FUNDING OPPORTUNITY for Human Rights Projects by Disabled People Organizations (DPOs)

Posted on 15 July 2009. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund Releases Second 2009 Request for Proposals, Extending Another Year of Grantmaking to Existing Target Countries and Opening Grantmaking to the Pacific
July 15, 2009
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF)—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced the second round of its 2009 grantmaking, “Raising Our Voice.” The application deadline is September 15, 2009. This round opens another year of possible funding to disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in: Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; and Bangladesh and adds an additional region to the Fund’s reach – the Pacific. In the Pacific, 14 island countries are targeted: Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

The broad objective of the Fund[1]—which was officially launched in March 2008—is to empower DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).

In 2008, the Fund made one-year grants to 33 organizations in 7 countries (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; Bangladesh), totaling USD 800,000. Grants ranged from USD 5000 – 50,000 and supported CRPD awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

In the second round of 2009 grantmaking, applicant organizations may apply within one of two categories: a) single organizations or partnerships and b) national DPO coalitions. Grants to single organizations will range from USD 5,000 to 30,000 and support efforts to build voice and visibility and to develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. Grants to national DPO coalitions will range from USD 30,000 to 70,000 and will support advocacy toward ratification of the CRPD, passage of specific legislation to accord with the CRPD, or the production of shadow reports.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by August 15. The deadline for applications is September 15, 2009.
DRF’s donors include the Aepoch Fund, the American Jewish World Service, an anonymous founding donor, the Australian Government’s International Development Assistance Agency – AusAID, the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development.

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[1] The Disability Rights Fund is a project of Tides.



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this announcement to We Can Do.

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JOB POSTS: Research Programme Director; Information and Communication Manager; Botswana

Posted on 1 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Please note that this blog post advertises two different job posts, both located in Francistown, Botswana with the same organization. Read carefully before applying.]

The Southern Africa Federation Of the Disabled (SAFOD) is seeking to engage the services of dynamic, qualified and experienced professionals for the positions of Research Programme Director and Information and Communication Manager. Both positions will be based in the SAFOD Research Centre in Francistown, Botswana. The following are the new positions that need to be filled in the SRP as soon as possible; see Application details at the bottom for instructions in how to apply:

1.RESEARCH PROGRAMME DIRECTOR:
Reporting to the SAFOD Director General, the Research Programme Director will have overall responsibility for the management of the SAFOD Research Programme.This would include all aspects of the professional, financial and administrative management of the programme. The Research director will also be accountable to DFID Central Research Department.

Management Responsibilities:
·Co-ordination of the Research Programme with the SAFOD member DPOs and with other disability programmes in the region to avoid duplication and to promote synergies;
·Ensuring gender dimensions are mainstreamed into research themes;
·Terminating unsuccessful activities;
·Act asan ex-officio member of the SRP Technical Advisory Board (TAB);
·Ensuring timely delivery of the activities of the SRP;
·Reviewing the progress of the SRP in terms of potential impact on disability policy and practice;
·Disseminating and promoting the use of SRP-generated knowledge for the benefit of disabled people in SAFOD member countries;
·Line management of SRP staff, which includes a Research Programme Manager and a Communictions Officer;
·Financial management of the budget and expenditure of the SRP;
·Safe-guarding any database of knowledge generated by the SRP so that it remains accessible after the research programme ends;
·Safeguarding any work that may be commissioned to contribute to the achievement of the purposes established for the SRP.
SRP Implementation:
Overall responsibility for implementing the SRP programme.
Development of the SRP will include the following tasks:
·Identification of future research activities;
·Identifying the stakeholders for research outputs within and beyond the SRP,
·With the advice of the Communications Manager, establish the means by which these outputs may be used and how they should be packaged and promoted;
·Establishing strategic relationships with SRP partners and with other collaborating research institutions in target countries to promote the transfer of knowledge to stakeholders;
·Development of new consortium milestones for agreement with DFID.
The Research Director may identify and commission work to achieve the outputs within the annual budgets and the financial limit set by the contract.
General
Taking into consideration the views of the Technical Advisory Board, establish all necessary arrangements to achieve the SRP outputs in a cost-effective way and to achieve best value for money in the commissioning of activities;
Establish and maintain liaison with relevant DFID advisers and with local institutions in SAFOD-member countries in which research activities are to be implemented;
Set up criteria for commissioning research and ensure research proposals are fully appraised to ensure that quality, developmental relevance and demand criteria are met;
Monitor progress against the outputs and milestones, and producing regular financial, operational and technical reports within prescribed deadlines;
Monitor SRP expenditure against the approved annual budget allocation and the financial limit with accurate forecasting of expenditure and submit quarterly and annual financial reports in the format prescribed by DFID. Provide additional financial information as required.
Prepare, for submission to DFID and with TAB endorsement, annual work plans and annual reports in the format prescribed and participate as required in SAFOD monitoring and review activities;
Facilitate access to the SRP for the Mid-Term Review of the programme mid-way through the programme cycle.

2.INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION MANAGER
The Communications Manager will be an expert in communicating research. The post will be full-time and the post-holder will report to the Research Programme Director.
The Communications Manager will have overall responsibility for planning and implementing a communications strategy. The post will involve close engagement with the research work, people, debates and partners across a range of countries, especially those where SAFOD is operating. This post will be crucial in helping the programme to develop policy-influencing strategies linked to research results. The postholder will need to combine strong interpersonal and communications skills with the vision, networking skills and entrepreneurial ability to develop and implement a communications strategy which promotes research to a wide audience.
Responsibilities include the following:
Take the lead to identify and establish the means by which research products will be packaged, promoted and adopted, inter alia:
·Planning and implementing a communications strategy for the SRP in consultation with research and management staff;
·Undertaking a communications assessment for the entire programme, including the capacity and needs of the SRP partners to collaborate and deliver communications components;
·Undertaking stakeholder analyses, in collaboration with research staff, to identify key audiences for research findings at different stages of research;
·Ensuring the identification and establishment of effective dissemination of research findings to key stakeholders;
·Packaging of research in a form appropriate for use by stakeholders, including disabled people;
·Working with research staff to produce outputs, mostly in print and electronic formats, such as policy briefings, resource guides, comments and opinion pieces, drawing on research findings as they emerge;
·Maintaining the SRP website, including monitoring of use and establishing subscription mechanisms for interested parties;
·Producing SRP newsletters, periodically;
·Promotion of research products to target institutions and beneficiaries;
·Syntheses of knowledge and lesson-learning on specific themes;
·Maintain effective relationships with SRP partners and with other collaborating research institutions in target countries to promote the transfer of knowledge to stakeholders;
·Ensure effective design and implementation of all research projects being conducted under the programme;
·Advise the Research Director on all matters relating to the implementation of the research programme and standard operating procedures and project management;
·Ensure that good relations are maintained in all the communities in which research is being conducted through regular and scheduled community meetings;
·Represent the programme at community functions and fora as required to provide information to community leaders /DPOs and partners about the programme and research conduct;
·Liaise with Director General to ensure local capacity building throughout SAFOD via sharing of experience in research management and, where appropriate, dissemination of key findings.
Person Specifications:
a)Experienced communications expert with a solid understanding of the processes for achieving evidence based research and targeted outputs for policy change;
b)Strong interpersonal communication skills to work and communicate with a variety of stakeholders including people of varied disabilities, academic research community; international development donors, disabled peoples’ organisations and so on;
c)Strong background and commitment to community based research and knowledge and skills of participatory learning and action research;
d)A social science degree or equivalent in communications and experience in the research field;
e)Excellent oral and/or written communications skills to work and communicate with people of varied disabilities, and capacity to edit and draft research reports and written out puts;
f)Computer literacy and Internet experience;
g)Knowledge in website and data base design;
h)Knowledge of a non-discriminatory society and that disability does not mean inability.
Key Result Areas:
·Development of a Communications Strategy to ensure the efficient and effective systems of dissemination and communication of SRP research products and findings to key stakeholders;
·Development of a capacity building programme to strengthen SRP member capacity to undertake disability research and disseminate findings;
·Establishment of outreach and mobilization programmes on disability research and related advocacy activities to effect change on the basis of key findings;
·Establishment and maintenance of a resource center holding documentation and information regarding disability policy and practice, as well as housing SRP programme research products;
·Maintenance of a database of SRP stakeholders as part of the communications strategy.

Application Details
Interested in these highly rewarding positions ?
Please send your applications, together with CVs, to the Personnel Assistant at:

Southern Africa Federation of the Disabled (SAFOD)
No. 19 Lobengula Street
Box 2247 Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
Tel: 263-9-69356; Fax: 263-9-62944
E: safod@netconnect.co.zw OR info@safod.org
Website: www.safod.org
SAFOD Regional Headquarters Botswana
Plot Number 6230 Tati River Plots
P. O. Box 3236 Nswazwi Complex
Francistown, Botswana
Tel/fax: +267 240 5156
Tel:+ 267 240 5164
E-mail: safod@botsnet.bw



I received both of these job announcements via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development email discussion group, which people can subscribe to for free.

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NEWS: Disability Rights Fund Receives $1.3 Million from DFID

Posted on 4 December 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

PRESS RELEASE: Disability Rights Fund Receives $1.3 Million from DFID

December 3, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – On the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the Disability Rights Fund (DRF) is happy to announce receipt of a grant of £868,000 ($1.3 million) from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID). This grant will support expanded grantmaking in 2009 to disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in the Global South.

“With the present economic downturn, this donation is an incredible message of support,” stated DRF’s Director Diana Samarasan. “It underscores the commitment of the British government to a rights-based approach to disability.”

Utilizing the framework of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD), DRF supports the human rights advocacy of DPOs in the Global South and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union. Through its unique governance structure, the Fund is a partnership between donors and the worldwide disability community. A global advisory panel provides recommendations on grantmaking strategies; and panel representatives also serve on the Fund’s grantmaking decision body together with donors. Panel members come from five continents and reflect a broad cross-section of the disability community,

DFID representatives stated, “it is essential that efforts like the Disability Rights Fund continue their support of communities often unreached by more conventional development efforts. DRF represents a unique model of supporting community-led efforts to institute rights.”

DRF’s first grants decisions, announced in November 2008, resulted in a total of $800,000 in grants to 33 organizations in seven countries. Grantees include a Ugandan organization of lawyers with disabilities, an emergent Peruvian group of people with psycho-social disabilities, and a grassroots network in Bangladesh of women-led disabled persons’ organizations. For a full list of grantees and more information about DRF, see www.disabilityrightsfund.org.

Other donors to DRF include: an anonymous founding donor, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the Open Society Institute, and the American Jewish World Service.

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Thank you to Diana Samarasan for passing along this press release. Readers who have not already done so may wish to explore see the resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website for an extensive collection of resources related to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); fund raising sources; and toolkits that can help organizations learn how to raise funds more effectively.

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NEWS: African Decade of Persons with Disabilities Extended to 2019

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ANNOUNCEMENT:

AFRICAN DECADE OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES EXTENDED TO DECEMBER 2019

A. CONGRATULATIONS AND GOOD NEWS!

We are ecstatic!

This is to announce that the AU Continental Decade of Persons with Disabilities has been extended to December 2019.

The Windhoek Declaration on Social Development adopted by Ministers in Charge of Social Development on 31 October 2008, adopted Resolution 6, which reads as follows:

‘6. ADOPT the extension of the Continental Decade of Persons with Disabilities for the period 2010-2019; CALL for the evaluation of the existing Decade and its Plan of Action (1999-2009) and the speedy conclusion of the evaluation and restructuring of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)’

In addition to the resolution extending the Decade, the Windhoek Declaration also adopted resolution 5(x) which reads as follows:

‘5. Further commit ourselves to implement the priority strategies under the key thematic social issues spelt out in the Social Policy Framework for Africa, through the following:

(x) Empowering and providing persons with disabilities with equal opportunities, safeguarding their rights and enlisting their participation and mainstreaming them in all development programmes’

The new Social Development Policy adopted by the Ministers in Windhoek Namibia has detailed coverage of disability work. We encourage organisations to get a copy of this policy and apply its contents in your programming processes.

We would like to thank all organisations (notably Pan African Federation Of the Disabled (PAFOD), African Union of the Blind (AFUB), and others), Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) Staff and leaders, Panel of Experts/Parliamentarians, Pan African Parliament, African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI), the African Union Social Affairs Commission, our Development Partners (Disabled Persons Organizations Denmark [DPOD], Sida, UK Department for International Development [DFID], and Southern Africa Trust), Christian Blind Mission (CBM) and those that supported our down-line networks and DPOs for their support during the first Decade and the campaign towards extension.

We look forward to hard work during the next ten years. We now have the benefit of learning from the mistakes that we made and the experience of managing an initiative of this nature.

B. MORE INFORMATION ON THE FIRST DECADE

The African Union declared the first decade of the new millennium (1999-2009) as the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities. In 2001 the African Union’s Labour and Social Affairs Commission along with its African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI) and the ILO held a meeting in Addis Ababa. In this meeting they designed a Continental Plan of Action (CPOA) to guide the member states of the African Union on how to implement the African Decade. The adoption of the African Decade of Disabled Persons (ADDP) placed responsibility on African States to implement Decade Programme activities.

With this declaration, the African Union adopted a Continental Plan of Action (CPOA) with twelve objectives that African States were to implement over the period.

The twelve objectives cover a wide range of themes that are of critical importance to improvement in the lives of persons with disabilities in Africa. These themes include ideas and strategies to:
1. Formulate and implement national policies, programmes and legislation to promote the full and equal participation of persons with disabilities.
2. Promote the participation of persons with disabilities in the process of economic and social development
3. Promote the self-representation of people with disabilities in all public decision-making structures.
4. To enhance support services for disabled persons.
5. Promote special measures for children, youth, women and elderly persons with disabilities.
6. Ensure and improve access to rehabilitation, education, training, employment, sports, the cultural and physical environment.
7. To promote and protect disability rights as human rights
8. To support the development of and strengthen Disabled Persons’ Organizations
9. Mobilize resources

These objectives where meant to be implemented by Africa States, with the cooperation of civil society organisations.
Prepared By:

Kudakwashe A.K. Dube, CEO
SADPD



This announcement is being circulated by The Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD). Their website is at http://www.africandecade.org.za and is worth exploring for anyone with an interest in human rights or social and economic development for people with disabilities in Africa. I modified this announcement to spell out most of the acronyms.

I received this announcement via the mailing list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development.

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Are Development Programs Achieving Disability Inclusion? If Not, What Next?

Posted on 4 September 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Reports, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

We cannot put all the world’s children into school, or eradicate global poverty and hunger, or stop the spread of HIV/AIDS, until and unless mainstream international development programs proactively include people with disabilities. The good news is that a slowly growing number of international agencies and organizations have written policies declaring their support for disability inclusion, otherwise known as disability mainstreaming. These include, as a few examples, the US Agency of International Development (USAID); the World Bank; The Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD); and the UK Department for International Development (DFID).

But, how well do these nice-sounding policies translate into practice? Do these programs actually reach poor people with disabilities in developing countries, or improve the quality of their lives, any better than before they wrote these policies? One DisabilityKar publication explores this question: Has Disability Been Mainstreamed into Development Cooperation? (Word format, 921 Kb)

One of the conclusions of this report is that the question is harder to answer than you might think: even the definition of what makes a “policy” a “policy” is apparently not always as obvious as it might seem. Then there are even trickier concepts to define, such as “inclusion,” “mainstreaming,” and “disability.” But ultimately the answer is mostly disappointing. Apart from some limited progress, many policies fail to go beyond pretty words on a page into pragmatic action in the field. If they are implemented, it is more or less haphazardly.

This conclusion in itself will probably not be especially new to close observers of the development field. What makes this study interesting, however, is that it is one of the few attempts to formally document what it terms a “disconnect between promise and results.” More importantly, it makes an attempt to answer why this disconnect happens, and what committed organizations can do to ensure that disability-friendly policies are carried out in practice. The study was published in July 2005, so some information has changed since then. But many of the underlying challenges are likely still similar today. Organizations and agencies that are serious about disability inclusion may wish to review this study with their own policies and practices in mind and consider ways they can help close the gap.

Has Disability Been Mainstreamed into Development Cooperation? (Word format, 921 Kb) analyzes policies and practice at USAID, the World Bank, NORAD, and DFID. The most common reason why disability inclusion policies fail include: lack of institutional support; failure to communicate policies; failure to break down traditional attitudes toward disability; failure to provide practical guidance in how to implement the policies; and inadequate resources.

Download the full 107-page report in Word format (921 Kb) at:

http://handicap-international.fr/bibliographie-handicap/4PolitiqueHandicap/mainstreaming/MainstreamDevCoop.doc

People interested in the DisabilityKar report may also be interested in reading a study of US-based organizations with an international focus on the extent to which they proactively include the concerns of women and girls with disabilities in their programs. This study, entitled Gender And Disability: A Survey of InterAction Member Agencies: Findings And Recommendations on Inclusion of Women and Men with Disabilities in International Development Programs (PDF format, 286 Kb), explores both policies and practice in dozens of relief and international development agencies and organizations. It also includes recommendations for how mainstream organizations can move forward in promoting genuine disability inclusion. Published by Mobility International USA, it is a few years older than DisabilityKar’s study, but covers more organizations and includes a gender focus as well as a disability focus. It can be downloaded in PDF format (286 Kb) at:

http://www.miusa.org/publications/freeresources/media/genderdisabilityreport.PDF



I discovered DisabilityKar’s study by exploring Handicap International’s new, on-line, free CD on Disability Rights and Policies. I encourage readers to explore the on-line CD on their own to find more publications and resources of interest. I first learned of MIUSA’s publication when I took my first course in international development and disability a few years ago at Gallaudet University.

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REPORT Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children

Posted on 23 May 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

There are 77 million children around the world who have never entered a primary school classroom. Most are from poor families in developing countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. And, according to a recent report (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), one-third of them have disabilities.

This is an enormous proportion when you consider that the World Health Organization estimates that only about 10 percent of the overall world population are people with disabilities. The World Bank has estimated that possibly as many as 15 to 20 percent of the world’s poorest people have disabilities. But even by this estimate, children with disabilities are still disproportionately represented among primary-school-aged children who are not in school.

So, what can be done to address this challenge? A recent 74-page report, Education’s Missing Millions: including disabled children in education through EFA FTI processes and national sector plans (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), explores this question. Education’s Missing Millions was funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) through a Partnership Programme Agreement with World Vision UK.

Country governments and international donors have been working together on the Education For All Fast Track Initiative (FTI) to put all primary-school aged children into a classroom by the year 2015. This goal cannot possibly be met until disabled children, too, are able to obtain an education. Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb)
analyzes education sector plans that the FTI has endorsed in 28 countries to examine how well they include children with disabilities.

Some efforts have taken place to include disabled children in education in some of these countries. However, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) still identifies many gaps that must be addressed. For example, many countries do not even have data on how many of their children have disabilities. Also, few countries have explored how they can use funding mechanisms or incentives to support the inclusion of children with disabilities. And countries often do not work as closely as they could with parents, communities, or non-government organizations (NGOs).

Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) calls upon FTI partners to actively target children with disabilities to ensure that they, too, can obtain a free, good-quality education. The report makes a series of recommendations for pragmatic ways in which country governments and donors can promote dialogue about policies and practices within the FTI Partnership; act as a “champion” for inclusion; and close gaps in data, policy, capacity, and financing that would otherwise exclude disabled children.

Both grassroots advocates and policy makers may be interested in the 8th chapter, on local community and NGO initiatives. This chapter presents examples of projects that helped promote the inclusion of a wider number of disabled children in the classroom and their communities.

You can download the full report, Education’s Missing Millions, in PDF format (1.2 Mb) at:

http://www.worldvision.org.uk/upload/pdf/Education%27s_Missing_Millions_-_Main_Report.pdf

People interested in education for children with disabilities in general may also be interested in reading about a report on the human rights approach to Education For All (EFA). Or you might be interested in joining a network on inclusive education in Eastern Africa; this is an email discussion group that allows you to exchange ideas and information with other people via email.



We Can Do found Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) by browsing the <a href=”http://www.AskSource.infoAskSource.info database on disability, health, and development.

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NEWS: European Union, Africa Cooperate in Support of Disabled People Living in Poverty

Posted on 6 February 2008. Filed under: Agriculture and Rural Development, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The EU-Africa strategy – working to support the rights and needs of persons with disabilities living in chronic poverty

PRESS RELEASE – DATE 24 DECEMBER 2007
THE AFRICA-EU STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP – A Joint Africa-EU Strategy

The Secretariat of the Africa Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) notes with appreciation the inclusion of disability in the Africa-EU Strategic Partnership: A Joint Africa-EU Strategy (the Strategy).

The context, shared vision, principles and objectives of the Strategy offer unprecedented opportunities to address the needs, human rights and aspirations of disabled people in both Europe and Africa. The new approaches and strategies outlined in the declaration are all relevant to the needs and priorities of disabled people in Africa. We would like to urge African governments to take primary responsibility to ensure that all the provisions on the Strategy mainstream disability at all levels of planning, implementation and evaluation of programmes.

Disabled people in Africa can play a useful role in promoting peace and stability, strengthening the principles of democracy and human rights and contributing to the objectives for trade and regional integration. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) cannot be attained without the active participation of disabled people on the African continent.

We believe that development cooperation must ensure that disability is mainstreamed in all programmes and that specific support should be provided to organisations, government departments and other entities with disability programmes and projects. We welcome the inclusion of gender equality and issues related to the environment and climate change. The latter issues have a negative impact on the quality of life of disabled people all over Africa and disabled people’s role in promoting the required changes should be recognised and supported.

Issues related to migration and agriculture/ food security are top priorities as disabled people are caught in various unfavourable situations that threaten their ability to survive. We pledge our support to initiatives that promote the active involvement of disabled people, not just as consumers of agricultural produce, but also as producers within all the essential processes of the food value-chain.

We would like to thank our partners, DSI/ Danida, Sida, DFID, ODG, Southern Africa Trust, and CBM for their support to the Secretariat’s programmes and initiatives.

We extend our thanks and gratitude to the African Union (AU), ARI and African Parliamentarians/ leaders for their support for disability inclusion in Africa and within the Strategy.

END OF STATEMENT from the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities

The above statement was taken from the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities; you can view the same statement at http://www.africandecade.org/reads/Press/the-eu-africa-strategy-working-to-support-the-rights-and-needs-of-persons-with-disabilities-living-in-chronic-poverty.

We Can Do readers who are interested in the EU/Africa partnership may also wish to read a letter to the African Union chair titled “Working to support the rights and needs of persons with disabilities living in chronic poverty”, available in PDF format (73 Kb) at:

http://www.africandecade.org/document-repository/Letterto%20AU%20chair.pdf

A draft discussion of the strategy to be used in the EU/Africa partnership can be downloaded in PDF format (1.5 Mb) at:

http://www.africandecade.org/document-repository/Joint%20Africa-EU%20Strategy_2007.pdf

There is also a web page about the join EU/Africa strategy:

http://europafrica.org/2007/01/01/about-the-eu-africa-consultation-web-site/



We Can Do found this press release by exploring the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities. I recommend that We Can Do readers may wish to explore their training materials on disability-related issues.

Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



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TRAINING for Women with Disabilities in South Asia

Posted on 13 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Education and Training Opportunities, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Project: Creating Space for Women With Disabilities to Communicate & Advocate for their Rights
Project Partners: AWWD (India), SARPV (Bangladesh), AKASA (Sri Lanka), HLWW (UK), Supported by: DFID, UK

REGIONAL LEADERSHIP TRAINING FOR WOMEN WITH DISABILITIES

“Currently our rights are not understood or heard. We need to mobilize our girls and women to take the challenge and responsibility to make our presence felt. A new generation of leaders is essential to make change happen”
Kuhu Das, Director, Association of Women with Disabilities – India

OBJECTIVE
The initial ‘master’ training will facilitate a group of 25 Women with Disabilities (WWD) from the South Asia region including India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan, Afghanistan and the Maldives in leadership & advocacy skills within a rights based framework. Those attending will in turn be supported to organize and run national level leadership and advocacy trainings when they return home. They will also develop country strategic advocacy plans, and be offered small seed grants to enable the implementation.

The participants will engage in a 7 day training process which will enable them to:

  • Share their country level situations
  • Deepen their understanding of a rights based approach to issues affecting WWD
  • Design & plan their adapted leadership and advocacy training at national level based on the initial ‘master’ training
  • Form a regional network of WWDs
  • Design & plan national advocacy and communication strategies for the rights of WWDs
  • Develop WWD leadership training modules including a resource base of materials

PARTICIPANTS (Criteria for selection):
The training is open to WWDs and organizations, who will be able to carry out the national level trainings in their respective countries after this initial workshop. They should be well networked and able to mobilize people and resources. They will need some experience of leadership and an ability to motivate others. A working knowledge of English is required, as is the ability to organize and host training events.

Priority will be given to WWD themselves and organizations working to further the rights of WWD

CONTENT OF TRAINING:

Regional Leadership Training: (TOT): 7 days.

  1. Sharing of project and training objectives, finalizing draft schedule and participatory agenda setting
  2. Leadership
    • Meaning, Necessity
    • Quality of a leader
  3. Communication – Advocacy – Lobbying
    • Meaning/Importance/Necessity
    • Good / effective communication
    • Communication tools
    • Development of Advocacy frameworks
    • Advocacy & lobbying – what, why & how
  4. Social Mobilisation
    • Understanding rights, including human rights, rights of women, rights of disabled
    • Significance of human rights instruments (national & international) – CEDAW, UNCRPD, BMF etc.
    • Use and limitations of these instruments
    • Social mobilization to achieve rights
    • Analysis of legislation and policies
  5. Group Mobilisation
    • Meaning/Importance/Necessity
    • Organizing people in groups
    • Mobilizing and managing groups
    • Strengthening group dynamics
    • Setting targets for group
  6. Networking
    • Why? The benefits and challenges
    • Making it effective & sustainable
    • Setting vision and target activities
  7. Planning & designing training
    • Adapting ‘master’ training to national level
    • Content development / modification
    • Quality assurance – M&E
  8. Facilitation skills
    • Participatory approaches
    • Skills development
  9. Working with the Media
    • How to engage with media
    • How to promote issues
    • Media literacy
  10. Action planning for national level training and advocacy activities
    • Strategy development
    • Integrating into existing national and local initiatives
    • Monitoring and Evaluation

TRAINING STYLE
The training will be highly participatory, drawing on the experience of the participants to develop and improve our collective knowledge base. Trainers will be from a variety of backgrounds and specialisms including advocacy expertise, network strengthening, media, project planning and management and leadership skills development.

COSTS
25 places will be fully supported including travel, food, accommodation and a small allowance.

Workshop Venue – Kolkota (to be confirmed)
Dates – mid February 2008 (to be confirmed)

APPLICATION PROCEDURE:
If you are interested to attend this workshop please email a one page letter outlining:
your interest in this field of work
your experience in disability activism and rights based approaches
your experience and capacity to take the work forward at national level
to:
Ms Kuhu Das: info@awwdindia.org (Regional coordinator – AWWD India)
and Mr David Curtis: curtis.d@healthlink.org.uk (Head of Programme and Capacity Development, Healthlink Worldwide, UK)

Closing date for applications: January 5th 2008.

A selection committee comprising members from the four lead organizations will assess each application. Please remember that after the initial ‘master’ training, there will be national level trainings in each of the countries in the region so there will be further opportunities to engage at national level.

This workshop is part of the ‘Creating Spaces – for women with disabilities (WWD) to communicate and advocate for their rights’ project – a collaborative initiative from Association of Women with Disabilities (AWWD) – India, Association for Women with Disabilities (Akasa), Sri Lanka, Social Assistance for the Rehabilitation of the Physically Vulnerable (SARPV) Bangladesh and Healthlink Worldwide, UK

The project is funded by UK Department for International Development (DfID)


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