouble finding the statistics you need to write a stronger grant proposal? Browse some of the earlier We Can Do posts listed under “Tips and Leads for how to find more Academic Research, Papers, and Statistics” in the Research, Reports, Papers, Statistics page (available from the top navigation bar). Some of these past blog posts may help point you to sources for various kinds of data, research, and other documented information.

Looking for more resources related to fund raising? You can find a few right here at We Can Do from the page entitled “Resources, Toolkits, and Funding” (available from top navigation bar). Or, starting in late August or early September 2008, you will find even more resources in the Resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website.

Also find more resources like this one at the Disability Funders Network website.



I found this handout by browsing the Disability Funder’s Network website.

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Listing Your Organization in UN Enable Website

Posted on 9 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

The United Nations is currently building an online list of civil society organizations that include persons with disabilities in their work, in order to facilitate knowledge sharing and network building. If you would like your organization to be listed on the United Nations Enable website, kindly reply to enable@un.org with the following information by Monday 16 June 2008 (with the Subject: civil society contacts)

  1. Organization name
  2. Organization website address
  3. Country or region of activities

Please note that a disclaimer will be included on the website stating the following: ‘The below contacts and information are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only; they do not constitute endorsement of or an approval by the United Nations of any of the products, services, or opinions of the corporation, organization, or individual. The United Nations bears no responsibility for the accuracy, legality or content of their statements and opinions.’

Thank you for your time and interest.

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FREE Websites for Disabled People Organizations (DPOs)

Posted on 16 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Funding, Human Rights, Opportunities, Resources, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following notice is being circulated by DANISHKADAH.

Greeting from DANISHKADAH (an organization for empowerment of Persons with Disabilities and Deafness)!

We at DANISHKADAH pleased to offer FREE websites for Disabled People Organizations (DPOs), this include hosting, domain, and development of accessible Web Pages. (Initially for Pakistani DPOs, but request from DPOs from other country may be entertained)

The aim of this project is to;

1. give exposure to least developed DPOs, who do not have resources to build and maintain their websites. And bring them up to be introduced.
2. making an accessible web based network of local / national DPOs and join that with international organizations.
3. keep everyone update about the activities of these DPOs, and promote collaboration among DPOs.
4. motivate and support DPOs for building pressure for ratification and implementation of UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), and monitor the changes.

By this letter we are inviting all of the DPOs to send their request for website, on predefined form. Please fill the form and email us at danishkadah@gmail.com, those who do not have access to internet can post filled form on given address.

Offer Detail:
FREE webhosting
FREE domain 1
FREE website (4-6 pages) 2
Added advantage:
– website will be built according to the web accessibility standards
– Possibility of having website in local language as well in English
– Get indexed on search engines and have better visibility of your organization on Internet
– More exposure in disability movement at national and international level
– build a better image of your organization, for donors and volunteers.

1 Sub-domain
2 you have to provide text and image (photos, logo) for your website

Regards
Muhammad Akram
Founder & Chairman
DANISHKADAH
http://www.danishkadah.org.pk/Projects/NetworkingDPO/index.html

WEB BASED NETWORKING OF DPOs
A project of DANISHKADAH
( FREE Accessible Web hosting and developing for DPOs )
REQUEST FORM

Our organization ____________________________________________________
(organization’s name)
would like to request DANISHKADAH for FREE hosting and development of accessible website for our DPOs.

From our side the contact person will be _________________________________
(name)
__________________________________, and he/she will provide the content for the website.

We understand that this offer is purely on voluntarily basis from DANISHKADAH and may be terminated, modified at anytime without any prior notice. We also understand that DANISHKADAH may add any link or content in our web pages, however the content provided by us may not be amended without our permission. And we affirm that we shall not hold or blame DANISHKADAH for any error or other reasons whatsoever.

_____________________ DPOs’ STAMP _____________________
Signature President General Secretary
Send to – danishkadah@gmail.com or post to

M. Arkram
Founder & Chairman
DANISHKADAH
Address: D-63, Blcok 8, Gulshan-e-Iqbal, Karachi-75300
Fax : ___________________

HOME | INTRODUCTION | PROJECTS | ACTIVITIES ARCHIVE | CONTACT
HOME: you can post recent news, invitation for your programs, and etc.
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1. Introduction
1.2. Vision, Mission, Objectives
1.3. Services (i.e special education, public awareness rising, rehabilitation, etc.)
1.4. Governing body (i.e. board of trustee, managing committee, whatever)
1.5. Membership (procedure detail and membership form if any)
1.6. Facts sheet
1.1.1. Established in _______
1.1.2. Registered with ______________ or non-registered NGO
1.1.3. Organization type – exclusively of / for deaf/blind/physically challenged, or mixed for all PWDs, or inclusive organization for PWDs and Non-PWDs
1.1.4. Total members, Male members, Female members, youth members (male / Female)
1.2. Wish list (if any)
2. PROJECTS (if any)
2.1. Existing project
2.1.1. Project 1, detail etc
2.1.2. Project 2, detail etc
2.2. Future project (planned)
2.2.1. Project 1 detail etc
2.2.2. Project 2 detail etc
3. ACTIVITIES AND NEWS ARCHIVE
3.1. 2008 Date wise activities such as;
3.1.1. December 3, 2007,
Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities
a very brief one paragraph report and a
PHOTO.
3.2. 2007
3.2.1. December 3, 2007,
Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities
a very brief one paragraph report and a
PHOTO.
3.2.2. September 11, 2007
Walk for the cause on International Day of Deaf Persons
a very brief on paragraph report and a
PHOTO
4. CONTACT
4.1. Address: _________________________________________
Phone: ____________________Fax: __________________
Mobile: __________________________________________
Email: ___________________________________________
Web: ____________________________________________

EXAMPLE
INTRODUCTION
Danishkadah is an NGO with a difference. Danishkadah means a place to learn / where wisdom excels. Danishkadah was established to empower persons with disabilities and deafness, and to work as a think-tank on disability related issues.

Danishkadah is not an ordinary Disabled People Organization (DPO) to chant slogans, or protest without proposing solutions. It is a non-political organization, which concentrates on issues and solutions. Our approach is inclusive working with all segments of the society.

We at Danishkadah believe in inclusion and collaboration with all the segments of society, i.e. Persons with Disabilities & Deafness (PWDDs), government, universities, media, corporate sector and general society. Without such collaboration, the ultimate goal of “accessible, barriers-free, and right base society” cannot be achieved.
Vision, Mission, Objectives
Our Vision
In our vision “knowledge is power”
Our Mission
Our mission is to empower Persons with Disabilities and Deafness (PWDD), so they can live better and independent lives. And our ultimate goal is “inclusive, barrier-free, and right based society” (Biwako Millennium framework – UNSCAPE)
Objective
1. Empower persons with Disabilities
2. Enhance technical skill in PWDs
3. Etc etc.
Services (i.e special education, public awareness rising, rehabilitation, etc.)
We offer following ;
• Basic literacy
• English Language
• Computer literacy
• Counseling
Governing body
Board or Trustee
• Mr. Muhammad Akram – Founder & Chairman
• Mr. Imranullah Shairrf – Member
• Mr. Muhammad Ashraf Member
Executive Committee
Mr. abc Secretary
…… …….
Membership (procedure detail and membership form if any)
Any one can become member by filling the given form and paying annual fee of Rs.10/-per year.
Facts sheet
Established in 2006
Registered with Registrar South Karachi
Organization type – an inclusive organization that welcome PWD and non-PWD alike
Total members 200, 150 Male , 50 Female, youth 100 male, 20 Female)
Wish list (if any)
– Computer laboratory
– Books
– etc
Note: You can attach a photo of your organization or group photo of your team to be displayed at top of introduction, and individual photo of your governing body to be displayed with each name.



Thank you to DANISHKADAH for circulating this notice. Please remember that applications or inquiries related to this opportunity should all be directed to DANISHKADAH at danishkadah@gmail.com, not We Can Do.

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Including the Disabled in Poverty Reduction Strategies

Posted on 29 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Edited April 8, 2008, to add this paragraph: A new, up-dated version of the handbook described below is now available for free on-line in a format accessible to blind people. It is currently available only in English, but a French translation will be available in a few months from now (April 2008). For more details, go to: https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/04/08/resource-on-line-handbook-supports-disabled-people-in-fighting-poverty/.

A resource, Making PRSP Inclusive (4 Mb), could help disability advocates in developing countries negotiate with their governments to ensure that disabled people, too, benefit from programs meant to enable them to escape poverty.

PRSP stands for “Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers” (PRSPs). A PRSP is a paper developed by governments that describe the policy and strategies they need to follow in order to reduce poverty and meet the Millennium Development Goals within their country.

These four little letters—PRSP—are some of the most powerful letters known in developing countries. These four letters can help fight poverty, disease, starvation, and ignorance among all populations—including the disabled. More precisely, they are meant to help governments figure out exactly what programs and resources they need to solve the biggest challenges that face the poorest citizens of their country. If a PRSP is developed well and wisely, then millions could benefit—and escape poverty. But if it is done poorly, then millions could lose—perhaps most particularly people with disabilities whose needs may often be overlooked.

PRSPs are never—or at least should never be—developed by government officials in isolation. Donors and development banks usually also participate in the process. They are able to offer advice based on what they have learned about PRSPs developed and implemented in many other developing countries. But the most important partners in the PRSP process are members of civil society. That means people like you—represented through non-governmental organizations (NGOs); trade unions; academic institutions; media outlets; federations of poor people; or, essentially, any organization that is not a government agency. Only the ordinary citizens of a country can best know what their own most urgent needs are. And only poor citizens know what barriers they most need to overcome before they can escape poverty.

The trouble is: in many countries, (Disabled People’s Organizations) DPOs, and people with disabilities generally, don’t participate in the process of developing their country’s PRSP. In some countries, the disability movement may still be weak and fragmented. Also, people with disabilities continue to be “invisible” in most societies: non-disabled people simply don’t think to include them unless they are asked or reminded.

The handbook, Making PRSP Inclusive, was written by the German chapter of Handicap International and the Christoffel-Blindenmission Deutschland (German Christian Blind Mission), and was financed by the World Bank and the German government. It is meant for everyone working in the field of disability including NGOs, service providers, professional associations, people with disabilities themselves, DPOs, and parents’ associations, who wants to participate in their national PRSP process. It is for people who want to ensure that the needs and concerns of disabled people are well represented when their government makes important decisions about what projects they should support; what policies they should implement; and what strategies they should follow when fighting poverty.

The handbook will help readers better understand what the PRSP; who helps develop a country’s PRSP; how the PRSP process works; who finances (funds, pays for) the PRSP; why it is important to include disability issues in your country’s PRSP; and how a DPO can participate in the PRSP. It includes ideas for how you can identify and recruit possible allies so you can help each other become more involved in the PRSP process in your country. It also includes suggestions for how you and the other groups you work with can develop a joint strategy for presenting the needs of disabled people in your country. Later chapters include detailed guidance on how you can work to develop a stronger network or alliance of DPOs and other organizations in your country to advocate or lobby for the needs of disabled people. “Case studies” are presented that describe how the disability movement has already succeeded in including disabled people in the PRSP process in Honduras, Bangladesh, Sierra Leone, Tanzania

For people new to disability–or for people who are looking for language that could help them explain disability to others–the Making PRSP Inclusive guidebook includes a section that defines disability and explains the medical, charity, and social models of disability and the World Health Organization (WHO) classifications of disability. (For additional explanation of the medical, charity, and social models of disability, and other models, see the paper Disability Movement from Charity to Empowerment by Kishor Bhanushali.)

The whole handbook, Making PRSP Inclusive, can be downloaded in PDF format; it is 4 megabytes, so people with a slow modem dial-up will need to allow plenty of time. It may also be possible for you to obtain permission to reproduce and distribute the handbook within your country: for instructions, see the page entitled “Imprint” in the handbook. [EDITED TO ADD: As indicated in the first paragraph of this article, a new, updated version of this handbook is now available on-line, without needing to download any PDF files.]

Handicap International has a full listing of its publications and resources that, like Making PRSP inclusive, can be downloaded for free. Some are targeted at disability advocates who need better tools and resources for educating their country governments about disability and persuading them to be more inclusive. Other publications are targeted at mainstream development organizations who want to find more effective ways of ensuring that people with disabilities are able to fully participate in the programs and projects they offer.

The information contained in this We Can Do post was gathered from the Handicap International web site; from the World Bank web site; and from the Making PRSP Inclusive guidebook itself.



Learn about the updated version of this handbook at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/04/08/resource-on-line-handbook-supports-disabled-people-in-fighting-poverty/

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Finding Development Organizations and Resources

Posted on 14 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Small, local DPOs (Disabled People Organizations) can be a valuable resource for disabled people in the communities where they work. But they cannot fight poverty and oppression among disabled people (or Deaf people) on their own. No single organization can.

Because of this, many DPOs may wish to reach out to larger, mainstream organizations. For example, perhaps you want support in persuading a micro-entrepreneural program to do a better job of including disabled would-be business owners in their training programs. Or you want to make sure the new water pump being installed in the village where you live or work is accessible for the many women in the community who have lost one or both arms due to land-mine accidents. How do you find organizations that might help? Or, how do you contact the organizations that are already working in your community or country?

In some cases, well-intended international organizations may implement projects that inadvertently create barriers for people with disabilities in your country. They may build schools without ramps. Or they offer training programs but fail to obtain sign language interpreters so that deaf people can participate in them. In most cases, this may be due to ignorance. They may lack experience with disabilities and fail to realize that the way in which they implement their programs can create problems for disabled people. Or they may even mistakenly assume that “there are no disabled people in this village” or that “disabled people aren’t interested in participating in this program” or “this program is for everyone, therefore disabled people are already included.” It can sometimes be worth the effort to reach out to these organizations to alert them to potential barriers for people with disabilities in your community and to offer your knowledge and advice in removing these barriers.

One starting point would be a listing from the World Bank entitled “Related Links, or Who’s Who in Disability and Development” at http://go.worldbank.org/DX34O72HO2.

Here, you will find a list of multi-lateral donors and bi-laterial donors; civil society organizations; organizations committed to corporate social responsibility (i.e., businesses that try to behave responsibily in the communities and countries where they operate); foundations; bibliographic sources; sources for statistics; and technology (internet accessibility). If you’re looking for disability-related statistics, then you may also wish to see an earlier We Can Do post entitled “Numbers Don’t Feed People” for links to more resources.

In case you didn’t already know: Multi-lateral donors are development banks like the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, Inter-American Development Bank and so forth. These are generally supported with donations from dozens of country governments. Their budget is used to make loans that support the country governments of developing countries in establishing development projects like roads, water and other infrastructure, schools, training programs for medical personnel, and so forth. Bi-lateral donors are individual country governments, like the United States or Japan, that make their grants or loans directly to the countries they support. Usually multi-lateral and bi-lateral donors do not directly fund smaller, local organizations: if you wish to receive funding from these organizations you may need to work through your country’s government. However, in some cases, these donors have made commitments to ensure that the projects they already support are accessible to people with disabilities. They may welcome your feedback and insights on how to do a better job of including disabled people in their programs.

DPOs may wish to explore the web sites for mainstream development banks, civil society organizations, and other mainstream organizations. This would allow you to become familiar with the development projects they support in your area. You could then contact the organization to start a dialogue to help ensure that these projects do not ignore or overlook the needs of people with disabilities in your country.

What about the other side of the equation? What if you’re a large, mainstream development organization that wants to find disabled people in the communities where you work so you can make sure your projects are accessible to them? One of the earliest posts I wrote for We Can Do, entitled “Finding Local Disability Organizations” should be suitable for your needs. You may also want to explore the many links in the We Can Do blogroll, posted at the right hand side and also at the very bottom of every page at We Can Do.

(Full disclosure alert: Yes, I currently work at the World Bank. However, I do not work directly on disability-related issues there. I maintain the We Can Do blog in my own time. Information posted here cannot be interpreted as speaking in any way for the World Bank or any unit or department within the Bank.)


If you have been to We Can Do before then you may have noticed that this blog has a new appearance and structure. How do you like it? Do you find it easier, or harder, to navigate and find the information you’re looking for? Any other feedback on how to improve the We Can Do blog in general? Please share your thoughts in the comments area at the post where I describe We Can Do’s new presentation or email me at ashettle at patriot dot net.


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