NEWS: European Union, Africa Cooperate in Support of Disabled People Living in Poverty

Posted on 6 February 2008. Filed under: Agriculture and Rural Development, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The EU-Africa strategy – working to support the rights and needs of persons with disabilities living in chronic poverty

PRESS RELEASE – DATE 24 DECEMBER 2007
THE AFRICA-EU STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP – A Joint Africa-EU Strategy

The Secretariat of the Africa Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) notes with appreciation the inclusion of disability in the Africa-EU Strategic Partnership: A Joint Africa-EU Strategy (the Strategy).

The context, shared vision, principles and objectives of the Strategy offer unprecedented opportunities to address the needs, human rights and aspirations of disabled people in both Europe and Africa. The new approaches and strategies outlined in the declaration are all relevant to the needs and priorities of disabled people in Africa. We would like to urge African governments to take primary responsibility to ensure that all the provisions on the Strategy mainstream disability at all levels of planning, implementation and evaluation of programmes.

Disabled people in Africa can play a useful role in promoting peace and stability, strengthening the principles of democracy and human rights and contributing to the objectives for trade and regional integration. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) cannot be attained without the active participation of disabled people on the African continent.

We believe that development cooperation must ensure that disability is mainstreamed in all programmes and that specific support should be provided to organisations, government departments and other entities with disability programmes and projects. We welcome the inclusion of gender equality and issues related to the environment and climate change. The latter issues have a negative impact on the quality of life of disabled people all over Africa and disabled people’s role in promoting the required changes should be recognised and supported.

Issues related to migration and agriculture/ food security are top priorities as disabled people are caught in various unfavourable situations that threaten their ability to survive. We pledge our support to initiatives that promote the active involvement of disabled people, not just as consumers of agricultural produce, but also as producers within all the essential processes of the food value-chain.

We would like to thank our partners, DSI/ Danida, Sida, DFID, ODG, Southern Africa Trust, and CBM for their support to the Secretariat’s programmes and initiatives.

We extend our thanks and gratitude to the African Union (AU), ARI and African Parliamentarians/ leaders for their support for disability inclusion in Africa and within the Strategy.

END OF STATEMENT from the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities

The above statement was taken from the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities; you can view the same statement at http://www.africandecade.org/reads/Press/the-eu-africa-strategy-working-to-support-the-rights-and-needs-of-persons-with-disabilities-living-in-chronic-poverty.

We Can Do readers who are interested in the EU/Africa partnership may also wish to read a letter to the African Union chair titled “Working to support the rights and needs of persons with disabilities living in chronic poverty”, available in PDF format (73 Kb) at:

http://www.africandecade.org/document-repository/Letterto%20AU%20chair.pdf

A draft discussion of the strategy to be used in the EU/Africa partnership can be downloaded in PDF format (1.5 Mb) at:

http://www.africandecade.org/document-repository/Joint%20Africa-EU%20Strategy_2007.pdf

There is also a web page about the join EU/Africa strategy:

http://europafrica.org/2007/01/01/about-the-eu-africa-consultation-web-site/



We Can Do found this press release by exploring the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities. I recommend that We Can Do readers may wish to explore their training materials on disability-related issues.

Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



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FELLOWSHIP: Intl Fellowship Program for West Africa for 2009/10 Academic Year

Posted on 6 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Addendum, Feb. 17, 2009: Please note that this blog post is more than one year old and advertises the 2008 application round for the 2009/10 academic year. However, this is an annual opportunity. The application deadline for the 2010/11 academic year is February 27, 2009. Please consult the International Fellowship program site directly for updated information at either http://www.aau.org/ifp/ or at http://www.pathfind.org/ifp]

***************OLD INFORMATION FOLLOWS BELOW THIS LINE, Consult http://www.aau.org/ifp for updated details************



The International Fellowship Program invites all people in certain West African countries, including people with disabilities, to apply for a scholarship. The deadline is February 29, 2008 for the 2009/2010 academic year.

This paragraph is taken from the IFP web site: The International Fellowships Program (IFP) is a program supported by the Ford Foundation, and coordinated in West Africa by the Association of African Universities (AAU) in collaboration with Pathfinder International in Nigeria and the West African Research Center (WARC) in Senegal. IFP provides fellowships for advanced study to exceptional individuals who will use their education to further development in their own countries and greater social and economic justice worldwide. IFP fellowships will be awarded to applicants from diverse backgrounds, including social groups and communities that lack systematic access to higher education.

IFP is planning to award 37 fellowships in West Africa for the 2009/10 academic school year. These fellowships are meant for students who have already completed one degree and are ready to attend graduate school anywhere in the world.

People who wish to learn more about this opportunity should read about it at the IFP web site at:

www.pathfind.org/ifp

Inquiries about the scholarship program can also be directed to the following contact:

Pathfinder International Nigeria Country Office
35 Justice Sowemimo St., Asokoro
Abuja FCT
Tel: 09-314 7378
Email: ifpnigeria@pathfind.org

The Joint National Association of Persons with Disabilities of Nigeria (JONPWD) also has further information about the scholarship program. JONPWD can be reached at duhkb@yahoo.com.


We Can Do first learned about this scholarship opportunity through the Disabled People International (DPI) on-line newsletter. People can subscribe to the DPI newsletter for free, or read it online, by following the link. (Any text at We Can Do that is underlined or presented in a different color is a hypertext link to an appropriate web page.)

Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.


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EVENT/NEWS: Asian Festival of Inclusive Arts

Posted on 5 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Mobility Impariments, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear Friends of Epic Arts,

It is with great pleasure that I introduce you to SPOTLIGHT An Asian Festival of Inclusive Arts.

For the first time ever, disabled and able-bodied artists from across Asia come together in Cambodia to present an exciting festival of performance, film, music and visual arts with a SPOTLIGHT on the abilities of all people.

http://www.spotlight-inclusiveartsasia.org/

Check out the website for more information on how you can join in the fun. The website is constantly being updated with news and images and will be up in Khmer towards the end of next week, so keep checking! The website will also serve as an archive of SPOTLIGHT after all the excitement has ended and hopefully as a communication tool for all the artists / organisations / individuals working in Inclusive Arts in Asia.

So forward this email to all your friends and colleagues and encourage them to come and participate in this truly exciting event.

Kind regards
Hannah & The SPOTLIGHT team

Hannah Stevens
Production Manager
Epic Arts/Cambodia
(+855) 12 454 935



We Can Do received this text via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD) mailing list.

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NEWS: World Bank, Syracuse U. Join Forces Against Poverty Among Disabled People

Posted on 2 February 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, News, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2008

Contact: Jaime Winne Alvarez
Phone: (315) 443-3784
jlwinne@syr.edu
World Bank: Phillip Hay
Phone: (202) 473-1796
Email:phay@worldbank.org

Global disability and poverty efforts get key boost from agreement between SU’s Burton Blatt Institute and World Bank

A promising new collaboration between the World Bank and Syracuse University could spur global efforts to reduce poverty for an estimated 400 million people with disabilities living in developing countries. The Burton Blatt Institute: Centers of Innovation on Disability at Syracuse University (BBI) and the World Bank have signed an agreement to support activities of the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD), an international disability network initiated by the World Bank and committed to promoting inclusive development as a means to achievement of Millennium Development Goals.

Established in 2006 with assistance from the World Bank and set up by a multi-stakeholder task force, the GPDD brings together organizations, government agencies, multinational lenders and research centers focused on reducing the link between disability and poverty, and promoting inclusive development activities. BBI will receive $350,000 from the World Bank’s Development Grant Facility (DGF)—with another $350,000 likely in 2009—to support the growth and organizational development of the GPDD. In turn, the GPDD will share information, expand knowledge, improve public policies and practices, and foster collaboration to improve education and economic opportunity for individuals with disabilities and their families worldwide.

“This is a great honor and unique opportunity for BBI and Syracuse University,” says Peter Blanck, BBI chairman and SU University Professor. “Both BBI and the GPDD share the same mission of advancing the civic, economic and social participation of people with disabilities worldwide. This collaboration and support system will help further accelerate the inclusion of people with disabilities into the social and economic mainstream.”

“This new collaboration will connect the expertise and resources of our Burton Blatt Institute to the GPDD and the World Bank in ways that will promote inclusive economic and social development across the globe,” says SU Chancellor and President Nancy Cantor.

“Given that people living with disabilities are among the poorest of the poor worldwide, we welcome this agreement with BBI and Syracuse University as another step forward in dismantling the link between poverty and disability,” says Joy Phumaphi, vice president of the World Bank’s Human Development Network. “The social and economic exclusion of people with disabilities in developing countries requires the attention and investment of resources by development institutions, government and nongovernmental organizations.”

Maria Reina has been jointly selected by BBI and GPDD leadership to serve as executive director of the leadership network in an open, international competitive process. Reina, director of international projects at BBI’s Washington, D.C., office since 2006, has diverse experiences working on disability research, advocacy and development work, including an intensive dedication to the United Nations Ad Hoc Committee for the Disability Convention. She previously worked for the Center for International Rehabilitation; the Institute for International Disability Advocacy; the Institute for International Cooperation and Development; the Argentinean Disabled People Organization, Cilsa; and the University Institute San Martin in Rosario, Argentina, where she was an adjunct professor.

“As a person with a disability from Argentina, I have traveled to developing countries and witnessed the physical and attitudinal barriers that diminish full participation and contributions of people with disabilities,” says Reina.

During the next six months, BBI and the GPDD will mobilize disability-led organizations worldwide—in cooperation with governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector—to identify best practice strategies that promote inclusion in economic and social development. Through research, training and community development activities, the GPDD will increase participation of people with disabilities in national poverty reduction efforts in developing countries.

“Improved access to education, health care, technology and transportation are needed to reduce the barriers of stigma and discrimination,” says Kalle Könkkölä, GPDD task force chair.

The World Bank provides critically needed financial and technical assistance to developing countries, and is composed of a number of development institutions owned by 185 member countries, including the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA). The mission of both institutions is to reduce global poverty and to improve living standards of developing countries around the world.

While IBRD focuses on middle income and credit-worthy poor countries, IDA focuses on the poorest countries in the world. The World Bank Group provides loans, interest-free credit and grants to developing countries, and is a knowledge leader in development. For more information, visit http://worldbank.org.

BBI fosters public-private dialogue to advance civic, economic and social participation of persons with disabilities in a global society. BBI takes its name from Burton Blatt (1927–85), a pioneer in humanizing services for people with mental retardation, a staunch advocate of deinstitutionalization, and a national leader in special education. The institute currently has offices in Syracuse, New York City, Washington, D.C., Atlanta and Tel Aviv. For more information, visit http://bbi.syr.edu.

For more information on GPDD, contact Reina at (202) 296-2042 or mvreina@law.syr.edu.



We Can Do received this press release via the mailing list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD). Individuals can sign up for the GPDD email distribution list for free; follow the link for more details.



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CONFERENCE: Dubai Rehabilitation International Forum

Posted on 1 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Taken from the Rehab Dubai 2008 web site:

The 6th edition of Dubai International Rehabilitation Forum – REHAB Dubai 2008 will be held from 10-12 March 2008 at the prestigious Dubai international Exhibition Center – one of the best exhibition venues in the world.

The first five editions of REHAB Dubai have raised the profile of disability and rehabilitation issues in the Arab region. This is witnessed in the growing number of conferences, institution of university courses, standardization of rehabilitation services, creation of infra-structural facilities for the disabled, promotion of tourism for the disabled and greater coverage by the media of disabled persons and issues concerning them.

The exhibition will showcase the latest rehabilitation products and services from different parts of the world. REHAB DUBAI is the only platform in the Middle East that will match both investors, suppliers /providers and consumers under one roof to help them arranging B2B meetings and direct face to face contacts which will result in emerging new markets & close long term deals.

The conference will include speakers and workshops on topics such as the rights of people with disabilities; alternative medicine for rehabilitation; psychological support for people with special needs; assistive technology; employment of people with special needs; inclusive education; sports rehabilitation; and art therapy.

There will also be a job fair meant to showcase employment opportunities for people with disabilities in United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Learn more about the conference at the Rehab Dubai 2008 web site.



We Can Do first learned of this conference by browsing the World Bank page on News, Events and Disability. Most of the text for this blog post is taken from the Rehab Dubai 2008 web site.



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NEWS: Peru Ratifies Disability Rights Treaty, Optional Protocol

Posted on 1 February 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Yesterday, Peru became the 15th country to ratify the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the 9th country to ratify the accompanying Optional Protocol.

The CRPD is an international human rights treaty focused on protecting the rights of people with disabilities. Some of the rights it is meant to protect include: equality before the law without discrimination; freedom from torture; right to live in the community; respect for home and the family; right to education; right to health; right to work; right to an adequate standard of living; right to participate in political and public life. The CRPD needs to be ratified by 20 countries before it can take full legal force.

For citizens who feel their rights have been violated under the CRPD, the Optional Protocol will give them one more way to obtain redress. If national-level channels of justice (e.g., court systems) fail to protect the rights of disabled people, then disabled people in countries that have ratified the Optional Protocol would be able to bring petitions to an international Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Committee is a body of independent experts that will review how different countries implement the CRPD.

There are several other international instruments that are used to help protect the rights of people with disabilities. These include the Declaration on the Rights of Disabled Persons; the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons; the Principles for the Protection of Persons with Mental Illness and the Improvement of Mental Health Care (1991); and the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities (1993). However, the CRPD and the Optional Protocol are the first instruments for disability rights that would be legally binding.

More information on the CRPD and the Optional Protocol is available at United Nation’s Enable website. Another web site, www.RatifyNow.org has information, toolkits, and resources that advocates and organizations can use to encourage their country governments to ratify and implement the CRPD and Optional Protocol.



We Can Do first learned about Peru’s ratification of the CRPD through the RatifyNow mailing list. People may join the mailing list, or become a member of RatifyNow, for free.

A modified version of this blog post is also available at the RatifyNow web site’s news page.



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REPORT: Human-Rights Approach to Education for All

Posted on 30 January 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Human Rights, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has released a report on a human rights based approach to making education accessible to all children, entitled A Human Rights-Based Approach to Education for All: A framework for the realization of children’s right to education and rights within education (PDF format, 812 Kb). The report discusses current thinking and practice on human rights based approaches in the education sector. It presents key issues and challenges in rights-based approaches and provides a framework for developing policies and programs at the school, local, national, or international levels. It is targeted particularly at governments, civil society organizations, United Nations and bilateral agencies, and other development partners.

This report touches briefly on issues affecting disabled children in education throughout. A search for the word “disabilities” finds multiple short references in the text. For example, there is a mention of such issues as the fact that the birth of some children–but particularly disabled children–may not be registered in some countries, making it more difficult to accurately estimate the need for schooling. And the report asserts that attention must be paid to the communication needs of children with sensory impairments (Braille for blind students; sign language for deaf students).

There are some disappointments here. For instance, the introduction has the usual discussion of the 77 million children who are currently out of school but misses an opportunity to point out that disabled children are disproportionately represented among them. But the integration of disability related concerns into a broader discussion of educational issues is itself an important step in the right direction. Especially positive is seeing disability issues integrated into a report like this one that emphasizes education as a human right for all children–including children with disabilities.

The report can be downloaded in PDF format (812 Kb) at:

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0015/001548/154861E.pdf



We Can Do learned about this report via the Disabled People’s International on-line newsletter. DPI’s newsletter can be subscribed to, via email, for free.



Find more Research, reports, or papers, or find more blog posts like this one on children, education, or humanrights.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Human Security, Social Cohesion and Disability

Posted on 29 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Human Rights, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, technology, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for Papers – Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal (www.rds.hawaii.edu)

Human Security, Social Cohesion and Disability

Guest Editors: Gregor Wolbring, Program in Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, Dept of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary;

Anita Ghai, Department of Psychology Jesus and Mary College, New Delhi;

Kirk Allison, Program in Human Rights and Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota;

Human security and social cohesion are two central requisites for the medical and social well being of disabled people. Science and technology (S&T) advances often seen as essential for disabled people also impact on human security and on social cohesion. Human security according to the Commission on Human Security is concerned with safeguarding and expanding people’s vital freedoms. It requires both shielding people from acute threats and empowering people to take charge of their own lives. The Commission identified economic security, food security, health security, environmental security, personal security, community security, political security, freedom from fear, and freedom from want as primary concerns.

Social cohesion in very general terms means: All that which brings people together (European New Towns Platform). In Canada the following description is in use: “Social cohesion is the ongoing process of developing a community of shared values, shared challenges and equal opportunity within Canada, based on a sense of trust, hope and reciprocity among all Canadians.” (Jeannotte and Sharon, 2001). This has also been articulated complementarily in terms of social capital which has been defined among others as “features of social organization such as networks, norms, and social trust that facilitate coordination and cooperation for mutual benefit” (Putnam 1995).

More about the concepts can be found in the below references:

  • Gregor Wolbring (2006). Human Security and NBICS http://www.innovationwatch.com/choiceisyours/choiceisyours.2006.12.30.htm
  • Gregor Wolbring (2007). NBICS and Social Cohesion http://www.innovationwatch.com/choiceisyours/choiceisyours-2007-01-15.htm
  • Caroline Beauvais and Jane Jenson.(2002) Social Cohesion: Updating the State of Research. Canadian Policy, Research Networks, Canadian Heritage, Ottawa. http://www.cprn.com/doc.cfm?doc=167&l=en
  • European New Towns Platform. (2005). “The Top 8 Specific Challenges for Social Cohesion in New Towns.” http://www.newtowns.net/themes
  • Definitions of Social Capital http://www.analytictech.com/networks/definitions_of_social_capital.htm
  • Social Captial Initiative, Working Paper 1, 1998, http://go.worldbank.org/W8FMEK6FR0
  • We are honored that the theme for an issue of The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal will be human security, social cohesion and disability. This topic is chosen because the discourse around human security and social cohesion is of central importance for disability studies and for the well-being of persons with disabilities. At the same time discourses in disability studies can crucially clarify and test the discourses of human security and social cohesion.

    Thus, we urge potential contributors, regardless of their fields of training, to articulate their ideas about human security, social cohesion and disability. We especially encourage contributors to envision:

    • Future threats to human security and social cohesion including threats linked to new and emerging sciences and technologies processes and products and their impact on disabled people.
    • How disability studies discourses have generated tools and will continue to generate tools which can be used to minimize future threats to social cohesion and human security.
    • Other possible prevention strategies and fixes to possible future threat to human security and social cohesion.

    We encourage the submission of empirical case studies and theoretical models and we especially encourage contributions which cover the topic from a low income country background.

    Potential contributors to this Special Issue might consider:

    1. What is the “disability,” the discrimination angle of human security and social cohesion?
    2. What is the body image angle of human security and social cohesion?
    3. What is the importance of the disability studies angle on human security and social cohesion for other marginalized groups, for the marginalized majority of the world?
    4. What are potential future threats to human security and social cohesion and what would the impact be on disabled people?
    5. What are the cultural angles of human security and social cohesion?
    6. What is the role and potential of law?
    7. What empirical evidence and theoretical models illuminate the processes and effects?
    8. What is the impact of emerging social concepts such as transhumanism, which is?
    9. What is the impact of new and emerging sciences and technologies?
    10. What role does or could disability studies be playing in the interaction between new and emerging sciences and technologies and human security and social cohesion?
    11. How do or do not the human security and social cohesion discourses serve the needs of disabled people?
    12. What are the connections between human security and violent conflict?
    13. What are the relationships between development and poverty reduction, human security, and the prevention of violent conflict?
    14. What is the impact of natural disasters on those with disabilities in terms of security and cohesion
    15. How can social capital be discussed in context of disabled people, human security and social cohesion?

    Send via email 250-word abstracts, by March 31st, 2008 to Guest Editors Gregor Wolbring gwolbrin@ucalgary.ca ; Anita Ghai anita.satyapal@gmail.com and Kirk Allison alli0001@umn.edu. Please be sure to send abstracts to all editors. For those abstracts that are selected, we will request completed articles of approximately 3000-5000 words two months after the note of invitation to submit a full article was sent. Note that an invitation to submit an article based on an abstract does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

    For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



    We Can Do received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) email distribution list, which can be joined for free.

    The Review of Disability Studies journal has been featured before at We Can Do: see an earlier, more generic call for papers at RDS, or see a listing of previous RDS articles relevant to people with disabilities in developing countries, with abstracts.

    Check for other calls for papers.



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    CASE STUDY: Strengthening Disabled Women Organizations in Nicaragua

    Posted on 26 January 2008. Filed under: Capacity Building and Leadership, Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Latin America & Caribbean, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    A publication entitled “Learning from experience: strengthening organisations of women with disabilities” (PDF format, 1.3 Mb) shares lessons learned about organizing, personal empowerment, awareness raising, and incorporating a gender perspective. The publication focuses on work done by a Nicaraguan non-governmental organization (NGO), Solidez, that works to strengthen the capacity of local disabled women’s organizations and integrate women with disabilities into society. Solidez aims to help independent organizations improve their ability to manage their own decisions and self development.

    In particular, this profile about Solidez is meant to analyze the lessons they have learned in organizational work and projects, empowerment and personal growth, awareness raising, and advocacy. It describes some of the barriers that Solidez has encountered in its work, for example in overcoming negative, religion-based attitudes toward gender or disabilities. Solidez also explains some of the strategies they used and their results: for example, they attribute part of their success to the use of home visits and meetings in women’s homes. The publication offers frank discussion of some of the challenges Solidez has confronted, such as finding ways to support groups in resolving sometimes very emotional inter-personal conflicts. It concludes with recommendations for how Solidez could further improve upon its efforts.

    The publication is available from One World Action, an NGO based in the United Kingdom that works to create opportunities for the world’s poorest people.

    You can download “Learning from experience: strengthening organisations of women with disabilities” in PDF format (1.3 Mb) at

    http://www.oneworldaction.org/Resources/One%20World%20Action/Documents/Disability%20Rights/solidezreport6.pdf



    We Can Do learned about this case study through contacts at Mobility International USA and from the Siyanda database of resources on gender and development.



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    RESOURCE: Handbook for Making Water and Sanitation Accessible to Disabled People

    Posted on 26 January 2008. Filed under: Health, Inclusion, Mobility Impariments, Poverty, Resources, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    A book is available that can help water specialists, disabled advocates, and family members learn how to make water supply and sanitation services more accessible for people with disabilities and other vulnerable populations.

    According to the World Bank, more than one billion poor people lack access to clean drinking water, and more than two billion people lack access to clean sanitation facilities such as toilets. Dirty water and lack of a clean place to defecate can make poor people sick. And sick people may die more easily, or become even poorer than they were before.

    People with disabilities, particularly mobility impairments, may face even more barriers in accessing clean water or sanitation. Water pumps might be poorly designed for people who have difficulty using one or both hands, or toilets may not be appropriately designed for people who have difficulty squatting. Many other individuals who are not ordinarly thought of as “disabled” may also face similar barriers, including frail elderly people; pregnant women; people carrying or taking care of babies and young children; and other individuals.

    The book, Water and Sanitation for Disabled People and Other Vulnerable Groups, was written particularly for planners and service providers in the water supply and sanitation sector. Disabled people’s organizations, and service organizations targeted at disabled people and their familieis, may also find some of the information useful to their work. It provides practical information, ideas, and guidance about how to meet the needs of people in “real communities”–meaning, places where people “come with a wide range of shapes, sizes, abilities, and needs.”

    This book is written so that users can skip over the chapters they don’t need and focus on the chapters they want. The first, introductory chapter may be useful for all readers. The second chapter answers the question, “Why should the water and sanitation sector consider disabled people”: it is written primarily for people who have little contact with disability issues but might also be helpful for some advocates. For example, the pictures on page 10 could be useful in educating others about the multiple types of barriers that disabled people face in society–not only in water and sanitation.

    Chapter 3 helps explain the water and sanitation sector to disabled people, disability service providers, and advocates. Chapter 4 helps explain disability issues to water and sanitation professionals, engineers, public health workers, and community development workers.

    Chapters 5, 6, and 7 provide practical ideas for how to make physical facilities more inclusive: these can be useful both for professionals and also for disabled people and their families.

    Chapter 8 offers ideas for planning and implementing services with disabled people in mind. Section 8.2 is particularly meant for water and sanitation service providers, while section 8.3 is mainly meant for the disability sector.

    Chapter 9 presents case studies that illustrate how disabled people and their families have benefitted from improved access to water and sanitation facilities. Case studies are shared from Bangladesh, Cambodia, Uganda, and Tibet.

    The appendices point readers to further resources that can help them learn more about either water and sanitation issues or disability issues.

    A print version of the book can be purchased from the Water, Engingeering, and Development Centre (WEDC) of Loughborough University; or a PDF version can be downloaded for free. For more information about the book and how to obtain it, go to

    http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk/publications/details.php?book=1%2084380%20079%209.

    People with visual impairments should note that, in order to download the PDF file, you would need to enter a visual image “captcha.” I did not see any clear instructions for alternate means for people with visual impairments to download the file. (If they exist and I missed them, please alert me in the comments area below.) You can contact WEDC by email to either share your concerns/feedback or to request assistance at: WEDC@lboro.ac.uk. I would be interested in knowing about the experiences of anyone with a visual impairment who tries to obtain this (or any other) book from WEDC.

    When I downloaded my own copy, I left a comment encouraging WEDC to offer auditory captcha in addition to visual captcha and to also give people the means of contacting them to ask for assistance in downloading or receiving PDF files. I haven’t heard back from them yet. If I do, I’ll try to remember to come back here and share what they say.



    We Can Do learned about this resource by browsing the Siyanda on-line database of gender and development materials. Try entering key words such as “disabilities” into the Siyanda search engine.



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    RESOURCE: How to Include Disabled Women in Your Organizations

    Posted on 23 January 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    [Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/yv5ouo]

    Certain resources can help women’s organizations and international development agencies better include disabled women in their program activities. Skip to the resource list.

    Women with disabilities confront many of the same challenges that other women in developing countries face, such as gender-based discrimination. But they also face some additional challenges, such as discrimination based on their disability. Some women’s organizations would like to advocate for the needs of disabled women in the same way that they advocate for all women. And international development agencies also want to ensure that they meet the needs of disabled women in the same way that they strive to meet the needs of all the poor people in the countries where they work.

    But sometimes mainstream organizations aren’t sure how to begin. What barriers might they unknowingly create that make it harder for disabled women to participate in their programs’ activities or to make their needs known to their organization? What further barriers exist in society that may need to be overcome before an organization can more effectively serve women with disabilities? How can women’s organizations and international development agencies remove these barriers?

    Several resources, listed below, can help. Mainstream organizations may wish to use these as guides to make their programs more accessible. Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) may wish to use these when communicating with mainstream organizations to persuade them to make change.

    MIUSA’s “Checklist for Inclusion”
    Mobility International USA (MIUSA) has a free checklist available (PDF format, 10 Mb). This 19-page self-assessment guide is written for mainstream international development agencies. It provides a series of questions that women’s organizations and international development agencies can use to help them identify what they’re already doing right and what things could be improved upon. For example: when you choose a meeting location, do you make sure that it is wheelchair accessible (ground-floor location with doors wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs, etc.)? Does your organization make its print materials available in non-print (Braille; diskette) and also large-print versions? Does your organization make qualified sign language interpreters available for its training, conference, and other program activities?

    MIUSA’s International Development and Disability (IDD) Program
    MIUSA’s International Development and Disability (IDD) program strives to bridge the disability community and the international development community in promoting the inclusion of people with disabilities as leaders and participants in development. It provides technical assistance and advice to both disabled people’s organizations and development agencies on gender and disability inclusion. In addition to their Checklist for Inclusion, organizations may wish to learn more about MIUSA activities, publications, videos, and other resources at MIUSA’s IDD web site:

    http://www.miusa.org/idd/index_html

    In particular, note that the checklist on inclusion was originally written as part of a more comprehensive guidebook on disability inclusion entitled Building an Inclusive Development Community: A Manual on Including People with Disabilities in International Development Programs.

    Can’t afford the book? Or want to supplement it with free resources? Consult MIUSA’s page of links to free resources:

    http://www.miusa.org/idd/keyresources

    Also, read some “best practice” stories (case studies) of other organizations that have successfully promoted disability inclusion in their activities:

    http://www.miusa.org/publications/freeresources/mti

    Another item that might be of interest is an article written by Sarah Rosenhek at the Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID) about her experience learning about gender and disability through participating in MIUSA’s August 2006 Gender Disability and Development Institute (GDDI). Her article, entitled “Strengthening Women’s Rights Organizations through Inclusion: Lessons Learned from the Gender, Disability and Development Institute,” includes pragmatic advice for other women’s organizations that Rosenhek learned at the institute.

    VSO’s Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability
    Volunteer Service Overseas has a publication available on-line for free entitled A Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability (PDF format, 2 Mb). This handbook guides mainstream international development organizations in finding ways to overcome the stigma that can be associated with disability; how to actively integrate more disabled workers in the workplace; how to integrate more disabled participants in program activities; and how to integrate disability into organizational policy. Each chapter has case studies that describe how other organizations have implemented the advice given in this handbook. Download the handbook itself at

    http://www.asksource.info/pdf/33903_vsomainstreamingdisability_2006.pdf (PDF format, 2 Mb)

    The VSO’s Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability was previously featured at We Can Do, with an overview of its contents.

    Siyanda On-line Database of Gender and Development Materials
    Siyanda is targeted at development specialists who want to integrate gender equality issues into their work,whether or not they specialize in gender issues. This database makes iteasy to search for, and locate, full-length materials, that can bedownloaded for free. Its library of documents includes items in multiple languages including English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, and others. Try a key word search for “disabilities.”



    We Can Do learned about the MIUSA resources and the Siyanda on-line database through contacts at MIUSA.



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    RESOURCE: Researching Companies’ Impact on Disability Rights

    Posted on 18 January 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

    [Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/2cv43v]

    When many people think about human rights, we may often think about governments and their legal obligations in protecting those rights. But it is not only governments who share responsibility for respecting human rights–for both disabled and non-disabled people. Businesses and companies, too, must understand human rights and must understand how they must behave in order to respect these rights.

    Some companies may do very well in upholding human rights–while others might do more poorly. Some companies might behave in an acceptable way toward some people but may still violate the human rights of others, including disabled people.

    A database, run by the Business and Human Rights Resource Center, can help advocates find information about the human rights impact of companies around the world. This database links to articles and reports on more than 3600 companies in more than 180 developed and developing countries. The linked material is published by a wide range of entities including non-governmental organizations; companies and business organizations; the United Nations; the International Labour Organization; other intergovernmental organizations; governments and courts; policy experts and academics; social investment analysts; journalists; and others.

    Some of the topics covered by the database include discrimination, the environment, poverty and development, labor, access to medicines, health and safety, security, and trade. The database links to both positive and negative reports about companies and their record in human rights. Companies have the opportunity to respond to any record in this database written about them.

    One section of the Business and Human Rights Resource Center focuses on companies and disabled people. Readers can narrow down their search further by country or by company. This resource can help advocates gather more detailed information about how various companies in their countries treat disabled people. They can use this information to decide what companies they want to target for disability human rights education campaigns or other activities to protect the rights of disabled people. Database items are availabe in English, Spanish, French, Portuguese and German. More non-English content may become available in the future.

    Learn how to use the site to find the information you want at http://www.business-humanrights.org/Gettingstarted/Howtousethesite.

    Learn what the Business and Human Rights Resource Center has done to make their site accessible to users with disabilities, including vision impairments.

    The Business and Human Rights Resource Center encourages individuals and organizations to contact them with comments and with suggestions for items they should add to their database. Has your organization published a report about how a company or business in your country has treated disabled people? If so, you may wish to consider contacting the Business and Human Rights Resource Center to encourage them to link to your report on-line.



    We Can Do learned about the existence of the Business and Human Rights Resource Center through a notice in Disabled People International (DPI)’s electronic newsletter. Further information and detail was gathered from the Business and Human Rights Resource Center web site.



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    NEWS: Azerbaijan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic sign CRPD

    Posted on 17 January 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    [Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/yr26xf]

    The countries of Azerbaijan and the Lao People’s Democratic Republic recently signed the international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Azerbaijan also signed the accompanying Optional Protocol for the CRPD. This brings the total number of signatories for the CRPD to 123 countries. Among these 123 countries, 69 have also signed the Optional Protocol.

    The CRPD declares that all people with all types of disabilities must enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms. It clarifies the ways in which human rights apply to people with disabilities and it identifies areas in which adaptations must be made so that people with disabilities can effectively exercise those rights. Some examples of human rights covered by the CRPD includes: right to life, liberty, and security; freedom from exploitation, violence, and abuse; right to live in the community; freedom of expression and opinion; respect for privacy; right to education; right to health; right to work; and others.

    If a disabled person feels their human rights under the CRPD have been violated, they can pursue justice within the usual channels within their own country. However, if all of these channels fail to bring redress, then people living in countries that have ratified the Optional Protocol can then bring complaints to the international Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

    Signing the CRPD and the Optional Protocol is the first step a country must take toward fully ratifying these treaties. Signing an international treaty, such as the CRPD, commits a country to avoid doing anything that would actively violate that treaty. However, merely signing a treaty does not, by itself, legally bind a country to obeying that treaty. Before a country can be legally obligated to follow a treaty, it must fully ratify it. Also, a treaty cannot take full legal force until and unless enough countries fully ratify (not just sign) the treaty. Twenty countries need to ratify the CRPD before it can take full legal force; 10 countries need to ratify the Optional Protocol before it, too, can take full legal force.

    So far, 14 countries have ratified the CRPD and 8 countries have ratified the Optional Protocol. Countries ratifying the CRPD include: Bangladesh, Croatia, Cuba, El Salvador, Gabon, Hungary, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Namibia, Nicaragua, Panama, South Africa, and Spain. Countries ratifying the Optional Protocol include: Croatia, El Salvador, Hungary, Mexico, Namibia, Panama, South Africa, and Spain.

    More information about the CRPD and the optional protocol is available at the UN Enable web site and at the RatifyNow web site. The RatifyNow web site also has resources that advocates can use to help persuade their country governments to both sign and also ratify the CRPD and Optional Protocol.



    We Can Do learned about Azerbaijan and the Laos People’s Democratic Republic from the UN Enable web site. Information relating to the background of the CRPD and Optional protocol was also gathered from their web site, as well as the RatifyNow web site.

    This article has been cross-posted, with slight modifications, both here and at the RatifyNow web site, with permission of author.



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    JOURNAL: The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal

    Posted on 17 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Rehabilitation, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    [Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/2gkrzx]

    Skip to list of articles

    Researchers and students, but especially people new to their field, can find it challenging to locate research, essays, and other academic literature about people with disabilities in developing countries. This may be in part because there are few international, disability-oriented journals available to publish such literature. One of the few exceptions is The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal (RDS).

    The RDS journal publishes research articles, essays, and bibliographies on the culture of disability and people with disabilities. On occasion, it also publishes poetry, short stories, creative essays, photographs, and art work related to disability. It publishes four times a year, with approximately 50 pages in each issue. People can subscribe to RDS for a fee, or people can download past issues of RDS for free. Issues from 2006 onward are available in either Word format or PDF format; older issues are available in text-only format.

    This publication is not focused solely on developing countries. In fact, many of its articles are written by researchers and writers in industrialized countries, particularly the United States. But some of its articles may be of interest to We Can Do readers. Some examples are listed further below. I chose some of these articles because they deal specifically with disabled people in developing countries; I list others because they deal with broader themes, such as exclusion, that transcend national and income boundaries.

    Please note that it is not possible to download separate articles. To read a specific article that interests you, you will need to download the full issue it is in and then skip ahead to the correct page. Page numbers given are based on the PDF version where applicable. Page numbers will be slightly different in the Word version. Or click on the hyperlink within the Word file to be taken directly to the article you select.

    Please also note that this is not a comprehensive listing of all articles in past issues of RDS. For example, I usually skipped over book reviews–but I did see a few for books that would be relevant to disabled people in developing countries. You may wish to explore the RDS on your own by following this link.

    Selected RDS Articles

    A Little Story to Share

    A Little Story to Share” by Lee-chin Heng, Volume 1, Issue 2, 2004, page 109-111. Abstract: An autobiographical story of a person from Malaysia with physical disabilities who possesses an associate diploma in music. Download in text-only format (2.1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSissue012004.pdf .

    Who is Disabled?

    Who is Disabled? Who is Not? Teachers Perceptions of Disability in Lesotho” by Christopher Johnstone, Ph.D. Candidate Educational Policy and Administration University of Minnesota, Volume 1, Issue 3, 2005, starting on page 13. Abstract: This paper reports on educational research conducted in Lesotho, Southern Africa. Mixed methods of research were used to elicit and describe teachers’ attitudes toward children they perceived as disabled. The study took place in a country where discussions on ‘the Continuum’ of services, specialist diagnoses, and Western notions of assistive technology are largely irrelevant. Over-arching themes are compared to themes that have emerged from special education and Disability Studies literature over the past decade. Download in text-only format (715 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01032005.pdf

    Evaluation of MA Program in Rehabilitation Counseling

    Evaluation of Master of Arts Program in Rehabilitation Counseling and Guidance Service for Persons with Disabilities in Thailand” by Tavee Cheausuwantavee, M.Sc. Ratchasuda College, Mahidol University, Thailand, Volume 1, Issue 3, 2005, starting on page 66. Abstract: This research examines the positive and negative aspects of the Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and Guidance for persons with disabilities in Thailand, since it began in 1997. A CIPP model was utilized for the program evaluation. Multiple methods were used to collect the data, and both retrospective and prospective data collection were undertaken. The research results indicated many positive outcomes. They also indicated certain features of rehabilitation within the Thai context differed significantly from traditional rehabilitation counseling programs in Western countries. Download in text-only format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01032005.pdf

    Leprosy in South India
    Leprosy in South India: The Paradox of Disablement as Enablement” by James Staples, Ph.D., School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Volume 1, Issue 4, 2005, starting on page 13. Abstract: Rooted in ethnographic fieldwork with people affected by leprosy in India, this article argues that certain impairments, in certain social contexts, are simultaneously disabling and enabling. This paradox poses difficult challenges, not only for those working with individuals affected with leprosy, but for disability activists
    andpolicy-makers. Download in text-only format (3 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01042005.pdf

    Social and Economic Stress Related to HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Botswana
    Social and Economic Stress Related to the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Botswana” by Thabo T. Fako, Ph.D. & Dolly Ntseane, Department of Sociology,University of Botswana & J. Gary Linn, Ph.D. & Lorna Kendrick, R.N., Ph.D. School of Nursing Tennessee State University, Volume 2, Issue 1, 2006, starting on p. 33. Abstract: The paper describes the consequences of HIV/AIDS in Botswana; the country with the highest HIV prevalence rate in Africa. In addition to frequently experienced trauma due to sickness and death, many households experience rising health expenditures and a sharp deterioration of incomes. High levels of morbidity and mortality among workers result in depressed returns on investment, reduced productivity and increased expenditure on training and replacement of workers. As the health care system finds it increasingly difficult to cope, home-based care provides an inadequate solution since the home infrastructure of many households is inadequate for proper care of seriously ill patients. The stigma associated with AIDS often isolates fragile households and provides an environment in which abuse of infected individuals and of orphans whose parents have died of AIDS is not uncommon. The quality of education also suffers, resulting in an ill prepared skilled manpower, with adverse consequences for social, economic, and political development as well as for good future governance of the country. Download in PDF format (3 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02012006.pdf or in Word format (800 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02012006.doc

    Toward a Global History of Inclusive Travel
    Toward a Global History of Inclusive Travel” by Laurel Van Horn, M.A., Open Doors Organization, USA; José Isola, President, Peruvian Polio Society, Peru, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting on page 5. Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the development of inclusive travel and tourism, from its origins in the United States and Europe following World War I and II to its current status as an increasingly important and viable movement worldwide. The paper investigates the key roles played by disability organizations, disability rights legislation, technological change, international organizations and pioneers within the travel and tourism industry. Developments are described sector by sector for air travel, ground transport, the cruise lines and the hospitality industry. While the primary historical focus is the U.S., the paper also highlights advances taking place in Dubai, Egypt, India, Japan, South Africa, Thailand and other countries. It concludes with a case study by José Isola of the development of inclusive travel in Peru. Mr. Isola also describes disability conferences that took place in South America in 2004. It is hoped others will begin to investigate the development of inclusive travel in their own countries and regions and contribute to a truly global history. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

    Ethnobotany on a Roll!
    Ethnobotany on a Roll! Access to Vietnam by My Lien T. Nguyen, Ph.D., Department of Botany, University of Hawai’i, at Mānoa, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting on page 36. Abstract: This article describes the research and experiences of an ethnobotanist with a physical disability working in Vietnam. Due to a spinal cord injury, the ethnobotanist uses a wheelchair and walking canes to explore the bustling food markets of Vietnam. Information and recommendations are provided for equipment and traveling to and in Vietnam, particularly for those interested in conducting scientific research and for travelers with physical disabilities. Success is largely due to the mutual respect and kindness shared by people along the way, and by accepting and accommodating to given situations. Appendices of resources for travel in Vietnam and educational granting sources for people with disabilities provided. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

    The Benefits of Studying Abroad
    Making an Impact: The Benefits of Studying Abroad” Michele Scheib, M.A., Project Initiatives Specialist, National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting page 50. Abstract: Qualitative interviews with ten individuals with disabilities who participated in a study abroad program within the past eight years, compared equally to long-term outcomes cited in studies with the general study abroad alumni population. Students reported increased self-confidence, independence and career or educational gains related to their study abroad experiences. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

    Esau’s Mission
    Esau’s Mission, or Trauma as Propaganda: Disability after the Intifada” by Marcy Epstein, University of Michigan, Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting on page 12. Abstract: Israelis and Palestinians, while sharing an I/Abrahamic root, many chapters of Semitic history, and common values of resourcefulness and valor, both have defended their cultural boundaries through the exchange of mutilating, annihilative blows upon the other. The intifada (an Arabic word meaning to shake off or shiver because of illness, fear, or weakness) of the millennium signify a trope of body and status among the fragmented population in the region; specifically, the propagandizing of traumatic events that suggest victimization and invalidation. The discursive nature of “unnatural” catastrophe–devastation of Palestinian communities by Israeli Defense Forces, blitzing of Israeli civilians in planned attacks–substitutes the propaganda of trauma for the reality of disability experienced in both cultures. Reflecting the duality of rhetorical positions seen in I/Abraham’s disposition of both Isaac and Esau, this essay links the root of trauma propaganda to the ideology of religious fitness and righteousness. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

    Natural Hazards
    Natural Hazards, Human Vulnerability and Disabling Societies: A Disaster for Disabled People?” by Laura Hemingway & Mark Priestley, Centre for Disability Studies, University of Leeds (UK), Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting on page 57. Abstract: The policy and research literature on disaster management constructs disabled people as a particularly “vulnerable group.” In this paper we combine concepts from disaster theory and disability theory to examine this assumption critically. Drawing on primary, secondary and tertiary sources, we assess the vulnerability of disabled people in two globally significant disasters: Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 and the Asian tsunami of December 2004. In both cases, disabled people were adversely affected in terms of their physical safety and access to immediate aid, shelter, evacuation and relief. Using a social model analysis we contest the view that this vulnerability arises from the physical, sensory or cognitive limitations of the individual and show how it may be attributed to forms of disadvantage and exclusion that are socially created. The paper concludes that “natural hazards” are realized disproportionately as “human disasters” for disabled people, and most notably for disabled people in poor communities. Social model approaches and strong disabled people’s organisations are key to building greater resilience to disaster amongst “vulnerable” communities in both high-income and low-income countries. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

    Politics and the Pandemic
    Politics and the Pandemic: HIV/AIDS, Africa, and the Discourse of Disability” by Laura L. Behling, Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota, Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting page 97. First Paragraph: In 2004, Africa News filed a report on then 12-year old William Msechu, a young African who lost both of his parents to AIDS in 1999. He, too, was HIV positive. Msechu is characterized as a “very bright boy,” although, the article reports, he is “yet to come to terms with his HIV status.” “I was told that I have tuberculosis and I am getting better,” the article quotes William as saying to journalists (“HIV-AIDS and STDs” 2004). William Msechu’s disbelief at having contracted HIV is unremarkable; persons diagnosed with severe diseases, including HIV/AIDS, often work through denial and incredulity.1 Just as unremarkable, however, is Msechu’s contention that he had not tested positive for HIV, but rather, had contracted tuberculosis, another widespread disease but not nearly as stigmatizing as HIV/AIDS. Substituting “tuberculosis” for “HIV” may be an affirming measure for Msechu, but it also provides one more example of the rhetorical slipperiness that historically, and still continues to accompany, the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

    Seeing Through the Veil
    Seeing Through the Veil: Auto-Ethnographic Reflections on Disabilities” by Heng-hao Chang PhD., Nanhua University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starting page 6. Abstract: This article is an auto-ethnography reflecting the interactions among society, my family and my brother who has Cerebral Palsy. The experiences of me and my family show the visible and invisible veils that segregate people with disabilities and their families from mainstream Taiwanese society.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

    Building Familial Spaces
    Building Familial Spaces for Transition and Work: From the Fantastic to the Normal” by Joakim Peter, MA, College of Micronesia—Federated States of Micronesia, Chuuk Campus, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starts page 14. Abstract: Transition for persons with disability is a process of negotiating difficult situations and barriers set by others and by systems. My strategies to overcome those barriers in my personal transitions through education systems and employment included the creations of familiar spaces in which group support plays a major role. This paper tracks my process through the familiar spaces and gives examples of encounters with barriers along my transition through hospital treatments to schools and then work.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

    A Model for Learning from Children
    Family Focused Learning: A Model for Learning from Children with Disabilities and Their Families via Technologies for Voice” by James R. Skouge, Kathy Ratliffe, Martha Guinan, & Marie Iding University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starting page 63 Abstract: In this paper, we describe a collaborative multidisciplinary model for faculty and students learning about culture and children with disabilities and their families in Pacific Island contexts. The model, Family Focused Learning, incorporates aspects of case-based and problem-based learning within the context of “consumer” and “professional” partnerships (Ratliffe, Stodden, & Robinson, 2000; Robinson, 1999).Children with disabilities and their families share the daily challenges and successes of their lives with graduate students and faculty at the University of Hawai‘i, via video letters, video mapping, cultural brokering and satellite videoconferencing. To illustrate this process, we present the story of “Tomasi,” a child with cerebral palsy in American Samoa, a US territory. Tomasi and his family are “given voice” and act as teachers for an interdisciplinary team of faculty and students from public health, social work, physical therapy, speech pathology, nursing, special education, nutrition, medicine, political science and law.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

    Social Change and the Disability Rights Movement
    Social Change and the Disability Rights Movement in Taiwan 1981-2002” by Chang, Heng-hao. Ph.D., Department of Sociology, Nanhua University of Chia-Yi, Volume 3, Issues 1 & 2, 2007, starting on page 3. Abstract: This paper provides a historical overview of the disability rights movement in Taiwan from 1981 to 2002. It shows the major events in Taiwanese disability history, legislation, and development of disability rights organizations, with a focus on two influential advocacy associations: the Parents’ Association for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities (PAPID) and the League of Enabling Associations (LEAs). It also demonstrates that the disability movement has developed in concert with Taiwan’s democratic transition.” Download in PDF format (780 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss01.pdf or in Word format (770 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss01.doc

    Disability and Youth Suicide
    Disability and Youth Suicide: A Focus Group Study of Disabled University Students” by Esra Burcu, Ph.D., Hacettepe University, Department of Sociology, Volume 3, Issues 1 & 2, 2007, starting page 33. Abstract: For young people thoughts of suicide are based on various social factors. The research literature in this area reveals that there are two important interrelated factors that correlate with suicide rates: being young and being disabled. This study was undertaken in order to explore possible reasons for this increased tendency for young disabled people to commit suicide. The study was carried out at a university in Turkey with a group of disabled students. All the members of the focus group had thoughts of suicide and felt that their disability played an important role in creating these thoughts. The basic premise of the research was that physical disability increases the young person’s isolation and social loneliness and this can generate ideas of suicide in the young person’s mind that may be acted upon.” Download in PDF format (780 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss01.pdf or in Word format (770 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss01.doc

    Impact of the South Asian Earthquake
    Impact of the South Asian Earthquake on Disabled People in the State of Jammu and Kashmir” by Parvinder Singh, Ph.D. Candidate, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Volume 3, Issue 3, starting page 36. Abstract: On the morning of October 8, 2005, a devastating earthquake, measuring 7.6 on the Richter scale, struck the Kashmir region with its epicentre near Muzzafarabad in Pakistan-administrated Kashmir. It took a while for both India and Pakistan to comprehend the scale of destruction that the quake had unleashed. In the two weeks following, the quake had left over 50,000 dead on the Pakistani side of the India-Pakistan border and claimed 1,300 lives on the Indian side. A second wave of deaths was expected with the onset of the region’s notorious winter. Download in PDF format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss03.pdf or in Word format (380 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss03.doc. Or, this article has also been published at We Can Do with permission of the author and RDS.

    The Scale of Attitudes Toward Disabled Persons
    The Scale of Attitudes Towards Disabled Persons (SADP): Cross-cultural Validation in a Middle Income Arab Country, Jordan” by Kozue Kay Nagata, Senior Economic Affairs Officer of the Development Cooperation Branch, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Volume 3, Issue 4, 2007, starting page 4. Abstract: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the level of the existing attitudinal barriers towards disabled persons in four communities of Jordan. Jordan is a middle income Arab country, with a PPP-adjusted GDP/capita of US$ 4320. The study attempted to determine the present level as a baseline of prejudice against people with a disability in Jordan, and to examine the relationship between the randomly selected participants’ attitudes and their previous exposure to and experience with disability. The Scale of Attitudes towards Disabled Persons (SADP) was selected as the instrument. An Arabic translated version of the Scale was used for 191 participants. The respondents showed overall negative attitudes towards disabled persons, as illustrated by previous documented materials. The result of this survey was highly correlated with the collective opinion expressed by the focus group that was conducted by the author in Amman in January, 2005. Thus, the cross-cultural validity of this instrument has been confirmed, and the major findings of this pilot study could inform future policy directions and public awareness raising strategies to foster positive public attitudes. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

    Barriers to Education
    Barriers to Education for People with Disabilities in Bekaa, Lebanon” by Samantha Wehbi, MSW, Ph.D., School of Social Work, Ryerson University, Volume 3, Issue 4, starting page 10. Abstract: This paper presents the findings of a recent study on the educational situation of people with disabilities in Lebanon. The main findings of a survey conducted with 200 participants in the impoverished rural Bekaa region illustrate the inadequate educational situation of people with disabilities. The focus of the paper is on a discussion of the barriers that people with disabilities face in pursuing their education. Participants identified the following difficulties in pursuing their education: educational system barriers, inadequate finances, health issues, transportation difficulties, and family pressures. Although the focus of the article is not on factors that can facilitate educational achievement, some of these supports are identified, including family support and personal motivation. The article concludes with a discussion of current and planned community responses such as the development of an interdisciplinary community action network (The Inclusion Network), the provision of literacy courses, and a pilot project to foster the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream schools. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

    Jordan and Disability Rights
    Jordan and Disability Rights: A Pioneering Leader in the Arab World” by Kenneth R. Rutherford, PhD, MBA, Missouri State University, Volume 3, Issue 4, 2007, starting page 23. Abstract: This article investigates Jordan’s rationale for assuming a leadership role on the disability rights issue in the Arab World. Tens of millions of people, including over ten percent of Arab families, are impacted and impoverished because of disability. To address this substantial challenge, the Jordan Royal family has leveraged Jordan’s tradition of openness and generosity coupled with one of the best educational systems in the Arab World to promote disability issues. As a result, Jordan is recognized by the international community as leading the Arab World in promoting disability rights. Jordan’s international and regional leadership on disability rights was recognized in 2005 when Jordan received the Franklin Delano Roosevelt International Disability Award. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

    You can browse and download past issues of the Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/.

    Or you can learn more about the RDS at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/about/.

    The RDS is always looking for new authors to submit materials for publication.



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    CALL FOR JOURNAL SUBMISSIONS: The Review of Disability Studies an International Journal

    Posted on 16 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    [Original publication at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/2z68p8]

    Call for Journal Submissions:
    The Review of Disability Studies an International Journal
    , www.rds.hawaii.edu

    In order to address the need for an internationally-focused academic journal in the field of Disability Studies, in 2003 the late David Pfeiffer and the Center on Disability Studies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa founded, “The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal” (RDS).

    The journal contains research articles, essays, and bibliographies relating to the culture of disability and people with disabilities. It also publishes forums on disability topics brought together by forum editors of international stature. Poetry, short stories, creative essays, photographs, and art work related to disability are also welcome. The journal is published four times a year, and each issue runs approximately 50 pages. The Journal is free online, but a subscription is needed to receive the print version.

    We would like to invite you and people from around the world to subscribe to the journal, and we also welcome correspondence from those who would like to advertise, evaluate manuscripts, serve as anonymous peer reviewers, and contribute manuscripts. The Journal is open to all perspectives, approaches, views, and paradigms relevant to the study and experience of disability.



    Thank you to Dr. Megan Conway for sending me this call for journal submissions to be posted at We Can Do. Any one wishing to know more about RDS should consult their web site directly at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/. Inquiries similarly should be directed to the staff of RDS.

    See a sample listing of RDS articles.



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    Finding Resources, Toolkits, and Funding Sources

    Posted on 15 January 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Funding, Introduction to "We Can Do", Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    [Original publication at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/28hh6h.]

    I have now created a new page, linked from the top navigation bar, entitled “Resources, Toolkits, and Funding. In this page, you can find the following types of materials:

    I added this page to help readers quickly locate pragmatic resources, announced or linked from We Can Do, that you can use to help disability communities in developing countries access human rights and public services or escape poverty.

    I want to continue improving this page. Please do share your feedback or suggestions in the comments area, either here or at the Resources, Toolkits, and Funding Sources page.

    This new page joins other pages in the navigation bar that can help you

    Still not sure how to find the materials you are looking for? See if the Navigating We Can Do page can help. I have recently revised and updated this page. I will probably continue to make further improvements in the Navigation page to make it easier to use. Please feel free to make suggestions or feedback.

    Want to make sure you don’t miss any upcoming resources, toolkits, funding sources, or other informative posts at We Can Do? Consider subscribing to We Can Do so you can receive an email alert when new material is posted here.



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    RESOURCE: Finding Disability-Related Laws and Policies

    Posted on 15 January 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Policy & Legislation, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    [Original publication at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/24xans.]

    Sometimes it is not “impairments” that disable people, but our environment. And sometimes we are disabled most when law, policy, judicial precedents, or regulations remain silent while others discriminate against disabled people. Or worse, some policies may actively strip away the rights of people with disabilities.

    Legislators, policy makers, policy analysts, lawyers, human rights specialists, and grassroots disability advocates may need to work together to remove barriers created by law or policy. But to do so, they must first understand what their law says. And before they can create better laws for their country, they may wish to understand what other, similar laws in other countries already say. Or they may find it helpful to review other legal literature and documents from around the world. Several resources are available that can help advocates and policy makers find the materials they are looking for.

    Disabilities Rights and Education Defense Fund (DREDF)
    The Disability Rights and Education Defense Fund (DREDF) website has links to many international resources on international laws and international conventions. Go to
    http://www.dredf.org/international/resources.shtml

    DREDF’s Country Law Index
    Of particular interest for people who wish to compare national laws that protect the rights of people with disabilities is DREDF’s country law index. Users will want to note that this listing of national laws is not comprehensive. The entry for the United States, for example, lists the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), but does not mention several other important US federal laws such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). But the country law index can be a good starting point. At http://www.dredf.org/international/lawindex.shtml

    Global Legal Information Network
    Researchers and advocates may also wish to try a search at the Global Legal Information Network (GLIN). GLIN is a public database of official texts of laws, regulations, judicial decisions, and other legal sources contributed by governmental agencies and international organizations. Texts are submitted in the original language, usually with a summary in English. Try a key word search for laws related to people with disabilities. A few hundred options turn up for words such as “disabilities,” “disabled,” or “discapacidad” (Spanish for “disability”). Try other synonyms or translations, too. Click on “More Search Options” to narrow down your search by country, or to narrow down your search to laws, judicial decisions, legislative records, or legal literature. http://www.glin.gov/search.action

    FindLaw
    At FindLaw, you can find a range of articles, news, commentaries, and case summaries related to legal issues in countries all around the world. Search by country, or try a key word search. This is not a disability-specific resource, though some of the materials at this site may be relevant. http://www.findlaw.com/12international/countries/

    Have I missed any key, international law-related resources? Please let me know via the comments area below.



    Thank you to Stephanie Gray at Mobility International USA (MIUSA) for helping alert me to the resources at DREDF. I found the other web sites listed here by browsing the DREDF website and subsequent links.



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    NEWS: Nepal signs disability rights treaty and protocol

    Posted on 10 January 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The Latest Development: Nepal signs the CRPD
    Nepal became the most recent signatory to the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the accompanying optional protocol on January 3, 2008. A total of 121 countries have now signed the CRPD and 68 have signed the optional protocol. Most of these countries, however, have not yet ratified either.

    Ratifying versus Signing a Treaty
    Signing a treaty is not the same as ratifying it. A signatory country is not required to obey the treaty: it only needs to avoid actively violating it. A country does not become a “states party” to a treaty until they fully ratify it. Becoming a states party (ratifying a treaty) means the country agrees to be legally bound by the treaty.

    The CRPD needs to be ratified by 20 countries before it can take full force; it has now been ratified by 14, including Bangladesh, Croatia, Cuba, El Salvador, Gabon, Hungary, India, Jamaica, Mexcio, Namibia, Nicaragua, Panama, South Africa, and Spain. The Optional Protocol needs to be ratified by 10 countries before it becomes enforceable; it has now been ratified by 7, including Croatia, Hungary, Mexico, Namibia, Panama, South Africa, and Spain.

    Both the full list of ratifications and the full list of signatories are available on the web.

    The Background: The CRPD and the Optional Protocol
    The CRPD is an international human rights treaty meant to protect a range of rights for people with disabilties. A few examples include the right to liberty; to freedom from torture, violent exploitation, and abuse; to healthcare; to education; to privacy; to sign contracts; to accessible public transit and public accommodations.

    Although several other international human rights treaties are already in force–most famously, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights–many of these treaties do not mention disabled people at all. The few that do usually do not cover their right to full participation in society.

    The Optional Protocol gives people who have suffered human rights violations another option for pursuing justice. In countries that only ratify the CRPD without the Optional Protocol, a person who feels their rights under the treaty have been violated can use the appropriate channels within their country to correct that violation. For example, they may be able to file a complaint with local or national legal authorities or bring a lawsuit through the courts. But if all national-level systems fail to achieve justice, then the Optional Protocol allows a person to pursue redress by applying to the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

    For more background on the CRPD, consult a FAQ written by the organization RatifyNow. More information about the CRPD is also available at the United Nations web site on disabilities.

    Individuals and organizations seeking to join the global movement to maximize the number of countries ratifying the CRPD and the Optional Protocols may wish to join the organization RatifyNow. Individuals may also participate in email-based discussions on the global movement by joining the RatifyNow Listserve.



    We Can Do learned about Nepal becoming a signatory via an announcement sent out by Ghulam Nabi Nazimani.

    Catch up on the latest news about the CRPD and other topics.

    This blog post is cross-posted both here and at RatifyNow with permission of the author.



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    RESOURCE: Network for Inclusive Education in Eastern Africa

    Posted on 9 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, News, Opportunities, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    To support the growing interest in the area of Inclusive Education throughout Eastern Africa, an Eastern Africa Discussion Group has been set up to help facilitate discussions. networking and information sharing on this topic. This discussion group is associated with EENET – The Enabling Education Network, which is a UK based information sharing network which promote the inclusion of marginalised groups in education world wide.

    If you would like to join the Eastern Africa Discussion Group, please send a blank email to eenet_eastern_africa-subscribe@yahoogroups.co.uk If you join and decide later you do not want to be a part of the group any longer, you can unsubscribe at any time.

    Learn more about the group and how to join, leave, or communicate with the listowner at:

    http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/eenet_eastern_africa/

    If you know any one else who you think might be interested in joining this group, please pass this message to them so as they have the information necessary to join.

    Kind Regards,

    Dimity Taylor
    Eastern Africa Email Coordinator
    EENET Eastern Africa – The Enabling Education Network

    To send an email to the email coordinator (Dimity Taylor) please send it to easternafrica@eenet.org.uk.

    EENET UK (Main Office)
    c/o Educational Support and Inclusion
    School of Education
    University of Manchester
    Oxford Road
    Manchester M13 9PL
    UK
    Office tel: +44 (0) 161 275 3711
    Mobile: +44 (0)7929 326 564
    Office fax: +44 (0) 161 275 3548
    General enquiries email: info@eenet.org.uk
    Website: www.eenet.org.uk
    To obtain printed copies of the “Enabling Education” newsletter, contact EENET at the above address or visit their website.

    EENET is an information-sharing network which promotes the inclusion of marginalised groups in education worldwide.



    [Edited 27 January 2008 to correct the above email address to easternafrica@eenet.org.uk] [Edited 21 August 2008 to update instructions for subscribing.]

    We Can Do learned about this mailing list when Dimity Taylor posted the above announcement on the mailing list for the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD). The GPDD email discussion list can be joined for free.



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    TRAINING: Community-Based Rehabilitation Training and Management

    Posted on 9 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Opportunities, Rehabilitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Please note that this blog post contains two separate announcements for two separate training opportunities from the same Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) training program in the Netherlands. Read carefully to determine which is best suited to your needs. Inquiries should be made directly to Huib Cornielje.

    Two week Training of Trainers in CBR programme in The Netherlands
    Enablement (Alphen aan den Rijn) in collaboration with a number of training experts are in currently developing a new course: TOT in CBR. The course is scheduled for the 25th of August to the 5th of September. This course is of particular importance if you want to know more about training and education with a special focus on training staff in CBR. Besides some theoretical background the course in particular will focus on practical applications; participatory methodologies; case study writing; group dynamics and facilitation skills.
    More information will follow. If you do have an interest to participate please do contact Huib Cornielje at h.cornielje@enablement.nl

    Announcement of the 2008 CBR Management course in The Netherlands
    Enablement is pleased to inform you that in 2008 (from September 15 to October 10) again a 4-week International Course in Management of Disability and Rehabilitation is being offered to rehabilitation professionals and disability and development workers and activists. Serious candidates should apply well in advance and if you intend to attend this course or intend to send someone to this course please fill out the online application form at www.enablement.nl

    Participants who attended the 2007 course came from a number of interesting projects in the following countries: Malawi, Rwanda, China, Japan, Germany, Nicaragua, The Philippines, Mexico, Cambodia, Indonesia and The Netherlands.

    The courses are conducted under the leadership of Huib Cornielje and Roelie Wolting. Besides, a number of Dutch trainers and international experts will play an important role in the training. The following international disability and CBR experts and trainers are on a regular basis involved in the course:

    • Prof. Patrick. Devlieger, University of Leuven, Belgium
    • Dr. M. Miles, Birmingham, UK
    • Dr Maya Thomas, senior consultant, India
    • Mr David Werner, CBR expert, USA
    • Mr Peter Coleridge, consultant, UK
    • Mrs Susie Miles, specialist in special needs education, UK
    • Mr Nick Heeren, CIEDEL, France

    Huib Cornielje
    Enablement
    h.cornielje@enablement.nl



    We Can Do learned about this opportunity through the “Disability Information Dissemination Network,” which is managed by the”Centre for Services and Information on Disability”(CSID),Bangladesh and currently sponsored by Sightsavers International. Individuals may receive announcements like this one via the CSID mailing list for free by sending an email to csid@bdmail.net, csid@bdonline.com, or info@csididnet.org with the word “join” in the subject line.



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    CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: Successful Disabled Women Entrepreneurs

    Posted on 8 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Employment, News, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Do you know of a successful disabled woman enterpreneur in a developing country? A World Bank annual publication, Doing Business would like to learn more about her, what has made her business successful, and what legal, regulatory, and practical barriers she has encountered along the way. Doing Business is published by the World Bank Group’s private sector arm, the International Finance Corporation.

    The Doing Business project is currently doing research in 178 countries to identify what legal and regulatory barriers make it harder for businesswomen to become successful. As part of this two-year research project, the Doing Business team is collecting stories about women entrepreneurs that describe why they are successful and highlight what obstacles they have needed to overcome. Gathering these case studies will help the team understand what strategies are needed to remove these barriers for all businesswomen. This will help them make better recommendations to country governments that want to encourage more women to start and expand their own businesses. A few of the case studies may be featured in a future Doing Business publication. Nominations need to be submitted by January 22, 2008, in order to be considered.

    Each year, Doing Business evaluates 178 countries in terms of how their laws and regulations help, or prevent, enterpreneurs from starting and expanding businesses. Many countries use the Doing Business guide to identify where their strengths and weaknesses are in promoting private sector growth. They make reforms based on its recommendations, which has helped more entrepreneurs start businesses, create jobs, and escape poverty.

    Each candidate for nominations should be the founder or owner of a business; active in her community; and have an experience that can offer lessons that can inform reform efforts. When submitting nominations, please send the following information:

    • Full name of Nominee
    • Name and type of business
    • Business address, phone number, and e-mail
    • Month and year business was started
    • A brief biography of the nominated entrepreneur
    • A brief description of the business
    • A brief summary of the obstacles overcome, discoveries made, and outcomes

    Read more about the desired criteria and how to nominate business women to be profiled at:

    http://www.doingbusiness.org/features/womenentrepreneurs.aspx

    Individuals may make inquiries or nominate women entrepreneurs they know in developing countries, with or without disabilities, by sending an email to:

    doingbusiness@worldbank.org
    snarsiah@worldbank.org

    Read more information about this project at: http://blog.doingbusiness.org/2008/01/women-entrepren.html

    The Doing Business project will select women from among the nominations, contact them, and prepare profiles on each woman. The chosen profiles will be published in Doing Business 2009.



    We Can Do learned about this call for nominations through the World Bank Doing Business blog. Please note that We Can Do is not associated with the Doing Business project. Any inquiries, as requested above, should be directed to doingbusiness@worldbank.org or to snarsiah@worldbank.org.



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    NEWS: Christian Blind Mission Now for All Disabilities

    Posted on 6 January 2008. Filed under: Blind, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Education, Mobility Impariments, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

    The Christian Blind Mission has announced that they will now serve people with all disabilities, not only people with vision impairments. Until now, the century-old organization also known as Christoffel Blinden Mission and now officially named cbm, has focused its efforts on preventing and treating blindness and on providing education and rehabilitation services for people with vision impairment.

    “The organization has decided that its purpose and work is to improve the quality of life of all persons with disability, which includes those with hearing or physical impairment and mental ill health as well as those with visual loss,” says CBM president, Prof. Allen Foster.

    CBM has also issued a new motto: “Together we can do more.” The word “together” is meant to emphasize the importance of partnership, particularly with organizations in low-income countries and with mainstream development organizations. The phrase “we can” is meant to emphasize ability over disability. And “do more” is meant to challenge the fact that the majority of people with disabilities in developing nations do not receive the medical, educational, and rehabilitation services they need.

    CBM works with more than 700 partners in more than 100 countries to serve more than 18 million people with disabilities.

    More detail can be found at:

    http://www.cbmicanada.org/news_viewer.asp?news_id=138



    Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nazimani for helping alert me to this news.



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    RESOURCE, NEWS: Making the XO Laptop Accessible

    Posted on 5 January 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Education, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    If you’ve seen the media hype about it, then you know that the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project wants to put a low-cost laptop into the hands of every child in primary schools in developing countries. The idea is to give children a tool for taking their own education into their own hands so they will learn more. Now people on an email list called “accessibility”, and people in the on-line wiki community, are working on ways to ensure that these laptops will be more accessible and usable for children with disabilities.

    In November, I wrote an opinion piece about the XO Laptop project. Basically I said I thought it was a great concept. And I still think that–in fact, I have now bought one of the XO laptops for myself through a short-term “Get one, Give one” program that ended in December 2007. One laptop is being shipped to me (meaning, no, it hasn’t arrived yet). Another laptop is being shipped to a child in a developing country somewhere. But I had, and still have, concerns about its accessibility for disabled children. And I find it disappointing that OLPC has not made it a stronger, and clearer, priority to make it usable by children with various vision, mobility, and other impairments.

    But the good news is that an on-line community exists for people who want to help make the XO laptop more accessible to children with disabilities in developing countries. Specifically, the Accessibility mailing list at:

    http://lists.laptop.org/listinfo/accessibility

    And there is also a “wiki” web site devoted to accessibility issues for the XO laptop. A “wiki” site enables people from around the world to collaborate with each other, via the web, on a common goal. In this case, the wiki laptop accessibility community enables people with the needed technical skills to work together to make the XO laptop more usable for users with disabilities. Start here to see a list of specific problems that have been identified with the XO for children with various disabilities:

    http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Accessibility

    Both on-line communities appear to be relatively small. But both would surely welcome new members with fresh energy and ideas. People with disabilities could share feedback about the features they need that would make the XO more accessible to them. If you have an XO of your own, you could play around with it to identify accessibility barriers that need more work. This is especially important if you discover that the barriers you identify, or the ideas you have for fixing it, have not already been listed at the wiki community page.

    Even better: if you have an XO, and you know a disabled child, you could watch them while they try out all the different features of the XO. Ask them for their reactions, and observe where they run into problems. Share the results with the on-line community.

    And, of course, if you have computer design, programming, or other relevant skills, then maybe you could help develop a way to improve the XO. And not just in terms of software. Also think about the needs of children with mobility impairments who might have trouble physically operating the XO as it is currently designed.

    Before becoming active in the on-line OLPC accessibility discussion/brainstorming groups, you may wish to browse through the archives of past discussions:

    http://lists.laptop.org/pipermail/accessibility/



    Thank you to the anonymous individual who left a comment at my opinion essay to alert me to the mailing list on XO accessibility.



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    RESOURCE: Listening to Poor People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Posted on 5 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cognitive Impairments, Families, Inclusion, Poverty, Reports, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    In Their Own Words
    A report from Inclusion International can help people better understand poverty among people with intellectual disabilities in developing countries.

    Nobody knows more than a poor person what it means to live with poverty or what the biggest barriers are to escaping it. And nobody knows more than a person who is excluded how devastating it can be to be constantly pushed to the margins of society. And it is poor, excluded people who see most clearly exactly what needs to change to bring them out of poverty and into the mainstream.

    It is the obligation of anyone who wants to improve the living conditions of the poor and the excluded to listen to their stories–and their proposed solutions–in their own words. If we fail to listen, we will inevitably fail to help.

    Documented Information = A Tool for Advocates
    For some We Can Do readers, listening to the poor and marginalized in developing countries can be as easy as stepping out their front door and talking to the people in their local communities. But even the most knowledgeable advocates may struggle to communicate what they know to non-disabled people in their country in a way that others will both understand and believe. In particular, they may need a way to strengthen their voices when educating funding agencies that have the power to support or turn away their organization. Advocates can use published research or reports to help others understand that poverty and exclusion among people with disabilities are not just “isolated cases” or “too few in number” to be worth targeted efforts.

    A report entitled “Hear Our Voices: A Global Report: People with an Intellectual Disabilities and their Families Speak Out on Poverty and Exclusion,” published by Inclusion International in November 2006, helps share insights into how intellectual disability can lead to poverty and exclusion. “Hear Our Voices” also makes recommendations for action. The report was made possible with the partnership and financial support of the Norwegian Association for Persons with Developmental Disabilities, NFU, and the Atlas Alliance of Norway.

    How “Hear Our Voices” Was Made
    Inclusion International (II) is a global federation of family-based organizations advocating for the human rights of people with intellectual disabilities worldwide. It spoke with people with intellectual disabilities, their families, and supporters in more than 80 countries about the experience of intellectual disability and poverty. “Hear Our Voices” combines personal with secondary research sources to analyze how well each of the eight Millennium Development Goals for fighting poverty are being met for people with intellectual disabilities. The report makes recommendations for how civil society organizations, governments and donor and international agencies can each play a role in ending poverty and exclusion among people with intellectual disabilities.

    In the acknowledgments page of their report, Inclusion International points out that people with intellectual disabilities “are too often invisible,” which means that “their stories are not influencing decisions that affect their lives.” Inclusion International explains, “We wanted to bring about change on a global scale – by convincing governments, multi-lateral institutions, and communities of the current injustice of exclusion. Where before our members’ voices were not being heard because they were isolated, we wanted to bring them together into a loud chorus. We wanted to link those local voices to bring about global change.” (p. viii)

    What Next?
    Here, Inclusion International’s focus is on people with intellectual disabilities. But people who are deaf, blind, have mobility impairments, autism, psycho-social disabilities, or other disabilities are also “invisible” in society—whether or not they are poor. And all poor people also are invisible–whether or not they have disabilities. Disabled poor people, their stories, and their ideas for how to solve their own problems, are too rarely heard when people with power make choices that affect their lives.

    Perhaps Inclusion International’s report could inspire other global organizations to do the research for more reports like it. Advocates could then use these reports to help amplify the voices (and signs) of disabled (and deaf/Deaf) people living in poverty around the world.

    Read the Report, Watch the Video
    The full 79 page report can be downloaded for free in English in PDF format (500 Kb) at

    http://www.inclusion-international.org/report/Hear_Our_Voices_English.pdf

    The report is also available in a 10-minute DVD (video). This video is not captioned. There are many pictures and only an occasional line of text on the screen that is used to highlight key statistics or other information. I’m guessing there is also some kind of narration–but this is not accessible to deaf viewers. I’m not in a position to evaluate whether this DVD would be accessible or usable to hearing people with vision impairments. If you are, please do comment below.

    The DVD can be viewed at:

    http://s80.photobucket.com/albums/j194/raqueldejuan/?action=view&current=PhotoStory8.flv

    The report and DVD are also available in Spanish at:

    http://www.inclusion-international.org/sp/report/index.html



    We Can Do learned about the “Hear Our Voices” report by browsing Inclusion International’s web site. The information for this blog post was gathered from their web site and particularly from the report itself.

    Find more information about disabled poor people around the world by click on “reports” or “resources” under “categories” in the right-hand navigation bar on this page. Or consult the recent Retrospective post under “Finding sources of information.”



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    CONFERENCE: Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV & AIDS

    Posted on 5 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    2nd General Meeting
    Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV & AIDS

    Kampala, Uganda
    March 11-13, 2008

    Preliminary agenda for the 3 days:

    • Overview of progress toward Campaign goals
    • Tools and Resources Exchange Fair : “Marketplace” for display and exchange of Guidelines, Toolkits, and experiences
    • Launching of Working Groups
      1. Communications Working Group
      2. Research Working Group
      3. International Conference Accessibility Working Group
      4. Access to HIV Services Working Group

    More detailed information about the Africa Campaign and the Kampala meeting will soon be available on the Africa Campaign website (www.africacampaign.info) on the News page.



    We Can Do first learned about this conference through the Disabled People International email newsletter. Thank you to the conference organizers at Africa Campaign for sending the details posted above.



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    JOB POST (short term): Training for Sign Language News Program in Albania

    Posted on 4 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Training for Albanian Sign Language News Programme

    From: Colin Allen <colinja20@hotmail.com>
    Subject: Training for Albanian Sign Language News Programme

    Dear friends,

    Albanian National Association is looking for the trainers (Deaf and Hearing) to provide a short term training for the Sign Language News Programme in Albania.

    Please note the application closing date is on Friday, 14th January 2008.

    Wish you a very joyful year!

    Warm regards

    Colin

    Trainers:
    ANAD is looking for two trainers to work as a team – one Deaf person and one sign language interpreter. The trainer team is jointly responsible for creating a training plan appropriate for the setting and for training of each specific target group

    The Deaf Trainer shall be responsible to work with the team of Deaf News Presenters to prepare the news bulletin presentation from the written language to Albanian Sign Language. The Deaf News Presenter will be responsible to present the news in Albanian Sign Language. Before his/her presentation the Deaf presenter needs to work with the Sign Language Interpreter for better understanding of the given written material by the TV editors.

    The Sign Language Interpreter shall be responsible to work with the team of Albanian Sign Language Interpreters to prepare the news bulletin presentation from the spoken language to Albanian Sign Language. The Sign language Interpreter will be responsible to work together with the Deaf presenter on the written news prepared and given by the News editors on Albanian Television.

    Assignment Contract

    ANAD will prepare a contract with each trainer including compensation of:

    Travel Expenses:
    ANAD will pay for an economy class travel between the trainer’s home city and the city of Tirana by using the most economic carrier; visa and passport charges; and airport tax will be covered by the project.

    Accommodation:
    ANAD will provide with accommodation during the assignment period. Trainers will share an apartment with electricity, heating and warm water.

    Financial Benefits:
    The Trainers are responsible for payment of taxes and social security including Trainer’s pension and travel insurance for the trip.

    Assignment Fee:
    The applicants are asked to send ANAD their propositions for fee calculated for the entire period of six weeks. The fee request need be announced as a total payment as the candidates are responsible for the payments of any taxes, social security or pension payments of their home country. Please note that ANAD is an organization with very limited funding and relies on voluntary assistance. As a result ANAD is incapable of offering payments on the level of the European consultancy fees.

    BACKGROUND
    Organizational Name
    Albanian National Association of the Deaf (ANAD)

    Street Address
    Bulevardi “Zhan D’Ark”, Kulla 4, Shkalla 1, Ap. 9,
    Tirana, Albania

    Postal Address
    P.O.Box: 2401/1
    Tirane, Albania

    Email Addresses
    anad@abissnet.com.al
    anad.organisation@gmail.com

    Contact Person(s)
    Eduard Ajas, Manager: anad.organisation@gmail.com

    Albana Izeti Project Co-ordinator: albana.izeti@gmail.com

    Project Consultant, Colin Allen: deafbalkan@hotmail.com

    ANAD GOALS
    The goals of the Albanian National Association of the Deaf (ANAD) are as follows:

    1. To achieve equal opportunities and full participation in Society for people who are Deaf in accordance with the principles and objectives of the United Nations Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other general acts and recommendations of the United Nations Organisation and its specialised agencies.
    2. To become and remain an ordinary member of the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) and to operate in accordance with its principles and objectives.
    3. To ensure that Albanian Government observes all international and national declarations, recommendations on human rights and rights of Deaf people and people with other disabilities.
    4. To promote the creation and development of Provincial Clubs of Deaf people and organisations providing services to Deaf people where such organisations do not already exist in the Republic of Albania.
    5. To promote the unification of Provincial Clubs for Deaf people in the Republic of Albania.
    6. To organise and stimulate the exchange of information and experiences among organisations of and for Deaf people and among professionals specialising in the study of deafness in the Republic of Albania.
    7. To provide advice, assistance and support either directly or indirectly to organisations of and for Deaf people, upon their request whenever appropriate, in the Republic of Albania.
    8. To distribute relevant information about deafness and the current needs of Deaf people through a variety of media and to the government of the Republic of Albania.
    9. To promote the conduct of research and studies in all fields of deafness, including the Albanian Deaf Community, its language and culture.
    10. To promote the establishment, development and maintenance of education programmes and support services which recognise the specific requirements of Deaf children and adults.
    11. To ensure adequate funding of services for Deaf people by governments and/or other relevant institutions and agencies.
    12. To promote the recognition and acceptance of methods of communication preferred by Deaf people in the Republic of Albania.
    13. To encourage the development and availability of appropriate technology for Deaf people in the Republic of Albania.
    14. To provide a forum where Deaf people can come together as equals to learn about and discuss relevant issues and express their ideas and aspirations in the Republic of Albania.
    15. To foster pride in the Deaf Community, its language and culture.

    DESCRIPTION OF THE ALBANIAN SIGN LANGUAGE NEWS TRAINING PROGRAMME

    Brief Summary
    The Albanian National Association of the Deaf has initiated this project based on the big need of Albanian Deaf Community for access to information.

    Lately The Albanian Government and the Albanian Public Television -TVSH have committed to introduce the News Edition in Albanian Sign Language during the peak hour. The signed language news will be a news bulletin of fifteen minutes during the weekdays.

    The reading and writing skills of Deaf people in Albania are limited. There are a small number of Albanian Sign Language Interpreters who are currently receiving the training under the organisation’s Interpreter Training Programme.

    ANAD secured a limited funding from the Finnish Association of the Deaf and the Ministry for Foreign Affairs in Finland to implement six week training. ANAD is seeking for two trainers’ one deaf and one hearing that have a good knowledge and experience in the environment of TV news bulletin in signed language.

    After the training, ANAD is seeking to appoint preferably three teams consisting of a Deaf person and a sign language interpreter working together. The teams will rotate by presenting the 15-minute daily news bulletin for 5 days in a row.

    Suggested Components of the Training:
    The suggested training is outlined as follows:
    Translation Process of the News Bulletin:
    For Hearing Sign Language Interpreters:
    The hearing sign language interpreter should work together with the Deaf presenter before the filming of the TV news and he/she will be responsible for translating the news bulletin prepared by the TV editors from the spoken language to the Albanian Sign Language for the Deaf presenter; different techniques of translation; the ways of news bulletin delivery; grammatical adaptations etc.

    For Deaf News Presenters: The TV signed news will be signed by Deaf people after doing some practise on the given material. The Deaf people will need some training on how to sign the news bulletin from auto cue to the Albanian Sign Language; different techniques of translation; the ways of news bulletin delivery; grammatical adaptations etc.

    Timing:
    The time for presenting a news bulletin is radically limited; the News Sign Language Interpreters should know how to deliver the news bulletin in a well managed manner

    Clothes:
    Suitable outfit to contrast between clothes and hands, make –up etc.

    Presentation:
    Present a professional image role of the News Sign Language Interpreter on camera.

    Please note: Both Deaf and hearing trainers are responsible to prepare a training component in their respective area.

    The trainers will capacitate the News Bulletin Teams including the hearing camera crew on how to shoot the footage in appropriate angles so that the presentation in sign language is visually optimal for Deaf viewers. The capacitating includes technical advice on how to arrange appropriate sign language presentation during inserted news stories etc.

    Time frame of the training
    At least two weeks prior to the workshop, the Workshop Announcement shall be distributed to the members of the Albanian Deaf Community and the Interpreter Training Programme. The Announcement will seek for interested team members and it describes the selection process that will take place during the workshop. At the end of the workshop, a team of evaluators will review each participant and discuss the best candidates to be invited attend to the Intensive Training for at least two weeks.

    The aim of the intensive training is to have at least 5-6 candidates from both Deaf and hearing target groups, i.e. maximum 12 persons to work in the Sign Language News program.

    At the end of two weeks intensive training each team i.e. a working pair – a Deaf person and a sign language interpreter would need to prepare 15-minute news bulletin presentation for the evaluator team’s review. Out of the projected six candidate teams the evaluators would then select three teams to be appointed for the program work.
    The selected three teams would need to attend a week of further training.

    During the final training week, all teams need to have an opportunity to rehearse their presentations at the News Television Studio with the studio crew before the actual broadcasts start.

    The proposed training plan:

    Week One (28 January – 1 February 2008)

    • Arrival and preparation for the meetings with the Television Station, Project Co-ordinator and ANAD staff members
    • Workshop
    • Evaluation to select 6 Potential Deaf and 6 Potential Hearing people for the Intensive Training.

    Week Two and Three (4 – 15 February 2008)

    • Intensive Training for two weeks (hours/days)

    Suggested training hours:

    Monday – Friday from 16.00 – 20.00

    Saturday from 10.00 – 17.00

    Week Four (18 – 22 February 2008)

    • Select three teams of Deaf person and Sign Language Interpreter to attend the further training.

    Week Five (25 – 29 February 2008)

    • One week training at the Television News Station.

    Week Six (3 -7 March 2008)

    • Final evaluation of the teams’ capacities and organizing of further training if necessary
    • Training Project Report

    Commencement Date:

    Monday, 28th January 2008 – Friday, 7th March 2008 negotiable

    APPLICATION
    ANAD welcomes anyone who wishes to apply for the position of Deaf Trainer and Sign Language Interpreting News Trainer.

    Please, do address ANAD a letter with following information: reason(s) for applying, contact details, Curriculum Vitae, tentative training plan/program corresponding to the post you are seeking.

    Please send your application package to:

    Ms Albana Izeti
    Project Co-ordinator
    Albanian National Association of the Deaf
    P.O.Box: 2401/1
    Tirane, Albania
    anad@abissnet.com.al
    anad.organisation@gmail.com

    Ms Inkeri Lahtinen
    Project Home Coordinator
    The Finnish Association of the Deaf, FAD
    inkeri.lahtinen@kl-deafl.fi

    Mr Colin Allen
    Project Consultant
    The Finnish Association of the Deaf, FAD
    deafbalkan@hotmail.com

    CLOSING DATE OF APPLICATION: MONDAY, 14 JANUARY 2008



    We Can Do received this job post via the Intl-Dev email distribution list. Intl-Dev can be subscribed to for free.



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    TRAINING for Program Coordinators in Bangalore

    Posted on 3 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, HIV/AIDS, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Action on Disability and Development (ADD) India
    Training for Project Coordinators

    Action on Disability and Development (ADD) India is a development organization working with persons with disability in rural areas in South India.

    ADD India is conducting a Training in Bangalore for Programme Coordinators. This is aimed at developing the skills of Coordinators working in the development sector to incorporate and manage teamwork and their role as leaders and to strengthen their field based functions.

    Training CBR Workers and Project Coordinators has been an integral part of ADD India for almost two decades. ADD’s training focuses on increasing the knowledge, building skills and developing a positive attitude to working in the field. There is also an emphasis on practical exposure with information and knowledge. The main resource persons is Mr. Ramakrishna from Anweshana in Bhubaneshwar, who has 20 years experience in training in the development sector.

    The main resource persons is Mr. Ramakrishna from Anweshana in Bhubaneshwar, who has 20 years experience in training in the development sector.

    Training Components will Include

    • Facilitating the Community Worker to implement the project.
    • Clarifying the role and responsibilities of the Project Coordinator.
    • Setting goal and task accomplishment
    • Understanding Group Processes
    • Sanghas and their management
    • Federation Vision, Values and leadership Development
    • Conflict Resolution
    • Resource mobilization from the community
    • Exposure visit to a Sangha and / or Federation.

    It is anticipated that candidates selected for this training would have some knowledge of disability work. Therefore, this training, while examining the fundamental principles behind work of this kind, aims primarily to develop skills in the areas of programme development, monitoring and capacity building of people.

    Recommended Programme participants

  • Coordinators and managers of Community Based programmes in the development sector.
  • Professionals working with vulnerable groups like People with Disabilities, Women’s Development, Community Work and Education and Disabled peoples organizations, HIV/AIDS, Children’s programmes.
  • Individuals who wish to develop the skills to become involved in community development programmes.
  • Training Methodology
    This training is residential and would be conducted with simple facilities. The method of training will include lectures, discussions, group work, practical sessions and field visit.

    Language
    The language of training will be English. Participants must understand English but could express themselves in other languages ie. Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam, Bengali, Oriya, Hindi etc. All reading materials will be in English.

    Fee, Duration and Venue of training
    The fee is Rs.7000/- per person, which includes the training fee, meals, tea/coffee, accommodation for 6 days, training materials and exposure visit.

    Participants will have to make their own travel arrangements to reach Bangalore.

    Duration: March 3-7, 2008
    Venue: In Bangalore. Exact venue will be informed to the selected participants.

    Please send the completed application form to ADD India by 20th January 2008 either by email or by post.

    Action on Disability and Development India
    4005, 19th Cross, Banashankari 2nd Stage
    Bangalore – 560 070 India
    Phone: 080 – 2676 5881, 2676 2097
    Email: addindia@vsnl.net

    Selection will be confirmed by January 30th. The selected participants should pay the full fee by way of bank draft favouring ‘Action on Disability and Development India’, payable at Bangalore.

    For further details please contact Mrs. Nisha Printer at addindia@vsnl.net



    I learned about this opportunity via Ghulam Nabi Nazimani.



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    Free Rice for the Hungry, Free Vocabulary Fun for You

    Posted on 1 January 2008. Filed under: Poverty, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    URL for this page: http://tinyurl.com/255u9a
    The Fun Part
    You can give free rice to hungry people, play a free game, and improve your vocabulary, all in the same key stroke at a new web site called FreeRice.

    234_60_banner2.jpg

    If you’re one of my regular readers at We Can Do: my apologies. I know you usually come here to find new resources, information, news, or announcements related to poverty and human rights among disabled people in developing countries. Usually I do try to stay very tightly focused on issues of disability and international development at this blog. But this post IS still about poverty, even though it’s not specific to disabled people. And, more importantly, it IS still a holiday for most readers. So what the heck. I’ll indulge, this once. And I hope you’ll indulge with me.

    (For those of you who have been paying attention to the last few posts at this blog: the holiday season in general is one reason why I have been posting fewer new resources and devoting more time in the past week to long-term improvements to this web site. For example, see the new pages on accessibility; announcements for conferences, events, call for papers, and training opportunities; navigating We Can Do to help new readers quickly find the resources they need at this blog site; and news. I WILL start posting more fresh content soon, so do stay tuned. And consider subscribing to We Can Do so you don’t miss anything.)

    If you’ve been reading the right blogs lately, then the image near the top of this page might look familiar. For those of you who are not able to view this image, I’ll describe it: this is a horizontal “banner.” At the left-hand side is a brown wooden bowl with a few grains of white rice in it. (Hm. Wouldn’t brown rice be healthier?) At the right-hand side, the text says: “Free Rice” on the first line in large letters and “Play and Help!” on the second line in medium sized letters. The background on the left side is a medium/dark green; on the right side, it’s a lighter shade of green with what I think is supposed to be a blurry image of rice plants. FreeRice has a number of other similar-looking banners available. [Sorry–I’m describing the image here instead of using alt tags because I don’t have a clue how to use alt tags. If you do, please take a few moments to advise me in the comments area below and I’ll fix it.]

    So how does FreeRice work? Simple. Go to www.freerice.com. You will see a vocabulary word at the top of the screen and four possible definitions or synonyms. Choose the one you think is the closest match. If you guess correctly, FreeRice will give 20 grains of rice to hungry people. Then, if you like, you can continue playing. If you’re sighted and able to view images with your computer equipment, then you’ll also see a picture of a bowl of rice filling up each time free rice is given.

    This game is tailored to the vocabulary skill of each player who participates. If you answer three vocabulary questions in a row correctly then it gives you a more challenging word. If you continue to guess correctly, the words become harder and harder. If you miss one, it gives you an easier word. If you keep missing, the words become easier and easier. Until you start to answer correctly again. There are 50 vocabulary levels. So nearly all people should be able to find a level that is comfortable for them whether you’re learning English as a second language or whether you’re a vocabulary geek.

    You might wonder: if this game is free, then where does the money come from to pay for all the rice that’s going to hungry people? It comes from advertisers. There is an advertisement banner at the bottom of the screen. The ad in this banner changes every time you guess a new word. The more you play, the more ads you see. And the advertisers are obviously hoping that more people playing FreeRice will translate into more sales for their products, or more donations to their charitable causes.

    You can guess one word or guess a million. Play for just one day or play every day the rest of your life. Or anything in between. It’s all up to you. The more you play, the more rice you give–and, in theory, the more vocabulary you learn. I say “in theory” because I’ve read some criticism somewhere (sorry, don’t remember where) that says vocabulary games like this one may not be necessarily the best way to learn vocabulary. But I’m sure it can’t hurt. And if you’re serious about it, you could use the game to develop a vocabulary study list and find other ways to rehearse the words you see. (Hint: double check your understanding with a dictionary. And use it in a sentence.)

    Accessibility for Blind People
    I’m not able to evaluate whether the FreeRice site is accessible to people who use screen readers. If this is you, I would be curious to learn about your experience there. Since the game itself is text-based, I’m guessing there should not be any major problems with it. Though I’m also guessing that the ads won’t be very accessible, unless a given advertiser thinks to use the alt tag for their images. And you won’t see that rice bowl filling up.

    The Serious Part
    This blog post deviates from the usual We Can Do post in two ways. One, as noted above, it’s not about disability. (Though disabled people do certainly starve also. In fact, given that disabled people are more likely to experience poverty, it’s probably safe to assume that people with disabilities are also more likely to go hungry.) Two, my normal focus in this blog is on finding long-term solutions to long-standing problems. Thus, things like how to better include disabled people in large-scale, long-term poverty reduction strategies. Or how to ensure that disabled children in developing countries are not left behind when their governments try to bring more children into the classroom.

    In this view: one criticism I do have for the FreeRice site is that it offers a temporary fix for something that is, for far too many people, a chronic problem. In the long run, it’s not enough to keep shipping free rice to hungry people. That feeds them today, but it doesn’t help them feed themselves tomorrow or next year. That means we also need to invest in more long-term strategies for fighting poverty. That means more schools so that the 77 million children out of school can enter the classroom for the first time. And we need more textbooks and better quality teachers–and possibly more computers–so that children already in the classroom will learn something while they’re there. Poor people who have entrepreneurial skills need small business loans so they can lift themselves out of poverty with their own hard work. And we need to give more aid dollars directly to organizations based in developing countries who are running great projects to fight HIV/AIDS, deliver clean drinking water, or abolish poverty.

    But this is not a slam against FreeRice, per se. In fact, I sometimes play this game myself. Yes, more chronic forms of hunger do need a long-term fix. But hunger can also be a short-term emergency, such as during a time of war (though wars, unfortunately, can sometimes be long-term) or in the first few months after a natural disaster. And short-term emergencies, unfortunately, will always happen. Therefore, we will always, to some extent, actually need short-term fixes like FreeRice.

    I just feel compelled to point out the need for long-term solutions because I worry that some people in industrialized countries are too quick to donate time (or money) to easy, “feel-good” causes that don’t actually solve problems. If you really want to help, then don’t just help. Instead, make it possible for people to help themselves.

    But, there’s nothing wrong with also having a little fun at freerice.com.

    In that spirit: Here’s wishing you a Happy New Year. May the year 2008 be delightful and fruitful for you. And for those of you who work to ensure that disabled people are not left out when governments and organizations fight poverty and speak out for human rights: I hope all your endeavors this year will be successful ones.



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    PAPER: Independent Living Movement in Developing Countries by Shoji Nakanishi

    Posted on 30 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Guest Blogger, Latin America & Caribbean | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    URL for this page: http://tinyurl.com/2eeldt

    Independent Living Movement in Developing Countries

    by Shoji Nakanishi
    Disabled People International (DPI) Japan

    It has been many years since experts of rehabilitation recommended training and educations to people with disabilities to enable them to get jobs as non disabled people do. The experts believe that independence means only economical independence. As a result, parents think it impossible for their disabled children to live independently in their communities. Parents tend to put these children into a residential institution for them to live permanently. Following these ideas, the government is promoting to build more institutions and to train more experts for people with disabilities.

    The Independent living movement by severely disabled people in America denied institutions that lead to isolation and discrimination. In 1972 The First IL center was established in Berkeley, the second one in Houston, in 1974 the third in Boston. A lot of IL centers have come into the world in a very short time. All disabled people in the whole country were united, and then won the amendment of rehabilitation law in 1978. As a result, IL centers got great opportunities to get subsidies from the federal government. “Independent Living: From Social Movement to Analytic Paradigm”, An academic paper written by Gerben DeJong, published in 1978, drastically changed the way of thinking toward disabilities, from rehabilitation to independent living. With this paper, the philosophy of independent living was accepted as a social movement on a academic basis. These two events rapidly promoted the establishment of IL centers nationwide.

    Independent Living Movement In Developed countries

    The IL movement, which gave dreams and wishes to disabled persons, has grown to service provision systems by disabled peoples themselves and advocacy activities by IL centers in these 30 years in all developed countries, except the Oceania region.

    Ed Roberts, the founder of the Center for Independent Living in Berkeley and other activists with disabilities said, “People with disabilities should live in communities.” “People with disabilities are neither patients to be cared for, children to be protected, nor Gods to be worshipped.” “People with disabilities themselves can identify their necessary assistance and manage it.” “People with disabilities are the victims of social prejudice rather than victims of disabilities.” This philosophy was soon accepted in many parts of the world. On the grounds of this philosophy, IL centers are providing these services below:

    1. Dispatch of Personal Assistants.
      • There are two ways of dispatching personal assistants; one is the way of direct dispatching like in Japan, another in the way of introducing through IL centers like in the U.S.
    2. Peer Counselling
      • Counselling, talking or sessions among peers who have the same or similar experiences of disabilities.
    3. Independent Living Skill Training
    4. Advocacy Activities
    5. Providing information
      • Housing and social welfare referral are included.

    Now the organizations of IL centers are established in each country and region, such as NCIL in America, CAILC in Canada, JIL in Japan, and ENIL in Europe. In 1999 The first summit of World independent Living was held in Washington D.C, U.S.A . Since then, three summits have taken place in different areas where a great number of disabled leaders, including leaders from developing countries became involved.

    Conditions concerning Independent Living in developing countries

    The Idea of independent living, which insists on self-decision and self-management, also fascinated people with disabilities in developing countries. But because of lack of social resources, it is thought to be difficult in developing countries to achieve environments where there are enough services and accessibilities. Moreover, quite a few people thought by mistake that independence means only economical independence, so that they believed that nobody can live an independent life except for a lightly disabled person. It is nearly impossible for people with disabilities to get jobs in Asia, where only 5 or 10 percent of disabled children can have school education.

    As a result, almost all developing countries tried to get disabled people to be independent through CBR (Community based rehabilitation) produced by experts, in the same period of the IL movement. Services based on institutions could be only beneficial for disabled people living in urban areas. The main target of CBR is for disabled people who live in rural areas, occupying 7 or8 percent of the total population. Non-disabled people in their communities were voluntaries trained as CBR workers, and then they did some simple rehabilitation work and help the daily lives for disabled people. Indeed, the quality of life for disabled persons might get improved to some extent, through basic physical training, walking training, sign language education, inclusion by CBR workers, and financial aids of private companies like Micro Credit. But CBR did not necessarily bring independent living for disabled persons though disabled persons had joined as official members since the beginning of providing services. That is because CBR was firstly positioned as extentions of institutions, so that disabled persons were kept under control or management of experts without disabilities.

    It is often the case that disabled people who have loved the idea of IL also name their activities IL in some developing countries. For example, a certain disability organization In Mexico established a new organization named “International Organization of Independent Living for People With Disabilities”, arranging the curriculum for disabled people which included lessons about fitness, physiology, swimming, manipulation of wheelchair, driving of remodeled cars, sexuality and family life, urology, training of daily living activities etc. In Thailand, one of the staff with disabilities working at Sirindorn National Medical Rehabilitation Center suggested the Independent Living Unit, providing much the same program as Mexico’s organization did. Even though these trials may not always share the same meaning of original independent living, it indicates that there are also many disabled people having a try at independent living by themselves, in developing countries.

    Scheme for spreading IL in developing countries

    In 1980, American disabled people who had got involved in the IL movement began to act in other countries to spread the philosophy abroad. Nowadays, Japan is taking charge of propagation of IL in the Asian region, while in America, IL centers or other organizations like Mobility International are inviting other countries’ disabled leaders to their training seminars.

    One of 4 activities is often adopted as a way of spreading the IL philosophy in developing countries; first is promoting theoretical framework of IL, second, advocacy, third, participation of severely disabled persons in self-help organizations, and the last, showing a role model as an example of IL.

    1. Activity to promote the theoretical framework of IL
      Firstly it is necessary to correct the mistake about IL that independence means doing everything alone without any help. In spite of someone’s help, it is regarded as IL, if only self-decision and self-management can be done. This idea welcomes people with disabilities as “very good news”. But, in most cases, this acceptance does not immediately bring grassroot activities. For instance, a lot of disabled people were excited to meet American activists who came to Japan for an IL promotion tour in 1982, but the IL movement in Japan did not start untill the first IL center was established in 1986. It is very important to follow up on their experiences.

    The first IL seminar in Asia was held in Bacolod, the Philippines in 1994, mainly promoted by STIL, Sweden and the Human Care Association, Japan. Three Asian persons with quadriplegia joined this seminar. After the seminar, Motab from Bangladesh tried to expand his job at the Center for the Rehabilitation of the Paralyzed to the activity of independent living but in vain because of his death 3 years ago. Male participants from the Philippines, all of whom had already married, got quite interested in the IL movement, but they found it difficult to make a movement in their own country, because they had to prepare for their family before they join the movement. On the other hand, Topong from Thailand, on the grounds of the ideals of the IL movement, held a demonstration for better access of Sky Train, and educated other organizations in local areas. The Human Care Association supported his activities, and then offered him to come to Japan for training

    Famous disabled activists participated in the 1999’s seminar in Malaysia held by the Asia Disability Institute. One of them was Christine Lee, who had staged a demonstration for access of the mono railway at the risk of being arrested. All participants were wildly enthusiastic on the last day of the seminar, and promised each other to promote the IL movement more actively from now on. But actually, few of them were able to increase their activities in the IL movement. There may be two reasons. One is most of the participants have their own jobs and have no time for the IL movement; the other is that severely disabled persons who really need IL have not joined the movement yet.

    Promoting activities are very essential to support and spread the IL movement

    2. Advocacy
       The IL movement in Brazil was based on advocacy. Rosangela Berman Bieler, a Brazilian woman with quadriplegic who happened to visit an IL center in America was so impressed with its philosophy that she joined the IL movement. In 1988 CVIRJ, the first IL center in Brazil, was establish by her in Rio de Janeiro. CVIRJ began to start a movement for easy access to the city, such as getting rid of steps on side walks. The problem of accessibility is very meanful not only because it is a problem that applies to all kinds of disabled people, but also because it will bring visible outcomes as advocacy. The IL center in Brazil made the movement more powerful by keeping contact with IL centers in America. Now in Brazil, there are 25 IL centers established, and the national union of IL centers has been united.

    In South Korea, the IL movement has made rapid progress in a short time, because the Korean people getting involved with the IL movement have already created activities of advocacy on a large scale. Chon Manfu, a severely disabled person who applied for the role model of IL in 2000, was empowered through the experiences of joining big demonstration in 2001 and a long-term hunger strike in May 2002, triggered by the death of a wheelchair user at a subway station. These events were arranged by Pack Gyoung Souk, the principal of a night school for the disabled people. A lot of his students, who have studied IL, are taking part in the IL movement, which is one of the reasons why the Korean IL movement has such power. Now, the main issue in Korea is to train disabled people as peer counselors. The physical and mental conditions for developing IL in Korea are being prepared; 3 IL centers in Japan, Human Care Association, CIL Tachikawa, and HANDS Setagaya, collaborated with each other to establish a new project team that dispatches peer counselors to Korea several times a year and provides long-term training in Japan for Korean disabled leaders. As a result, some of them have reached the high standard of peer counselors that JIL is setting. There are 5 IL centers in Korea.

    3. Participation of severely disabled persons in self-help groups

    In Thailand, many disabled people used to sell lottery as a job, which made enough money to prepare for their own family. But because of this job, the disability movement did not grow among people with disabilities in Thailand. Under these circumstances, Topong, as I said before, thought it was only the IL movement that would change the environment of disabled people in Thailand. He tried to promote the IL movement in collaboration with 3 organizations of disabled people, Nontabri,Chonbri,Nakonpatom, three of which were very conscious about the rights of people with disabilities. To support his activities, the Human Care Association invited him to come to Japan for an IL seminar.

    Each of these three organizations were democratic self-help groups, which provided home visiting services for disabled persons. Leaders of these organizations were willing to accept the idea of IL. The first step of a three year project is to open a seminar by Japanese disabled leaders, ten participants from three organizations were all studying hard, but none of them were severely disabled. So, the project team gave a task for them that they should find at least five severely disabled persons and take them outside their homes until the next years’ seminar was held.

    After this, three organizations began to train students to be a voluntary staff, and ask them to take severely disabled persons outside. Some of disabled persons went outside for the first time in their lives; some of them were strogly opposed by their families, so that they were forced to refuse staff visits; some of them gave up to go outside because of their bad health; some of them had lifters fixed in their bathroom by staff who saw families lift the disabled person with great difficulty. As a result, many of them attended the peer counselling workshop held in 2002 empowered physically and mentally. As they are finished learning skills of managing an IL center in 2003-2004 year, the real activities are ready to start.

    4. Showing role model of IL

    Young disabled persons who belongs to the MileStone Society in Pakistan came to Japan for the Duskin Training Program, including the 9 month IL seminar at several IL centers, such as Human Care Association and Main Stream Association. It is almost a year since they have gone back to Pakistan and begun to start the IL movement. They looked around Lahore to discover severely disabled persons confined in their homes, and persuade them to attend training workshops held at an office. They asked some promising participants to experience IL in a room in the corner of the office.

    In the end, a young girl with muscular dystrophy made a decision to live independently. She learned various IL skills such as how to take proper care from others and how to tell personal assistants what she wanted her PA to do by actually living in a special room arranged in a corner of her house. In the day time, now she works as a member of the Life IL Center the renamed office, riding in a power wheel chair taken from Japan. It is very meaningful that she began to live independently for the first time in Pakistan, moreover in such an Islamic society, where women are likely to be conservative. After her independence, two male disabled persons, who have been encouraged by her, want and even practice now to live independently.

    Spreading the correct philosophy of IL

    It is true that more and more people have heard about IL, and especially in developing countries, where their expectation toward IL is getting bigger and bigger. Nevertheless, most of them have given up their dreams, making excuses like these: “We have no resources to use in our country.” “Prejudices against disabled people are still deeply rooted.” “Government does not still prepare sufficient welfare systems.”

      One of the strategies to achieve the targets of the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action is “Strengthened community-based approaches for the prevention of causes of disability, rehabilitation and empowerment of persons with disabilities.” It says that “Many developing countries in the region are now beginning to augment and replace traditional institutional and centralized rehabilitation programmes and projects with approaches better suited to their social and economic environments of poverty, high unemployment and limited resources for social services. Community-based rehabilitation programmes form the hub of such strategies. The community-based approach is particularly appropriate for the prevention of causes of disability, early identification and intervention of children with disabilities, reaching out to persons with disabilities in rural areas, raising awareness and advocacy for the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all activities in the community, including social, cultural and religious activities. Education, training and employment needs could also be met by this approach. It is essential that persons with disabilities exercise choice and control over initiatives for community-based rehabilitation..” It even recommends in Strategy 10 that “Governments, in collaboration with organizations of persons with disabilities and civil society organizations, should immediately develop national policies, if that has not yet been done, to promote community-based approaches for the prevention of causes of disability, for rehabilitation and for the empowerment of persons with disabilities. Community based rehabilitation (CBR) perspectives should reflect a human rights approach and be modeled on the independent living concept, which includes peer counselling.”

    Many people tend to think it nearly impossible to introduce IL to their countries. Naturally the idea of IL can apply to all disabled people in all countries by all ages. The problem is whether you can have the courage of doing what you have not done yet, and whether you have many peers and friends who will support your activity. Pioneers have a lot of difficulties, but have a great impact on other people. Nowadays a variety of IL programs and seminars are prepared for such people. People in developed countries including US are ready to assist you to be a leader of IL movement. We are showing the achievements and good news of IL at all times.



    Thank you to author Shoji Nakanishi for granting permission to publish this article at We Can Do. Shoji Nakanishi is currently Chairperson of DPI Asia Pacific and Treasurer DPI World Council. He founded the Japan Council on Independent Living Centers.

    I first learned about this paper when Ghulam Nabi Nazimani passed it along.

    Have you written an article that you think would be appropriate for publication at We Can Do? Please review the We Can Do Wish List for Written Materials and Resources and contact me. You may either leave a comment somewhere at this blog or sent me an email to ashettle [at] patriot.net.

    To find more academic papers or research related to people with disabilities in developing countries, click on Academic Papers and Research under “Categories” in the right-hand navigation bar.



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    Finding What You Want at We Can Do

    Posted on 28 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Introduction to "We Can Do" | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

    We Can Do has a growing collection of information on resources, funding sources, academic papers and research, case studies, conferences and other events, call for papers, education and training opportunities, job and internship opportunities, and volunteer opportunities. But how do you find everything that might be helpful to you in the work you do with disability communities in developing countries?

    I have now created a new page to help guide you. Click on Navigating We Can Do in the top navigation bar for some quick tips on:

    • finding particular types of information
    • finding information by theme or topic
    • consulting an overview of all We Can Do posts
    • finding announcements for upcoming (or on-going) conferences, events, call for papers, education, and training opportunities
    • making sure you haven’t overlooked any recent posts at We Can Do
    • browsing all past posts in the We Can Do Archives; finding the most popular–and the most under-rated–We Can Do posts
    • finding information and resources elsewhere; making sure you don’t miss future information posted at We Can Do

    Please do share any ideas you may have for how I can make it easier for you to “navigate” We Can Do. I want you to be able to quickly find the information you need to help you fight poverty among disabled people in developing countries and advocate for human rights. I also welcome feedback on making We Can Do more accessible to readers with disabilities, including people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers.



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    RESOURCE: Atlas on Country Resources in Intellectual Disabilities

    Posted on 27 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cognitive Impairments, Education, Employment, Families, Health, Human Rights, News, Reports, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Montreal PAHO/WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health have released an atlas that presents global data on intellectual disabilities. The Atlas: Global Resources for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: 2007 (PDF format, 5.6 Mb) was launched during the Second International Conference on Intellectual Disabilities held in November 2007 in Bangkok, Thailand.

    WHO initiated the Atlas in recognition that “global data collection in the field of intellectual disabilities has long been neglected” (Preface, p. 11). The Atlas gives an overview of the extent to which resources and services for children, adolescents, and adults with intellectual disabilities are available throughout all the member states of WHO. This includes information on health services; education; services specific to intellectual disabilities; work-related services such as sheltered or supported employment and vocational training; services to families; and other types of services such as leisure activities, transportation, assistive technology, rights or advocacy support, or food/meal supplies. Data is also given for how these resources and services are distributed by region and by income level.

    This information was gathered in the hope that it can be used to help stimulate advocacy and planning efforts in support of people with intellectual disabilities and their families. Specifically, it helps identify specific gaps and needs in the resources and services available for people with intellectual disabilities and their families throughout the world. This information could be used to advocate with governments or foundations for the resources needed to fill these gaps. The Atlas also has developed two instruments that can be used at the country or the regional level to help map where intellectual disability services are available (in Appendix III and IV of the Atlas). Furthermore, the Atlas has helped produce a network of contacts in the intellectual disability field (in Appendix II of the Atlas).

    The Atlas also was developed in acknowledgment that disability is increasingly recognized as a human rights issue. Health and other public services for people with intellectual disabilities are a human right, as recognized by the new international disabilities rights treaty. The Atlas was enabled by a new linkage between WHO and the intellectual disability field, via the Montreal PAHO/WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research in Mental Health and its associated partners, the Lisette-Dupras and the West Montreal Readaptation centres for persons with intellectual disabilities.

    This new resource is primarily targeted at individuals and agencies responsible for planning health and social policy and services within countries. However, it also is meant for those who provide services to people with intellectual disabilities; for international and national NGOs active in the intellectual disability field; human rights advocates and activists; public health professionals and students; and for civil society in general.

    The entire Atlas is available for free in PDF format (5.6 Mb). You can download it by clicking on the link to:

    http://www.who.int/entity/mental_health/evidence/atlas_id_2007.pdf

    You can also read more background information on the Atlas, including the contact person at WHO, at:

    http://bangkok-id-conference.org/program-documentation-ressources/project-atlas



    We Can Do first learned of this resource through the web site for the International Conference on Intellectual Disabilities/Mental Retardation. The information in this blog post was gathered partly from



    What other resources are available via We Can Do that you might have overlooked? See the We Can Do Retrospective: The First 100 Posts (and Then Some) for an overview.

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    Finding Conferences, Training Opportunities, and Call for Papers

    Posted on 24 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, Introduction to "We Can Do" | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Until now, the only way someone could quickly look up all conference and event announcements, or training opportunities, or call for papers was to look under “Categories” in the right hand navigation bar and click on “Events and Conferences, “<a href=”Education and training opportunities, or “Call for Papers.

    This probably worked fine for people who monitor We Can Do on a regular basis. When a new announcement went up on the site, you could be sure it wasn’t too late to apply (because, after all, it was a new announcement). And you could see at a glance if it was of interest to you. But for someone new to the site, I imagine it might have been more difficult to browse through the large, and growing backlog of various types of announcements. Some of the newer announcements are already dated–for events that have now come and gone. But some of the older announcements are still perfectly valid–for events that still won’t take place for many more months.

    Now there’s a better way to quickly locate announcements for upcoming events, conferences, call for papers, and education or training opportunities. If you look up at the top of this page, you will see there is a new link entitled Conferences, Events, Call for Papers, Training Opportunities. You can click on that page at any time to see events organized by date. You might notice that I cribbed most of this new page from the work I did on my Retrospective post, which links to the first 100-plus posts at We Can Do.

    I will still post announcements for events, education and training opportunities and so forth as I receive them. But from now on, I will also try to link to these announcements from the new page. And from time to time, I will remove links to dated announcements.

    If you subscribe to We Can Do, then you can receive a free email alert each time a new post goes up at We Can Do. That way, you can be sure you won’t miss any new announcements or other material of interest at We Can Do.

    Please let me know what you think of this new feature. Also please do let me know of any suggestions you may have for other ways I can improve We Can Do.



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    We Can Do Retrospective: The First 100 Posts (and Then Some)

    Posted on 22 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Arts, autism, Blind, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Commonwealth Nations, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Deaf, Democratic Participation, Disability Studies, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, East Asia and Central Asia, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Events and Conferences, Families, Fellowships & Scholarships, Funding, Guest Blogger, Health, HIV/AIDS, Housing, Human Rights, Immigration, Inclusion, Interpreting, Introduction to "We Can Do", Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation, Remittances, Reports, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Violence, Volunteer Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Skip introduction, go straight to the Table of Contents

    If you’re new to We Can Do, what interesting information, news, or resources might you have overlooked from the past few months? Although some older items may no longer be interesting, others may still be relevant and helpful a year or three from now. This post can help guide you through the first 100-plus posts at this blog. You can click from the table of contents below to any section of this page that interests you–and then another click on “table of contents” can take you back to the contents, or “top of this page” takes you back to this introduction.

    Top of this page


    Table of Contents

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    About We Can Do

    To learn more about the purpose of We Can Do, see About We Can Do. For more on its guiding philosophy, go to Why We Can Do.

    Thinking about submitting your own written materials, job posts, conference announcements, or resources to We Can Do? Check the Wish list for written materials and resources.

    Want to receive an alert in email when a new post goes up at We Can Do? You can Subscribe to We Can Do for free.

    I changed the organization and appearance of We Can Do in early October to its present format.

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    The Five Most Popular We Can Do posts

    The five listed here are the ones that have attracted the most “page views” since We Can Do began in late July. You may notice that not all of these are featured in the 10 “most popular posts” listed in the right-hand navigation bar. That’s because the navigation bar only lists posts that have received a lot of traffic very recently (I think within the past few days; its done automatically by wordpress so I’m not sure how it works). But here I’m listing the five that have the highest TOTAL page views.

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    The Five Most Under-Rated We Can Do posts

    Are these posts really under-rated? You’ll have to read them and decide for yourself. But in choosing these five, I used two criteria: 1. These are posts that have received fewer than 100 visitors–sometimes far fewer. 2. These are posts that I think could be helpful or interesting to readers and maybe deserve more attention than they have gotten. These are in no particular order:

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    Finding Practical Resources and Case Studies or Helpful Organizations

    Finding organizations; Resources for inclusive development; Human rights resources; Case studies; Other helpful resources

    Finding organizations
    Mainstream international development agencies sometimes say that they don’t know how to find people with disabilities, or their representative organizations, in the developing countries where they work. Reviewing the July post entitled Finding Local Disability Organizations may help point you in the right direction. Also see Disability Organizations in Afghanistan, Asia, Kenya, Uganda.

    Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) sometimes aren’t sure where to find mainstream development organizations and resources that might be willing to collaborate with them.

    There is an international network of organizations for families of people with Rubinstein Taybi Syndrome.

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Resources for Inclusive Development
    Both disability advocates and mainstream development organizations want to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind when countries and organizations fight poverty or improve public health, education, water, and other services. But it can be a challenge to figure out how to make projects and government policies more inclusive. The following resources can help:

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    Resources on the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
    By now, you may be aware that a global movement is taking place to ratify the international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Many relevant resources are now being produced in relation to the CRPD, some of which have been posted or featured here at We Can Do:

  • Read the CRPD “translated” into plain English.
  • UNICEF has developed a child-friendly version of the CRPD to help children understand disability rights
  • Disabled People International offers two toolkits on ratifying and implementing the CRPD for disability advocates who want to help ensure that all disabled people have their human rights recognized.
  • A handbook on disability rights targeted at parliamentarians can help parliamentarians, people who work in close contact with government agencies, and disability advocates in general, better understand the CRPD.
  • The United Nations’ new web site, UN Enable, is one of the best, and most official, places to find information on the CRPD.
  • Handicap International has produced its own Teaching Kit on the CRPD.
  • The International Disability Equality Agency (IDEA) has issued Equalize It! A Manifesto for Disability Equality in Development Cooperation that expresses their position on how to ensure disability equality in the international development field.
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    Case Studies
    Reviewing case studies of projects implemented elsewhere can be a valuable source of ideas that could help you figure out how to run or implement your own projects. I would love to post many more best-practice and failed-practice case studies than I have available right now. If you think you have something worth sharing, please check my Wish List of Written Materials and Resource and contact me at ashettle [at] patriot.net.

    But for now, here are two case studies:

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Other Helpful Resources

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Finding Useful Sources of Information and Research

    Finding academic research, papers, resources, or statistics
    Looking for academic research and academic papers; resources that can be used by people working in the field; or sources of statistics? Some of the following posts may be helpful:

    Information on people with disabilities
    Interested in learning about the living conditions of people with disabilities in specific nations, or in specific thematic areas? Some of the following may be of interest:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Funding Sources

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Academic Papers

    We Can Do has published, or re-published, academic papers, or linked to same, on a range of subjects, including:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    News

    September 2007; October 2007; November 2007; Early December 2007

    September 2007
    At one point in September, the international disability community prematurely thought we might be On the Verge of Making History by ratifying the disability rights community.

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    October 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    November 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Early December 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Opinion Pieces

    So far, the opinion pieces here are all by me. But I would like for We Can Do to be host to an active exchange of ideas and differing perspectives. If you have a strong opinion about something, please consider submitting it. Yes, that includes opinions that disagree with mine! Consult the Wish list for written materials and resources for ideas of the kinds of topics I’m trying to cover at We Can Do.

    Meanwhile, here are a few of my own opinion pieces:

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    Call for Papers (for Conferences, Journals, Other)

    You might be just now starting your academic career as an undergraduate or graduate student. Or perhaps you have been doing quantitative or qualitative research, or writing policy analysis, or case studies, or social analysis, for years. Either way, if you’re looking for opportunities to present, publish, or otherwise disseminate your papers or run a workshop, then check out these upcoming or ongoing opportunities:

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    International Conferences and Events

    Looking for a conference to attend? Here are a few upcoming events:
    January 2008; February 2008; March 2008; April 2008; May 2008; August 2008; September 2008; November 2008

    January 2008
    The South Asian Conference on Autism is being held in New Delhi, India in January 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    February 2008

  • The Disabilities Initiatives in Development Seminar, also in Bangladesh also in February 2008.
  • One for all: Persons with Disabilities Initiative in Development, again in Bangladesh in February 2008.
  • The International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies at the University of Central Lancashire in Preston, UK is holding a conference on sign language research in the UK in February 2008.
  • A conference on the deaf community, sign languages, social issues, civil rights, and creativity will be held on the campus of Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, USA.
  • The Techshare India 2008 Conference on accessibility will be held in New Delhi, India, in February 2008.
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    March 2008
    The 8th annual meeting of the Gulf Disability Society will meet in United Arab Emirates in March 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    April 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    May 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    August 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    September 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    November 2008
    The Association on Women’s Rights in Development (AWID)’s International Forum on Women’s Rights and Development will be held in Cape Town, South Africa in November 2008. A call for proposals is open until January 28, 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Jobs, Internships, Volunteer Opportunities

    We Can Do will probably never be a comprehensive job-board. Serious job, internship, or volunteer placement hunters will want to explore other means of finding opportunities. For example, jobs, internships, and volunteer opportunities in the international field generally, or in the disability field generally, can sometimes be found at www.idealist.org. But I do occasionally happen to come across a job announcement. Here are a few that may still be open to applications:

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    Education and Training Opportunities

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    Missed Opportunities

    Missed call for papers; Missed training opportunities; Missed job, internship, and volunteer opportunities; Missed events and conferences

    Some of the material I post at We Can Do is time-sensitive material. That means the conferences announced here have come and gone; job posts have been filled; and deadlines are over. So, if it’s too late for you to do anything about any of the following announcements, then why bother listing them? First, some conference organizers issue compilations of papers and presentations or other interesting materials after their event is over. If a topic interests you, it may be worth communicating with event organizers to see if any follow-up publications are available. Second, organizations that offer one conference, job opportunity, call for papers, etc., may offer something similar in the future. Many conferences, for example, meet every one, two, three, or four years. Monitoring, joining, or communicating with organizations of interest to you could help ensure that you learn about the next opportunity in time to plan for it.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Call for Papers
    The German Journal for Disability and Development called for papers on art and disabilities to be submitted by the end of November 2007.

    Also browse through the listing of upcoming conferences and missed conferences.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Training Opportunities

    In October 2007, the International Labour Organisation had a training course for professionals from developing countries.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Jobs, Internships, and Volunteer Opportunities
    Remember that it is too late to apply for these specific opportunities. These are listed here in case you want to check out the sponsoring organizations for future opportunities like these:

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Event and Conference Opportunities

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    What’s Next for We Can Do?

    I am not yet satisfied with We Can Do. I still see many gaps that I want to repair. I want to find, and post, more materials of a pragmatic nature. By which I mean, material that people in the field can put to immediate use in improving the lives of disabled people in developing countries. If you think you can help me locate helpful materials, please review my Wish list for written materials and resources and contact me.

    I also want to reach more development professionals at mainstream development organizations and more employees and volunteers at international disability organizations. And I want to reach more small DPOs and individual advocates in more developing countries. The knowledge shared at We Can Do cannot help until it is brought to people with disabilities living in poverty in developing countries. That “final mile” can only be bridged by readers like YOU.

    If you want to help, I hope you will consider telling your colleagues and contacts about We Can Do. If you run a web site or a blog, please consider linking to We Can Do at https://wecando.wordpress.com. If you have the skills, the time, and the commitment to launch a We Can Do mirror site translation into some other language, please talk to me (leave a comment or email me at ashettle [at] patriot.net). And please do feel free to print out the more helpful We Can Do posts to share with people you know in developing countries who do not have easy access to the Internet.

    For those of you who like numbers: We Can Do had 285 page views in July; 851 in August; 1305 in September; 2936 in October; 4862 in November; and more than 5100 in the first three weeks of December. And who is responsible for making these numbers happen? Why—you, of course! So, thank you for visiting We Can Do.

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

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    NEWS: El Salvador, Mexico Ratify Disability Rights Treaty

    Posted on 21 December 2007. Filed under: Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Press Release from Rehabilitation International (RI)
    Mexico, El Salvador and Nicaragua Ratify the UN Disability Rights Convention
    RI Calls on Governments to Recognize the Human Rights of All by Ratifying the CRPD

    (United Nations, New York, USA, 17 December 2007): RI congratulates the Governments of Mexico, El Salvador and Nicaragua for ratifying the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), bringing the number to 14 States Parties. Mexico also ratified the Optional Protocol. RI calls on all governments which have not yet ratified the CRPD and its Optional Protocol to do so as a matter of priority and without reservations and declarations. Furthermore, RI urges all States Parties to begin the process of implementation by developing laws, programs and policies to ensure that ALL persons with disabilities, regardless of the type of disability, enjoy all of the rights in the Convention.

    Libre Acceso President Federico Fleischmann said, “We recognize the great efforts of the Government of Mexico for being a leader in promoting the human rights of persons with disabilities, as embodied in the Convention. RI and its member in Mexico, Libre Acceso, are committed to working within its broad network to ensure that Mexican laws are strengthened to comply with the high standards set by the Convention.”

    As part of its Global Advocacy Campaign, RI partnered with Libre Acceso, representatives of the Mexican government, the Mexican law firm Barrera, Siqueiros y Torres Landa, S.C., the international law firm Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP and local disability experts to develop recommendations on how Mexico’s National Disability Law can comply with the Convention. These recommendations, presented to the Mexican Government on October 18, 2007, were formally adopted by Partido Accion Nacional (PAN), the political party of the Mexican President, as the official proposed amendments to this national law. The Senate and Chamber of Deputies will now discuss the amendments, which may be adopted as early as next year. This RI project has been made possible because of the generous support of an anonymous donor and Irish Aid.

    “We are very happy today to deposit the instrument of ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Setting up the legal framework is only the first step. The real challenge is to build a culture where the human rights of every person are fully respected,” said Senator Guillermo Tamborrel, President of the Commission on Vulnerable

    Groups and a member of PAN. Senator Tamborrel, together with Senator Maria los Angeles Moreno Uriegas of Partido Revolucionario Institutional (PRI), were present when Mexico deposited its ratification instrument today.

    The CRPD, the first human rights treaty of the 21st century, represents an essential legal instrument prohibiting discrimination against persons with disabilities in all areas of life, and includes specific provisions related to rehabilitation, habilitation, education, employment, health and access to information, public facilities and services, among others. The Optional Protocol concerns how individuals or groups can seek redress for violations of the CRPD once national remedies are exhausted. The Convention will become international law after 20 ratifications.

    For more information, also consult the recent We Can Do post entitled “12 Countries Ratify International Disability Rights Treaty. Background information on the CRPD, a list of signatories, and a visual map of ratifying countries, can also be found at the United Nations Enable web site. Resources and ideas for how to become involved with the global campaign to ratify the treaty can be found at the RatifyNow organization web site.

    # # #

    For more information on the UN Convention and contact details of experts within the RI membership, please contact Tomas Lagerwall (sg@riglobal.org), RI Secretary General, or Shantha Rau (shantha@riglobal.org), Senior Program Officer, at +1-212-420-1500.

    About RI
    Founded in 1922, RI is a global and diverse organization bringing together expertise from different sectors in the disability field, to advance and implement the rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities. RI is currently composed of over 700 members and affiliated organizations in 93 nations, in all regions of the world.

    RI works closely with other disability organizations, actively participating in the International Disability Alliance (IDA) – a network of eight global, democratic organizations of persons with disabilities – and was an active member of the International Disability Caucus (IDC) – a coalition of disability organizations and NGOs that participated in the negotiations toward the Convention. RI also maintains official relations with the United Nations and its agencies and institutions as well as with other international organizations, NGOs and universities.

    For more information about RI, please visit their accessible website: http://www.riglobal.org



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    Accessibility CONFERENCE: Techshare India 2008

    Posted on 18 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, South Asian Region, technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The Techshare India 2008 Conference titled “Breaking the Barriers” is a conference and exhibition on accessibility targeted at people with disabilities, the corporate and government sectors, non-government organizations (NGOs), educators, and product producers. The conference will be held February 4 and 5, 2008, at India Habitat Centre, New Delhi.

    The conference is meant to allow participants to share insights and knowledge; network with professionals in the field from around the world; and meet people with disabilities working with assistive technology at the first known Experiential Lab at Techshare India. This is a pan-disability (i.e., all disabilities) conference and exhibition aimed at addressing barriers present in the mindset of people; infrastructure; education; and technology. The goal is to break down barriers and include people with disabilities into mainstream society.

    To learn more, please go to http://www.barrierbreak.com/conferenceregistration.php

    Need funding to attend conferences like this one? Be aware that available funding will be limited and cannot help everyone. Each funding source has its own criteria for determining who is or isn’t eligible for possible funding and for what purposes, so read carefully. Information at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2007/11/29/funding-for-conference-participation-from-developing-nations/



    We Can Do learned about this conference via the free, weekly electronic newsletter from Disabled People International (DPI).



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    NEWS: 12 Countries Ratify International Disability Rights Treaty (CRPD)

    Posted on 17 December 2007. Filed under: Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The United Nations (UN) has announced that 12 countries have now ratified the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Six of these countries also have ratified the optional protocol.

    This international disability rights treaty is meant to “promote, protect, and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights by persons with disabilities,” including self-determination, physical and programmatic access, personal mobility, health, education, employment, habilitation and rehabilitation, participation in political life, and equality and non-discrimination. (Source: RatifyNow.) The CRPD will become legally binding after 20 countries have ratified it. The optional protocol is a separate document that would allow individuals to seek redress (justice or compensation) for treaty violations internationally after they have exhausted everything that can be done at the national level. The optional protocol will be legally binding after 10 countries have ratified it.

    The most recent four countries to ratify the convention (treaty) are: Bangladesh (November 30); Spain, for both the convention and the optional protocol (December 3); Namibia, for both the convention and the optional protocol (December 4); and Nicaragua (December 7). The other eight ratifying countries are Croatia, Cuba, Gabon, Hungary, India, Jamaica, Panama, and South Africa; of these, Croatia, Hungary, Panama, and South Africa also ratified the optional protocol.

    A total of 118 countries have signed the convention, and 67 countries have signed the optional protocol. Signing the convention and optional protocol does not legally bind a country to obey them. However, signing these documents does commit the country to take no action that would conflict with the goals of the CRPD.

    If you are sighted, you can view a global map that shows visually which countries have signed or ratified the CRPD or the optional protocol. I am not sure if this map is accessible to people with visual impairments. If not, then please consult the UN Enable web site accessibility statement, which encourages people to contact them regarding accessibility issues at their web site.

    More information on the CRPD is available in the RatifyNow factsheet and the RatifyNow FAQ. More information on the optional protocol is also available at the RatifyNow website.



    We Can Do learned about these ratifications in part through the AdHoc_IDC (International Disability Caucus) email list. This on-line, email-based news and discussion service can be joined for free. I also gathered additional background information from the RatifyNow and UN Enable web sites.



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    JOB POST: Senior Social Affairs Officer, P-5

    Posted on 16 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The United Nations has a job opening for a Senior Social Affairs Officer, who would be focused on issues related to people with disabilities. This position is located in the UN Division for Social Policy for Development of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs. The Senior Social Affairs Officer reports to the Director of the Division. Responsibilities would include social analyses, intergovernmental support, technical cooperation, and program support. The application deadline is January 14, 2008.

    For more detail on the nature of this job, the entailed responsibilities, the required skills and background, and how to apply, please review the job post at:

    https://jobs.un.org/Galaxy/Release3/vacancy/Display_Vac.aspx?lang=1200&VACID=f03d8407-39ec-4269-aeb4-7931609daafe



    We Can Do learned about this opportunity via the email distribution list for the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD), which can be subscribed to for free. Thanks to Rosangela Berman Bieler for alerting the GPDD list to this opportunity!



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    CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Forum on Women’s Rights and Development

    Posted on 16 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The 11th AWID International Forum on Women’s Rights and Development

    The Power of Movements

    November 14-17, 2008
    Cape Town, South Africa
    www.awid.org/forum08

    (Click here to download the PDF of the full Call for Proposals)

    From November 14-17, 2008, up to 1,500 women’s rights activists from around the world will gather in Cape Town, South Africa to debate and strategize about how to build stronger women’s movements globally. The Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID) invites you to contribute to this urgent discussion by submitting a proposal to organize a session at the 11th AWID forum: The Power of Movements.

    We Can Do readers will note that this forum is not specifically focused on disability issues. However, it would be an opportunity for Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and other interested parties to introduce topics of relevance to movements among women with disabilities in developing countries. We Can Do readers may also wish to consider submitting proposals for sessions on including women with disabilities among the wider women’s movements generally. You could also explore how to build bridges between women’s movements and disability movements, or explore what lessons each movement has to learn from the other.

    Session proposals should consider one of the following questions:

    Understanding social movements and collective power

    • What is a movement and what is movement building? What are the diverse ways in which movements can be built?
    • What are the strengths and limitations of movements? How do you recognize a movement in decline?
    • What role does constituency building play in movements? How do you build constituencies?
    • What makes a movement “feminist”, and how do its character, approaches and strategies differ from other movements, even if they are led and constituted by women?

    Unpacking the architecture of feminist and women’s movements

    • What kinds of organizational structures have evolved through time to successfully support feminist and women’s movements? What other structures do we need to strengthen or build in order to build up the institutional capacity and impact of women’s movements?
    • What role (formal and informal) do organizations play in movements? How can the relationship between women’s organizations and movements be understood?
    • What forms of organizing have appeared in recent years, both in women’s movements and in other social movements? What can we learn from these forms, and what other forms do we still need to develop?

    Challenges to effective movement building work

    • What are the key obstacles to movement building today? What are some innovative and effective responses to these obstacles?
    • How can we strengthen and build new and innovative leadership styles and models that contribute to movement building? Which models obstruct or impede movement building?
    • How do we deal collectively and constructively with the politics and tensions within our movements over issues such as over-specialization, North-South/East-West tensions, unequal access to resources, leadership, succession, competition, etc.?
    • What are the movement building challenges faced by social movements in areas or countries under occupation, armed conflict or war? What are examples of effective ways to support their efforts? What are alternatives to movement building in countries where social movements are routinely targeted with threats and intimidation?

    Overcoming fragmentation and building inclusive movements

    • How do we build more inclusive movements? What mistakes have we made in the past, and how do avoid them going forward? What have been key lessons learnt in dealing with issues such as class, race, age, religion, ethnicity and other conditions in trying to build inclusive movements?
    • How do we overcome the fragmentation and overspecialization in our movements-e.g. the increasing specialization on particular issues, sectors or themes-to build bridges, common political agendas and shared strategies?
    • How can we build better linkages and do more effective strategizing across levels of activism-e.g., between those doing grassroots work and those doing advocacy at the public-policy level?
    • What other linkages do we urgently need to build, and how do we build them?

    Building sustainable, multi-generational movements

    • What are the diverse needs and contributions of different generations of women, and how can we draw upon them to create stronger and more sustainable movements?
    • How can multi-generational dialogues work to strengthen our movements? What are some good experiences of such dialogues and what impacts-good or bad-have they had?
    • How can women’s movements build spaces that significantly incorporate and support-rather than tokenize-young women’s contributions to gender equality and women’s rights struggles?
    • How do we create more sustainable models of activism? How do we renew and sustain our movements and ourselves (and each other)?

    Building effective alliances with and learning from other social movements

    • How do we move beyond women’s movements to identify, build and expand solidarities and collective actions with other social movements – and why should we do so? What is the cost of remaining insular?
    • In working with other social movements, where do we draw the line between strategic compromise and marginalization of a women’s rights agenda?
    • What are other movements doing right? What can we learn from them?
    • What have been some organizational experiences in local, national, regional and global joint work with members of other social movements your organization has had? Tell us about your challenges and achievements.

    Mobilizing resources for movement building

    • What does funding for movement building look like? Are there any specific examples of experiences that demonstrate how this might be done in an effective way?
    • How does the way in which money is given by donors support or undermine movement building work? What changes are needed in donor policies and strategies to strengthen women’s movements?
    • What changes do we need to make in how we mobilize resources for movement building work? What are the successful strategies that we can learn from?
    • How do we expand the resources for our movement building and for our work in general?

    Measuring the success of movements

    • How do we know when we’ve achieved our goals? What constitutes “success”? And how do we measure our impact?
    • What kinds of evaluation methodologies contribute to movement building? How can we use the data from these methodologies to strengthen our movement building work?
    • How do we capture and evaluate the movement building aspects of our work? What are some examples of innovative indicators and evaluation frameworks?

    New directions in movement building

    • What new tools, processes, methodologies and innovations are available for movement building? What are their benefits as well as some of their pitfalls?
    • What new language, terminology and ideas around women’s rights can we build that are accessible, make sense to and motivate larger numbers of women, and will increase our political impact? What are other innovative ways of reaching out to the broader public and having greater societal impact?
    • What are some innovative ways that movements can deal effectively with emerging challenges, such the rise of religious fundamentalisms, the potential abuses of new technologies, the feminization of HIV and AIDS, the emerging environmental crisis, etc.?

    The Power of Movements

    Submit your proposal online at www.awid.org/forum08

    Email or call AWID for more information or a
    Word version/hard copy of the application form
    forum08@awid.org
    +1 416 594 3773

    SUBMISSION DEADLINE:
    JANUARY 28, 2008



    Are you a person from a developing country who would need funding in order to attend this or other conferences? Learn about possible limited funding sources for participating in conferences at:

    https://wecando.wordpress.com/2007/11/29/funding-for-conference-participation-from-developing-nations/



    We Can Do learned of this opportunity through contacts at Women Leaders at Mobility International USA (MIUSA). Most of the text in this announcement originates with AWID, except for the paragraph targeted at We Can Do readers.



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    Equalize It! A Manifesto for Disability Equality in Development Cooperation

    Posted on 15 December 2007. Filed under: Guest Blogger, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    From the International Disability Equality Agency (IDEA):

    Equalise It ! A Manifesto for Disability Equality in Development Cooperation

    This manifesto has been written to identify the issues for the disability movement, clarify any confusion there may be for disability and development professionals and set out a programme for change in order to create real equality for disabled people and our democratic, representative organisations (DPOs) in the development process. The adoption of the UN Convention on the rights of People with Disabilities by a growing number of countries makes the implementation of the principles in this manifesto a matter of urgency.

    Disability, Poverty and Development Charities.

    As disabled people….
    Throughout the world we face discrimination.
    Throughout the world we are socially excluded.
    Throughout the world we cannot get equal access or any access at all to education, employment or decent health care.
    Throughout the world we are ignored in development programmes
    And so…

    Throughout the world we, disabled people, remain the poorest of the poor!

    The fact of this poverty has been used by global development organisations and charities to raise millions of dollars both from the public and from development agencies. However, only a small proportion of this money ever filters down to us or our organisations, DPOs. Even a smaller proportion ever succeeds in effecting sustained improvement in our lives.

    At the same time we often have little or no control over what is being done ‘to us’ ‘for us’ or ‘on our behalf.’ There tends, therefore, to be little agreement between what many non-disabled professionals and charities think disabled people need and what we actually want. As a consequence, development projects can leave behind little but disappointment. Because of this the big development organisations and disability charities are frequently seen by disabled people as part of the problem, not part of the solution. Nonetheless, disabled people in the South and Southern DPOs have had little choice but to continue working with them and to smile while doing it. The disability businesses, charities and generalist development organisations have access to the money and with that comes power and control.

    These organisations retain control because they are corporate organisations alive to a new funding environment which is demanding that boxes are ticked for such things as ‘human rights’, ‘inclusion’ and ‘listening to the voice of disabled people.’ They have all ticked the boxes, adopted the appropriate language and changed their public image. This is part of their corporate funding strategy. However, the reality is that their operations have not changed very much at all. They continue to be managed by non-disabled people and employ few, if any disabled people.

    This reality on the ground is that for us, especially in the South, non-disabled professionals from the North continue to come and to go. Projects come and projects go. Through this never-ending process the disability organisations and charities go from strength to strength, while our DPOs continue to live from hand to mouth.

    This manifesto sets out how to begin to overturn this situation and the unequal power relations which feed it.

    “Nothing About Us Without Us”

    “Nothing About Us Without Us” was the slogan adopted by Disabled Peoples’ International (DPI) at its founding in 1981. DPI was established after Rehabilitation International (RI), then the world’s leading disability charity, refused to permit adequate representation by disabled people. This slogan has been particularly effective in capturing a key idea of our struggle for human rights – self determination is essential for achieving true equality.

    This was clearly acknowledged in the 1993 UN Standard Rules on the Equalisation of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities. Rule 18 says, “States should recognise the rights of persons with disabilities to represent persons with disabilities at national, regional and local levels. States should also recognise the advisory role of organisations of persons with disabilities in decision-making on disability matters”.

    “Nothing About Us Without Us” is also in line with the more general human rights approach to development cooperation. For example the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) holds that “The human rights approach to development means empowering people to take their own decisions, rather than being the passive objects of choices made on their behalf.’

    The ideas of self-determination and human rights developed and fought for by us in our international disability movement and encapsulated in “Nothing About Us Without Us” are also at the very heart of the new UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

    Disability – a Human Rights Issue

    UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities recognises that ‘disability results from the interaction between persons with impairments and attitudinal and environmental barriers that hinders their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others.’
    http://www.un.org/disabilities

    There are eight guiding principles that underlie the Convention and each one of its specific articles:
    1. Respect for inherent dignity, individual autonomy including the freedom to make one’s own choices, and independence of person
    2. Non-discrimination
    3. Full and effective participation and inclusion in society
    4. Respect for difference and acceptance of disabled people as part of human diversity and humanity
    5. Equality of opportunity
    6. Accessibility
    7. Equality between men and women
    8. Respect for the evolving capacities of children with disabilities and respect for the right of children with disabilities to preserve their identities.

    In particular the Convention emphasises the importance of self-representation through DPOs and commits State Parties to working “in partnership with relevant international and regional organizations and civil society, in particular organizations of persons with disabilities” (Article 32).

    The Office of the United Nation High Commissioner for Human Rights

    Four core values of human rights law that are of particular importance in the context of disability.

    • the dignity of each individual, who is deemed to be of inestimable value because of his/her inherent self-worth, and not because s/he is economically or otherwise “useful”;
    • the concept of autonomy or self-determination, which is based on the presumption of a capacity for self-directed action and behaviour, and requires that the person be placed at the centre of all decisions affecting him/her;
    • the inherent equality of all regardless of difference;
    • and the ethic of solidarity, which requires society to sustain the freedom of the person with appropriate social supports.

    http://www.ohchr.org/english/issues/disability/intro.htm#human

    As participation is a legal right which we can claim, it is the duty of states and society to ensure that right. Our participation and inclusion must not only be in the systems, structures and services of society, but in the policy-making process as well.

    As can be seen, the UN Convention calls for disabled people and our organisations to be in the driving seat. However, this will not happen unless there is a fundamental change in the unequal, neo-colonial relationship which currently exists between disabled people and the large corporate charities, government agencies and international development institutions.

    It seems clear that at this phase of our struggle for equality and human rights “Nothing About Us Without Us” is no longer enough. As disabled people we and our organisations need not only to be included, we need to assume the leading role.

    Professionals On Tap, Not On Top

    Some time ago, David Werner, one of the founders of the Projimo Project in Mexico, wrote:

    “Women in most countries are now demanding their right to leadership in the institutions that represent their concerns. It is high time for disabled people everywhere to make similar demands. It is time for planners and administrators to provide the necessary opportunity, encouragement and appropriate skills training.

    “And, most urgently of all, it is time for non-disabled professionals to recognise the right of disabled persons to self control, and therefore to gracefully step to one side, into a role where they, as professionals, are no longer on top but rather on tap – as allies.

    This was an attempt to understand the real relationship between disabled people and non-disabled professionals and to alter it. Redefining the relationship is an essential step to achieving a human rights based, empowering and emancipatory approach to disability and development. Without it we will remain no more than the passive raw material for international and national NGOs.

    It doesn’t have to be this way. As with other social movements such as black power in the USA, women’s equality or the anti-imperialist struggles, as disabled people we must assume real leadership in our own liberation. We must fight to realise the promise of the UN Convention. And, those non-disabled professionals and organisations who want to help, need to move over and accept a new, more appropriate and equitable relationship. They need to be on tap, not on top. They need to become our genuine allies.

    A Check List for Allies

    To become genuine allies in the liberation of disabled people funders, development agencies, disability organisations, INGOs and other intermediaries must take steps to transform themselves and how they operate. Among other things, they need to:

    • Ensure that the need for programmes and policies are identified by disabled people and that we are not included simply to legitimise funding applications.
    • Ensure that disabled people are involved in all areas of the programme, not just as recipients or beneficiaries, and preferably through our own democratically run organisations (DPOs).
    • Ensure programmes are committed at every stage to full human rights and equality of opportunity.
    • Ensure that resources are transferred to DPOs in order to build capacity and sustainability.
    • Empower and resource disabled people to represent ourselves through our own organisations.
    • Champion disabled leadership both inside and outside your organisation.
    • Be prepared to change your internal and external policies and practices through engaging with the authentic voice of disabled people in the North and South.
    • If you are a disability organisation or charity, to reform your governance, staffing and operations structures to move towards disabled people being in the majority positions at all levels of the organisation.
    • If you are a donor or generalist development agency, ensure that your governance, staffing and advisory bodies are representative of society and you have at least 20% representation of disabled people at all levels of your organisation.

    The signatories to this manifesto are ready and willing to work with, support and assist any organisation that wishes to travel this road with disabled people. At the same time we will continue to challenge those who ignore our legitimate demands for control of our own destiny.



    Thank you to Mark Harrison at the International Disabilities Equality Agency (IDEA) for permission to publish the Equalize It! Manifesto at We Can Do.

    IDEA is looking for more organizations to sign the manifesto and join their campaign. For more details, see the IDEA web site. For questions related to this manifesto, or to ask about your organization signing it, please contact Mark Harrison directly at Mark.Harrison@uea.ac.uk.

    The text of the Equalize It! manifesto can also be viewed at the IDEA web site at:

    http://disabilityequality.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=20

    Or, you can download the Equalize It! Manifesto in PDF format at:

    http://disabilityequality.org/Equalise%20It%21.pdf



    People interested in learning more about the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) may also wish to follow the link to the RatifyNow web site at

    http://www.ratifynow.org

    RatifyNow is a global campaign to maximize the number of countries that ratify the CRPD.



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    THREE JOB POSTS, Luanda, Angola

    Posted on 15 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Jobs & Internships, Rehabilitation, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Read carefully. This post contain THREE separate job announcements, all in Luanda, Angola. The first is for a Technical Expert who is experienced in social and health projects. The second is for a Project Coordinator who is a technical expert in severe disability rehabilitaiton. The third is for an expert in the identification of sanitation and hospital services, services of continous support to target group. All job posts are meant to begin in February 2008 and continue for 12 months. The deadline for all three job posts is December 31, 2007.


    Technical Expert – Experienced in social and health projects

    Country of assignment and location
    Angola, Luanda

    GTZ International Services in consortium with MundiServiços has been shortlisted for this World Bank-financed project.

    The project
    In the sequence of the Lwena Memorandum of Understanding complementary to Lusaka Protocol, the Angola Government has prepared the Angolan Program for Demobilization and Reintegration which is being implemented at National level by The Institute of Socio-Professional Reintegration for Ex-combatants (IRSEM). In the scope of this program assistance is been delivered to facilitate economic and social reintegration of 138.000 Ex-combatants. 105.000 are from Ex-FMU (Unita Forces) and 33.000 from FAA (Angolan Armed Forces).
    Among the program beneficiaries can be distinguished special groups as follows:
    Female Ex-combatants, Widows of Ex-combatants eligible for PGDR (Minors whose parents are Ex-combatants or their guardian, Ex-combatants with disabilities, designated as a “Vulnerable Group” to whom PGDR has designed a specific strategy to assist them.

    Estimated are that 1750-2000 of the 28000 disabled who will be demobilised are severely disabled: para-, hemi-, tetraplegic, multiple limb amputees, deaf, blind, mentally disabled,… They are the specific target group of this project.

    The objective of the project is to deliver technical assistance to IRSEM to create conditions for social reintegration and physical rehabilitation in order to prevent or minimise the dependency for specialised services for ex-combatants with severe disabilities.

    Your tasks
    Provide TA, organise and identify specialists for the following activities which will be defined by the results of the needs assessments of each Person with a Disability and of the service provision sector:

    1. PREPARATION PHASE

    • Identification of failure in terms of social services, psychological support and human support.
    • Formulating an action plan to improve Angolan service delivery to target group

    2. IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION PLAN, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION

    • Contracting out social reintegration of the disabled person taking in the account the actual and future living environment
    • Contracting out vocational trainings for disabled to perform professional activities. Special stock for small lending, creation of adapted micro enterprises and / or work opportunities.
    • Organizing training of Angolan institutions for psychological support to families and availability of resources in order beneficiaries can develop income generation activities taking advantage of existing economic opportunities.
    • Organizing training in occupational activities adapted to the disabled and to avail them of affordable opportunities
    • Orientation of contracted social services to refer family members to the existing projects for the development of economic activities.
    • Assuring access to distribution of tools for those having a viable idea of self employment

    • Providing technical support to create micro and small companies
    • Organizing training of Angolan institutions for economic capacity building to provide income generation/salaries for the People with Disability and/or family / relatives caring for the severe disabled

    Your qualification
    University degree in Public Health or Social Science or relevant field

    • Minimum of 5 years professional experience, of which 3 years in international projects
    • At least 3 years of experience in the provision of social services for vulnerable groups of population
    • Work experience in technical assistance projects funded by WB or other development agencies advantageous
    • Relevant work experience in the region
    • Excellent communication skills
    • Excellent command of Portuguese and English
    • Excellent degree of stress tolerance and flexibility

    Commencement
    Expected date of commencement is February 2008. The period of execution will be 12 months.

    Contact
    For further information please contact
    Mrs. Annette Mueller-Roth
    Phone: +49 61 96 79-1483
    e-mail: Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de

    Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de


    Project Coordinator – Technical expert in severe disability rehabilitation

    Country of assignment and location
    Angola, Luanda

    GTZ International Services in consortium with MundiServiços has been shortlisted for this World Bank-financed project.

    The project
    In the sequence of the Lwena Memorandum of Understanding complementary to Lusaka Protocol, the Angola Government has prepared the Angolan Program for Demobilization and Reintegration which is being implemented at National level by The Institute of Socio-Professional Reintegration for Ex-combatants (IRSEM). In the scope of this program assistance is been delivered to facilitate economic and social reintegration of 138.000 Ex-combatants. 105.000 are from Ex-FMU (Unita Forces) and 33.000 from FAA (Angolan Armed Forces).
    Among the program beneficiaries can be distinguished special groups as follows:
    Female Ex-combatants, Widows of Ex-combatants eligible for PGDR, Minors whose parents are Ex-combatants or their guardian, Ex-combatants with disabilities, designated as a “Vulnerable Group” to whom PGDR has designed a specific strategy to assist them.

    Estimated are that 1750-2000 of the 28000 disabled who will be demobilised are severely disabled: para-, hemi-, tetraplegic, multiple limb amputees, deaf, blind, mentally disabled,… They are the specific target group of this project.

    The objective of the project is to deliver technical assistance to IRSEM to create conditions for social reintegration and physical rehabilitation of this severely disabled subgroup in order to prevent or minimise the dependency for specialised services for ex-combatants with severe disabilities

    Your tasks

    Provide TA in order to:

    1. PREPARATORY PHASE:

    • organize a needs assessments (from each individual and from the capacity of the service delivery sector),
    • elaborate an individualized action plan and a disability sector plan

    2. IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION PLAN, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION

    • the implementation of training to the local service delivery sector
    • assisting IRSEM in contracting out the local service delivery
    • supervision

    The following activities have to be organized for the target group

  • Advise to IRSEM on the supply of auxiliary means for physical rehabilitation
  • Elaboration of recommendations for the modalities of collaboration between IRSEM and National and Local agencies involved in long term programs, assisting the reintegration process of severely People with a 100 % Disability
  • Identify and train appropriate partners for the delivery of special services and assistance, necessary to physical rehabilitation and social-economic reintegration of the target group:
  • Medical (surgery, ophtalmology, ENT,…), disability nursing, physiotherapy, prosthetic – orthotic devices and mobility aids,
  • psychosocial support
  • Professional support and economic capacity building (Agriculture activities and creation of micro and small business, Micro finance assistance) to provide income generation
  • Support to communities where disabled live to implement several social initiatives (schools, community centre, irrigation channels, healthcare post etc.) that facilitate the reintegration in shelter communities
  • Your qualification

  • University degree in Social Science or Public Health, with experience in disability
  • Minimum of 10 years professional experience, of which 7 years in international projects
  • At least five years of experience in the provision of social services for vulnerable groups of population
  • Work experience in technical assistance projects funded by WB or other development agencies very advantageous
  • Relevant international work experience in the region highly desirable, intercultural competence required
  • At least five years of experience in monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of projects in the social sector
  • Excellent managerial and communication skills
  • Excellent command of Portuguese (written and spoken) and English
  • Excellent degree of stress tolerance and flexibility
  • Commencement

    Expected date of commencement is February 2008. The period of execution will be 12 months.

    Contact
    For further information please contact
    Mrs. Annette Mueller-Roth
    Phone: +49 61 96 79-1483
    e-mail: Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de

    Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de


    Expert in Identification of sanitation and hospital services, services of continuous support to target group

    Country of assignment and location
    Angola, Luanda

    GTZ International Services in consortium with MundiServiços has been shortlisted for this World Bank-financed project.

    The project
    In the sequence of the Lwena Memorandum of Understanding complementary to Lusaka Protocol, the Angola Government has prepared the Angolan Program for Demobilization and Reintegration which is being implemented at National level by The Institute of Socio-Professional Reintegration for Ex-combatants (IRSEM). In the scope of this program assistance is been delivered to facilitate economic and social reintegration of 138.000 Ex-combatants. 105.000 are from Ex-FMU (Unita Forces) and 33.000 from FAA (Angolan Armed Forces).
    Among the program beneficiaries can be distinguished special groups as follows:
    Female Ex-combatants, Widows of Ex-combatants eligible for PGDR, Minors whose parents are Ex-combatants or their guardian, Ex-combatants with disabilities, designated as a “Vulnerable Group” to whom PGDR has designed a specific strategy to assist them.

    Estimated are that 1750-2000 of the 28000 disabled who will be demobilised are severely disabled: para-, hemi-, tetraplegic, multiple limb amputees, deaf, blind, mentally disabled,… They are the specific target group of this project.

    The objective of the project is to deliver technical assistance to IRSEM to create conditions for social reintegration and physical rehabilitation in order to prevent or minimise the dependency for specialised services for ex-combatants with severe disabilities

    Your tasks
    Provide TA, organise and identify specialists for the following activities which will be reviewed by the results of the needs assessments:

    PREPARATION PHASE

    • Organizing contracted out medical, psychological and social (environmental) assessment of beneficiaries in order to come to an individual screening plan
    • Training of the assessment teams
    • Identification of failure in terms of specialised medical and rehabilitation care, specialised training, psychological support and supply of technical and human support.
    • Formulating an action plan to improve Angolan service delivery to target group

    IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION PLAN, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION

    • Contracting partners to supply of auxiliary means for physical rehabilitation, including prosthesis, crutch/walking-stick, wheelchairs, tricycles, hearing devices, visual aids or others which may be considered necessary
    • Contracting of special services (or to strengthen existing services) such as eye care services, consultants for psychology support, hearing device delivery and consultants, orthopedic and esthetic surgery and neurology services.
    • Development of occupational therapy activities and special tools
    • Contracting supplementary assistance for daily activities
    • Contracting long term medical care (home care and sanitary education of the disabled). Access to specialised consultations, supply of medical and pharmaceutical assistance and/or daily technical support
    • Organizing specialised nursing training (to the disabled person, his/her family or others) by professional Health personnel in: transfers at home, urine and stool evacuation, physiotherapeutic exercises, warning signals, circulation problems, epilepsy crises orientation, orientation for psychological and psychiatrist disorder.
    • Contracting of specific training for persons with lacking sensorial sensitivity, such as sign language for the deaf, improvement of tactile habits and blind orientation and other communication techniques.

    Your qualification

    • University degree in physical or neurological rehab or relevant field
    • Minimum of 7 years professional experience, of which 3 years in international projects
    • At least 3 years of experience in the provision of social services for People with disability
    • Work experience in technical assistance projects funded by WB or other development agencies advantageous
    • Relevant work experience in the region
    • Excellent communication skills
    • Excellent command of Portuguese and English
    • Excellent degree of stress tolerance and flexibility

    Commencement
    Expected date of commencement is February 2008. The period of execution will be 12 months.

    Contact
    For further information please contact
    Mrs. Annette Mueller-Roth
    Phone: +49 61 96 79-1483
    e-mail: Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de



    We Can Do learned about these three job opportunities through the email distribution list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD), which can be subscribed to for free.


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