Helping Find Deaf Organizations Around the World

Posted on 23 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Deaf | Tags: , , , , , , , |

The Center for International Programs and Services (CIPS) at Gallaudet University is seeking assistance in identifying both national- and local-level deaf organizations around the world.

Gallaudet is the only liberal arts university for deaf students internationally and is in Washington, DC. CIPS plans to develop a web site providing information for Deaf individuals and deaf organizations around the world. This work is being done in June and July 2009 by a short-term graduate student intern, Andrea Shettle.

As a first step, CIPS wishes to make a list of organizations of Deaf people around the world with their full contact information (name of organization; mailing address; phone number; fax number; SMS; email address if any; website if any). This includes international, national, and local-level organizations. This information could help deaf organizations find each other so they can exchange knowledge and ideas.

If you think you may be able to assist in making this list as accurate and as comprehensive as possible, please contact Andrea Shettle at CIPS (Andrea.Shettle@gallaudet.edu) between now and July 17, 2009. You can help ensure that CIPS does not miss any of the deaf organizations you are familiar with in your country or elsewhere! The emphasis for the next few weeks is on deaf organizations in developing countries. However, information in locating deaf organizations in all countries is welcome.

Everyone who attempts to assist CIPS in assembling this list will eventually receive a Word document file listing all the deaf organizations we are able to find worldwide.

Learn more about CIPS at http://cips.gallaudet.edu
Contact Andrea Shettle in regard to sharing contact information for deaf organizations you are familiar with at Andrea.Shettle@gallaudet.edu between now and July 17, 2009.

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NEWS: Deaf Empowerment Program in Ghana, Uganda Launches

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Deaf, Education, Employment, Interpreting, signed languages, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

First posted in November 2008 at http://www.uclan.ac.uk/ahss/research/islands/sign_language.php

£58,000 for deaf empowerment in Africa

The iSLanDS Centre has received a grant from the Education Partnership Africa programme for capacity building in sub-Saharan Africa.

The project “Training and employability for the deaf communities in Ghana and Uganda” is a joint initiative with the University of Ghana, Kyambogo University in Uganda, and deaf organisations in both countries, and aims at capacity building in the areas of applied sign language studies.

Course and curriculum development includes a sign language interpreter training course at the University of Ghana, a 2-year diploma course for deaf students in Applied Sign Language Studies in Uganda, and summer courses in academic skills development for deaf students. All of these are first-time initiatives, and are realised in close partnership with local deaf organisations.

We expect this project to impact positively on literacy, employability, and access to work for talented deaf participants in these programmes.

For further details, contact the project leader Ulrike Zeshan at uzeshan@uclan.ac.uk, or Sam Lutalo-Kiingi at slutalo-kiingi@uclan.ac.uk



I learned of this program via the Deaf Studies Africa mailing list. All inquiries should please go to either of the project leaders (see email addresses above), NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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SCHOLARSHIPS for Deaf Students in Applied Sign Language Studies, New Delhi, India

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities, signed languages, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR DEAF STUDENTS
in BA (Hons) Applied Sign Language Studies

An initiative by:

International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies, Preston, UK
Indira Gandhi National Open University, New Delhi, India
Deaf Empowerment Foundation, The Netherlands

Program information

1. THE COURSE

Applied Sign Language Studies brings together the study of sign language and deaf communities with areas of study in applied linguistics, such as first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, language planning and policy, and language pedagogy. Graduates will work as sign language teachers, professionals in the field of language support for deaf people, teaching assistants in deaf education, and interpreter trainers.

The course is designed specifically to be accessible for deaf students and is taught through sign language. “Learning by doing” is included in work placements, lab work, and experiential modules. Deaf students without standard secondary school qualifications can take a one-year preparatory course (“Foundation Entry”) and continue with the BA course afterwards.

The BA in Applied Sign Language Studies is a joint international initiative. The course was developed at the International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies in the UK and will be taught at the Indira Gandhi National Open University in New Delhi, India. The beginning of the programme in 2009 is subject to validation.

2. THE SCHOLARSHIPS

The Deaf Empowerment Foundation is providing scholarships for deaf students in the preparatory Foundation Entry course in the 2009/2010 academic year.

Scholarships for Indian students
These cover one year of tuition fees at Rs. 10,000 and are available to Indian nationals. Students from other developing countries may also be eligible and should confirm their status when applying.

Scholarships for international students
These cover one year of tuition fees at ₤1,500 and are available to non-Indian students. This includes all students from industrialised countries and certain categories of students from developing countries other than India. The latter should confirm their status when applying.

Scholarships are for tuition fees only and do not cover travel, accommodation or living expenses.

CONTACT: scholarship@def-intl.org

From: http://www.def-intl.org/?q=node/20



I received this announcement via the Deaf Studies Africa email discussion group. All inquiries about this opportunity should please be directed to scholarship@def-intl.org, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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Grassroots Advocacy Leadership Training for International Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals, June 28-July 5, 2009, USA

Posted on 10 March 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

by Simon Guteng

Subject: Grassroots Advocacy Leadership Training for International Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals

It is with much pleasure and enthusiasm that I [Simon Guteng] announce our summer 2009 international leadership training program titled “Grassroots Advocacy Leadership Training for International Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals”, June 28-July 5, 2009.

Committed to improving the quality of personal and professional lives of deaf and hard of hearing individuals, the Gallaudet Leadership Institute and Professional Studies (GLIPS), a unit of the College of Professional Studies and Outreach at Gallaudet University, in collaboration with the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) ensures and assures the following program experiences and outcomes for participants:

1. Thorough understanding of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)

2. Preparation for working at national level leadership positions

3. Skills to organize grassroots level deaf people into dynamic and productive groups

4. Hands-on training in strategic planning and goal setting

5. Knowledge of leadership styles and identification of one’s own strengths

6. Improvement in human relations skills

7. Enhanced knowledge about emotional intelligence and its uses

8. Certificate of attendance and participation

Participation cost per participant is $910. This cost covers program/registration fee, room, and meal.
It DOES NOT include or cover your airfare, ground transportation within and outside of United States, emergency medical/travel insurance, and pocket money.

The World Federation of Deaf (WFD) will dispatch an announcement letter on the leadership training to all National Associations of the Deaf around the world through their Headquarters. You should anticipate this letter of announcement from WFD. Meanwhile, feel free to use this email letter as a valid and legitimate letter to source funds.

For registration, please visit www.regonline.com/grassroots_advocacy.

I look forward to the participation of many deaf leaders from around the world.

Sincerely,
Simon I. Guteng

Simon I. Guteng, Ph.D.
Director
Gallaudet Leadership Institute and Professional Studies
College of Professional Studies and Outreach
Gallaudet University
Hall Memorial Building Room E111A
800 Florida Avenue, NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 250-2130 Voice & Video Phone
1-866-381-8410 Toll Free: Voice & Video Phone
(202) 448-7191 Fax



Simon Guteng’s announcement was recently circulated on the Intl-Dev email news distribution service.

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JOB POSTS: “Careline Officer”, Mobile Phone Company, Bangladesh

Posted on 10 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , |

The following job vacancy notice is targeted at people in Bangladesh who are deaf or hard of hearing, or who have physical disabilities. The application deadline is February 12, 2009.

Subject: [1191] “Career Opportunity for People with Disabilities!”

Dear Friends,
Please find the following circular on career opportunity for people with Disabilities.

You are cordially requested to disseminate it among deserving persons with disabilities or display it on your notice board.

Hope your cooperation will contribute towards getting employment of a person with disability.

“Career Opportunity for People with Disabilities!”

BanglaLink, a leading Mobile Phone Company in Bangladesh invites applications from deserving candidates for the position of “Careline Officer” for its Customer Support/Call Center division.

This position is exclusively open for men and women with hearing and physical disability.

For detailed information about academic requirement and other competencies please e-mail to awdpbd@gmail.com

Deadline for application is February 12, 2009

Source:
Asst. Information Officer
AWDP-Bangladesh
E-mail: info@awdpbd.org
Web: http://www.awdpbd.org



I received this announcement via the CSID news distribution list, which people may subscribe to for free. All inquiries should please be directed to awdpbd@gmail.com, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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MIUSA International Leadership Employment and Disability Professional exchange program, March 15-April 5, 2009 (English and Espanol)

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Employment, Events and Conferences, Latin America & Caribbean, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

YES, late applications are being accepted after the application deadline. , se puede presentar su solicitud despues 16 de enero, 2009.

En español

In English
MIUSA is currently accepting applications from professionals with disabilities from Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, and Guatemala for MIUSA’s International Leadership, Employment, and Disability (I-LEAD) Professional exchange program in Eugene, Oregon USA, March 15 – April 5, 2009.

MIUSA strongly encourages professionals with all types of disabilities to apply, including people who have hearing, visual, psychiatric, learning and health related disabilities.

Applications and two references are due by January 16, 2009. However, late applications will be accepted.

The 2009 I-LEAD Professional exchange program will bring together influential leaders in government, business, education, community development, and disability rights organizations who demonstrate the capacity and commitment to expand employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Latin America.

Spanish-English translation and American Sign Language interpretation will be provided during formal program activities.

Partial scholarships are available for this program.

Completed applications should be submitted to apply@miusa.org, or via fax at +1-541-343-6812.

Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact lshula@miusa.org or sygall@miusa.org.

Thank you so much, and we look forward to collaborating with you and your team, to increase employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Latin America.

Warmly,

Lydia Shula
Executive Project Specialist / Executive Assistant to the CEO
Mobility International USA
132 East Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Tel/TTY: +1 (541) 343-1284
Fax: +1 (541) 343-6812
Email: lshula@miusa.org
Web: http://www.miusa.org

Empowering people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

En español
PARA DISTRIBUCIÓN INMEDIATA
Diciembre 2008

EMAIL: apply@miusa.org
SITIO WEB: www.miusa.org
Programa de Intercambio sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad I-LEAD Profesional: Eugene, Oregón, EE.UU.

Diciembre 10, 2008 — Mobility International USA (MIUSA) se encuentra aceptando solicitudes de profesionales con discapacidad de Argentina, Brasil, Costa Rica, y Guatemala para el Programa de Intercambio Profesional de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD por sus siglas en inglés) en Eugene, Oregón, EE.UU., del 15 de marzo al 5 de abril, 2009.

MIUSA alienta a los profesionales con todo tipo de discapacidad a presentar su solicitud, incluyendo personas con discapacidad auditiva, visual, psiquiátrica, de aprendizaje y relacionada con la salud.

Las solicitudes junto con dos referencias deben entregarse hasta el 16 de enero, 2009. Por favor ver solicitud adjunta.

El programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009 congregará a líderes influyentes de organizaciones gubernamentales, educativas, de desarrollo comunitario, negocios y de organizaciones que trabajan por los derechos de las personas con discapacidad que hayan demostrado capacidad y compromiso en la expansión de las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

Los líderes seleccionados para este programa intensivo participarán en talleres interactivos, seminarios, visitas a instalaciones, y paneles de discusión para examinar temas críticos que enfrentan las personas con discapacidad en el área laboral. Como resultado del programa, los líderes desarrollarán estrategias prácticas y crearan planes de acción conjuntos para impulsar sus esfuerzos y compromiso por incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad a nivel local, nacional, y/o regional.

Únicamente las actividades formales del programa contarán con traducción español-inglés y al lenguaje de señas estadounidense. Se facilitará materiales en formatos alternativos y podrán negociarse otras adecuaciones de accesibilidad que aseguren una completa participación.

MIUSA, una organización sin fines de lucro, se dedica a empoderar a las personas con discapacidad alrededor del mundo a alcanzar sus derechos humanos mediante los intercambios internacionales y el desarrollo internacional. Desde 1981 MIUSA ha liderado programas intercambio internacional para personas con y sin discapacidad en más de 90 países, incluyendo Australia, Azerbaiyán, China, Costa Rica, Inglaterra, Alemania, Japón, México, Rusia y Uzbekistán.

Los co-patrocinadores del programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009 incluyen a Wal-Mart y el Fondo de Becas Lisa y Mike Sygall. Habrá disponibles becas parciales para este programa.

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)

Programa de Intercambio Profesional sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad
(I-LEAD por sus siglas en inglés)

Marzo 15 a Abril 5, 2009 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

En el programa de Intercambio I-LEAD Profesional de MIUSA, tanto mujeres como hombres con y sin discapacidad de seis distintos países de América Latina que son líderes en el gobierno, en empresas, en el sector educativo, y en organizaciones de desarrollo comunitario y de defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, edificarán redes de contactos, desarrollarán estrategias prácticas, y generarán planes de acción conjuntos que incrementen las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

QUIÉN PUEDE PRESENTAR SU SOLICITUD:
Mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad provenientes de Argentina, Brasil, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala y México.

MIUSA seleccionará individuos que demuestren capacidad y compromiso en la realización de cambios que expandan las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad a nivel local o regional o a nivel nacional. Por ejemplo:

• Líderes de coaliciones de Organizaciones de Personas con Discapacidad (OPDs), a nivel municipal o nacional, u OPDs que incluyan diversas discapacidades que sean influyentes.

• Líderes del gobierno, incluyendo alcaldes o ministros u otros funcionarios clave en agencias de Servicios Sociales, Ministerios de Educación o Transporte, u otros.

• Educadores influyentes, tales como directores de escuelas, programas vocacionales, o universidades.

• Empresarios líderes que empleen o faciliten capacitación a personas con discapacidad, o que estén interesados en expandir su inclusión de personas con discapacidad como parte de su fuerza laboral.

• Profesionales y líderes de organizaciones comunitarias que promuevan la microempresa y el empleo, incluyendo adiestradores empresariales, formadores vocacionales, micro-prestamistas.

LENGUAJE:
Los lenguajes oficiales de I-LEAD Profesional son el español, el inglés y el lenguaje de señas estadounidense.

Se facilitará traducción español-inglés e interpretación en lenguaje de señas únicamente durante los talleres formales del programa, los seminarios y las visitas a instalaciones.

DETALLES GENERALES DEL PROGRAMA:
El programa I-LEAD incluirá talleres, visitas a instalaciones y actividades prácticas sobre temas que incluyan:

• Estrategias de empleo para mujeres y hombres con discapacidad incluyendo educación, capacitación, empleo asistido, rehabilitación vocacional.
• Políticas y legislación para oportunidades de trabajo.
• Oportunidades igualitarias en la educación, incluyendo escuelas inclusivas y escuelas específicas para discapacidad, legislación y servicios y adecuaciones de accesibilidad.
• Planificación profesional y educación superior incluyendo políticas y sistemas de apoyo para personas con discapacidad.
• Transporte y comunidades accesibles: políticas y modelos de sistemas de transporte accesibles y acceso público.
• Asociaciones entre microempresa y sector privado.
• Estrategias de liderazgo para empleo, incluyendo formulación de proyectos, uso de medios de comunicación, generación de coaliciones.
• Experiencias multiculturales y de formación de grupos de trabajo.
• Metas y planes de acción para el empleo de las mujeres y los hombres con discapacidad.
ALOJAMIENTO Y TRANSPORTE:
• Se proveerá alojamiento simple pero cómodo con habitaciones y baños compartidos.
• Se ofrecerán el desayuno, el almuerzo y una cena ligera al día. Todas las comidas adicionales, aperitivos, o gastos varios (incluyendo lavandería) serán responsabilidad de cada delegado.
• Se proveerá transporte público accesible.

COSTO DEL PROGRAMA:
• El costo total del programa es USD $250. Es posible que hayan becas limitadas en base a la necesidad que haya demostrado el solicitante.

• MIUSA proporcionará: los boletos de avión ida y vuelta para que los participantes viajen desde sus países hasta Eugene, Oregón, EEUU; comida, alojamiento y transporte local para todas las actividades del programa I-LEAD Profesional.

• Los participantes del programa serán responsables por obtener sus pasaportes y visas estadounidenses vigentes y todos costos relacionados.

PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN CONTACTARSE CON:
Mobility International USA
Programa de Intercambio I-LEAD Profesional 2009
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) es una organización cuya misión es empoderar a las personas con discapacidad alrededor del mundo para que alcancen sus derechos humanos mediante los intercambios internacionales y el desarrollo internacional.

Mobility International USA
Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional
Marzo 15 a Abril 5 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

SOLICITUD e INSTRUCCIONES

1. Por favor llene TODAS LAS SECCIONES de esta solicitud, incluyendo:
_____ Formulario de Información de Solicitud (Sección 1 a 3)
_____ Preguntas de Redacción (usar hojas adicionales para sus respuestas)
_____ Dos Formularios de Recomendación Completos

IMPORTANTE: LAS SOLICITUDES NO SERÁN REVISADAS HASTA QUE ESTÉN COMLETAS.

2. Se aceptarán solicitudes en inglés y en español. ¡NO se tendrá en cuenta la ortografía, el vocabulario o la gramática en inglés de lo solicitantes!

3. Dos Formularios de Recomendación: DEBEN completarse por dos personas familiarizadas con su trabajo y cualidades de líder. Miembros de la familia no pueden completar sus recomendaciones.
• Al menos una referencia debería venir de la organización, institución o empresa a la que usted representará en I-LEAD Profesional.
• Las personas de referencia deberían completar y firmar el Formulario de Recomendación y enviarlo a MIUSA vía e-mail (de preferencia) o vía fax. (E-mail a: apply@miusa.org, Fax: +1-541-343-6812.)

4. ¡ENVÍE SU SOLICITUD PRONTO! Esperamos revisar un gran número de solicitudes para un número limitado de cupos.

Fecha límite de solicitud: enero 16, 2009.

Envíe su solicitud vía e-mail (de preferencia), vía fax o por correo postal a:

Mobility International USA
I-LEAD Professional 2009
apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Website: www.miusa.org

FORMULARIO DE INFORMACIÓN DE SOLICITUD:

SECCIÓN 1: Información del Solicitante

Apellido del solicitante: _________________________________________________________
Nombre del solicitante: _________________________________________________________

Fecha de nacimiento: Mes: ________ Día: ________ Año: ____________

Dirección de e-mail 1: _________________________________________________________
Dirección de e-mail 2: _________________________________________________________

Dirección residencial: _________________________________________________________
Ciudad: Provincia/Estado:
País: Código postal:

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

¿Tiene un pasaporte vigente? NO SÍ País del pasaporte ___________________

Número de pasaporte: _________________________________________________________

Fecha de expiración de pasaporte: Mes: ________ Día: ________ Año: ____________

Idioma materno (hablado o de señas):_______________________________________________

Nivel de Idioma Inglés: Principiante _______ Lento ________ Rápido ________ Fluido ________

Nivel de Idioma Español: Principiante _______ Lento ________ Rápido _______ Fluido _______

Nivel de Lenguaje de Señas (EEUU): Principiante _____ Lento _____ Rápido _____ Fluido _____

Otros idiomas (hablados o de señas): _______________________________________________

¿Cuál es su ocupación?: _________________________________________________________

Por favor liste una persona que podría contactarse con usted si nosotros no logramos contactarnos con usted:
Nombre:___________________________________ Relación con usted:__________________

Direcciones de e-mail:__________________________________________________________

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

SECCIÓN 2:

Organización/ONG/Negocio que usted representará: __________________________________

Su Posición/Título de su Cargo en esta Organización/Institución/Empresa:
____________________________________________________________________________

Persona de Contacto en la Organización: ___________________________________________
E-mail:_______________________________________________________________________

Dirección residencial: _________________________________________________________
Ciudad: Provincia/Estado:
País: Código postal:

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

SECCIÓN 3:

INFORMACIÓN DE DISCAPACIDAD
El programa de intercambio de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional tendrá un equilibrio de mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad. MIUSA realizará los arreglos adecuados para asegurar que cada delegado con discapacidad pueda participar de forma completa e igualitaria. Para ayudarnos a cumplir esta meta, por favor complete la siguiente información:

¿Tiene usted una discapacidad? NO SÍ

De ser así, por favor describa su discapacidad: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mobility International USA

1. Organización/ONG/Empresa a la que representará:
a) ¿Cuál es el nombre de la organización, ONG o empresa al cuál usted representará?

b) ¿Cuál es su posición en la organización, ONG o empresa? Por favor resuma sus responsabilidades.

c) ¿Cuál es el propósito, misión u objetivo de la organización, institución o empresa? (Límite 100 palabras)

d) ¿En qué forma están involucradas, incluidas o beneficiadas las personas con discapacidad a través de su organización, institución o empresa?

2. Participación Comunitaria:
a) Por favor liste otras organizaciones a las cuales pertenece, y las actividades de servicio comunitario en las que esté involucrado a nivel local o nacional.

3. Empleo para personas con discapacidad:
a) Por favor liste los tres problemas más críticos (en su opinión) que limiten las oportunidades de trabajo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad.

b) ¿Qué ha hecho usted o su organización para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad?

c) Por favor liste otras organizaciones o individuos con quienes su organización haya colaborado para promover las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad.

4. Ideas de proyectos o acciones
a) Por favor describa un proyecto, una iniciativa o acción(es) que usted o su organización podrían implementar para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las mujeres y hombres con discapacidad en su comunidad.

b) ¿Cuál sería el resultado del proyecto, iniciativa o acción(es)? ¿Cuántas personas con discapacidad se beneficiarían?

c) Liste cinco socios comunitarios y describa cómo estarían involucrados en este proyecto, iniciativa o acción(es).

5. ¿Por qué y en qué forma su participación en I-LEAD Profesional 2009 resultaría en la expansión de las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad? Por favor sea específico/a.

6. Por favor liste:
a.) Cualquier experiencia previa en programas de intercambio o conferencias internacionales (dónde, por qué y cuándo).

b.) Cualquier viaje previo a los EEUU (dónde, por qué y cuándo).

7. Por favor añada cualquier otro comentario relevante respecto a su participación en este intercambio.

Fecha límite de solicitud: enero 16, 2009. (O depues)

Envíe su solicitud vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal mail a:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
I-LEAD Professional 2009
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Página Web: www.miusa.org

Mobility International USA
Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional
Marzo 15 a Abril 5, 2009 en Eugene, Oregón, EEUU

Apellido del Solicitante: _________________________________________________________
Nombre del Solicitante: _________________________________________________________

Dirección(es) de e-mail: ____________________________________ País:

FORMULARIO DE RECOMENDACIÓN

Nota para la Persona de Referencia: La persona mencionada a continuación está solicitando participar en el programa de intercambio de MIUSA sobre Liderazgo Internacional, Empleo y Discapacidad (I-LEAD) Profesional, en el que mujeres y hombres con y sin discapacidad que son líderes en el gobierno, en empresas, en el sector de la educación, en organizaciones de desarrollo comunitario y de defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, desarrollarán estrategias prácticas y planes de acción conjuntos para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en América Latina.

Por favor envíe el formulario completo vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal a MIUSA (ver abajo) o devuélvaselo al solicitante para que lo entregue conjuntamente con su solicitud TAN PRONTO COMO SEA POSIBLE. (Use hojas de papel adicionales si es necesario). Gracias.

Por favor escriba a máquina o claramente en letra imprenta. Use papel adicional si es necesario.

Nombre de la persona que facilita la referencia: _____________________________________
Organización: _________________________________________________________________
E-mail:_______________________________________________________________________

Tel/TTY: (______)(____)____________________ Fax: (_____)(_____)___________________
(Código país, código ciudad, número local) (Código país, código ciudad, número local)

1.) ¿Por qué recomienda al/la solicitante para el Programa de Intercambio de MIUSA I-LEAD Profesional?

2.) Por favor mencione brevemente las metas u objetivos de su organización (100 palabras o menos).

3.) ¿Qué rol(es) tiene el/la solicitante en su organización?

4.) De ser seleccionado/a, ¿en qué forma ayudaría la participación del/la solicitante en el programa de intercambio I-LEAD Profesional para que su organización incremente las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad en su comunidad?

5.) Por favor describa el apoyo que su organización puede ofrecer a proyectos y actividades para incrementar las oportunidades de empleo para las personas con discapacidad.

Firma de la Persona de Referencia: ___________________________ Fecha: ____________

Por favor devolver al solicitante o enviar vía e-mail (de preferencia), fax o correo postal a:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
I-LEAD Professional
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97401 USA
Email: apply@miusa.org
Fax: +1-541-343-6812

Página Web: www.miusa.org



I received this announcement via Joan Durocher and also via the Intl-Dev email news distribution list.

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PAPER: Deaf People in African Histories c. 960s – 1960s

Posted on 19 December 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Deaf, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Individuals interested in investigating the history of Deaf, deaf, or hard of hearing people in any African nation may wish to read the paper entitled, “Deaf People Living and Communicating in African Histories, c. 960s – 1960s” by M. Miles (2005).

The abstract for this paper is as follows:

“Glimpses of the lives and communication of deaf and hearing impaired people are seen in one thousand years of history across Africa. Textual evidence of 100 historical deaf adults and children, of hundreds more in groups, and of gestural communication and formal Sign Language, appears from 42 African nations, sourced in travellers’ accounts, legal and genealogical records, government reports, institutional and missionary archives, academic theses, linguistic studies, folklore, ethnography, novels, religious narrative, mime and dance. The data may assist in construction of valued identities and evidence-based cultural histories. Uses and interpretations remain for deaf people to discuss and choose according to their own varied interests and objectives.”

The article has 190 references, and notes some Africa-wide activities of deaf people, including in relation to deaf studies and sign language studies.

The author, M. Miles, has suggested that organizations of deaf people in each African nation should build their own archives and records of deaf people in order to help create an understanding of what it means to be deaf in Africa in the late 20th and early 21st century.

Read the full text of the article at:

http://www.independentliving.org/docs7/miles2005a.html



Thank you to the author, M. Miles, for announcing this article on the DeafStudies-Africa email-based discussion list.

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Support for Late-Deafened People in Asia

Posted on 16 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Resources, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , |

** Support for Late-Deafened People in Asia **
Danishkadah is in the process of setting up an Asian Group of Late Deafened people. Any Late Deafened (LD) person or organization which has late deafened members may contact the person below for further details about the group.

The group is also open to help others outside of this region to form their own support group. Please contact Akram Muhammad at info@danishkadah.org.pk



This announcement is taken from the Disabled People International newsletter.

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NEWS: Deaf Malaysian Writer Wins National Media Award

Posted on 21 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Media & Journalism, News | Tags: , , , , , |

Challenges Deaf writer wins national Media Award

Kuala Lumpur, Oct 26, 2008: CHALLENGES writer James Chua has won the Mercedes-Benz Malaysia Red Ribbon Media Award in Journalism in HIV/AIDS reporting in Malaysia for the print media magazine category (English).

His Winning Entry : HIV/AIDS, a Serious Health Threat in Any Language was published in the very first issue of Challenges Magazine, that is Volume 1/issue 1 April 2008.

We, at Challenges, are so proud of James! Well Done!

more details : www.challengesmagazine.wordpress.com
www.challengesmag.com

Mary Chen
Editor
CHALLENGES
Malaysia’s 1st Cross-disability national magazine
Get your copy today online order :
http://www.challenges.kids.net.my

Get updates here
www.challengesmag.com
contact us: www.challengesmagazine.wordpress.com



Thank you to Mary Chen for submitting this item to We Can Do.

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Videos about Deaf Life: Central Arican Republic, Philippines, Venezuela, Mexico, Austria

Posted on 3 October 2008. Filed under: Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Employment, Latin America & Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , |

Four on-line videos give an overview of deaf communities around the world; all can be viewed at:

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2008/09/24/deaf-awareness-week-striving-for-quality-education/

The first video on this page shares the story of a school for deaf children in the Central African Republic that has been struggling for funding. Several teachers have quit because they have not been paid consistently for the past four years; only two teachers remain struggling on. Unfortunately, this type of story is common in many schools in developing countries–not only in deaf schools. This video is in the signed language of the Central African Republic with English subtitles. As a deaf person, I can’t tell if this video has English voice over for blind people.

The second video was made by deaf students in the Philippines. This video, in Philippines sign language and English subtitles, portrays the difficulties many deaf people in their country confront when they look for jobs after graduation. Unemployment is another challenge that is common to deaf people and disabled people all around the world–not only in developing countries but also in industrialized countries. I don’t know if this video has voice over.

In Venezuela, teachers for the deaf explain the importance of a bilingual and bi-cultural education. Some Venezuelan Sign Language is seen on the screen in the background scenes, and there are some occasional Spanish words on the screen in between visual shots of children in the classroom, etc. Unfortunately there are no subtitles in any language to help deaf people understand what the teachers say in this video. But hearing people who understand Spanish could give this one a try.

The last video has a deaf woman from Mexico and a deaf man from Austria simultaneously demonstrate the Mexican and Austrian fingerspelled alphabets; the cardinal numbers in Mexican and Austrian signed languages; and the names of the months. I’m guessing there is probably no audio description.

Sighted people will note that the Mexican and Austrian signed languages are dramatically different from each other. I can tell you that they are both also very different from American Sign Language–and all three languages are different from the signed language used in the San Jose area of Costa Rica.

In addition to the four videos, the following web page also has links that give more information about the programs described in the videos:

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2008/09/24/deaf-awareness-week-striving-for-quality-education/



Thank you to Sylvia Cabus for alerting me to these on-line videos.

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NEWS: Jamaica HIV & AIDS Program Includes Disabled People

Posted on 2 October 2008. Filed under: Blind, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean | Tags: , , , , |

The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS) program in Jamaica has been taking action to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind in HIV/AIDS education efforts. Initiatives include providing materials in Braille for blind people and incorporating sign language into television public service announcements for deaf people. Read more detail about the project at:

http://www.unaids.org/en/KnowledgeCentre/Resources/FeatureStories/archive/2008/20080905_disability_hiv_jamaica.asp

Learn more about HIV/AIDS in relation to people with disabilities, and some of the resources available to help, by clicking on HIV/AIDS in the pull-down menu under “Topics/Categories” in the right-hand navigation bar.



I learned about this project via a recent issue of the Disabled Peoples International electronic newsletter.

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RESOURCE: Deaf Peers’ Education Manual on Sexuality, HIV & AIDS

Posted on 30 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Research tells us that people with disabilities, and Deaf people, are at higher risk for HIV/AIDS than the general population. But many HIV/AIDS education programs exclude people with disabilities from opportunities to learn how to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS. Sometimes this exclusion is deliberate: some program managers mistakenly assume that Deaf and disabled people don’t need sexuality education because they don’t have sex. In other cases, programs exclude because they don’t offer sign language interpreters, nor do they offer print materials that are accessible to people who are intelligent but who have lacked access to opportunities for an education.

A training manual has been developed that can be used to help trainers learn how to facilitate workshops on sexual health and HIV/AIDS, entitled the The Deaf Peers’ Education Manual (PDF format, 6.44 Mb). This manual is targeted at members of the Kenyan Deaf community. The signs described in the manual, for example, assume knowledge of Kenyan Sign Language, rather than the many other hundreds of signed languages and dialects used around the world. However, most of the content can be easily adapted for use in Deaf communities in other countries.

The manual offers guidance to facilitators on how they can sensitively handle frank discussion of sexuality; the physical and emotional implications of human sexual development; the difference between friendship, infatuation, and real love; how the HIV virus is transmitted; the difference between HIV and AIDS; and how the HIV virus is NOT transmitted. It suggests a range of activities that can be used with Deaf participants to help them understand these complex and sensitive topics.

The manual was first released in 2007. But the organization that initiated the manual, Sahaya International, is interested in revising and updating the manual based on the feedback of other people who use it around the world. At this time, print copies of the manual are not available, but individuals may print their own copy from the PDF file. Koen Van Rampay with Sahaya International invites feedback on the manual, as well as discussion on printing and distributing the manual, at: kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu

More information about Sahaya International; their manual; and their project to teach Deaf people in Kenya about Sexuality and HIV/AIDS is available at:

http://www.sahaya.org/deaf.html

Please note that the manual has some separate, companion materials that trainers can use in educating Deaf participants. One set of printed materials can be used to teach participants basic facts on human sexual anatomy and reproduction. The other teaches participants about common myths related to HIV/AIDS. Both use cartoons and are designed to be used by readers who may have had limited opportunity to pursue an education or acquire literacy skills. The link to the main Deaf Peers’ Education Manual is available near the top of http://www.sahaya.org/deaf.html, but people will need to scroll down to the very bottom of the page to download the other materials.

The linked web page also shows some videos about the Sahaya International project in Kenya. These videos are in Kenya Sign Language with a voice interpreter (presumably in English). Unfortunately, these videos do not have subtitles. This creates a barrier for Deaf people outside of Kenya who might know other signed languages, but not Kenyan Sign Language. This is a shame because some of the people who are likely to have the strongest interest in the Sahaya International project are other Deaf people in other countries who want to emulate their efforts within their own local Deaf communities.

I hope that Sahaya International will find some low-cost (or no-cost) manner for putting subtitles on their videos. A suggestion: Many vloggers (video bloggers) who post to http://www.deafread.com face similar challenges where they wish to subtitle without high tech skills or financial resources. Perhaps a keyword search there would lead to web pages that offer tips, suggestions, and possible resources. Or, if someone reading this at We Can Do can offer the appropriate expertise or technical guidance, perhaps you could contact Sahaya International directly at kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu.



We Can Do learned about the Sahaya International project and manual when Ghulam Nabi Nizamani widely circulated an email originating with Koen Van Rampay.

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10th Asia Pacific Congress on Deafness, August 4-7, 2009, Bangkok, Thailand

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Events and Conferences, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

Invitation to APCD2009

Deadline for submitting abstracts: January 31, 2009.

Dear Friends,

On behalf of the organizing committee, we would like to inform you regarding an upcoming Congress “10th Asia Pacific Congress on Deafness – APCD2009 will be held in connection with 10th Hearing International Annual Meeting-HI and 2nd ASEAN Academy of Neuro-Oto-Audiology-AANOA” at The Landmark Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand during 4-7th August, 2009. This will be another great event. It is my great privilege and pleasure to warmly invite you to be a part of these three combined conferences.

Organizing Committee of APCD2009 will ensure you of the innovative programming, latest technology and opportunity in Medical, Surgical, Rehabilitation and Education for the Hearing Impaired and the Deaf. Conference offers professional development for deaf education, teachers, interpreters, support staffs, professionals in the field of deafness and parents, audiologists and hearing specialists. You will have the opportunities to site visit of professional interest such as diagnostic and rehabilitation technology and school for the deaf in Bangkok .

We promise you that APCD2009 will be memorable from scientific, education and social aspects. We are looking forward to welcoming you to APCD2009.

Please note that the deadline for abstract submission is 31st January 2009.

Additionally, for more information please visit our website at http://www.apcd2009.org/. Any inquiries please do not hesitate to contact us at congress@apcd2009.org.

We will be appreciated if you could kindly forward this email to your members and friends.

Sincerely yours,
Suchitra Prasansuk M.D.
Congress President



This email was recently circulated via the Intl-Dev email news distribution service. All inquiries should be directed to the conference organizers, NOT to We Can Do. As indicated above, please visit the conference website for more detail.

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RESOURCE: Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Children, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Less than a decade ago, more than 100 million primary-school aged children still had never entered a classroom. Today, that number has dropped below 80 million, even though the world’s population has grown in that time. Clearly progress has been made. But children with disabilities are being left behind: one-third of the world’s children out of school are disabled. Many of the rest are excluded for other reasons that pose their own set of challenges: some are left behind because they are girls; or because they don’t speak the dominant language of their country; or because they experience discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity.

How can Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and other Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) help schools in their country be more inclusive of students who have commonly been excluded? Save the Children UK has released a new report that offers guidance: “Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience” (PDF format, 4.14 Mb). This report describes successful projects, and the lessons learned, from countries as diverse as Vietnam, Kyrgyzstan, Peru, Bangladesh, China, Somalia, Brazil, Western Balkans, Mongolia, Nepal, Tajikistan, Serbia, India, and Morocco. Children with disabilities are targeted for many of these projects.

The report begins by describing both the conditions that prevent inclusive education and the conditions that can help make it possible. It also analyzes projects that have made it possible for linguistic minority students–and Deaf students–to obtain a bilingual education. Teacher training programs have helped encourage teachers to create more inclusive classrooms for children with disabilities and other students who have historically been excluded. Several countries have used Community-based Education Management Information Systems (C-EMIS) to draw upon the knowledge and motivation of local community members in making education more inclusive. Each chapter ends by discussing what lessons other communities in other countries may find helpful in implementing their own projects.

Advocates who tire of hearing governments complain there isn’t enough money will especially wish to read the 6th chapter on “Addressing financial barriers to inclusive education.” Funding issues are also discussed briefly throughout earlier chapters of Making Schools Inclusive (PDF format, 4.14 Mb).

The 8th chapter points readers to further materials and resources that may be helpful to them in advocating for more inclusive education in their countries.

The full 64-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (4.14 Mb) at http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Making%20schools%20inclusive%20SCUK.pdf.



We Can Do learned of this report through an announcement posted on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. The discussion group is devoted to issues relating to inclusive education in Eastern Africa.

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CONFERENCE: 2nd Intl Forum of the Deaf in Morocco on Mental Health

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Call for Nominations or Applications, Deaf, Events and Conferences, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Psychiatric Disabilities, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The 2nd international Forum of the Deaf

The 2nd International Forum of the Deaf in Morocco is an initiative that aims to promote: Mental Health awareness among the medical core and the deaf community of Morocco. The establishment of  a national policy to investigate the linguistic, social, mental health, and physical needs of the deaf; for the purpose of developing a cohesive network for the implantation of programs to benefit the unification of the deaf community in Morocco. Subsequently, it will promote contact, participation and cooperation among deaf associations.
 
This Forum is entitled “Mental health and deafness” which will be held in the city of Fez, in order to better educate the population on the issues facing the deaf community.  In accordance with the royal directives, and the initiative of human development, The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf Association, The Africa Contact Group For Mental Health and Deafness and the World Federation of the Deaf are organizing a Forum of the deaf of Morocco from October 9th to 11th 2008.  45 deaf associations with two delegates (1 deaf and 1 hearing) and 120 specialized educators representing all of Morocco national territories will be invited to attend the forum. The forum of the Deaf of Morocco will comprise of three major themes: Mental Health and deafness, Education and academic qualification, and Sign language.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf is engaged in a number of campaigns to raise the standard of living of the deaf in Morocco. There is a growing public interest in the use of sign language in the various social domains where the deaf are involved. These include courts of law, educational institutions, police stations, and other various places of work. An outstanding example of this association’s dedication for the empowerment of the deaf are a special education training for educators May 2008, a SL training for police officers March 2008 and two summer youth camps for the deaf that were held in Rabat August 2006 and Salé August 2007.  These camps gave the deaf youth of Morocco a chance to interact with one another and to build life long friendships.  As well as, the first steps in building cooperation and participation among deaf associations in Morocco.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS), is looking for organizations to help them organize the second international forum of the deaf in Fez.

The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) is a non-governmental organization that strives to address the needs of the entire community, including the deaf youth of Morocco. Its membership consists of over 20 professionals from the city and surrounding areas of the province who have come together to pool their resources and labor in order to help develop the deaf community. The association was incorporated in 2006 under the laws of Morocco with the goal of helping to develop the social and economic roles of the deaf in the larger society. They are led by elected officers, including: a president, treasurer, secretary and vice president, who are chosen each year at an annual meeting.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) is nonprofit and raises money for projects through donations from members, grants, and donations from local, national and international government, and non-government organizations. The group has received various awards and certificates of recognition from the government in advancing the status of the deaf.

The association established The First International Forum of the Deaf of Morocco in 2006 in collaboration with the Dutch Foundation Marokkofonds.  The forum was an instrumental opportunity to promote deaf issues in Morocco and International.  This association has also
been advocating the nationwide adoption of sign language as the medium of instruction in all deaf schools and training institutions.

Furthermore, they lobby the Moroccan government of the challenges facing the deaf community.  Finally, this association developed and implemented deaf youth summer camps in association with the Ministry of Sports and Youth.
 
The successful projects led by The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) have illustrated the need to develop deaf awareness, and networking skills to overcome the limited opportunities for the deaf community within the Moroccan society as a whole. The members of The Moroccan
Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) approaches international institutions with the idea of organizing a group of deaf associations and helping them develop these specific skills, with an end goal of enabling them to advance from their current social and economic situation.

Expected outcomes

  • Meadows of 200 thousand deaf persons together with the Moroccan medical core will be sensitized on the mental health and human right of the deaf issues.
  • Implementing awareness raising projects.
  • Deaf empowerment.
  • Training in special education and sign language
  • Establishing a wide range of contacts.

Methodology
 The statistics of 200 thousand deaf persons usually expose a big number of the deaf to the means of specific communication of the handicapped and the non-implication of the handicapped in the programs or fight projects against the sexually transmittable diseases.

 After the difficulties proven by this category of the handicapped the Moroccan Forum of the Deaf Association takes advantage of this occasion to initiate a campaign of sensitization on the deaf problems, with the assistance of the interpreters in signs. It will also target the medical core and the Moroccan administrations to explain through the different international experts the importance of mental health and deafness.
 
The proposed forum will focus on many of the aforementioned elements in a professional sitting.  A subcommittee of Moroccan facilitators, French facilitators, and other Volunteers will focus on planning programs, while other members of the Moroccan Forum of the Deaf will concentrate on administrative elements of the forum. In implementing both of these as well as cultural activities, the forum will meet the aforementioned objectives.
 
Economic and Social Exchange:

  • Presentations on management methods for the purposes of developing and implementing projects will be presented.
  • Presentation on education and vocational training.
  • Presentation on sign language in the media.
  • Presentations on the need for a unified signing language for the purpose of educational and social development of the deaf will be presented.
  • Exhibition of handcrafted products made by the deaf will be on display.
  • Associations of the deaf will perform musical concert and theatrical presentations daily.

Workshops

  • Mental health and Deafness
  • Education and vocational training
  • Sign language linguistics

If you have any questions related to the conference please feel free to contact :

Mr. Abdelaziz Arssi- Project Director 
Tel/SMS : 0021262102415
Fax:0021235601651
Mail: fmsourds@gmail.com 

Mr. Mohammed DDich -Program Manager
Tel/SMS:0021266511034
Mail:fmsourds@gmail.com

Mr.Rachid El Ouardi- Finance Manager
Tel/SMS: 0021262216863
Mail: fmsourds@gmail.com 

Thank you for your time and consideration on this important issue facing the deaf community of Morocco. 



We Can Do received this announcement via the AdHoc_IDC listserv. People interested in the conference should please contact one of the organizers directly, not We Can Do. (Note their phone numbers and email address given above.)

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NEWS: Sign Language Training Program Launches in Guyana

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Deaf, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Guyana Ministry of Education, in partnership with the Guyana Community Based Rehabilitation Programme (GCBRP), has initiated a sign language training program targeted at improving the quality of education for deaf children, the Kaieteur News has reported. The program will provide sign language training to teachers so they can better accommodate the communicate need of deaf children in their classrooms. It is being offered through the St. Stanislaus College in Brickdam.

Read the original Kaieteur News story entitled “Education Ministry launches sign language training” for more detail at:

http://www.kaieteurnews.com/?p=782



Thank you to Monty Chester for alerting me to this news item.

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FREE Websites for Disabled People Organizations (DPOs)

Posted on 16 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Funding, Human Rights, Opportunities, Resources, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following notice is being circulated by DANISHKADAH.

Greeting from DANISHKADAH (an organization for empowerment of Persons with Disabilities and Deafness)!

We at DANISHKADAH pleased to offer FREE websites for Disabled People Organizations (DPOs), this include hosting, domain, and development of accessible Web Pages. (Initially for Pakistani DPOs, but request from DPOs from other country may be entertained)

The aim of this project is to;

1. give exposure to least developed DPOs, who do not have resources to build and maintain their websites. And bring them up to be introduced.
2. making an accessible web based network of local / national DPOs and join that with international organizations.
3. keep everyone update about the activities of these DPOs, and promote collaboration among DPOs.
4. motivate and support DPOs for building pressure for ratification and implementation of UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), and monitor the changes.

By this letter we are inviting all of the DPOs to send their request for website, on predefined form. Please fill the form and email us at danishkadah@gmail.com, those who do not have access to internet can post filled form on given address.

Offer Detail:
FREE webhosting
FREE domain 1
FREE website (4-6 pages) 2
Added advantage:
– website will be built according to the web accessibility standards
– Possibility of having website in local language as well in English
– Get indexed on search engines and have better visibility of your organization on Internet
– More exposure in disability movement at national and international level
– build a better image of your organization, for donors and volunteers.

1 Sub-domain
2 you have to provide text and image (photos, logo) for your website

Regards
Muhammad Akram
Founder & Chairman
DANISHKADAH
http://www.danishkadah.org.pk/Projects/NetworkingDPO/index.html

WEB BASED NETWORKING OF DPOs
A project of DANISHKADAH
( FREE Accessible Web hosting and developing for DPOs )
REQUEST FORM

Our organization ____________________________________________________
(organization’s name)
would like to request DANISHKADAH for FREE hosting and development of accessible website for our DPOs.

From our side the contact person will be _________________________________
(name)
__________________________________, and he/she will provide the content for the website.

We understand that this offer is purely on voluntarily basis from DANISHKADAH and may be terminated, modified at anytime without any prior notice. We also understand that DANISHKADAH may add any link or content in our web pages, however the content provided by us may not be amended without our permission. And we affirm that we shall not hold or blame DANISHKADAH for any error or other reasons whatsoever.

_____________________ DPOs’ STAMP _____________________
Signature President General Secretary
Send to – danishkadah@gmail.com or post to

M. Arkram
Founder & Chairman
DANISHKADAH
Address: D-63, Blcok 8, Gulshan-e-Iqbal, Karachi-75300
Fax : ___________________

HOME | INTRODUCTION | PROJECTS | ACTIVITIES ARCHIVE | CONTACT
HOME: you can post recent news, invitation for your programs, and etc.
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1. Introduction
1.2. Vision, Mission, Objectives
1.3. Services (i.e special education, public awareness rising, rehabilitation, etc.)
1.4. Governing body (i.e. board of trustee, managing committee, whatever)
1.5. Membership (procedure detail and membership form if any)
1.6. Facts sheet
1.1.1. Established in _______
1.1.2. Registered with ______________ or non-registered NGO
1.1.3. Organization type – exclusively of / for deaf/blind/physically challenged, or mixed for all PWDs, or inclusive organization for PWDs and Non-PWDs
1.1.4. Total members, Male members, Female members, youth members (male / Female)
1.2. Wish list (if any)
2. PROJECTS (if any)
2.1. Existing project
2.1.1. Project 1, detail etc
2.1.2. Project 2, detail etc
2.2. Future project (planned)
2.2.1. Project 1 detail etc
2.2.2. Project 2 detail etc
3. ACTIVITIES AND NEWS ARCHIVE
3.1. 2008 Date wise activities such as;
3.1.1. December 3, 2007,
Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities
a very brief one paragraph report and a
PHOTO.
3.2. 2007
3.2.1. December 3, 2007,
Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities
a very brief one paragraph report and a
PHOTO.
3.2.2. September 11, 2007
Walk for the cause on International Day of Deaf Persons
a very brief on paragraph report and a
PHOTO
4. CONTACT
4.1. Address: _________________________________________
Phone: ____________________Fax: __________________
Mobile: __________________________________________
Email: ___________________________________________
Web: ____________________________________________

EXAMPLE
INTRODUCTION
Danishkadah is an NGO with a difference. Danishkadah means a place to learn / where wisdom excels. Danishkadah was established to empower persons with disabilities and deafness, and to work as a think-tank on disability related issues.

Danishkadah is not an ordinary Disabled People Organization (DPO) to chant slogans, or protest without proposing solutions. It is a non-political organization, which concentrates on issues and solutions. Our approach is inclusive working with all segments of the society.

We at Danishkadah believe in inclusion and collaboration with all the segments of society, i.e. Persons with Disabilities & Deafness (PWDDs), government, universities, media, corporate sector and general society. Without such collaboration, the ultimate goal of “accessible, barriers-free, and right base society” cannot be achieved.
Vision, Mission, Objectives
Our Vision
In our vision “knowledge is power”
Our Mission
Our mission is to empower Persons with Disabilities and Deafness (PWDD), so they can live better and independent lives. And our ultimate goal is “inclusive, barrier-free, and right based society” (Biwako Millennium framework – UNSCAPE)
Objective
1. Empower persons with Disabilities
2. Enhance technical skill in PWDs
3. Etc etc.
Services (i.e special education, public awareness rising, rehabilitation, etc.)
We offer following ;
• Basic literacy
• English Language
• Computer literacy
• Counseling
Governing body
Board or Trustee
• Mr. Muhammad Akram – Founder & Chairman
• Mr. Imranullah Shairrf – Member
• Mr. Muhammad Ashraf Member
Executive Committee
Mr. abc Secretary
…… …….
Membership (procedure detail and membership form if any)
Any one can become member by filling the given form and paying annual fee of Rs.10/-per year.
Facts sheet
Established in 2006
Registered with Registrar South Karachi
Organization type – an inclusive organization that welcome PWD and non-PWD alike
Total members 200, 150 Male , 50 Female, youth 100 male, 20 Female)
Wish list (if any)
– Computer laboratory
– Books
– etc
Note: You can attach a photo of your organization or group photo of your team to be displayed at top of introduction, and individual photo of your governing body to be displayed with each name.



Thank you to DANISHKADAH for circulating this notice. Please remember that applications or inquiries related to this opportunity should all be directed to DANISHKADAH at danishkadah@gmail.com, not We Can Do.

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REPORT: Violence Against Disabled Children

Posted on 8 March 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Reports, Resources, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

UNICEF has released a summary report entitled, “Violence Against Disabled Children” (PDF format 245 Kb), with the subtitle “UN Secretary Generals Report on Violence against Children, Thematic Group on Violence against Disabled Children, Findings and Recommendations.”

The first half of this report, released in July 2005, summarizes what is known about violence toward children with disabilities at home, in schools, in institutions, in the criminal justice system, within the broader community, and at work (in child labor situations). Children with disabilities are known to be at higher risk for abuse, partly because they may be perceived as “easy victims.” Also, abuse toward disabled children is less likely to be investigated or persecuted, which means abusers know it is easier to escape consequences even if the abuse is discovered.

Many children, with or without disabilities, may face adults who fail to listen or to believe them when they try to report abuse. But children with disabilities face additional barriers. As one example, some adults may mistakenly assume that a child with intellectual disabilities or psycho-social disabilities must surely be “confused,” or unable to tell right from wrong, or unable to make their own decisions about what is done to their bodies.

Disabled children may also be targeted for child murder, either because parents perceive them as bringing shame to the family or because adults may be convinced they will be “better off” dead than disabled. In countries where many men share the belief that sex with a virgin will “cleanse” them of HIV/AIDS, girls, boys, and adults with disabilities may be targeted for rape on the assumption that they do not have sex. Children with disabilities also may be forcibly sterilized, sometimes as early as the age of 8 or 9.

The report makes a series of 13 recommendations for families, communities, policy makers, governments, advocates, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) or Civil Society Organizations, United Nations agencies, and other stakeholders with an interest in preventing violence toward disabled children. These recommendations include, as a few examples: increasing public awareness; reforming legislation so that the laws can better protect children with disabilities; advocating change to improve inclusion of disabled people throughout society; improving reporting mechanisms so that people who become aware of abuse have a way to report it; closing down institutions and integrating disabled children into the community; but also improving government oversight of institutions for as long as they continue to exist.

The 33-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (245 Kb) at:

http://www.unicef.org/videoaudio/PDFs/UNICEF_Violence_Against_Disabled_Children_Report_Distributed_Version.pdf

People interested in the topic of violence against children may also wish to read an article on violence and disabled children in the 2003 issue of the joint Rehabilitation International and UNICEF newsletter, One in Ten:

http://riglobal.org/publications2/10_24.htm

Also of possible interest:

A recent report, Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities could give ideas to advocates and families for how they can use international human rights laws to protect the rights of children with disabilities.

Learn about a report on human rights abuses of disabled children and adults in Serbia, including the use of violence.

Read a paper on Violence Against Blind and Visually Impaired Girls in Malawi

Those interested in abuse and human rights violations in institutional settings may also wish to read the following first-hand accounts written by the same author, Amanda Baggs. These are well worth reading. Some talk about the more obvious kinds of violence that most people are used to thinking of as “abuse.” Some talk about forms of psychological manipulation that are so subtle that outside observers might miss them. But Amanda Baggs makes powerful arguments for why “outposts in our head,” or the uses of power nevertheless can be at least as important for anyone who cares about the well-being of children (and adults) with disabilities. Click on any title below to see Amanda Bagg’s post:

Why It’s So Hard to Write Directly About My Life
Outposts in Our Heads: The Intangible Horrors of Institutions that Must Not Be Forgotten
The Meaning of Power
Extreme Measures, and Then Some



We Can Do learned about the UNICEF report on violence against disabled children from the AskSource.info database. Asksource.info provides a library of information, resources, and toolkits related to people with disabilities and to health issues, particularly in developing countries.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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REPORT: Human-Rights Approach to Education for All

Posted on 30 January 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Human Rights, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has released a report on a human rights based approach to making education accessible to all children, entitled A Human Rights-Based Approach to Education for All: A framework for the realization of children’s right to education and rights within education (PDF format, 812 Kb). The report discusses current thinking and practice on human rights based approaches in the education sector. It presents key issues and challenges in rights-based approaches and provides a framework for developing policies and programs at the school, local, national, or international levels. It is targeted particularly at governments, civil society organizations, United Nations and bilateral agencies, and other development partners.

This report touches briefly on issues affecting disabled children in education throughout. A search for the word “disabilities” finds multiple short references in the text. For example, there is a mention of such issues as the fact that the birth of some children–but particularly disabled children–may not be registered in some countries, making it more difficult to accurately estimate the need for schooling. And the report asserts that attention must be paid to the communication needs of children with sensory impairments (Braille for blind students; sign language for deaf students).

There are some disappointments here. For instance, the introduction has the usual discussion of the 77 million children who are currently out of school but misses an opportunity to point out that disabled children are disproportionately represented among them. But the integration of disability related concerns into a broader discussion of educational issues is itself an important step in the right direction. Especially positive is seeing disability issues integrated into a report like this one that emphasizes education as a human right for all children–including children with disabilities.

The report can be downloaded in PDF format (812 Kb) at:

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0015/001548/154861E.pdf



We Can Do learned about this report via the Disabled People’s International on-line newsletter. DPI’s newsletter can be subscribed to, via email, for free.



Find more Research, reports, or papers, or find more blog posts like this one on children, education, or humanrights.

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REPORT: State of Disabled People’s Rights in Kenya (2007)

Posted on 17 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Blind, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Human Rights, Mobility Impariments, Reports, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/27gxpy]

A recent publication, entitled “State of Disabled People’s Rights in Kenya (2007) Report,” analyzes national and regional Kenyan legislation on disability; government programs and policies on disability, and case law in disability. The report also presents the results of interviews with disabled people in three selected regions within Kenya about their human rights situation, in respect to dignity, autonomy, equality, and inclusion. Deaf people, blind people, and people with mobility impairments, and intellectual disabilities were interviewed. An overview of the disability rights movement in Kenya is given.

The examination of legislation and policies found that the Constitution of Kenya guarantees the human rights and liberties of all citizens. However, although the constitution outlaws discrimination on grounds such as race, tribe, or color, it does not specifically outlaw discrimination on the basis of disability. Further, anti-discrimination laws have not been enforced in cases where disability-related discrimination has occurred.

Interviews with individual disabled people in Kenya found that nearly three-quarters had been denied the right to make decisions affecting their own lives. Also, 80% report experiencing segregation, isolation, and lack of support for their needs. More than one-third reported that their own families had committed abuse or violence on them, and more than 45 percent said their families did not allow them to participate in family activities on the same basis as other family members.

The report recommends strengthening the capacity of Disabled People’s Organizations to address human rights issues; mainstreaming disability rights issues into government bodies and the national development strategy; involving disabled people and their organization in improving anti-discrimination legislation; and making the court process more accessible to disabled people so they can more effectively challenge disability-based discrimination.

The “State of Disabled People’s Rights in Kenya (2007) Report” was commissioned by the African Union of the Blind in collaboration with the Kenyan Union of the Blind, the World Blind Union, and the Centre for Disability Rights Education and Advocacy (CREAD), with support from the Swedish International Development Agency, the Swedish Association of the Visually Impaired, and Disability Rights Promotion International (DRPI).

The report can be read on-line at http://www.yorku.ca/drpi/Kenya07.html#startContent

The report also can be downloaded in PDF format (1.2 Mb) at http://www.yorku.ca/drpi/files/KenyaReport07.pdf



This article has been reposted at the RatifyNow.org web site with permission of author. RatifyNow is an organization working to maximize the number of countries signing, ratifying, and implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).



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Helping Make We Can Do Accessible

Posted on 7 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Inclusion, Introduction to "We Can Do" | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Do you have an interest in ensuring that We Can Do is accessible to as many people as possible? Do you have advice, ideas, feedback, concerns, or other comments to share related to accessibility at We Can Do? If so, please consult the new page on “Accessibility“. I can use YOUR help. This can be as simple as two minutes of your time to comment on accessibility barriers you have encountered at We Can Do. Or it could mean 10 or 20 minutes to help advise me on how to create a table and make it accessible to blind people. Or it could mean a more extensive, on-going commitment to translate We Can Do materials into other languages.

“Accessibility” in part refers to making We Can Do accessible to people with disabilities. The disability group that tends to face the most barriers on the Web are people with vision impairments. Of particular concern are people who use screen readers, whether due to vision impairments or for other reasons such as dyslexia. So far, the people I know who use screen readers have not told me about any problems in navigating We Can Do. But each screen reader is different. And sometimes different people differ in how well they know how to use the equipment they have. So if you use a screen reader, I still want to hear your feedback on accessibility at We Can Do. I also would welcome advice and assistance in specific areas such as making pictures or tables accessible to blind people. If you think you might be able to help, please consult the Accessibility page for more details about what questions I have.

People who are blind are not the only people who face accessibility barriers. People who are deaf or hard of hearing, or have mobility impairments, specific learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, or cognitive disabilities all face challenges in navigating the web. If you might have feedback you want to share in these areas, please consult the Accessibility page and share your comments.

At We Can Do, I am concerned with not only accessibility for people with disabilities fortunate enough to have Internet access and literacy skills. I also want to ensure that We Can Do is as accessible as possible for people in developing countries who may be using very old, slow equipment and dial-up connections. Or for people who cannot access the Internet at all. Or who do not read well in English. If you have thoughts you want to share, or if you have the time and interest to help, please consult the Accessibility page and contact me.

I realize I have been posting many “administrivia” items at We Can Do lately and somewhat fewer fresh materials. I do have a couple more pages in mind that I want to add to the top navigation bar. But I will also be posting more news, resources, and papers in the coming few weeks. Please do keep coming back to We Can Do.



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NEWS: Christian Blind Mission Now for All Disabilities

Posted on 6 January 2008. Filed under: Blind, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Education, Mobility Impariments, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

The Christian Blind Mission has announced that they will now serve people with all disabilities, not only people with vision impairments. Until now, the century-old organization also known as Christoffel Blinden Mission and now officially named cbm, has focused its efforts on preventing and treating blindness and on providing education and rehabilitation services for people with vision impairment.

“The organization has decided that its purpose and work is to improve the quality of life of all persons with disability, which includes those with hearing or physical impairment and mental ill health as well as those with visual loss,” says CBM president, Prof. Allen Foster.

CBM has also issued a new motto: “Together we can do more.” The word “together” is meant to emphasize the importance of partnership, particularly with organizations in low-income countries and with mainstream development organizations. The phrase “we can” is meant to emphasize ability over disability. And “do more” is meant to challenge the fact that the majority of people with disabilities in developing nations do not receive the medical, educational, and rehabilitation services they need.

CBM works with more than 700 partners in more than 100 countries to serve more than 18 million people with disabilities.

More detail can be found at:

http://www.cbmicanada.org/news_viewer.asp?news_id=138



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nazimani for helping alert me to this news.



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CONFERENCE: Around the Deaf World

Posted on 21 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Events and Conferences, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Around the Deaf World in Two Days (It’s a Small World): Sign Languages, Social Issues/Civil Rights, Creativity

A conference will be held on signed languages, social issues, civil rights, and creativity within the Deaf community. The event will meet on the campus of Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, USA on February 29-March 1, 2008. ASL (American Sign Language) and BSL (British Sign Language) Interpreters will be provided. CART services (i.e., live transcription/captioning) will be provided at some events.

Some of the lectures held during these two days focus on Deaf communities in industrialized countries. But a few may be of interest to people who wish to focus on Deaf communities in developing nations:

  • Angela Nonaka will speak on indigenous and village signed languages in Thailand
  • Ann Senghas and Marie Coppola will speak about the development of Nicaraguan Sign Language
  • Sandra Wood will speak about the acquisition of Brazilian Sign Language by homesigners
  • Amy Wilson and Nickson Kakiri will highlight the best practice for collaborating with Deaf communities in developing countries
  • Jun Hui Yang will speak about social situations and the education of Deaf children in China

Learn more detail about the conference at:

http://www.swarthmore.edu/SocSci/dnapoli1/Aroundtheworld.html



Thank you to Barbara Duncan for alerting me to this event. An announcement on this conference was disseminated to the Society for Disability Studies (SDS) email discussion group.



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RESOURCE: Sri Lankan Sign Language Dictionary Published

Posted on 6 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, News, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A new Sri Lankan Sign Language dictionary has been published with pictures of 350 different signs and short conversational phrases. Sri Lankan Sign Language has different dialects in different parts of the country. The new dictionary focuses on the dialect used at the Rohana Special School community and with deaf people across the Southern Province of Sri Lanka. You can download the entire dictionary for free on-line at the link from this sentence. It is the first known conversational dictionary to be developed for Sri Lankan sign language.

I learned about this dictionary from the blog, Found in Ceylon. The blog is written by a deaf American man, Adam. Adam was a volunteer at the Rohana Special School in Sri Lanka. His blog was originally meant to chronicle his experiences at the school. But he has now returned to the United States and continues to blog about news relevant to the school and his contacts in Sri Lanka.

Learn about the dictionary at:

http://www.foundinceylon.com/blog/2007/12/05/introducing-sri-lankan-sign-language-the-dictionary/

Or download it from:

http://www.rohanaspecialschool.org/Rohana_Special_School_in_Sri_Lanka/Sri_Lankan_Sign_Language_Dictionary.html


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RESOURCE: VSO Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability

Posted on 17 November 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A publication from Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO) offers practical advice to mainstream international development organizations on how they can better include disabled people in the programs they run in developing countries. It is entitled A Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability (PDF format, 1.9 Mb) and can be retrieved from the asksource.info web site at http://www.asksource.info/pdf/33903_vsomainstreamingdisability_2006.pdf.

VSO recommends that all readers begin with chapter 1, which provides an overview of disabilities; what it means to “mainstream” disability; and why it is important. This chapter strives to ease readers into what can initially seem a daunting task:

“Mainstreaming is an ongoing process of including disability into all our work. However, this process can seem so huge that we never start. Looking at the experiences gathered for this handbook, we found it was most helpful to think about mainstreaming as a project. Like any other project, it is important to plan and budget first, carry out some activities, then review progress and make a new plan to follow up.” (VSO, 2006, “A Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability,” p. 12)

VSO also encourages all users to read chapter 2 no matter what other, more specific interests they may have. This chapter explains how to challenge discrimination toward disabled people on an individual basis and provides practical hints and tips on interacting with people with disabilities and what language is appropriate. At the end of the chapter are two case studies on how people have challenged discrimination toward people with disabilities in developing countries.

Subsequent chapters can be read in any order, according to an organization’s interests and priorities in relation to gradually increasing how much they include disabled people in their activities. Once an organization becomes comfortable with tackling one challenge, users can then select another chapter in the handbook to read. Each chapter contains an introduction to the topic with key messages; practical advice and lessons, illustrated with examples; case studies from VSO’s mainstreaming experience; and key resources on the Internet.

  • Chapter 3 discusses why it is important to have both the commitment of individual staff members and management support in mainstreaming disability; the importance of including disabled people and their organizations in building your organization’s commitment to inclusion; and developing a clear rationale for mainstreaming that is linked to your organization’s existing mission and values.
  • Chapter 4 covers the process of sensitization; here, the term refers to engaging each individual with the organization’s commitment to disability.
  • On the philosophy that “mainstreaming starts with us,” Chapter 5 discusses how an organization can actively include disabled workers among its own staff.
  • Chapter 6 addresses how to include disabled people in your organization’s program planning, implementation, management and review processes as the best way of ensuring that your programs will not be discriminatory.
  • Chapter 7 describes how to include disabled people across various programs and sectors such as education programs, HIV/AIDS programs, and so forth.
  • Chapter 8 argues that, without a policy framework,”mainstreaming will remain small-scale, local and unsustainable”; here, organizations can find guidance on addressing policy and institutional barriers that prevent disabled people from equal participation.

In addition to VSO’s Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability, international development professionals may also wish to consult my earlier blog post entitled Finding Local Disability Organizations for help with finding people with disabilities and their organizations in developing countries. Note that one of the resources listed, Mobility International USA, provides free consultation service and training to international development organizations that are working to be more inclusive of disabled people.

Organizations that already have some experience in mainstreaming disability, and that are ready for more ambitious challenges, may also wish to view Including the Disabled in Poverty Reduction Strategies. The resource linked from this post could help you support grassroots disability advocacy efforts in negotiating with country governments to include disabled people in their poverty reduction efforts.

The paper Disability Movement from Charity to Empowerment by Kishor Bhanushali may be an interesting read for people new to disability.

Also click on “resources” under “categories” in the right-hand navigation bar to see what other resources are listed at We Can Do that might be useful to you.


I learned about this resource through a bi-monthly email newsbulletin from the AskSource website. AskSource is targeted at people who share an interest in health or disability issues in developing countries. People who wish to subscribe themselves to their mailing list to be alerted of future new resources like this one can fill out the form at www.asksource.info. Or, you can email source@ich.ucl.ac.uk, type SUBSCRIBE SOURCE in the subject line, and state your name, organisation and email address. Additional information, such as your subject interests or activities, will help AskSource tailor their communications to your needs.


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NEWS: World Association of Sign Language Interpreters Conference Report

Posted on 6 November 2007. Filed under: Deaf, Events and Conferences, Interpreting, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The email further below comes from the secretary of the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters (WASLI) regarding their recent conference in Spain. Some sign language interpreters from developing nations were among the participants.

At the WASLI web site (http://www.wasli.org), you can see a daily newsletter from the conference (in English at top, in Spanish if you scroll down the page). You will also find text on topics such as developing a code of ethics for interpreters (see the link to the code of ethics in Kenya); mentoring sign language interpreters; links to information about deaf interpreters; and more.

Their “WASLI Country Reports 2007” (PDF format, 2.8 Mb) presents recent information about the situation of sign language interpreters or Deaf/deaf people generally in dozens of both industrialized and developing nations around the world. Some of the developing nations represented include: Botswana, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Nigeria, Cambodia, India, Peru, and Mexico.

WASLI also published a similar report two years earlier, WASLI Country Reports 2005 (PDF format, 1 Mb). The low- and middle-income countries represented in this report include: Argentina, Brazil, Cameroon, Kenya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Nigeria, Palestine, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Limited summaries of the WASLI website is available in other languages in PDF format by clicking on “About this website in other languages” WASLI’s left-hand navigation bar. Languages include Arabic, Brazialian Portuguese, Italian, Kiswahili, Japanese, Thai, French, Cantonese, Indonesian, Spanish, and Russian.

Email From WASLI Secretary

From: Zane Hema WASLI Secretary
To: secretary@wasli.org
Subject: WASLI
Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2007 00:44:55 -0000

WASLI is committed to developing the profession of sign language interpreting world wide

Greetings Friends

2007 has been an important year for WASLI primarily because it was the year that the 2nd WASLI Conference took place in Segovia, Spain 13-15 July 2007.

WASLI Conference 2007 – UPDATED WEBPAGE

The WASLI 2007 page on the website has been devoted to the WASLI 2007 Conference in Segovia.  It has been updated to include:

A photo gallery,

Minutes of the General Membership meeting,

Scenes from Segovia (Conference Newsletter)

Messages of Greetings

Countries Report

Update on the WASLI 2007 Conference Proceedings

… with more information to follow

WASLI Conference 2007 – OFFICIAL STATISTICS

Total number of participants – 255 (197 women and 58 men) from 41 different countries.  (This figure does not include working interpreters, companions and an individual from Press purposes)

159 were members of an interpreter association.

20 delegates were sponsored (8 people who were sponsored did not come)

Spain had the highest number of participants at 102

Regional Representation

Africa – 6 countries represented

North America – 3 countries represented

Europe – 14 countries represented

Balkans – 3 countries represented

Australasia & Oceania – 2 countries represented

Asia  – 8 countries represented

Transcaucasia & Central Asia – 1 country represented

Latino America – 4 countries represented

More news to follow shortly …

Zane HEMA

WASLI Secretary


We Can Do received the above email via the Intl-Dev email distribution list, which circulates information of interest to international development professionals and others with an interest in the field. The other information about WASLI and its country reports was gathered from the WASLI web site. Neither We Can Do nor Intl-Dev are associated with WASLI–individuals interested in their organization should follow the link to review their web site directly.


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Report: 1st Africa Deaf HIV/AIDS Workshop

Posted on 20 October 2007. Filed under: Case Studies, Deaf, HIV/AIDS, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

No continent has been struck by HIV/AIDS more than sub-Saharan Africa: nearly two-thirds of all people living with HIV are in Africa, and so were three-quarters of those who died from AIDS in 2006 (see UNAIDS report). We also know that people with disabilities are at higher risk for becoming infected with HIV (see Nora Groce’s study). And Deaf/deaf and hard of hearing people are no exception.

Two years ago, people who shared a concern about HIV and AIDS within the Deaf communities of Africa gathered at a workshop to exchange their knowledge and raise awareness within the Deaf community and among government officials about the need to address HIV/AIDS. The report resulting from this workshop is now available in PDF format on-line.

REPORT ON THE CONTINENTAL-WIDE HIV/AIDS SENSITIZATION WORKSHOP FOR DEAF POPULATION IN AFRICA.
VENUE: PEACOCK HOTEL DAR ES SALAAM
DATES: 24 TH – 30TH AUGUST 2005
THEME: OUR FUTURE-OUR RIGHTS TO HIV/AIDS INFORMATION, CARE AND SUPPORT ______________________________________________________________________________ The objectives of the workshop were as follows:
• To provide HIV/AIDS awareness and life skills training to the representatives from the Deaf community in Africa.
• To sensitise the Deaf on their rights to HIV/AIDS information and to care and support when infected by HIV/AIDS.
• To provide a forum for the Deaf to exchange inter-country experience on HIV/AIDS among the Deaf population in Africa.
• To educate and raise awareness among the government officials, UN agencies and participants from institutions working on HIV/AIDS, on the specific problems face by Deaf people in accessing HIV/AIDS information, care and support.

The report summarizes the opening remarks which touched upon the challenges facing Deaf Africans in fighting HIV/AIDs and ideas for moving forward. It also summarizes some of the key presentations including:

“LINGUSITC AND ATTITUDINAL OBSTACLES FACED BY THE DEAF PEOPLE IN ACCESSING HIV/AIDS INFORMATION IN AFRICAN COUNTRIES: THE CASE OF TANZANIA.” By Dr. Mary Mboya, Lecturer Department of Education Psychology-University of Dar es Salaam.

“THE ROLES OF RSESA IN ADVOCATING THE LINGUISTIC RIGHTS OF THE DEAF PEOPLE IN EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA AND INITIATIVE TO ESTABLISH THE AFRICAN DEAF UNION.” By Dominic Majiwa-Regional Director, World Federation of the Deaf, Regional

“BARRIERS FACED BY DEAF WOMEN IN AFRICA THAT CONTRIBUTE TO VULNERABILITY TO HIV/AIDS” By Euphrasia Mbewe – Deaf Women Activist, Zambia.

“UGANDA NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THE DEAF STRUGGLE TO FIGHT HIV/AIDS AMONGST THE DEAF PEOPLE.” By Florence N. Mukasa – Gender and Theatre Coordinator, Uganda National Association of the Deaf.

“SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT HIV/AIDS” By Meena H. A. – UNAIDS Country Office – Dar es salaam.

“THE AFRICAN DECADE AND VISION TO COMBAT HIV/AIDS AMONG THE PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES IN AFRICA” By Thomas Ongolo – The Secretariat of African Decade of Disabled Persons in South Africa.

“LOBBYING AND ADVOCACY STRATEGIES FOR HIV/AIDS AND HEARING DISABILITY INFORMATION, CARE AND SUPPORT.” By Ananilea Nkya – Tanzania Women Media Association (TAMWA)

The report also describes how deaf participants were trained in preventing HIV/AIDS, and in advocating for more inclusion of deaf people in HIV/AIDS work carried out by their governments.

The report can be downloaded in PDF format (143 kilobytes) at http://siteresources.worldbank.org/DISABILITY/Resources/News—Events/BBLs/ADUReport.pdf


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CONFERENCE: Improving Education, Rehabilitation for Deaf

Posted on 19 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education, Events and Conferences, Middle East and North Africa, Rehabilitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The 8th Symposium of the Arab Federation of the Organs of the Deaf

“Improving Education and Rehabilitation of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing People”

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
April 28 – 30, 2008

The Arab Federation of the Organs of the Deaf will hold its 8th symposium in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The title of the symposium is: “Improving Education and Rehabilitation of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing People”.

Call for papers:

The scientific committee is seeking papers about (but not limited to) :

* The latest method in Deaf education Bilingual/Bicultural approach.
* Latest method in teaching Math, science, reading and writing.. etc.
* Deaf education at college level.
* Inclussion of the Deaf and hard of hearing in mainstream schools.
* Latest methods in training teachers of the Deaf.
* Cochlear Implants.
* Early intervention in Deaf and hard of hearing education.
* Speech therapy.
* Hearing aids and assesstive devices.

Languages of the symposium:

1. Arabic language.
2. Sign language.
If needed:
3. English language (upon request)
4. International Sign Language (upon request).

Important dates:

Deadline for submitting abstracts: December 25th, 2007.
Deadline for submitting full papers: February, 22, 2008.

All papers should be sent by the email or by air mail on a CD to Dr. Zaid Al Muslat Al Meshari, Vice president of the Arab Federation of the Organs of the Deaf and the president of the scientific committee.

This event is organized by the Saudi Deaf Sport Committee. Its address is:

P.O. Box 154311
Riyadh 11736
Saudi Arabia

Tell: +966 (1) 4784198
Fax: +966 (1) 4761665
sma20006 at hotmail dot com
www.deafsp-sa.com

The symposium organizers will provide free tickets and accommodations for those who present a paper.


I obtained this announcement via the Intl-Dev mailing list. However, neither We Can Do nor Intl-Dev are associated with this conference.


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Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities PART ONE

Posted on 29 July 2007. Filed under: Children, Deaf, Education, Multiple Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , |

A few years ago, I took a class on deaf children with additional disabilities at Gallaudet University. One project I did for that class was to reach out to some of my contacts in developing countries to gather what information they knew about the challenges experienced by deaf children with additional disabilities, particularly in relation to gaining access to an education.

The information I gathered is now three years old. I’m sure some details have changed since I conducted this project. But most of this is, unfortunately, still valid at least in its broad strokes. Deaf children in developing countries, with or without additional disabilities, too frequently don’t have access to an education.

The project I did for class is much too long to post in a single blog entry. Instead, I will be breaking it up into multiple parts, to be posted over the next few months or so.

Here, I post the introduction, as it was first written three years ago:

Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities in Developing Countries

Introduction: How This Project Fits Into the Big Picture

According to the World Bank, 98 percent of all children with disabilities in developing countries are not in school. About 40 million children with disabilities of primary school age are not receiving an education. This includes children who have only a single disability, for example sighted deaf children without mental retardation, learning disabilities, or mobility impairments. What then of deafblind children? Or deaf children with mental retardation? Or deaf children with any other combination of additional disabilities? (NOTE: The link that I originally provided as a source three years ago seems to be gone or revised now. But the World Bank page on education is at http://go.worldbank.org/GMDMICVFF0. If I’m able to re-locate something more specific later, I’ll come back and edit this paragraph accordingly.)

It is often difficult to find reliable, documented information on deaf children or adults in developing countries. Finding reliable information on specific sub populations, such as deaf children with additional disabilities, is even more difficult. This knowledge does exist–but in bits and pieces, locked away inside the heads of hundreds of people around the world who have worked directly with, or at least visited and observed, programs for deaf children in developing countries. I wanted to gather together some of these little pieces of information into one place, even if only in an informal fashion.

Finding the Information
This project began, primarily, as an informal survey of people I already knew via email who either live and work in developing countries or who live in developed countries but who have traveled extensively. Many of my initial contacts were not able to assist within the time frame available. Some may not have seen my email message at all. People in developed countries who work in the international field travel extensively and may be away from email contact for weeks or months at a time, while people in developing countries, for various reasons that I will not elaborate upon here, often have unreliable email access and may also go weeks at a time without being able to check email. Other contacts simply did not have the time to reply. Those who are actively working with deaf communities in developing countries often consider their work to be tantamount to a “calling” and may have little time to devote to any task that does not directly benefit the local deaf community. Also, people in developing countries are more likely to have two or more jobs simply to survive, and thus still have little or no time for email.

Nevertheless, some people did reply, either to share information or to suggest further contacts or to point me to resources on the web or elsewhere that might assist. Some of my “second generation” contacts referred me to still more possible contacts. During the past two weeks, I have sent out email messages to about 59 individuals around the world. I also sent email messages to three list servers: one, deafintl , is devoted to deaf people in developing countries; another is for deaf people in or from Africa; and a third is exclusively for women with various disabilities who participated in a recent leadership training program, Women’s Institute for Leadership and Development, that took place in Eugene, Oregon, last fall through the organization Mobility International USA.


My Sources

Ultimately, I gathered information from the following sources:

> More than a dozen individuals sent me partial or complete replies to my questions.
– Most emails were very brief.
– However, a few individuals were able to answer follow-up questions.
– One individual went the extra mile by personally visiting schools in Lahore, Pakistan, in an attempt to gather information.

> One individual sent me her 43 page masters thesis, written entirely in Spanish, which contained some relevant information. Her thesis is summarized in the section on Argentina.

> I also consulted some web sites that were recommended to me, but particularly the following:
Perkins School for the Blind
Sense International

Disclaimer
It should be noted that, for most countries, I only had one contact or other source of information. Even people who have been active for many years within the deaf community of a given country are not necessarily familiar with all resources available to that community, particularly when it comes to resources that might be available in a different part of the country, or resources outside their professional field, or resources targeted at a sub population within the deaf community in which they have not specialized. The information shared in this document, accordingly, should not be considered complete even in the few cases (e.g., Kenya) where I received responses from more than one person.

In some places, I included quotes from the people who shared information with me. In all of these cases, the quotes reflect the tone, opinions, attitudes, and sentiments of the person quoted. The inclusion of a given quote does not imply that I necessarily agree or disagree with the person’s position.

I have organized the information by country. I will put each country in a separate post at this blog over the next few weeks. When I do, I will edit this entry to include a direct link to each post .



Guest bloggers are welcome to submit essays, announcements, resources, articles, case studies, and opinion pieces of their own to “We Can Do.” I encourage you to first read the Introduction to We Can Do blog.I don’t have a written set of guidelines for guest bloggers–yet. But I’m working on them. In the meantime, if you’re interested, please contact me at ashettle [at] patriot.net and we can discuss.

(Replace [at] with the at sign @ and type the email address as one word with no spaces. Sorry to present my email address in such a cumbersome way. I’m trying to prevent my email address from being hijacked by even more spam harvesters than the five million who have already been flooding my email box.)


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