Information Wanted: Africans with Disabilities, Policies, Programs, Organizations

Posted on 23 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

**The Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities needs your Help**
The Secretariat is currently collecting and updating information on the situation faced by persons with disabilities in the 54 African countries. It will enter this information into the country folders on its website. The information collected relates to policies, programmes, contact details for organisations engaged in disability work, best practice in the inclusion of disability in mainstream programmes, etc. If you have such information to share, please write to info@africandecade.co.za.

We Can Do readers will want to explore the excellent web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities. As implied in the above paragraph, their web site has a section with information on the 54 individual countries of Africa. Your assistance can help them expand the information provided in these folders. Providing information to the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities can also be an opportunity for you to help bring attention to policies, programs, organizations, and practices that have benefited people with disabilities in your country. Again, you can email relevant details to info@africandecade.co.za

It is also well worth exploring their collection of training materials for organizations of people with disabilities. Some of their training materials have been highlighted in past We Can Do posts, but not all of them. Training materials include a guidebook for journalists; material on lobbying and advocacy; resource mobilization and fund raising; evaluation; capacity building; and more.



The first paragraph of the above text is copy/pasted from a recent issue of the email newsletter for Disabled People’s International.

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Why Obama Matters Globally

Posted on 18 November 2008. Filed under: Call for Comments or Information, Human Rights, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , |

The new US President-elect Barack Obama has said that the United States should “lead the world” in helping people with disabilities “take full advantage of their talents and become independent, integrated members of society.” He also has pledged to sign the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and to urge the US Senate to ratify it. If the United States does indeed ratify the CRPD, disability advocates in other countries would then be able to point to this fact when pressuring their own governments to do the same.

Obama’s election could have important implications for people with disabilities not only across the United States but possibly also in other countries. But we will only reap the full benefits of his presidency if he follows through on all his promises to people with disabilities. Most politicians, at least in democratic countries, are more quick to follow through on their promises when they know that both people in their own country and also people around the world are watching them.

Accordingly, people with disabilities and our loved ones, colleagues, and allies from both across the United States and all countries around the world are being encouraged to send emails to Barack Obama’s team. You can send an email to Kareem Dale, Obama’s National Disability Vote Director (at kdale@barackobama.com), WITH COPIES TO Anne Hayes, a volunteer on the Obama Disability Policy Committee (at ahayesku@hotmail.com). If you wish, you may read other people’s emails to Obama for inspiration.

In your letters to Obama, you may wish to urge him to move quickly to sign the CRPD. Or, you may wish to urge him to remember to ensure that all US foreign assistance and poverty reduction programs are actively inclusive of people with disabilities in their design and implementation. What would it mean to the disability community in YOUR country if the US were to sign and ratify the CRPD? Share your ideas. Have you observed US-funded foreign assistance programs in your country that were not fully inclusive of people with disabilities? Share your stories with Obama’s team.

If you need more detail on the national and global email-writing campaign to Obama, you may wish to view the slide show program below. Or, if you have difficulty with this slide show program, then most of this text is also posted at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/11/07/disabilities-email-obama/

After you write your own email to Obama, please do encourage your friends and colleagues to do the same.



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RESOURCE: Manual on Mainstreaming Disability in Development Projects

Posted on 2 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Christian Blind Mission announces the publication of a new manual on including persons with disabilities in development projects. The manual is part of the “Mainstreaming Disability in Development Cooperation” project funded by the European Commission. The purpose of the manual is to give guidance and practical tools to operational staff to include a disability
perspective in the Project Cycle Management. [Note from We Can Do: Although this manual is written from a European perspective for European-based international development agencies and organizations, some of its content seems broadly relevant to mainstream international development organizations based outside of Europe.]

The manual aims to support the inclusion of the perspectives of persons with disabilities throughout the project management cycle, from program planning through evaluation. It contains examples of projects which include the perspectives of persons with disabilities, many of which are financed by the EC partnership with NGOs, including CBM. The manual is
accompanied by a web-based toolbox, which is available in September 2008.

To download the manual go to

http://www.cbm.org/en/general/CBM_EV_EN_general_article_36218.html

This manual comes in two parts. The first part, entitled Make Development Inclusive: Concepts and Guiding Principles (PDF format, 750 Kb), discusses what disability is; why all poverty reduction projects should include a disability perspective; the degree of disability inclusion needed for different types of projects; and the legal and policy framework in Europe and internationally. It also includes a discussion of the “twin-track approach” to development, which explores the difference between disability-inclusive mainstream projects and disability-targeted initiatives–and why we need both.

The second part of the manual, entitled Make Development Inclusive: A Pratical Guide (PDF format, 2.8 Mb) advises mainstream development organizations in how they can make their projects more inclusive to the benefit of everyone–without bankrupting themselves or consuming staff time that just isn’t available. Case examples are described that highlight how disability inclusion has been done at every stage of programming, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating projects around the world.

More information on the project Make Development Inclusive can be found online at www.make-development-inclusive.org

CBM is an international disability and development organization with 100 years of expertise whose purpose is to improve the quality of life of persons with disabilities and their families and prevent and treat those diseases which can lead to disability in the most marginalized societies
in the world. Working for and together with persons with disabilities, CBM advocates for meaningful and effective participation, equal opportunities and full inclusion in all spheres of society.



I learned of this resource from Joan Durocher, who learned about it from Karen Heinicke-Motsch. Most of the text in this blog post comes from an announcement from CBM; the text summarizing the content of the two parts of the manual is mine.

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NEWS: Australia Commits to Leading Disability Inclusion in Development in Pacific Region

Posted on 30 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, News, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Australian government agency devoted to international assistance programs, AusAid, released the following statement yesterday.

MEDIA RELEASE
BOB MCMULLAN MP
PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE
MEMBER FOR FRASER

——————————————————————————–
AA 08 60 29 September 2008
Australia Leads Support for People With Disabilities in Asia Pacific
Parliamentary Secretary for International Development Assistance, Bob McMullan, today committed Australia to a leadership role in supporting people with disability in the Asia Pacific.

An estimated 650 million people across the world have a disability and about 80 per cent of the population with a disability live in developing countries. The Asia Pacific region is home to two-thirds of this population.

“The Australian Government recognises that poverty is both a cause and consequence of disability and is committed to ensuring that the benefits of development reach those who are most excluded,” Mr McMullan said.

Australia is providing $45 million over two years to develop an avoidable blindness program and the development of a comprehensive disability strategy to guide Australia’s international development assistance program.

Mr McMullan said the Government’s new emphasis on disability reflected Australia’s commitment to increasing social participation for all.

Mr McMullan released the draft strategy for consultation today at the International Conference on Disability, Disadvantage and Development in the Pacific and Asia on 29 September – 1 October.

“This conference shows that there is a growing interest in disability across the region and increasing recognition that people with disability, who often count amongst the poorest of the poor, have an important role to play in national development.

“I am determined that Australia will take a lead in this respect,” said Mr McMullan.

He said the conference also represented a timely opportunity to discuss the draft disability strategy with disability representatives, many of whom have contributed to its development, before its official launch later this year.

The conference aims to exchange knowledge and promote action on disability in developing countries. Organised by the Australian Disability and Development Consortium, it has attracted over 200 participants from the region and will open at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra on 29 September.

Australia has recently ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and, in addition to a disability strategy for its aid program, is preparing a national disability policy to be released in 2009.

The text for the above statement statement was taken from the AusAid website at: http://www.ausaid.gov.au/media/release.cfm?BC=Latest&ID=1213_3874_2510_2635_942

More information about AusAid efforts to include disability issues in their assistance programs is available at: http://www.ausaid.gov.au/keyaid/disability.cfm

Looking to make your own mainstream international development organization more disability-inclusive? Check the page on Resources, Toolkits, and Funding for a listing of past We Can Do posts with links to resources related to inclusive development.



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I first received a copy of AusAids’ statement via the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group.

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RESOURCE: Global Partnership for Disability and Development Launches New Website

Posted on 25 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Regular readers who look closely may have noticed that one source I often credit for the information I share is the email distribution list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD).

If you didn’t know, the GPDD works to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities and their families in development policies and practices. They do this by facilitating collaboration among development agencies and organizations to reduce poverty among children, women, and men with disabilities living in poor countries.

One of its sponsors is the World Bank, which is why the GPDD used to have its electronic home at http://www.worldbank.org/disability/gpdd. But the GPDD now has a new website all to itself.

You can find updated information on GPDD’s work, background, and membership, as well as relevant news and events at:
http://www.GPDD-online.org.

And what about their mailing list? I’ll let GPDD describe its purpose: “The Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) mailing list facilitates interaction between stakeholders to advance the social, economic, and civic empowerment of people with disabilities, and the mainstreaming of disability issues in development.” If you have made a habit of examining my source credits at the bottom of each post, then you will have noticed that GPDD is a common avenue for distributing conference and job post announcements related to disability and international development, as well as announcements about new resources and publications.

But the people who participate on the list do sometimes exchange information that doesn’t necessarily make it to this blog site. (The same goes for any of the other sources I cite.) People also use the GPDD list for networking among people who share similar goals in reducing poverty among people with disabilities and sometimes turn to each other for advice and guidance on finding the information they need. If you think you’d like to subscribe to the GPDD mailing list directly, you can do that for free. You don’t have to become an official member of GPDD to join. More details at http://gpdd-online.org/mailinglist/

Or, if you think you might want your organization or agency to become a GPDD member, then read the GPDD membership page to decide if you are eligible. You can also check their list of links to see what organizations are already members.

Please send any feedback, comments, or concerns regarding the GPDD website to Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu.



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REPORT Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children

Posted on 23 May 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

There are 77 million children around the world who have never entered a primary school classroom. Most are from poor families in developing countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. And, according to a recent report (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), one-third of them have disabilities.

This is an enormous proportion when you consider that the World Health Organization estimates that only about 10 percent of the overall world population are people with disabilities. The World Bank has estimated that possibly as many as 15 to 20 percent of the world’s poorest people have disabilities. But even by this estimate, children with disabilities are still disproportionately represented among primary-school-aged children who are not in school.

So, what can be done to address this challenge? A recent 74-page report, Education’s Missing Millions: including disabled children in education through EFA FTI processes and national sector plans (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), explores this question. Education’s Missing Millions was funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) through a Partnership Programme Agreement with World Vision UK.

Country governments and international donors have been working together on the Education For All Fast Track Initiative (FTI) to put all primary-school aged children into a classroom by the year 2015. This goal cannot possibly be met until disabled children, too, are able to obtain an education. Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb)
analyzes education sector plans that the FTI has endorsed in 28 countries to examine how well they include children with disabilities.

Some efforts have taken place to include disabled children in education in some of these countries. However, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) still identifies many gaps that must be addressed. For example, many countries do not even have data on how many of their children have disabilities. Also, few countries have explored how they can use funding mechanisms or incentives to support the inclusion of children with disabilities. And countries often do not work as closely as they could with parents, communities, or non-government organizations (NGOs).

Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) calls upon FTI partners to actively target children with disabilities to ensure that they, too, can obtain a free, good-quality education. The report makes a series of recommendations for pragmatic ways in which country governments and donors can promote dialogue about policies and practices within the FTI Partnership; act as a “champion” for inclusion; and close gaps in data, policy, capacity, and financing that would otherwise exclude disabled children.

Both grassroots advocates and policy makers may be interested in the 8th chapter, on local community and NGO initiatives. This chapter presents examples of projects that helped promote the inclusion of a wider number of disabled children in the classroom and their communities.

You can download the full report, Education’s Missing Millions, in PDF format (1.2 Mb) at:

http://www.worldvision.org.uk/upload/pdf/Education%27s_Missing_Millions_-_Main_Report.pdf

People interested in education for children with disabilities in general may also be interested in reading about a report on the human rights approach to Education For All (EFA). Or you might be interested in joining a network on inclusive education in Eastern Africa; this is an email discussion group that allows you to exchange ideas and information with other people via email.



We Can Do found Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) by browsing the <a href=”http://www.AskSource.infoAskSource.info database on disability, health, and development.

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INFORMATIONAL RESOURCE: UN Human Rights Disability Section

Posted on 21 March 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) has launched a disability section within their web site. Its purpose is to strengthen the work of the United Nations OHCHR on disability-related issues. It will promote the development of long-term projects to integrate disability issues into international treaty monitoring bodies, including the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. It is available in English, Spanish, and French.

At the OHCHR disability section web site, readers can find information about a range of human rights treaties that touch upon disability issues; the text of a study on human rights and disability; information about various committees that monitor how well human rights are implemented and what is being done to ensure that disability issues are integrated into their activities; links to disability-related speeches by the high commissioner of human rights; and links to statements by disability leaders and country government representatives on the occasion that the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was first opened for countries to sign and ratify.



We Can Do learned about the disability section of the OHCHR web site via the AskSource.info data base of resources related to development, disability, and health issues.

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NEWS: Advocates urge UN Social Development Commission to Make Development Agenda Disability-Inclusive

Posted on 18 March 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Inclusion, News, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

In February 2008, delegates urged the United Nations Social Development Commission to help ensure that people with disabilities are included in efforts to reduce poverty and improve the quality of life in developing countries.

A panel of experts with disabilities pointed out that people who are poor are at higher risk for acquiring disabilities due to poor nutrition, health care, and living conditions. Meanwhile, people who have disabilities are at higher risk for poverty because they encounter barriers to education, employment, and public services.

The Commission also was reminded that people with disabilities have the same desire and rights as everyone else to feel needed and be part of society. This makes it critical to remove barriers to the participation of people with disabilities and mainstream their concern into overall development efforts in developing countries. Doing so improves the lives of people with disabilities and also improves society as a whole by increasing productivity.

A more detailed summary of each speaker’s remarks to the UN Social Development Commission, and the outcome, is available at

http://media-newswire.com/printer_friendly_1061037.html



The information given in this blog post is summarized from the Media-Newswire press release referenced above. We Can Do first learned about this link from the RatifyNow email discussion group.

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JOB POST: Secretary General, Rehabilitation International

Posted on 20 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Michael Fox, president of Rehabilitation International, has been circulating the following announcement; note that the application deadline is March 28, 2008:

As advised at the RI 2007 Assembly in Djerba, Tunisia – our Secretary General Tomas Lagerwall has decided to leave RI later this year – and return to Sweden after a seven year term with RI.

Accordingly, and on behalf of the RI Selection Committee, I am pleased to invite submissions from applicants worldwide for this important role of RI Secretary General – as following details and information.

Regards

Michael Fox
RI President
www.riglobal.org
Sydney phone 612 6552 9333

4 February 2008

RI Secretary General – New York

RI was established in 1922, and is a well recognised and respected international disability and rehabilitation advocacy organisation. RI is a global cross-disability and cross-disciplinary NGO providing a unique meeting ground for participants in a field that has disciplinary and ideological opinions and differences. RI has well-established partnerships with the UN and its agencies as well as other international and regional organisations in the field of disability. Further information on RI and our UN and global networks are available at www.riglobal.org.

RI is a democratic organisation governed by an Assembly – representing RI member organisations in almost 100 countries. The RI Annual Assembly is a global forum to discuss developments in disability issues and general policies and programs of the organisation. The RI Executive Committee provides strategic direction, formulates and considers policies and oversees the budget of the organisation. The RI EC consists of 22 members composed of the RI President, President-elect or Past President, Treasurer and representatives of RI Regions and expert Commissions.

RI is a matrix organisation, with regional leadership in Africa, the Arab Region, Asia, Europe, Latin America and North America as well as thematic Commissions in particular fields of expertise, to assist in developing and expanding program activities in accordance with RI strategic goals. The RI Foundation was established in 2006 and provides the basis for significant growth and development of the RI agenda worldwide.

RI and its members are involved in a range of advocacy projects and activities to promote the RI goal of advancing and achieving the rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities worldwide. The next RI World Congress is scheduled in Quebec City, Canada during August 2008. RI also works toward increasing international collaboration and advocates for policies and legislation recognising the rights of people with disabilities and their families, including the ratification and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

RI Secretary General
RI is managed by a full time Secretariat in our New York City head office. The Secretary General is the CEO of the organisation and our current incumbent has successfully managed this role since 2001.

We now require the services of a resourceful, experienced and dynamic candidate for the role of RI Secretary General. There will be a suitable and agreed transition period for the successful candidate.

CLOSING DATE FOR APPLICATIONS Friday 28 March 2008

DUTY STATION New York, United States of America

ACCESSIBILITY RI New York offices are ADA accessible

Responsibilities and Competencies of Secretary General
The responsibilities and competencies of the successful applicant will include

* Implementation of RI policies, strategies and programs as determined by the RI General Assembly and RI EC – and as agreed with, and in close consultation with, the President, Executive Committee and RI Foundation Board

* Effective management and implementation of the RI Strategic Plan – with balanced commitment to RI Global activities and development of the RI Foundation

* Demonstrate professionalism, judgement, technical awareness and leadership

* Excellent interpersonal skills and ability to operate effectively across organisational boundaries – with ability to establish and maintain effective working relations with people of different national and cultural backgrounds

* Solicit input by genuinely valuing other peoples ideas and expertise – and willing to learn from others

* Ability to operate in a changing environment with innovation and professionalism

* Take the lead with respect to the preparation and implementation of the work program, ensuring that resources are utilised effectively and prudently to implement activities in accordance with the RI Mission, budget and available human and financial resources

* Monitor and review the work program and budget by conducting regular analysis to assess progress of actual work versus the program

* Define requirements and work with system units with respect to improving budget reporting systems and cost effective utilisation of program resources

* Supervise and provide guidance on financial administration and management information issues and practices to Board members, in conjunction with the Finance Committee

* Support, manage, travel and organise RI events as required

* Supervise staff at RI New York and other locations as required

* Provide guidance and leadership to RI staff

* Promote RI membership growth in conjunction with the Membership Committee

* Oversee work related to billing and receipt of income from various services, monitoring and evaluation of individual contractors for services

* Represent RI at international, regional and national meetings related to disability rights and related issues – including IDA, the International Disability Alliance

* Collaborate with relevant organisations including United Nations, World Bank, DPOs, foundations, the private sector, NGOs and civil society at large

* Participate in inter-agency consultations, meetings, and conferences related to disability rights and services issues

* Organise and participate in expert group meetings, workshops and seminars on disability rights and services as required

* Provide advisory services to and collaborate with UN agencies, governments, DPOs, NGOs, regional groups, private sector groups and other stakeholders on disability rights, services and related issues

Qualifications

Education – A minimum of first level university degree with a relevant combination of academic qualifications and experience.

Work Experience – A minimum of 5 years progressively responsible experience in change management, human resources and financial / budget operations, with relevant professional experience in international, governmental and non-governmental organisations.

The RI Secretary General role calls for very good administrative, diplomacy and management skills. First hand disability related experience is preferred.

Languages – Fluency in oral and written English is required. Fluency and / or working knowledge of other languages is desirable.

Other Skills – Ability to use relevant computer technology and software.

Remuneration
A competitive compensation and benefits package is offered – subject to professional experience, family situation and other criteria as may be applicable. Immigration procedures can be negotiated as required.

Selection Process
Applicants will be short listed on the basis of academic credentials, experience, availability and other relevant factors. Additional information may be requested from candidates.

Short listed applicants will be invited to come to New York or elsewhere as appropriate, for an interview with representatives of the RI Selection Committee. Candidates will be interviewed on various criteria including related knowledge, skills, abilities, personality and availability.

The intention is for the new RI Secretary General to be appointed by June 2008.

How To Apply
Interested persons from any nationality worldwide are invited to apply for this important position. This invitation to apply for the role of RI Secretary General is open to everyone.

Detailed responses including Resumes / CVs, and a minimum of two written references, are to be submitted by Friday 28 March 2008. Submissions can be sent by email, post of fax to

Marca Bristo, RI North America Vice President

c/o Access Living
115 W Chicago Ave
Chicago, IL 60610 USA

Email mbristo@aol.com or
Fax 1 312 640 2140

All applications will be confidential to the Selection Committee and RI Executive Committee, until the successful candidate is announced.

We look forward to your application

Regards

Michael Fox AM
RI President
Sydney Australia



We Can Do retrieved this announcement from the email discussion list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD). Individuals may join their mailing list for free. Please note that interested parties should contact Rehabilitation International directly, not We Can Do.



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RESOURCE: Training Manual for African Journalists

Posted on 6 February 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Media & Journalism, Poverty, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Journalists in Africa who want to integrate the concerns of disabled people into their mainstreamed news coverage can turn to a training manual for assistance. The 26-page manual, released by the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities, is entitled The Invisible People: A Practical Guide for Journalists on How to Include Persons with Disabilities (PDF format, 665 Kb).

This manual is targeted at journalists, including media personnel who are new to disability issues and related human rights concerns. But it might also be useful as an advocacy tool for Disabled People Organizations (DPOs) or individual advocates who work closely with journalists.

Although the training manual is targeted at African journalists, most of its content is broad enough that it might also be of interest to journalists in other regions. My only caution is that usage of disability-related terminology, to some extent, can vary from culture to culture. For example, in some countries the term “people with disabilities” is strongly preferred; in others, the strongly preferred term is “disabled people”; and in still others, “persons with disabilities” is considered correct. Or, in Spanish, “personas con discapacidades.” However, in my observation so far, certain themes seem to be universal: terms such as “deaf and dumb,” “retarded,” or “invalid” are considered offensive in nearly any country.

The Invisble People” (PDF, 665 Kb) provides journalists with basic background information about people with disabilities and an overview of the disability rights movement both globally and in Africa.

Part of the manual focuses on certain key principles journalists can bear in mind when including people with disabilities. These include: the need to focus on the person rather than the disability; show people with disabilities as active in society; picturing them as part of the general public, not just when covering disability issues; allow disabled people to have their own voice; avoid common stereotypes such as “the superhero” and “the victim”; work with journalists who themselves have disabilities; communicate with DPOs; don’t only interview disabled persons on disability issues–interview them about mainstream issues also.

Next, “The Invisble People” (PDF, 665 Kb) the manual addresses several issues that are key concerns for the disability community. These include accessibility, the enabling environment, poverty, mainstreaming, health care, HIV/AIDS, education, employment, culture, sport, children with disabilities, women with disabilities, and the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The manual also makes recommendations about the appropriate terminology to use when referring to persons with various types of disabilities.

The manual ends with engaging examples of the wrong way, and the right way, to cover disability issues in the media.

You can download the manual in PDF format (665 Kb) by clicking on its title anywhere it appears above, or by following the link to:

http://www.africandecade.org/trainingmaterials/journalist-training-manual



We Can Do found this manual by exploring the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities. I encourage We Can Do readers with an interest in pragmatic disability-related training manuals to explore their other resources at http://www.africandecade.org/trainingmaterials.

Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

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