Global Forum for Inclusion 2008: Transforming Rights into Action, Nov 17-26, 2008

Posted on 26 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Families, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following open letter of invitation comes from Diane Richler, President of Inclusion International.

GLOBAL FORUM FOR INCLUSION 2008: Transforming Rights into Action. 17-26 Nov 2008.

The Forum for Inclusion 2008: Transforming Rights into Action is Co-Hosted by Inclusion International and the Canadian Association for Community Living

To be held at the Westin Hotel in Ottawa, Canada in November 2008, this Forum will engage self-advocates, families, activists, professionals and partners from around the world. Focused on the new UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Forum will look at how to transform rights into actions that lead to full inclusion and citizenship for people with intellectual disabilities.

Several events will take place in Ottawa: International Gathering of Families (November 17-18); International Gathering of Self-Advocates (November 17-18); International Conference: Putting the UN Convention into Action for People with Intellectual Disabilities (November 18-19); and Inclusion in Focus: Spotlight on Canada, at the 50th Anniversary Conference of the Canadian Association for Community Living (November 19-21). These events will be followed by study tours in Canada and the United States.

For information on these events, registration, accommodation and more please visit:
WWW.INCLUSION2008.COM Conference information is available in English, French, or Spanish.

If you need letters of invitation or have questions concerning your attendance, please contact
Raquel González R.Gonzalez@uel.ac.uk

We hope to see you there!

Diane Richler
President of Inclusion International



Thank you to Inclusion International for sending this announcement to be posted here. Interested parties should please contact them directly to inquire about the conference, NOT We Can Do.

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World Federation of the DeafBlind 9th Helen Keller World Conference, Kampala, Uganda, Oct 22-27, 2009

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Call for Papers, Deaf, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Multiple Disabilities, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that this includes a call for abstracts for proposed presentations and workshops, the deadline for which is February 1, 2009.

FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT

World Federation of the DeafBlind, WFDB 9th Helen Keller World Conference and WFDB 3rd General Assembly

Imperial Royale Hotel, Kampala, Uganda, October 22 – 27, 2009.

Hosting organisation: The National Association of DeafBlind people Uganda, NADBU

Dates and programme:

Arrival Thursday October 22 ,2009 with a welcome reception in the evening

Friday, October 23: HKWC conference plenary sessions

Saturday, October 24: HKWC a day full of workshops 16 different topics

Sunday October 25: HKWC plenary morning session collecting results from workshops and in the afternoon a cultural event/ excursion

October 26 and 27 General Assembly of WFDB until late afternoon

Venue: Imperial Royale hotel in Kampala Uganda, a totally new five star hotel with excellent facilities for our conference.

The hotel has 270 rooms and the Imperial Group has two other hotels nearby from where they will provide free transport to the Conference hotel.

Hotel prices

A single room at Imperial Royale will cost 120 USD per night and a double room 177 USD including breakfast, taxes and free wireless internet access.

www.imperialhotels.co.ug/improyale_overview.htm

Grand Imperial hotel Single room 109 USD double/ twin room 144 USD including breakfast and taxes

www.imperialhotels.co.ug/grand_imperial_overview.htm

Hotel Equatoria single room 86 USD double / twin room 132 USD including breakfast and taxes

www.imperialhotels.co.ug/equatoria_overview.htm

Conference fee
The conference fee will be 200 euros per person for deafblind participants, 200 euros per person for interpreters/ assistants and 250 Euros per person for all others which will include welcome reception, conference material, 5 days lunches, 5 days coffee/ tea breaks, mineral water during the conference, but not excursions, conference dinner or any other dinner ,airport transfer and transport to conference, visa, vaccination and other personal expenses.

Day guests 50 USD including lunch, coffee/tea breaks and water

Sponsored participants

WFDB will sponsor a limited number of participants from developing countries.

Maximum one deafblind participant with interpreter/ assistant per country.

If you need sponsorship, please advice WFDB as soon as possible indicating travel cost from your country to Kampala, Uganda.

Conference theme:

CRPD, changing the lives of persons with deafblindness

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, CRPD is a human rights instrument. How can we use this instrument to ensure that the rights of persons with deafblindness are respected and enforced.

Plenary sessions and workshops will cover the following themes:

What is CRPD and what does it mean for persons with deafblindness?

How can organisations work towards ratification of CRPD in their country ?

When a country has ratified CRPD, what changes will happen?

How can deafblind organisations and individuals use CRPD and its provisions, covering the specific areas:

A. Recognition of deafblindness as a unique disability

B. Recognition of the needs of persons with deafblindness

C. Recognition of modes and means of communication including sign languages

D. Recognition as a Person before the law, legal capacity, dignity and integrity of the person

E. The right to job and livelihood, income generation

F. Support systems, how can we use CRPD to get services of interpreters, personal assistants and other support persons

G. Access to information and communication technology, including hearing aids, vision aids and communication devices

H. Peer support, forming support groups, self help groups and own organisations of persons with deafblindness

I. Women with deafblindness, their special situation and needs

J. International cooperation , North- south partnerships, south – south partnerships,

K. Rehabilitation. Community based rehabilitation and other models of rehabilitation

L. How can persons with deafblindness be included in the educational system? What does inclusive education mean for persons with deafblindness?

M. Access to health care. Prevention and treatment of HIV-Aids.

N. Partnerships with other DPOs , NGOs, government,local government, private enterprise, service providers, other partners.

O. Raising Awareness of the needs and skills of persons with deafblindness

P. Participation of persons with deafblindness in cultural life.

Call for abstracts:

Abstracts of plenary presentations or workshops covering one of these areas, can be sent to the WFDB office before February 1, 2009 see address below.

WFDB contact address:

Lex Grandia, Snehvidevej 13, DK 9400 Noerresundby , Denmark
phone: +45 98 19 20 99
fax: +45 98 19 20 57
e-mail: lex.grandia@mail.dk
wfdb@wfdb.org
website: www.wfdb.org



Lex Grandia recently circulated this notice on the IDA_CRPD_Forum email discussion group. If interested in this conference, then please contact Lex Grandia directly at the contact information provided above, NOT We Can Do. Thank you.

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WHO Disability and Rehabilitation Newsletter July 2008 Issue

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Mobility Impariments, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Text-only version of the WHO/DAR Newsletter
July 2008 Issue

The World Health Organization (WHO) disability and rehabilitation newsletter is produced three times a year and distributed via e-mail. Subscription/unsubscription requests should be sent to WHO’s Disability and Rehabilitation Team (DAR) at the following e-mail address: pedersenr@who.int

IN THIS ISSUE

Features
* WHO Task Force on Disability
* WRDR Regional Consultations
* RI World Congress
* Wheelchair Guidelines
* CBR Congress
* New faces at DAR

Editorial
This month sees the halfway stage of development of the World Report, a moment to celebrate and take stock of how far we have come and how much more there is to do before we launch the document in eighteen months time. Another milestone has been the first meeting of the WHO Task Force on Disability, part of the Organizations’ response to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. These are exciting times for WHO’s work in disability and rehabilitation, and we have an expanded and enthusiastic team of staff working to deliver change. We are particularly grateful to all our collaborators and funders who have worked with us to help us achieve our ambitions to improve the lives of people with disabilities.

Alana Officer,
Coordinator
Disability and Rehabilitation

Task Force on Disability
WHO Director-General, Dr Margaret Chan, has set up a Task Force on Disability, chaired by Assistant Director-General Dr Ala Alwan, with representation from each regional office and from each cluster within HQ. This exciting initiative comes in the wake of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and will work to raise the profile of disability at WHO. Key tasks will include: conducting audits of WHO premises and making access improvements; reviewing websites and printed information to improve their accessibility; promoting employment opportunities for people with disabilities; and providing disability equality training for staff.

The Task Force will also work with the Technical Programmes of WHO to assist them to make their programs inclusive of and accessible to people with disabilities. For example, what about the needs of people with disabilities in disaster and emergencies? What about the needs of women with disabilities during pregnancy and childbirth?

Task Force focus: Information
So, what is WHO doing to ensure better access to all the information it produces? Ian Coltart of WHO Press, responsible for publishing guidelines and standards across WHO, writes…

“With a global audience and a mission to disseminate WHO’s information as widely as possible, WHO needs to ensure that it’s published information is accessible in appropriate formats for different audiences, including partially sighted and blind people, as well as people with learning difficulties.

WHO Press has developed and published a large print version of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The book is produced in A4 size with a clear page layout designed for partially sighted people. The book is available from the WHO online bookshop, at: http://bookorders.who.int/bookorders/anglais/detart1.jsp?sesslan=1&codlan=1&codcol=15&codcch=4088. WHO Press also plans to develop a Braille version of ICF for the blind.

WHO Press is working with WHO’s Disability and Rehabilitation Team (DAR) to develop publishing guidelines for WHO staff on producing specific formats such as large print and Braille, but also to improve the general design and layout of WHO’s mainstream printed products to accommodate partially sighted audiences.

World Report on Disability and Rehabilitation Regional Consultations
In May and June 2008, regional consultations on the preliminary draft of the World Report on Disability and Rehabilitation were held in San José, Costa Rica for the Americas Region; Dar-Es-Salaam, Tanzania for the African and Eastern Mediterranean Regions; Rome, Italy for the European Region; and Manila, the Philippines for the South-east Asian and Western Pacific Regions. Each consultation brought together a diverse group of experts with complementary knowledge and experience, including people with disabilities. Participants included editors of the Report, chapter authors, academics, service providers, policymakers, government officials, NGO representatives, and disability advocates.

Claudia Sánchez, a Columbian architect and participant in the consultation in San José, felt that the process was vital because “it brings into the report experiences from around the world that come from the real people”, i.e. those who have direct knowledge of the issues. While it was most helpful to gather constructive criticisms of the preliminary draft, it was also encouraging to witness how many participants were excited by the potential of the Report to advance work in disability and rehabilitation. As Kudakwashe Dube, CEO of the Secretariat of the Africa Decade of Persons with Disabilities remarked at the Dar-Es-Salaam event, “the report challenges countries to take serious steps to mainstream disability and capacitate all actors in order to achieve an improvement in the quality of life of persons with disabilities”.

The participants’ feedback, cultural perspectives on the draft and the sources of regional information they identified, will help ensure that the final document is relevant in diverse global contexts. They also proposed recommendations for action and generated ideas for regional dissemination of the Report and related events. The comments and suggestions from the four consultations will be collated and reviewed by the Editorial Committee. Lead authors will then use the input to help guide development of the next draft.

Wheelchair Guidelines
The wheelchair is one of the most commonly used assistive devices for enhancing personal mobility. For many people, an appropriate, well-designed and well-fitted wheelchair can be the first step towards inclusion and participation in society.

The United Nations Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and World Health Assembly Resolution WHA58.23 all point to the importance of wheelchairs and other assistive devices for the developing world, where few of those who need wheelchairs have them, insufficient production facilities exist, and all too often wheelchairs are donated without the necessary related services.

When the need is not met, people with disabilities are isolated and do not have access to the same opportunities as others within their own communities. Providing wheelchairs with related services not only enhances mobility but begins a process of opening up a world of education, work and social life. The development of national policies and increased training opportunities in the design, production and supply of wheelchairs are essential next steps.

In the light of the realities of the developing world and the immediate need to develop functioning systems of wheelchair provision in less-resourced parts of the world, the World Health Organization (WHO), the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics (ISPO) and Disabled Peoples’ International (DPI), in partnership with the Centre for International Rehabilitation, the Motivation Charitable Trust and Whirlwind Wheelchair International, have developed the Guidelines on the provision of manual wheelchairs in less-resourced settings. These will assist WHO Member States to develop a local wheelchair provision system and thereby implement Articles 4, 20 and 26 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Update from the WHO Ghana Country Office
As part of measures to strengthen the capacity of the Rehabilitation Services in Ghana, a joint WHO and International Society of Prosthesis and Orthotics (ISPO) mission was carried out. Details of the mission were provided in the fourth Newsletter (http://www.who.int/disabilities/publications/newsletter/en/index.html). In response to the mission’s recommendations, the Ghana Health Service, the Ministry of Health and the WHO Ghana Country office selected two candidates for certificate level training in prosthetics and two candidates for certificate level training in orthotics. The training will be carried out in the WHO collaborating Centre: Tanzania Training Centre for Orthopaedic Technologies (TATCOT), Moshi, Tanzania. The certificate courses, each of one year duration, comprise theoretical, laboratory and clinical practice to prescribe and deliver the appropriate lower limb prosthesis or orthotic in consultation with the intended user. This is an important step towards developing prosthetics and orthotics service provision in Ghana. The training has been made possible through support from ISPO and full scholarships from the Leahy War Victim Fund of USAID .

RI World Congress
Rehabilitation International (RI), a partner of WHO, is a global organization bringing together expertise from all sectors in the disability field advancing the rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities. RI is organizing its 21st World Congress in Quebec City from 25 -28 August 2008, attended by more than 1000 participants, including people with disabilities and their organizations, human rights activists, experts, rehabilitation professionals, government representatives, service providers and leaders of civil society. The vision statement of the Congress is “Disability Rights and Social Participation: Ensuring a Society for all” and the key areas of discussion are: Human Rights, Independent Living and Social Participation and Implementation of the UN Convention.

WHO will be launching the new Wheelchair Guidelines during the plenary session of the first day of the Congress. Additionally, WHO is hosting three sessions during the event and will be supporting the ICF conference, a dedicated two-day track, within the RI conference:

1. CBR Guidelines — 25 August (Block 63 – 2:10 pm) with Barbara Murray (ILO), Karen H. Motsch (CBM), Venus Ilagan (RI), Tomas Lagerwall (RI), Alana Officer (WHO) and Chapal Khasnabis (WHO).

2. World Report on Disability and Rehabilitation — 25 August (Bloc 62 – 4:20 pm) with Anne Hawker (RI); Charlotte McClain-Nhlapo (World Bank); Sebenzile Matsebula (RI); Kicki Nordstrom (WBU) and Alana Officer (WHO).

3. 3. Wheelchair Guidelines — 27 August
(Bloc 72 – 10:30 am) with David Constantine (Motivation); Dan Blocka (ISPO); Rob Horvath (USAID); Anna Lindstrom (Swedish Institute of Assistive Technology – SIAT); Venus Ilagan (RI) and Chapal Khasnabis (WHO).

4. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) — August 26 and 27.
The 14th annual North American Collaborating Center (NACC) Conference on the ICF will be hosted by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), Statistics Canada and the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) in collaboration with Rehabilitation International. The theme is Evaluating Social Participation: Applications of the ICF and ICF-CY.

Conference website: www.riquebec2008.org/

1st CBR Asia-Pacific Congress
This event, taking place on 9-11 December 2008 at the United Nations Conference Centre (UNCC), Bangkok, Thailand, will be the first meeting of CBR practitioners from countries in Asia and the Pacific. The Asia-Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, promoted by ESCAP, has given an impetus for Governments and NGOs to create an inclusive, barrier free and rights-based society. A regional policy guideline, the Biwako Millennium Framework (BMF) for Action and its supplement, the BMF +5, promoted a paradigm shift from charity to a rights-based approach to disability. Meanwhile, the CRPD heralds a new era of state recognition of the human rights of people with disabilities.

The Congress will bring together key stakeholders to share resources and to be updated on CBR as an effective multi-sectoral strategy for rehabilitation, equalization of opportunity, poverty reduction and social inclusion of people with disabilities. It will promote research and evidence based practice related to CBR, and facilitate the development of an alliance and resource base for the Asia-Pacific region – comprising UN, Governments, NGOs, DPOs and others.

Satellite workshops pre- and post-conference will be held on CBR and mental health; CBR, human rights and the CPRD; CBR and Leprosy for up to 45 participants each.

The Congress is jointly organized by WHO, UNESCAP and the Government of Thailand and supported by ILO, UNESCO, JICA, CBM, HI, AIFO, NAD, ILEP and others.

Conference Website: www.cbr-asiapacific.org/
E-mail: secretariat@cbr-asiapacific.org

New faces at DAR

Three short term staff have brought their wit and wisdom to bear on WHO’s projects on disability and rehabilitation. Bliss Temple is a trainee physician from North Carolina, USA, and she has been supporting the development of the World Report. Tom Shakespeare is a disability studies academic from Newcastle, UK, and has been working for the Task Force on Disability. Veronica Umeasiegbu is a physical therapist from Nigeria, currently studying Rehabilitation Counselling at the University of Pittsburgh, USA and has been working on CBR. As well as their solid academic and professional credentials, as people with disabilities they bring personal experience of the issues.



We Can Do discovered this newsletter when it was forwarded to the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group and the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group, both of which can be subscribed to for free.

If you wish to receive future issues of the WHO Rehabilitation Newsletter directly via email, then please inquire with pedersenr@who.int. You may also download past issues of the newsletter in PDF format at http://www.who.int/disabilities/publications/newsletter/en/index.html

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RESOURCE: Disability Rights and Policies

Posted on 21 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Handicap International has released a new CD on “Disability Rights and Policies.” Each of the 8 major sections of this CD offers an extensive range of reference documents and resources, in both English and French, related to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and to international development. The CD is targeted at organizations at all levels from local to international, and across many sectors including development, emergency relief, and human rights. It is meant to be used as a reference tool for any organization that supports inclusive development, including disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), public authorities, and service providers.

Many of the publications and web sites offered in this free, on-line CD, with some exceptions, are unfamiliar to me. In other words, many haven’t yet been featured at We Can Do. Some seem to be valuable enough to deserve individual blog posts to themselves in the future, though I know I’ll never get to them all. Instead, I encourage We Can Do readers to browse the “Disability Rights and Policies” CD for themselves.

The content of the CD is grouped into 8 different thematic areas:

The CD can be downloaded from the following website:
http://handicap-international.fr/bibliographie-handicap/

It is available in both English and French.

The CD also can be requested from Handicap International (info@handicap-international.us).



Thank you to Handicap International for alerting me to this resource.

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REPORT: Personal Mobility, Accessibility for Disabled People in South East Europe

Posted on 20 August 2008. Filed under: Blind, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, Mobility Impariments, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Countries that have chosen to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) are now required to protect the right of people with disabilities to personal mobility; and to an accessible environment. But disabled people in the South-Eastern countries of Europe, such as Kosovo, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia, Albania, Croatia, and Hungary, are often denied the right simply to move from one place to another on the same basis as other people in their society. They lack mobility aids such as prosthestic devices, wheelchairs, and crutches; public buildings, and even their own homes, are not accessible to them; and neither is public transportation.

People who wish to learn more about the conditions that limit the mobility of people with disabilities in South East Europe–and what can be done to improve their situation–can consult a report entitled “Free movement of people with disabilities in south east Europe: an inaccessible right?” (PDF format, 1 Mb) This report addresses the mobility and accessibility needs of people with mobility impairments; people who are blind or have vision impairments; people with intellectual disabilities; and deaf people. The 124-page report was published by Handicap International in 2006.

The first part of the report discusses the current situation, and barriers, faced by people with various disabilities in South East Europe. The second part describes good practices that have successfully made the environment more accessible for people with disabilities throughout the region. The third part discusses the importance of awareness raising; the laws and policies needed to improve the situation; the need for training in universal design; and the importance of including people with disabilities in planning all new construction. The report closes with a series of recommendations.

The full report can be downloaded for free in
http://www.disabilitymonitor-see.org/documents/dmi2_eng/dmrII_webeng.pdf

People interested in creating accessible environments, and in the principles of universal design, may also be interested in learning about a free, on-line book on Universal Design and Visitability.



We Can Do learned about this report by exploring the newest resources to be posted at the AskSource.info database on disability issues; health issues; and development.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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JOB POST: Social Affairs Officier, P-4, United Nations, New York USA

Posted on 19 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The United Nations Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities within the Department of Education and Soscial Affairs has a job opening available for a Social Affairs Officer. The job, at level P-4, is based at the United Nations headquarters in New York, USA. The application deadline is September 30, 2008.

The following description of responsibilities is taken from the official United Nations job post for Social Affairs Officer:

Responsibilities
Under the guidance of the Chief of the Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and within delegated authority, the incumbent is responsible for:

1. Promoting and facilitating the outreach and dialogue for the implementation of the rights of persons with disabilities within inter-governmental/non-governmental communities, especially academic institutions as well as among specialized constituencies in the disability community: to further policy dialogue and improve the knowledge base on the rights of persons with disabilities and the implementation of the Convention and other international instruments relating to disability.

2. Leading the development of a research agenda and establishing partnerships with experts and stakeholders, especially research institutes and academia; overseeing the development of and/or conceptualizing, formulating and managing major projects/studies; analyzing key trends and changes in socio-economic structures and related issues (e.g. occupational, cultural, educational, demographic patterns, gender issues, etc.) at global, regional or national levels.

3. Establishing partnerships with other experts and stakeholders (e.g. governments, research institutes, academia, UN system and other international organizations, NGOs, the private sector, etc.) to discuss emerging topics related to social development, exchange views on latest findings, policy guidelines, new models of development.

4. Serving as a focal point for collaboration on major issues/topics concerning disability; providing authoritative technical and policy advice and assistance to inter-governmental bodies, Member State officials, international and other organizations on planning, evaluating and implementing strategies, policies and programmes which impact socio-economic development at global, regional or national levels.

5. Writing and preparing studies on disability, law and social and socio-economic issues for publication within the UN system and in academic journals and other publications.

6. Promoting the organization at national and international fora and presenting institutional views/policies; coordinating and chairing and/or contributing substantively to sectoral seminars, general training programmes, workshops and expert group meetings.

Read more about the required qualifications for this job and how to apply at the United Nations web site at:

https://jobs.un.org/Galaxy/Release3/vacancy/Display_Vac.aspx?lang=1200&VACID=b9496c61-3c77-48f6-bd5e-e773f790ef75

Please note that all applications and queries should be directed to the United Nations, NOT to We Can Do. To learn how to apply or inquire with the United Nations, please follow the above link to learn the information that you require. Thank you.



We Can Do first learned about this job opportunity via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development email discussion group.

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CALL for Views, Information on Ratifying, Implementing, Monitoring Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 18 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Call for Papers, Human Rights, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

English; español; français

The following announcement from the United Nations should be of interest to anyone who has been watching developments with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities CRPD. It is also important for anyone who wishes to be involved with implementing or monitoring the CRPD. Individuals or organizations who wish to be involved with sharing feedback might also wish to join the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group and also the IDA_CRPD_Forum email discussion group. Please note that any related feedback or queries should please be directed to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, NOT to We Can Do. The deadline for feedback is September 15, 2008.

In English, español, or français

In English
On 4 June 2008, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights sent a letter to non-governmental organizations in relation to Human Rights Council resolution 7/9 entitled “human rights of persons with disabilities,” requesting views and information on:

a) Legal measures for the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and Optional Protocol;
b) Legal measures for implementation of the Convention and Optional Protocol;
c) Legal measures on national monitoring, particularly in relation to Article 33 of the Convention;
d) Any other information relating to paragraph 16 of the resolution.

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights has the pleasure to extend the deadline for submissions and consequently would be grateful if any response could be forwarded to the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, (United Nations Office at Geneva, Ch-1211 Geneva 10; Fax. + 41 22 917 90 08; email: registry@ohchr.org by September 15, 2008.)

7/9. Human rights of persons with disabilities

The Human Rights Council

Recalling the relevant resolutions of the General Assembly, the most recent of which are resolution 62/170 of 18 December 2007 on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Optional Protocol thereto, and resolution 62/127 of 18 December 2007 on the implementation of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons,

Recalling also the relevant resolutions of the Commission on Human Rights, the most recent of which is resolution 2005/65 of 25 April 2005, as well as those of the commission for Social Development of the Economic and Social Council,

Reaffirming the universality, indivisibility, interdependence and interrelatedness of all human rights nad fundamental freedoms and the need for persons with disabilities to be guaranteed their full enjoyment without discrimination,

Recognizing that disability is an evolving concept and that disability results from the interaction between persons with impairments and attitudinal and environmental barriers that hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others,

Recognizing also the importance of accessibility to the phyiscal, social, economic and cultural environment, to health, education, information and communication, in enabling persons with disabilities to enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms fully,

Recognizing further the importance of international cooperation for improving the living conditions of persons with disabilities in every country, particularly in developing countries,

Recognizing that women and girls with disabilities are often subject to multiple discrimination, and emphasizing the need to incorporate a gender perspective in all efforts to promote the full enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms by persons with disabilities,

1. Reaffirms the need to promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity, and in this regard, calls upon Governments to take active measures:

(a) To prevent and prohibit all forms of discrimination against persons with disabilities;
(b) To ensure, for persons with disabilities, full and effective participation and inclusion, respect for their individual autonomy, including the freedom to make one’s own choices; independence; and equality of opportunity;

2. Welcomes the adoption by the General Assembly on 13 December 2006 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol, and expresses the hope that they will enter into force at an early date;

3. Also welcomes the fact that, since the opening for signature of the Convention and Optional Protocol on 30 March 2007, 126 States have signed and 17 have ratified the Convention, and that 71 States have signed and 11 have ratified the Optional Protocol, and calls upon those States and regional integration organizations that have not yet done so to consider signing and ratifying the Convention and the Optional Protocol as a matter of priority;

4. Further welcomes the attention that several special rapporteurs ahve paid to the rights of persons with disabilities in carrying out their mandates, and requests special procedures, in carrying out their mandates, to take into account the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights by persons with disabilities;

5. Encourages the Human Rights council Advisory committee, and other mechanisms of the Council, to integrate the perspective of persons with disabilities, as appropriate, in carrying out their work and in their recommendations so as to facilitate the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the work of the council;

6. Urges all stake holders to give consideration to the rights of persons with disabilities at all stages of the universal periodic review, including during the consultations carried out by States at the national level for the preparation of information to be submitted for the review, so as to include national human rights institutions and non-governmental organizations representing persons with disabilities in such consultations;

7. Welcomes the attention pad to the rights of persons with disabilities in the work of several human rights treaty monitoring bodies and encourages all such bodies to further integrate the perspective of persons with disabilities in their work, including in their monitoring activities and through the issuing of general comments;

8. UrgesGovernments to address fully, in consultation with, inter alia, national human rights institutions and organizations of persons with disabilities, the rights of persons with disabilities when fulfilling their reporting obligations under the relevant United Nations human rights instruments, and welcomes the efforts of those Governments that have begun to do so;

9. Welcomes the report of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on progress in the implementation of the recommendations contained in the study on the human rights of persons with disabilities (A/HRC/7/61) and invites the High Commissioner to continue to provide adequate support for the integration of the perspective of persons with disabilities in the work of the Council and to continue the activities of her Office that contribute to raising awareness and understanding of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, including in cooperation with the Department for Economic and Social Affairs of the Secretariat;

10. Encourages States to raise awareness regarding the rights of persons with disabilities, including through public awareness campaigns and training programmes, to combat stereotypes, prejudices, harmful practices and attitudinal barriers relating to persons with disabilities and to promote positive perceptions and greater social awareness of persons with disabilities;
11. Encourages the High Commissioner for Human Rights to take fully into account the progressive implementation of standards and guidelines for the accessibility of facilities and services of the United nations system, also taking into account relevant provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and underlines the need for the Council, including its Internet resources, to be fully accessible to persons with disabilities;

12. Encourages States to take appropriate measures to identify and eliminate obstacles and barriers to accessibility for persons with disabilities, in particular to ensure that persons with disabilities have access, on an equal basis with others, to the physical environment, transportation, information and communications, and to other facilities open or provided to the public, both in urban and rural areas;

13. Welcomes the important role played by national human rights institutions and civil society organizations, including organizations of persons with disabilities, in the negotiation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and encourages relevant institutions and organizaitons to continue their efforts to promote understanding of the Convention and, where appropriate, its implementation;

14. Encourages the Office of the United Nations High commissioner to continue to strengthen its partnerships with and its outreach activities toward civil society organizations, with a particular emphasis on organizations representing persons with disabilities, so as to raise awareness among them about the work of the human rights system;

15. Decides to hold an annual interactive debate in one of its regular sessions on the rights of persons with disabilities and that the first such debate should be held at its tenth session, focusing on key legal measures for ratification and effective implementation of the convention, including with regard to equality and non-discrimination;

16. Requests the Office of the High Commissioner to prepare a thematic study to enhance awareness and understanding of the convention on the Rights of Persons with disabilities, focusing on legal measures key for the ratification and effective implementation of the Convention, such as those relating to equality and non-discrimination, in consultation with States, civil society organizations, including organizations of persons with disabilities, and national human rights institutions, and requests that the study be available on the website of the Office of the High Commissioner, in an accessible format, prior to the tenth session of the Council;

17. Notes that the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to submit to the Assembly at its next session a report on the status of the Convention and the Optional Protocol and on the implementation of resolution 62/170, and that it also requested the Secretary-General to submit that report to the Council as a contribution to its discussion of the rights of persons with disabilities;

18. Invites the Special Rapporteur on disabiltiy of the Commission for Social Development to continue cooperating with the Council and to address it on activities undertaken pursuant to his/her mandate, in accordance with its programme of work.

40th meeting, 27 March 2008 [Adopted without a vote. See chap. III.]

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En español
Estimado Señor, estimada Señora,

El 4 de junio de 2008, la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos envió una carta a las organizaciones no gubernamentales, en relación con la resolución 7/9 del Consejo de Derechos Humanos titulada “Los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad,” pidiendo información referente a:

a) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la ratificación de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;
b) Medidads jurídicas esenciales para la aplicación efectiva de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;
c) Medidads jurídicas esenciales para la aplicación y el seguimiento nacionales en relación con el articulo 33 de la Convención;
d) Cualquier otra información relacionada con le parrafo 16 de la resolución.

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos tiene el honor de prolongar el periodo para someter la correspondiente información. En consecuencia, la Oficina agradeceria que toda información en respuesta a la nota verbal se enviara a la Oficina del Alto comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechose Humanos, (Oficina de las Naciones Unidas en Ginebra, CH-1211 Ginebra 10; Fax. + 41 22 917 90 08; email: registry@ohchr.org, antes del 15 de septiembre de 2008.

7/9. Los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad

El Consejo de Derechos Humanos,

Recordando las resoluciones pertinentes de la Asamblea General, las más recientes de las cuales son la resolución 62/170, de 18 de diciembre de 2007, relativa a la Convención sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad y su Protocolo Faculativo, y la resolución 62/127, de 18 de diciembre de 2007, relativa a la aplicación del Programa de Acción Mundial para las Personas con Discapacidad,

Recordando asimismo las resoluciones pertinentes de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos, la más reciente de las cuales es la resolución 2005/65, de 25 de abril de 2005, y las de la Comisión de Desarrollo Social del Consejo Económico y Social,

Reafirmando la universalidad, indivisibilidad, interdependencia e interrelación de todos los derechos humanos y liberatdes fundamentales, asi como la necesidad de garantizar que las personas con discapacidad los ejerzan plenamente y sin discriminación,

Reconociendo que la discapacidad es un concepto que evoluciona y que resulta de la interacción de las personas condeficiencias y las barreras debidas a la actitud y el entorno que evitan su particiación plena y efectiva en la sociedad en igualdad de condiciones con las demás,

Reconociendo asimismo la importancia de la accessibilidad al entorno fisico, social, económico y cultural, a la salud, la educación, la información y las comunicaciones para que las personas con discapacidad puedan gozar plenamente de todos los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales,

Reconociendo además la importancia de la cooperación internacional para mejorar las condiciones de vida de las personas con discapacidad en todos los paises, particularmente en los paises en desarrollo,

Consciente de que las mujures y las niñas con discapacidad están sujetas a multiples formas de discriminación, y surayando la necsidad de incorporar una perspectiva de género en todas las actividades destinadas a promover el pleno goce de los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales por las personas con discapacidad,

1. Reafirma la necesidad de promover, proteger y asegurar el goce pleno y en condiciones de igualdad de todos los derechos humanos y liberatdes fundamentales por todas las personas condiscapacidad y de promover el respeto de su dignidad inherente y, a este respecto, pide a los Gobiernos que adopten medidas activas para:

(a) Prevenir y prohibir todas las formas de discriminación contra las personas con discapacidad; y
(b) Garantizar a las personas con discapacidad la participación e inclusión plenas y efectivas en la sociedad; el respeto a su autonomia individual, incluida la libertad de tomar sus propias decisiones; la independencia, y la igualdad de oportunidades;

2. Acoge con satisfacción la aprobación por la Asamblea General, el 13 de diciembre de 2006, de la Convencion sobre los Derechos de las personas con discapacidad y su Protocolo Facultativo, y expresa el deseo de que entren en vigor en breve;

3. Acoge con satisfacción asimismo que desde la apertura a la firma de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo, el 30 de marzo de 2007, hayan firmado la Convención 126 Estados y la hayan ratificado 17, y que hayan firmado el Protocolo 71 Estados y lo hayan ratificado 11, y pide a los Estados y las organizaciones de integración regional que todavia no lo hayan hecho que consideren como cuestion prioritaria la firma y la ratificación de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;

4. Acoge con satisfacción además la atención prestada por varios rlatores especiales en el cumplimiento de sus mandatos a los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, y pide que todos los responsables de los procedimientos especiales, en el cumplimiento de sus mandatos, tengan en cuenta el disfrute pleo y en condiciones de igualdad de todos los derechos humanoes por las personas con discapacidad;

5. Alienta al comite Asesor del Consejo de Derechos Humanos y a los demas mecanismos del Consejo a que integren la perspectiva de las personas con discapacidad, segun proceda, en sus actividades, y en sus recomendaciones para facilitar la inclusión de esas personas en la labor del Consejo;

6. Insta a todos los intersados a que tengan en consideración los derechos de las personas condiscapacidad en todas las etapas del examen periódico universal, por ejemplo en las consultas cleebradas por los Estados a nivel nacional para preparar la información que se ha de presentar para el examen, de modo que incluyan en esas consultas a las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos y a las organizaciones no gubernamentales que representan a las personas con discapacidad;

7. Acoge con satisfacción la atención prestada a los derechos de las personas con dicapacidad en la labor de varios órganos de supervisión de tratados de derechos humanos y alienta a estos a que sigan integrando la perspectiva de las personas con discapacidad en su trabajo, especialmente en sus activades de supervisión y al formular las observaciones generales;

8. Insta a los gobiernos a que, en consulta con las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos y las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad, entre otros, tengan plenamente en cuenta los derechos de las personas con discapacidad cuando presenten los informes previstos en los instrumentos pertinentes de las Naciones Unidas en materia de derechos humanos, y se contratula de los esfuerzos de los gobiernos que han empezado a hacerlo;

9. Acoge con satisfacción el informe de la Alta comisionada para los Derechos Humanos sobre los progresos alcanzados en la aplicación de las recomendadiones en el estudio sobre los derechos humanos y la discapacidad (A/HRC/7/61), e invita a la Alta comisionada a que siga prestando la ayuda oportuna con miras a integrar la perspectiva de las personas con discapacidad en el trabjo del Consejo y a proseguir las activi dades de su Oficina que contribuyan a dar a conocer y explicar la Convención sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, por ejemplo en cooperación con el Departamento de Asuntos Económicos y Sociales de la Secretaria;

11. Alienta asimismo a la Alta Comisionada para los Derechos Humanos a que tenga plenamenta en cuenta la aplicacion progresiva de normas y directrices sobre la accesibilidad de las instalaciones y los servicios del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, teniendo presentes ademas las disposiciones pertinentes de la Convencion sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, y subraya la necesidad de que el Consejo sea totalmente accesible a las personas con discapacidad, incluidos sus recursos de Internet;

12. Alienta ademas a los Estados a que adopten las medidas oportunas para identificar y eliminar los obstaculos e impedimentos a la accesibilidad de las personas con discapacidad, en particular para velar por que esas personas tengan acceso, en igualdad de condiciones con las demas, al entorno fisico, el transporte, la informacion y las comunicaciones y a otros servicios abiertos o suministrados al publico, tanto en las zonas urbanas como en las rurales;

13. Se congratula por el importante papel desempenado por las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos y las organizaciones de la sociedad civil, en particular las organizaciones de personas con dicapacidad, en la negociacion de la Convencion sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, y alienta a las instituciones y organizaciones pertinentes a que prosigan sus actividades para fomentar la comprension de la Convencion y, cuando proceda, su aplicacion;

14. Alienta a la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos a que siga fortaleciendo sus aliaznas con las organizaciones de la sociedad civil y sus actividades de comunicacion con ellas, centrandose especialmente en las organizaciones que representan a las personas con discapacidad, para hacerlas mas conscientes de la labor del sistema de derechos humanos;

15. Decide celebrar en uno de sus periodos ordinarios de sesiones un debate interactivo anual sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad, y que el primero de esos debates se celebre en su decimo periodo de sesiones y trate de las medidads juridicas esenciales para la ratificacion y la aplicacion efectiva de la Convencion, y tambien en relacion con la igualdad y la no discriminacion;

16. Pide a la Oficina del Alto comisionado que prepare un estuido tematico para mejorar el conocimiento y la comprension de la Convencion sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad centrado en las medidas juridicas esenciales para la ratificacion y la aplicacion efectiva de la convencion, como las relativas a la igualdad y la no discriminacion, en consultat con los Estados, las organizaciones de la sociedad civil, incluidas las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad, y las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos, y pide que el estuido este disponible en el sitio web de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado en un formato acceisble antes del decimo periodo de sesiones del Consejo;

17. Toma nota de que la Asamblea General pidió al Secretario General que le presentara en su próximo periodo de sesiones un informe sobre la situación de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo y sobre la aplicación de la resolución 62/170, y de que tambien pidió al Secretario General que presentara ese informe al Consejo para facilitar el examen de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad;

18. Invita al Relator Especial de la Comisión de Desarrollo Social encargado de la situación de la discapacidad a que siga cooperando con el Consejo y a que le informe, de conformidad con el programa de trabajo del Consejo, sobre las actividades que haya realizado en cumplimiento de su mandato.

40a sessión, 27 de marzo de 2008. [Aprobada si nvotación. Vease cap. III.]

Top of page English; español; français

En français
Madame/Monsieur,

Le 4 juin 2008, le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droit de l’homme a envoyé une lettre aux aorganisations non gouvernementales, en référence à la résolution 7/9 du Conseil des droit de l’homme intitulée <> en demandant des informations sur les points suivants:

a) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification de la Convention et Protocole Facultative;
b) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à la mise en œuvre de la Convention et Protocole Facultative;
c) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à l’application et su suivi au niveau national (article 33 de la Convention);
d) ainsi que toute autre information se rattachant au paragraphe 16 de la résolution.

Le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droit de l’homme a l’honneur de prlonger le délai pour soumettre les réponses. en conséquence, il serait utile que toute information en réponse à la note verbale soit communiquée au Haut-Commissariat aux droit de l’homme, Office des Nations Unies à Genéve, CH-1211 Genéve 10, Fax + 41 22 917 90 08; Courrier électronique: registry@ohchr.org, vant le 15 septembre 2008.

Je vous prie d’agréer, Madame/Monsieur, l’expression de mes salutations distinguées.

Ibrahim Wani, Chef, Service du développement et des questions économiques et sociales.

7/9. Droits fondamentaux des peronnes handicapées

Le Conseil des droits de l’homme,

Rappelant les résolutions pertinentes de l’Assemblée générale, dont les plus récentes sont la résolution 62/170 du 18 décembre 2007 sur la Conventoin relative aux droits des personnes handicapées et le Protocole facultatif s’y rapportant et la résolution 62/127 du 18 décembre 2007 sur la mise en œuvre du Programme d’action mondial concernant les personnes handicapées,

Rappelant également les résolutions pertineentes de la Commission des droits de l’homme, dont la plus récente est la résolution 2005/65 du 25 avril 2005, ainsi que celles de la Commission du déeleoppement social du Conseil économique et social,

Réaffirmant que tous les droits de l’homme et toutes les libertés fondamentales sont universels, indivisibles, interdépendants et intimement liés, et qu’il est indispensable de garantir aux peronnes handicapées la pleine joussance de ces droits et libertés sans discrimination aucune,

Reconnaissant que la notion de handicap évolue et que le handicap résulte de l’interaction entre des personnes présentant des incapacités et les barriéres comportementales et environnementales qui font obstacle à leur pleine et effective participation à la société à égalité avec les autres,

Reconnaissant également qu’il importe que les personnes handicapées aient accés aux équipements physiques, sociaux, économiques et culturels, à la santé, à l’éducation, à l’information et à la communication pour jouir pleinement de tous les droits de l’homme et de toutes les libertés fondamentales,

Reconnaissant en outre l’importance de la coopération internationale pour améliorer les conditions de vie des personnes handicapées dans tous les pays, en particulier dans les pays en développement,

Reconnaissant que les feemes et les filles handicapées sont souvent exposées à de multiples discriminations et soulignant la nécessité d’intégrer le principe de l’égalité des sexes dans tous les efforts visant à promouvoir la pleine joussance par les peronnes handicapées des droits de l’homme et des libertvs fondamentales,

1. Réaffirme qu’il est nvcessaire de promouvoir, de protéger et d’assurer la pleine et égale joussance de tous les droits de l’homme et de toutes les libertés fondamentales par les personnes handicapées et de promouvoir le respect de leur dignité intrinséque et, à cet égard, demande aux gouvernements de prendre des mesures énergiques pour:

a) Empêcher et interdire toutes les formes de discrimination envers les personnes handicapées; et
b) Garantir la participation et l’intégration pleines et effectives des personnes handicapées dans la société, le respect de leur autonomie individuelle, y compris leur liberté de faire leurs propres choix, le respect de leur indépendance et l’égalité des chances;

2. Note avec satisfaction l’adoption par l’Assemblée générale, le 13 décembre 2006, de la Convention relative aux dorits des personnes handicapées et de son Protocole facultatif, et exprime l’espoir que ces instruments entreront en vigueur à une date proche;

3. Note également avec satisfaction que, depuis l’ouverture à la signature de la Convention et du Protocole facultatif le 30 mars 2007, 126 États ont signé la Convention et 17 l’ont ratifiée, et que 71 États ont signé le Protocole et 11 l’ont ratifié, et demande aux États et aux organisations régionales d’intvgration qui ne l’ont pas encore fait d’envisager de signer et de ratifier la Convention et le Protocole facultatif à titre prioritaire;

4. Note en outre avec satisfaction l’attention que plusieurs rapporteurs spéciaux ont portée aux droits des personnes handicapées dans l’exercice de leur mandat et invite les titulaires de mandats relevant des procédures spéciales à tenir compte, dans l’exercice de leur mandat, de la pleine jouissance — dans des conditions d’égalité–de tous les droits fondamentaux par les personnes handicapées;

5. Encourage le Comité consultatif du Conseil des droits de l’homme et dautres mécanismes du Conseil à intégrer la question des personnes handicapées, selon qu’il convient, dans l’exécution de leur tâche et dans leurs recommandations afin de faciliter l’incorporation de cette question dans les travaux du Conseil;

6. Prie instamment toutes les parties prenantes de prendre en considération les droits des personnes handicapées à toutes les étapes de l’Examen périodique universel, notamment lors des consultations que les États ménent au niveau national pour réunir les informations à présenter à l’Examen, afin que les institutions nationales des droits de ‘lhomme et les organisations non gouvernementales représentant les personnes handicapées prennent part à ces consultations;

7. Se félicite de l’attention accordée aux droits des personnes handicapées dans les travaux de plusieurs organes conventionnels relatifs aux droits de l’homme et encourage tous ces organes à poursuivre l’intégration de la question des personnes handicapées dans leurs travaux, notamment dnas leurs activitvés de suivi et dans les observations générales qu’ils publient;

8. Prie instamment les gouvernements, en consultation avec, notamment, les institutions nationales des droits de l’homme et les organisations de personnes handicapées, de traiter en détail de la question des droits des personnes handicapées dans les rapports qu’ils sont tenus de présenter en vertu des instruments pertinents des Nations Unies relatifs aux droits de l’homme, et salue l’initiative des gouvernements qui ont commencé à le faire;

9. Accueille avec satisfaction le rapport de la Haut-Comissaire des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme sur les progrés accomplis dans la mise en œuvre des recommandations formulées dans l’étude sur les droits de l’homme et l’invalidité (A/HRC/7/61) et invite la Haut-Commissaire à continuer à appuyer comme il convient l’intégration de la question des personnes handicapées, notamment en coopération avec le Département des affaires économiques et sociales du secrétariat;

10. Encourage les États à faire œuvre de sensibilisation au sujet des droits des personnes handicapées, y compris au moyen de campagnes de sensibilisation du public et de programmes de formation, afin de lutter contre les stéréotypes, les préjugés, les praticques dangereuses et les barriéres comportementales concernant les personnes handicapées, et à promouvoir les perceptions positives et une plus grande conscience sociale à l’égard des personnes handicapées;

11. Encourage la Haut-Commissaire aux droits de l’homme à tenir pleinement compte de l’application progressive des normes et des directives régissant l’accessibilité des lcaux et des services du systéme des Nations Unies, en tenant également compte des dispoitions pertinentes de la Convention relative au droits des personnes handicapées, et souligne que le Conseil, y compris ses rssources Internet, doit être pleinement accessible aux personnes handicapées;

12. Encourage les États à prendre des mesures appropriées pour recenser et éliminer les obstacles et les entraves à l’accesibilité pour les personnes handicapées, en particulier à veiller à ce qu’elles aient accés, à égalité avec les autres, aux équipements physiques, aux transports, à l’information et à la communication et à d’autres équipements ouverts ou destinés au public, tants dans les zones urbaines que dans les zones rurales;

13. Se félicite du rôle important joué par les institutions nationales des droits de l’homme et les organisations de la socétécivile, notamment les organisations de personnes handicapées, dans la négocation de la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, et encourage les institutions et les organisations intéressées à poursuivre leurs efforts pour faire comprendre la Convention et, le cas échéant, promouvoir sa mise en œuvre;

14. Encourage le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme à continuer de renforcer ses partenariats avec des organisations de le sociét civile, notamment les organisations et les activités de sensibilisation qu’il méne dans leur direction, en privilégiant en particulier les organisations représentant les personnes handicapées, afin de les sensibiliser aux travaux du systéme des droits de l’homme;

15. Décide de tenir tous les ans, au cours d’une de ses sessions ordinaires, un débat interactif sur les droits des personnes handicapées dont le premir devrait avoir lieu à sa dixiéme session, l’accent étant mis sur les principales mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification et à la mise en œuvre effective de la Convention, notamment en ce qui concerne l’égalité et la non-discrimnation;

16. Prie le Haut-Commissariat de réaliser une étude thématique visant à faire miux connaître et comprendre la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, en insistant sur les principales mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification et à la mise en œuvre effective de la Convention, telles que les mesures ayant trait à l’égalité et à la non-discrimination, en consultation avec les États, les organisations de la société civile, notamment les organisations de personnes handicapées, et les institutions nationales des droits de l’homme, et demande que cette étude soit disponible sur le site Web du Haut-Commissariat, dans un format accessible, avant la dixiéme session du Conseil;

17. Note que l’Assemblée générale a prié le Secrétaire général de lui présenter à sa prochaine session un rapport sur l’état de la Convention et du Protocole facultatif et sur la’application de la résolution 62/170 et l’a également prié de soumettre ce rapport au Conseil en tant que contribution à son débat sur les droits des personnes handicapées;

18. Invite le Rapporteur spécial de la Commission du développement social chargé d’étudier la situation des handicapés à continuer à coopérer avec le Conseil et à lui rendre compte des activités entreprises en application de son mandant, conformément au programme de travail du Conseil.

40e séance, 27 mars 2008 [Adoptée sans vote. Voir chap. III.]

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This letter, in all three languages, was recently circulated on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development email discussion group; the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group and also the IDA_CRPD_Forum email discussion group. Please note that any related feedback or queries should please be directed to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, NOT to We Can Do.

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History of Disability Rights in El Salvador

Posted on 18 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Upside Down World has recently published an extensive history of the disability rights movement in El Salvador from the 1990s through today, with special attention to the 12-year civil war; land mines and land mine victims; disability-related legislation in the country; and the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). 

El Salvador is one of 34 countries to have ratified the CRPD.  The CRPD is the first international, legally-binding treaty to protect the human rights of people with disabilities.  It protects many different human rights including: the right to healthcare and to informed consent in health services; the right to procreate and to obtain contraceptives; the right to education; the right to live with one’s own family in the community; and many more. 

El Salvador also is one of 20 countries to have ratified the accompanying Optional Protocol.  The Optional Protocol gives people with disabilities another way to obtain justice if their human rights have been violated under the CRPD.  People must first pursue all means of justice available to them within their own country.  If all of these attempts fail, and if their country has ratified both the CRPD and the Optional Protocol, then they may register a complaint with the international Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.  The Committee is authorized to investigate human rights violations under the CRPD.

In addition to the countries that have ratified the CRPD and Optional Protocol so far, another 96 countries also have declared official interest in ratifying the CRPD in the future, and 51 of these countries also are officially interested in ratifying the Optional Protocol.  A country signals strong official interest in an international treaty by signing it.  Signing a treaty is the first step toward ratifying it.  A country that has signed a treaty is not yet obligated to obey it, but must still avoid taking actions that would violate it.  A country that has fully ratified a treaty must make its laws more consistent with the treaty by creating new laws as necessary, or by abolishing old laws that violate the treaty.

Read the full story on the history of disability rights in El Salvador, entitled “A Recent History of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador” at

http://upsidedownworld.org/main/content/view/1384/1/

Find out if your country has signed or ratified the CRPD and Optional Protocol at http://www.un.org/disabilities/countries.asp?navid=12&pid=166

Learn more about the CRPD and Optional Protocol by reading the RatifyNow FAQ.

Learn how you can become involved with the global campaign to promote the ratification and implementation of the CRPD and Optional Protocol in your country and elsewhere.

This blog post was first published at <a href=”http://www.RatifyNow.orgRatifyNow.org and is re-posted here with permission of author. RatifyNow is an organization working to promote the ratification and implementation of the CRPD around the world, and periodically posts links like this one to interesting news stories related to disability rights and the CRPD.

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Our Rights: Disability Awareness Action Newsletter

Posted on 6 August 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , |

Thank you to Disability Awareness Action for giving its open permission to disseminate their newsletter. People who wish to receive future issues should contact them directly to inquire. 

Our Rights  –  issue 1, July 2008

  
text only version

DAA’s newsletter for Disability LIB.

In the interest of solidarity, this newsletter is send around by email to disabled people and their organisations across the world, and we invite you to forward it freely. We have provided links to internet sites, web pages, radio programmes and video clips, but understand that not all links are technically accessible to all users. From October Our Rights will be available in electronic format and on our website. For our contact details follow this link http://www.daa.org.uk/contact.htm

 

Contents

Welcome 

Hello from DAA

·                                Who we are

·                                What we do

·                                Our Rights e-bulletin 

·                                What we want to achieve

Thank you to Change and People First for use of their pictures to support the written information.

http://www.changepeople.co.uk 

http://www.peoplefirstltd.com/index.php 

         

Disability LIB partners

·                                Funding crisis

Building on our success – involvement sought

·                                   “A seed of change…”

The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People

·                                 UN Convention in Easy Read

·                                 “A new era” Kofi Annan

·                                  “Nothing about us without us.”

·                                 UN Convention Campaign Coalition

·                                 House of Lords discusses Convention

Disabled by society …. Our stories: Forced interventions

·                                   Article 11 forced interventions  

·                                   Forced Treatment even in your own home? 

·                                   Easy Read guide to compulsory treatment orders  

·                                   Mental Health Petition

 

International News

·                                   Easing life for disabled refugees

·                                   Who has signed the Convention and made it a law in    

their country?

·                                   Users and Survivors of Psychiatry

·                                   Ratify Now!

·                                   European Countries say how rights are progressing

 

Welcome! Our small team at Disability Awareness in Action (DAA) extends a very warm welcome to disabled people, organisations controlled and run by disabled people (DPOs) and their allies.

 

A very warm welcome to you all!

·                                 To all our new readers who are part of the Disability LIB family – the DPOs and individuals across the UK who are in the mighty struggle for rights and social change.

·                                 Welcome to all our old friends who used to read the Disability Tribune – we are delighted to be with you again.  We have the money for the Our Rights e-bulletins from our alliance with Disability LIB. 

Welcome to our first e-bulletin, which will introduce who we are, what we do and what we hope to achieve. We are always happy to hear from disabled people and their allies on the issues raised. Contact us by email or via the website.

Please contact: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

 

Who we are

We are a small team of disabled people working in collaboration with disabled people’s organisations and with partners of the Disability LIB project http://www.disabilitylib.org.uk/

 

What we do

DAA is committed to sharing information and resources on the human rights of disabled people.  Our aim is to give disabled people and their organisations information and resource links to help them take effective action for themselves.

 

We seek to inform and share concerns, we want to celebrate and share success. We are also aware of failures and shortfalls, and of examples where the law or government policy does not seem to work in our interest. We report on that as well!

Our Rights

Our Rights is a regular monthly e-bulletin. We provide information on human rights issues as they affect disabled people across the world, from diverse backgrounds and with a variety of different impairments. We give updates on policy and the law. We will give you evidence to support your rights – evidence of good and bad practice, evidence that comes from you. We want to build our strengths – together!

 

What we want to achieve

We are working towards fundamental social change and a better society for all.  DAA believes that disabled people can use the law and the framework of human rights as a tool. This means we want to use the ideas behind the law to argue for a better world, in which to live. “ A seed of information can lead to a groundswell of action.”

 

This action has to come from disabled people themselves. We can increase our impact on social change by joining together. We are very excited at being able to use DAA’s network with disabled people all over the world – to play a part in fulfilling our objectives towards the Disability LIB project (details below). Working in solidarity with each other we will achieve more and gain from the commonality of our experience.

   

Disability LIB partners

Funding Crisis

As many organisations have known all too well these past few years, a serious funding crisis has affected many activities aimed at realising better lives for disabled people.

Six organisations of disabled people and Scope have  formed an alliance and secured a £4.2million funding grant from the Big Lottery fund 
capacity build 200 Disabled People’s Organisations. The idea of this project is that the funding crisis can be reduced by increasing information, capacity and effectiveness and wants to go far beyond the 200 DPOs to make their materials and information available to all.
This alliance is called Disability LIB (Listen Include Build). The aim is to confront discrimination and disablism, and to secure the full and equal rights of disabled people. Disability LIB will provide disabled people’s organisations with information, advice and support that will enable them to be more effective, and to play a full part in achieving their aims .
The project has its own website and central office. www.disabilitylib.org.uk
Disability LIB
6 Market Road
London
N7 9PW
England UK

Telephone: 0844 800 4331
Email:
contact@disabilitylib.org.uk

Buiding on our success – Your involvement sought

This is an example of DAA success and how “ A seed of information can lead to a groundswell of action.”:

“Disability Tribune has had some real successes over the years, including the Global Rights Campaign where we asked you to tell us about your lives. We were inundated with your stories and once gathered together they made an extremely powerful document which we delivered personally to the UN Human Rights Commission on the 3rd December 2001. We are certain that this document influenced the decision to begin the elaboration process for a UN Convention protecting the rights and dignity of disabled people.”

DAA, 2005.

We need to keep the pressure on. Our personal stories are powerful.

Please contact us with your stories on the experiences of disabled people, of how society continues to discriminate and stories of unfair treatment or abuse of our human rights: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

 

UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People

 

UN Convention in Easy Read
The full name of this agreement is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. We call it the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People. It sets out what countries have

to do to make sure that disabled people have the same rights as other people. The basic ideas are that disabled people are free to make their own choices, to be included in society as everyone else and are to be respected for who they are. Governments must make sure it does things so that our rights are protected.
http://www.officefordisability.gov.uk/docs/international-agreement-rights-disabled-people.pdf

 

The dawn of a new era.

http://www.un.org/sg/annan.shtml   

  “Today promises to be the dawn of a new era, an era in which disabled people will no longer have to endure the discriminatory practices and attitudes that have been permitted to prevail for all too long.  This Convention is a remarkable and forward-looking document.” UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan

You can read his full speech at
http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2006/sgsm10797.doc.htm
 
A Celebration: Nothing about us without us! Disabled people have to be at the forefront of action. It is no longer acceptable to have other people speak or act for us. The Convention opens up further possibilities. Listen to disabled people celebrate this potential. A celebration and comments given about the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People. When you first use this service, you will be asked to register your name, email address, organisation details and country. Text version is also available.
http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/english/detail/9606.html
More details about the celebration on the 12th May can be found here. There is even a video clip. http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=474 
 

 

UN Convention Campaign Coalition

Organisations have formed themselves into a coalition to bring political pressure and work to ensure early – and full – commitment from the UK government. They call for all interested groups to join together to campaign for ‘ratification without reservations’. Further information can be found at

http://www.un-convention.info/page3.html

House of Lords discusses Convention    We have on record, that disabled people’s organisations are crucial in realising rights, and will be involved when the government takes forward not only the  convention but the whole range of disability-related policies. http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld200708/ldhansrd/text/80709-0001.htm

Disabled by society …. Our stories: Forced interventions

Disabled people have long been undergoing a range of therapy, treatment and forms of interventions. I myself have enjoyed the benefits of an Australian Physiotherapist (who looked like he had  escaped from the set of a famous TV soap), have received emergency hospital interventions, and am pleased with latest developments in a range of pain management regimes. I chose and agreed to these interventions. They are provided not as a means to ‘correct’ impairment, but upon my request and in a way that leaves me in control. The picture is very different for many disabled people, people living in residential homes, survivors and users of Psychiatry, people with learning difficulties and older people who experience much reported systematic abuse or neglect.

The fact is, today, tomorrow and the next day, many interventions continue in the UK and world-wide, which are cruel or degrading, even torture to disabled people. Disabled people and their allies have been trying to close down a residential school that uses electric shock as a form of punishment for young people with Autism. This intervention is used to  punish or ‘correct’ the children. Young people with Autism were also forced to listen to loud static through a helmet. DAA collects and catalogues evidence of such treatment, and any human rights abuses experienced by disabled people. We invite you to contact us with your stories. Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

 

Article 11 forced interventions

A paper by Tina Minkowitz explains why disabled people argue so strongly against any form of forced interventions. The context within which ‘treatment’ or interventions that are meant to be ‘good for us’ takes place is often one of an imbalance of power between the professional or expert and the disabled person. This power disadvantage is in-built into the system of ‘treatment and care’, that assumes that our impairments are a deficit and need to be corrected. http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/enable/rights/art11suppl.htm 

 

Forced Treatment even in your own home?

The UK Government’s Mental Health Act 2007 introduced the idea of providing forced interventions not only in hospitals, but also in the community. These alarming measures extend forced treatment beyond hospital. They are called Compulsory Treatment Orders. This means that even more power is given to professionals. Far-reaching powers can specify a treatment regime even into the person’s own home. It

gives powers to decide on and limit their lifestyles, for example, forcing them to take certain medicine, or saying what time they have to be in at night. In Ireland campaigners want their law changed (see below).  

 

Easy Read guide to compulsory treatment orders is given in this link

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2007/09/03145057/11

Mental Health Petition
Activist Mary Maddock, psychiatric survivor and founder-member of  MindFreedom Ireland presented her petition to the European Union. She wants the law to be changed, because people with mental health issues can at the moment be forced to take medication. This is an example of a forced intervention. Her petition is entitled ‘The Illegality of Ireland’s Mental Health Act of 2001 as it Concerns the Forced Use of Mind AlteringDrugs on Unwilling patients.’ A copy of the petition text can be accessed at http://www.mindfreedom.org/as/act/inter/mfire/maddock-petitions-ireland

International news

Easing life for disabled refugees Abdi Salah fled the civil war in his native Somalia at the age of 11. Mr. Salah has polio and is among the estimated 3 million disabled people who have fled conflict, war, or natural disasters. Listen to his story (duration: 3’30”): http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/english/detail/10056.html

Who has signed the Convention and made it a law in their country?

Here is a list of countries in alphabetical order that have completely agreed to (ratified) the Convention.

         Australia17 July 2008

         Bangladesh – 30 November 2007

         Croatia – 15 August 2007

         Cuba – 6 September 2007

         Ecuador – 3 April 2008

         Egypt – 14 April 2008

         El Salvador – 14 December 2007

         Gabon – 1 October 2007

         Guinea – 8 February 2008

         Honduras – 14 April 2008

         Hungary – 20 July 2007

         India – 1 October 2007

         Jamaica – 30 March 2007

         Jordan – 31 March 2008

         Kenya – 19 May 2008

         Mali – 7 April 2008

         Mexico – 17 December 2007

         Namibia – 4 December 2007 

         Nicaragua – 7 December 2007

         Niger 24 June 2008

         Panama – 7 August 2007

         Peru – 30 January 2008

         Philippines – 15 April 2008

         Qatar – 13 May 2008

         San Marino – 22 February 2008

         Saudi Arabia – 24 June 2008

         Slovenia – 24 April 2008

         South Africa – 30 November 2007

         Spain – 3 December 2007

         Tunisia – 2 April 2008

You can access updates on the progress around the world at http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=18&pid=257

There are 5 regional groups of UN Member States:

·                                 African States

·                                 Asian States

·                                 Eastern European States

·                                 Latin American and Caribbean States

·                                 Western Europe and Other States Group

·                                 Eastern European States

 

To support the global campaign, go to Ratify Now!

http://ratifynow.org/ratifynow-faq/

 

Users and Survivors of Psychiatry

 “It is now the task of the world community to bring the ideals that are laid out in the Convention into reality.” says the World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry in February 2008.

European Countries say how rights are progressing

DAA is contributing to information gathering. On the question of how well the countries are doing in getting on with the Convention, government officials and organisations of disabled people often have conflicting views. A research centre for Human Rights of Disabled People in Finland (VIKE) is conducting a survey on the processes of ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People in seven European states. The chosen countries are Finland, Germany, Hungary, Serbia, Sweden, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Further details at http://www.kynnys.fi/vike.html  

 

And Finally…

“I am disabled just like I’m female …
Just like I’m Korean
Just like I’m 20 years old
There are no ifs about it.
Yet non-disabled people enjoy summing this up as not having “hope”
(that’s their reasoning for why a lot of us are anti-stem cell)
But the thing is…
I have hope– lots of it. …

Hope for justice, pride, solidarity.
I just don’t waste my hope on silly things
Like wishing I could walk again.”

(extract from a poem by Ms Cripp Chick)

 

Dear Friends,

Thank you for your time. We look forward to hearing from you, do contact us at mysay4daa@live.co.uk We are proud and excited to be part of this struggle to make all our rights a reality.

The next edition will bring you further informationi and up-dates on the Convention. We also look at the issue of bio-ethics and will, of course, share your stories. Bye for now.


Thank you to DAA for giving open permission to people to disseminate their newsletter. People interested in subscribing should contact them directly, not We Can Do.

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CONFERENCE: Africa Regional Conference on MDGs and Disability

Posted on 21 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Africa Regional Conference on MDGs and Disability
Regional Conference to be held on September 14th to 19th 2008, in Nairobi, Kenya
AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY
Pan Afric Hotel, Nairobi Kenya
14th to 19th September 2008.
Organizers:
ECUMENICAL DISABILITY ADVOCATES NETWORK (EDAN), SECRETARIAT OF THE AFRICAN DECADE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (SADPD), AFRICAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION (ACDF) AND THE UN MDG CAMPAIGN OFFICE FOR AFRICA

AIM: To enhance the capacity of leaders from disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in MDGs in African countries and to provide knowledge, increase competence and strengthen organizational advocacy strategies and networking skills.

We would like to announce and to invite participants to the above Conference which will bring together leaders of the disability movement, professionals and service providers together to interact in discussion on the MDG campaign, implementation and the implication to persons with Disabilities. The Conference is organized on the backdrop of the fact that 2007-2008 marks the halfway point to 2015, the year set for the achievement of the MDGs and the observation that the campaign and implementation work going on is yet to recognize Disability as a sector that need specific attention.

2007-2008 also marks the coming into force of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). It has been widely acknowledged that one of the shortcomings of the MDGs has been the exclusion of persons with disabilities. Taking this into account, the UNCRPD was drafted to ensure the inclusion of persons with disabilities into the development agenda. In the light of this, there are consistent referrals to the combating of conditions of poverty affecting persons with disabilities and especially their situation in the context of developing countries. Over 80%% of the 650 million persons with disabilities live in the poorest parts of the world. This means that over 20% of the poorest people globally are persons with disabilities.

For the MDGs to have real significance, they cannot ignore those living with disabilities. As James Wolfensohn, the former president of the World Bank has pointed out: “Unless disabled people are brought into the development mainstream, it will be impossible to cut poverty in half by 2015 or to give every girl and boy the chance to achieve a primary education by the same date.

Although persons with disabilities have organized groups which are involved in disability advocacy, awareness and lobbying on other pertinent issues of concern to them, there has been very little interaction with the MDGs campaign and many of them are not aware of it. They are not a consideration in the regional strategies as currently spelt out and implemented. They have continued to be left out of the Campaign relegating them further to marginalization. They therefore cannot engage their governments in this regard. It is necessary that they get involved.

This reality has brought about the need for the Secretariat of African Decade of Persons with Disability (SADPD), Ecumenical disability advocates network EDAN, African Community Development Foundation (ACDF) and UN Millennium Campaign office to partner in a project to facilitate an engagement to bring about the disability factor in all aspects of the MDG Work. This project has among other things the purpose to set in motion capacity building as well as inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities and their organizations in the mainstream campaign activities. The ultimate purpose is to facilitate a process to build a strong disabled person’s organisation DPOs to ensure that the voice of disabled persons will be heard and taken into account in all sectors of national MDG development.

The continental conference was originally expected to bring together a limited number of disability leaders from all over Africa associated with the work of the Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities and the Ecumenical Disability Advocates Network. The number was limited due to resources but we have received recommendations that the conference should be opened up for a wider participation. This announcement is therefore an invitation to persons with disabilities, DPO’s, Service providers and professionals especially those involved in development and issues of MDGs in various Regional Network to this conference. It is also an appeal to individuals and all regional organizations to sponsor those in their networks who can ably take the information back to their countries. Anticipated expenses within Kenya including airport transfers, Conference facilities, accommodation and full board for five days per person is 1,000 US Dollars. This figure does not include the air fare from the port of departure to Nairobi.

The organizing Committee has very limited scholarships to go to a few leaders in the Disability movement as this will facilitate key leadership meetings that will take place alongside and after the MDG Conference. Those in this category are requested to make their applications which will be considered on need basis and early application.

The Conference is as indicated above planned to take place at the Pan Afric Hotel Nairobi, Kenya between 14th and 19th September 2008. The first three business days programme beginning in the morning of Monday, 15th September will be devoted to knowledge dissemination, interactive discussions through workshops and development of advocacy strategies for inclusion in the MDG campaigns and implementation. The last two days will be devoted to the work of the Decade for persons with Disabilities and its relationship to development in the Region. A programme and other information materials will be sent later but those interested are requested to fill in the attached registration form and send it back to facilitate further planning.

Participants who are not in the Decade network and would like to experience a little of the Kenya tourism including group organized game drive may take this option provided there will be enough of them to make a group and that they will have informed us in good time. These arrangements are not part of the conference and their expenses are not included in the figures given for acommodation and board during the conference. Those interested may request for separate information in that connection.

AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY

Pan Afric Hotel, Nairobi Kenya

14th to 19th September 2008.

Organizers:
ECUMENICAL DISABILITY ADVOCATES NETWORK (EDAN), SECRETARIAT OF THE AFRICAN DECADE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (SADPD), AFRICAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION (ACDF) AND THE UN MDG CAMPAIGN OFFICE FOR AFRICA
AIM: To enhance the capacity of leaders from disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in MDGs in African countries and to provide knowledge, increase competence and strengthen organizational advocacy strategies and networking skills.

REGISTRATION FORM
Please type or write clearly in English. Complete registration form may be sent by e-mail (to info@edan.or.ke) or printed and sent by fax. Deadline: August 11th 2008

Surname(s)(as in passport)………………………………………………………………………….
First name(s) (as in passport)…..…………………………………………………………………..
Address …………………………..…………………………………..……………………………
Postal Code …………………………………… Town ………………………………………….
Country …………………………………………………………………………………………..
Home telephone……………………………. Office telephone ………………………………
(Country code/area code/number) (Country code/area code/number)
Fax ……………………………………………. E-mail …………………………………………
(Please provide at least one fax number or one e-mail address for quick communication)
Gender […..] Male […..] Female
Date of birth (day/month/year) …………………………………………………………………..
Your Disability ……………………………………………………………………………………
Profession or occupation .………………………………………………………………………
Organization ……………………………………………………………………………………..
Position in the organisation ……………………………………………………………………
Nationality (country issuing your passport) ……………… Passport number ……………………
Date and place of issue of the passport ……………… Passport valid until ………………..
(day/month/year) (day/month/year)
Sponsoring organization…………………………………………………………………….…..
Special need……………………………………………………………………………………….

Give details of your travel Itinerary:
The Conference Planning Committee will organize accommodation and board and meet the airfare expenses from the port of departure to Nairobi for those it will sponsor. Any other personal expenses, including passport costs, local travel related expenses such as vaccinations, luggage insurance or telecommunication costs are the participants own responsibility.

The planning Committee will organize hotel accommodation and airport pick up on request for the self sponsored participants.

Place……………………….Date…………………………. Signature …………………………

Send your registration to: Samuel Kabue
Executive Secretary
Ecumenical Disability Advocates Network (EDAN)
P.O. Box 22
00200 Nairobi
KENYA
Tel: +254-20-4445837
Fax: +254-20-4445835
E-mail: info@edan.or.ke



We Can Do received this announcement via the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities email news distribution list. Please note that any inquires relating to this conference should please be directed to info@edan.or.ke, or to the contact information given above, NOT to We Can Do.

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NEWS: Disability Advocate Venus Ilagan Appointed as New RI Secretary General

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Distinguished Disability Advocate Venus Ilagan Appointed as New RI Secretary General

(New York, New York, US, July 14, 2008)

Rehabilitation International
(RI) is pleased to announce the appointment of a new Secretary General, Venus Ilagan of the Philippines. As a woman with a disability from the South, Venus has worked tirelessly to advance the rights of persons with disabilities, particularly during the negotiations for the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Venus is expected to commence this important new role in September 2008, subject to resolution of visa and contractual arrangements, and Venus will be based at the RI headquarters in New York City, New York.

Venus is a well-known advocate for the rights of persons with disabilities for years. As a leader in the National Organization of Disabled Peoples’ of the Philippines (KAMPI) and the Differently-Abled Women’s Network (DAWN) of the Philippines, as well as holding various positions, including Chairperson, of Disabled Peoples’ International (DPI), Venus has promoted disability rights at the national, regional and international levels. Her vast experience with UN agencies and other international organizations includes her consultancy work with the Asian Development Bank and the World Health Organization.

As a representative of DPI, Venus has strong links within the International Disability Alliance (IDA), a coalition of 10 international and regional organizations of persons with disabilities, and served as IDA Chair from May 2004 -May 2005. She is well regarded within IDA and the newly created IDA CRPD Forum, of which RI serves as the Secretariat.

RI President Michael Fox remarked, “We are extremely pleased that Venus will be joining the RI team. She will be leading the RI Secretariat at a critical time in our growth, with the focus on implementation of the UN Convention and growth of the RI Foundation. We very much look forward to working with her and sharing her insights and experience.”

RI will formally welcome Venus as our new Secretary General during the RI World Congress, to be held in August 2008 in Quebec City, Canada. For more information about this event, please visit www.riquebec2008.org

RI also takes this opportunity to show our great appreciation to the current Secretary General, Tomas Lagerwall of Sweden. Since joining the RI Secretariat in 2001, Tomas has further developed excellent relations with RI membership in many countries, and has provided key support to the development of IDA. Tomas played an important role during the successful negotiations and coming into force of the CRPD. Tomas has demonstrated an enormous dedication to RI, and the RI Executive Committee and members most sincerely thank Tomas for his seven years of service to RI. 

About RI
Founded in 1922, RI is a global network of organizations of persons with disabilities, government agencies, service providers, researchers and advocates promoting and implementing the rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities. RI is currently composed of about 1,000 members and affiliated organizations in 93 nations, in all regions of the world.

For more information about RI, please visit their accessible website: http://www.riglobal.org.



The above announcement was circulated by Rehabilitation International. I retrieved it from the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

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CALL FOR PAPERS on International Disability Convention

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , |

Dr. Kishor Bhanushali circulated the following call for papers on the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in late June:

Dear All:

This is Dr. Kishor Bhanushali from India, working as a faculty member with ICFAI Business School. I am working on edited book on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. I am looking for authors to contribute articles related to various aspects of convention and its likely impact on persons with disabilities. For further information, pls contact me at kishorkisu@rediffmail.com,
kishor@ibsindia.org

Thanks for your overwhelming response to my book on U.N. Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Let me share with you some information about the proposed book and also
about ICFAI Books and ICFAI University Press.

Introduction:
United Nations estimated that there are about 650 million persons living with disabilities in the world. If we include the members of their families, there are approximately 2 billion persons who are directly affected by the disabilities, representing almost third of the world’s population. Persons with disabilities are generally overlooked in the development process as they do not enjoy rights at par with their non-disabled counterparts. Therefore ensuring equality of rights and access for these persons will have an enormous impact on the social and economic situation in countries around the world. In this scenario 2008 is a significant yeasr because of the entry of Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol, which are legally binding documents obligating the state governments to promote and protect the rights of persons with disabilities. U.N. Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities ensures that all persons with all types of disabilities must enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms on an equal basis with others. It clarifies and qualifies how all categories of rights apply to persons with disabilities and identifies areas where adaptations have to be made for persons with disabilities to effectively exercise their rights, where their rights have been violated, and where protection of rights must be reinforced.

The Convention marks a “paradigm shift” in attitudes and approaches to persons with disabilities. It takes to a new height the movement from viewing persons with disabilities as “objects” of charity, medical treatment and social protection towards viewing persons with
disabilities as “subjects” with rights, who are capable of claiming those rights and making decisions for their lives based on their free, and informed consent as well as being active members of society (U.N.).

Theme:
The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol was adopted on 13 December 2006 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, and was opened for signature on 30 March 2007. It was the first comprehensive human rights treaty of the 21st century and is the first human rights convention to be open for signature by regional integration organizations. Countries that join in the Convention engage themselves to develop and carry out policies, laws and administrative measures for securing the rights recognized in the Convention and abolish laws, regulations, customs and practices that constitute discrimination. Countries are to guarantee that persons with disabilities enjoy their inherent right to life on an equal basis with others, ensure the equal rights and advancement of women and girls with disabilities and protect children with disabilities.

Objective(s):
1. To understand the need of convention to protect the rights of persons with disabilities
2. Understand various aspects of convention on rights of persons with disabilities
3. Understand various aspects of convention and its expected impact on the life of persons with disabilities in various countries of the world
4. To discuss the issues involved in implementation of convention in various countries of the world

About Icfai University Press
In order to survive and thrive in a rapidly transforming economic and business environment, executives and professionals need to continuously acquire emerging knowledge and skills. The Icfai University Press therefore brings out a portfolio of publications to make the much-needed knowledge available to its readers who include students, research scholars and working executives. Presently, the Icfai University Press brings out 18 magazines and 57 journals.

About Icfai Books
Icfai Books is the initiative of the Icfai University Press to publish a series of professional reference books in the areas of accounting, banking, insurance, finance, marketing, operations, HRM, IT, general management and allied areas with a special focus on emerging and frontier themes. These books seek to provide, at one place, a retrospective, current as well as prospective view of the contemporary developments in the environment, with emphasis on general and specialized branches of knowledge and applications.

These professional books are based on relevant, authoritative and thought-provoking articles written by experts and published in leading professional magazines and research journals. The articles are organized in a sequential and logical way that makes reading continuous and helps the reader acquire a holistic view of the subject. This helps in strengthening the understanding of the subject better and also enables the reader stretch their thoughts beyond the contents of the book. These books are designed to meet the requirements of working executives, research scholars, academicians, students of professional programs and Indian and foreign universities. Around 40 books are sent to print every month.

The books are meant for the purpose of dissemination of knowledge and information and are sold at highly discounted prices. The publishing unit is, therefore, heavily subsidized by the parent organization involved in higher education. If you need any more information about Icfai Journals and Magazines, please visit www.iupindia.org. At this juncture, we are pleased to inform you that we now have launched our own website www.books.iupindia.org and we wish to allow readers the facility of e-downloading the books from our website and also from some other websites we may work in future. We are sure, you will agree that this will result in larger distribution of books and also give better visibility to the source(s)/author(s) and the books. Therefore, we now seek your permission to reprint the above article in the electronic version. Kindly let us know that we have you permission for the same.

You are requested to forward the abstract of your paper at earliest. Final paper can be submitted in month time. If you have already published some paper which you think is suitable for the book can also be reprinted.

Awaiting Response
 

Dr Kishor Bhanushali
Faculty – Economics
ICFAI Business School
ICFAI House



We Can Do first saw this call for papers on the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group, which is devoted to the discussion of disability issues in the Asian and Pacific regions. Dr. Kishor Bhanushali was kind enough to supply additional details.

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Disability Rights Fund Opens Grantmaking to DPOs in 7 Countries

Posted on 16 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

En español

PRESS RELEASE
Disability Rights Fund Opens Grantmaking to DPOs in 7 Countries

JUNE 16, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced its first grants competition.

The broad objective of the Fund — which was launched by the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the United Kingdom Department for International Development, and an anonymous donor on the first anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) — is to empower disabled persons organizations in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to effectively implement and monitor the CPRD.

In 2008, the Fund plans to give out a total of USD $700,000 in one-year grants ranging from USD $5000 – $50,000 and aimed at awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

To be eligible for this year’s grants program, applicant organizations must be based in and conduct the majority of their activities in the following seven countries: in Africa, Ghana, Namibia and Uganda; in Latin America, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru; in Asia, Bangladesh. In these countries, the Fund will support Disabled Persons’ Organizations activities that advance the human rights of persons with disabilities at country-level.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, www.disabilityrightsfund.org. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by July 15. The deadline for applications is August 15.

Disability Rights Fund Steering Committee Co-Chair, William Rowland, President of the World Blind Union, stated “The Disability Rights Fund heralds an innovative partnership between donors and persons with disabilities. The flow of new resources to support our struggle for rights is a development of major significance.”

####

COMUNICADO DE PRENSA
El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad abre su período de subvenciones a OPDs en 7 Países

16 de junio de 2008

PARA SU INMEDIATA PUBLICACIÓN

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad, una iniciativa colaborativa que apoya los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad – anunció hoy su primera competición por subvenciones.

El objetivo amplio del Fondo – que fue lanzado por el Open Society Institute, el Sigrid Rausing Trust, el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional del gobierno británico, y un donante anónimo, en el primer aniversario de la Convención Sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD) de las Naciones Unidas – es el de empoderar a organizaciones de personas con discapacidad en el mundo en desarrollo y la Europa del Este/antigua Unión Soviética, para la implementación y monitoreo efectivos de la CDPD.

En el 2008, el Fondo tiene planificado otorgar un total de USD $700,000 (dólares estadounidenses) en subvenciones de un año de duración que varían desde los USD $5,000 hasta $50,000, dirigidos al aumento de la concientización, el fortalecimiento de alianzas y redes, y la defensa de derechos.

Para poder optar al programa de subvenciones de este año, las organizaciones aplicantes deben tener su sede y realizar la mayoría de sus actividades en alguno de los siguientes siete países: en África, Ghana, Namibia y Uganda; en América Latina, Ecuador, Nicaragua y Perú; en Asia, Bangladesh. En estos países, el Fondo apoyará actividades de las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad que contribuyan al avance de la CDPD a nivel de los países.

Se alienta a que las organizaciones interesadas revisen los criterios de eligibilidad y los detalles para aplicar que se encuentran en el sitio de Internet del Fondo: www.disabilityrightsfund.org. Cualquier pregunta acerca del proceso para realizar propuestas deberán dirigirse a: info@disabilityrightsfund.org a más tardar el 15 de julio de 2008. La última fecha para enviar aplicaciones es el 15 de agosto de 2008.

William Rowland, Co-Presidente del Comité Coordinador del Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad, quien también funge como Presidente de la Unión Mundial de Ciegos, declaró “El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad ha constituído una asociación innovadora entre donantes y personas con discapacidad. La canalización de nuevos recursos hacia la lucha por reivindicar nuestros derechos, es un desarrollo de importancia significativa.”



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this press release for publication at We Can Do.

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Feedback Sought for United Nations Study on Disability Rights

Posted on 16 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following email has been circulated by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

En español; En français

4 June 2008

Dear Sir/Madam

I am writing to seek your contribution to a study being undertaken by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in relation to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol.

The Human Rights Council, in its resolution 7/9, decided to request “the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner to prepare a thematic study to enhance awareness and understanding of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, focusing on legal measures key for the ratification and effective implementation of the Convention, such as those relating to equality and non-discrimination, in consultation with States, civil society organizations, including organizations of persons with disabilities, and national human rights institutions” (para.16).

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights would be grateful to receive any relevant information for the preparation of this study. In particular, views and information would be welcome on:

a) Legal measures for ratification of the Convention and Optional Protocol;
b) Legal measures for implementation of the Convention and Optional Protocol;
c) Legal measures on national monitoring, particularly in relation to article 33 of the Convention;
d) Any other information relating to paragraph 16 of the resolution.

The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights would be grateful if any information could be sent to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (United Nations Office at Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 10; Fax. +41 22 917 90 08; E-mail: registry@ohchr.org) by 15 August 2008. Please indicate whether the information provided could be made available on the OHCHR website. I thank you in advance for your cooperation.

Yours sincerely,

Ibrahim Wani
Chief,
Development, Economic and Social Issues Branch


4 de junio de 2008

Estimado Señor, estimada Señora,

Tengo el honor de escribirle para pedir la contribución de su organización en relación con un estudio de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos sobre la Convención de los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad.

En su resolución 7/9, el Consejo de Derechos Humanos decidió pedir “a la Oficina del Alto Comisionado que prepare un estudio temático para mejorar el conocimiento y la comprensión de la Convención sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad centrado en las medidas jurídicas esenciales para la ratificación y la aplicación efectiva de la Convención, como las relativas a la igualdad y la no discriminación, en consulta con los Estados, las organizaciones de la sociedad civil, incluidas las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad, y las instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos” (párrafo 16).

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos estaría muy agradecida de recibir información concerniente a la mencionada decisión. En particular, se agradecería información y opiniones referentes a los siguientes aspectos:

a) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la ratificación de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;
b) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la aplicación efectiva de la Convención y el Protocolo Facultativo;
c) Medidas jurídicas esenciales para la aplicación y el seguimiento nacionales en relación con el artículo 33 de la Convención;
d) Cualquier otra información relacionada con le párrafo 16 de la resolución.

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos agradecería que toda la información en respuesta a la presente nota verbal sea enviada a la Oficina del Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos (Oficina de las Naciones Unidas en Ginebra, CH 1211 Ginebra 10; Fax. +41 22 917 90 08; E-mail: registry@ohchr.org) antes del
15 de agosto de 2008.

Reciban un cordial saludo,

Ibrahim Wani
Jefe,
Servicio de Desarrollo y Cuestiones Económicas y Sociales


4 juin 2008

Madame/Monsieur,

J’ai l’honneur de vous écrire afin de solliciter votre contribution pour l’élaboration d’un rapport du Haut-Commissariat aux Droits de l’Homme sur la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées et son protocole facultatif.

Dans sa résolution 7/9, le Conseil des droits de l’homme prie «le Haut-Commissariat de réaliser une étude thématique visant à faire mieux connaître et comprendre la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées, en insistant sur les principales mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification et à la mise en œuvre effective de la Convention, telles que les mesures ayant trait à l’égalité et à la non-discrimination, en consultation avec les Etats, les organisations de la société civile, notamment les organisations de personnes handicapées, et les institutions nationales des droits de l’homme» (paragraphe 16).

Le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme serait reconnaissant de recevoir tout renseignement relatif à l’étude, notamment sur les questions suivantes :

a) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à la ratification de la Convention et Protocole Facultative;
b) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à la mise en œuvre de la Convention et Protocole Facultative;
c) des mesures juridiques nécessaires à l’application et au suivi au niveau national (article 33 de la Convention);
d) ainsi que toute autre information se rattachant au paragraphe 16 de la résolution.

Merci de bien vouloir communiquer votre information au Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme, Office des Nations Unies à Genève, CH – 1211 Genève 10 ;
Fax. +41 22 917 90 08 ; E-mail: registry@ohchr.org, avant le 15 août 2008 et de nous indiquer si vous souhaitez que cette dernière soit placée sur le site Internet du Haut Commissariat.

Je vous prie d’agréer, Madame/Monsieur, l’expression de mes salutations distinguées.

Ibrahim Wani
Chef,
Service du développement et des questions économiques et sociales



We Can Do received this email via the AdHoc_IDC listserv and also via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

Readers unfamiliar with the CRPD may wish to review a brief “FAQ” at the RatifyNow.org website. More detail on the CRPD can also be found at the United Nation’s official web page on the topic at www.un.org/disabilities.

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UN Launches Blog-Based Discussion on Inclusion and Development

Posted on 9 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Please direct inquiries to the email addresses provided in the announcement below, not to We Can Do. Dirija por favor las preguntas a los correos electronicos abajo, no a We Can Do. Veuillez diriger les questions vers les email address fournis ci-dessous, pas a We Can Do.

Version française; Versión español

Dear Colleagues and Partners,

The adoption of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities marks a renewed commitment of the United Nations to improving the situation of people with disabilities, wherever they are. A man, a woman, or a child suffering from any kind of disability is much more likely to be poor, unemployed or discriminated against than a person without a disability. The disparity is even starker in developing countries.

More than 50 United Nations Development Program (UNDP) country offices in recent years have implemented programmes to recognize and respect the rights of persons living with disabilities, to provide them with training to help navigate better in life and to stand a better chance to be employed, to improve their participation in decision-making, to address the needs of millions of people who became disabled because of devastating conflicts and disasters. This year, UNDP made a commitment at the highest level to consolidate and strengthen our work to support persons with disabilities. On the other hand we are also looking at UNDP as employer and are decided to make our organization more accessible for employees, partners, and guests living with a disability.

In that context, we invite you to a blog-based discussion on Inclusion and Disability, to be held from 9 June to 9 July 2008. The blog-based discussion departs from traditional discussion methods. It is hosted on an interactive collaborative space hosted by UNDP Bratislava Regional Centre and enables each participant to share their views and resources. The lead
moderators will be:

  • Lance Clark, UNDP Resident Representative and UN Resident Coordinator, UNDP Serbia
  • Milena Isakovic, Programme Officer, UNDP Serbia
  • Marielza Oliveira, Programme Advisor, Regional Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Louise Nylin, Human Rights Advisor, Bratislava Regional Centre
  • Susanne Milcher, Social Inclusion Advisor, Bratislava Regional Centre
  • Ronald Wiman, author of the Manual on Inclusive Planning, Senior Social Development Advisor, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and STAKES, Finland
  • Geraldine Glassman, HR Associate, BOM/OHR/Staff Wellbeing Unit

To enrich the discussion, we encourage you to invite your colleagues and partners from UN agencies, the civil society, governments and media.

The outcomes of this discussion will help develop a UNDP policy and programming guidance document, as well as help formulate a more inclusive human resource strategy of UNDP.

To participate or contribute to the discussion, please notify by sending an e-mail to pr-net@groups.undp.org or to martin.santiago@undp.org

The specific details on how to participate will be shared on Monday 9 June.

We look forward to your participation.

Best regards,

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Director, Poverty Practice
Director, Office of Human Resources

Co-chairs of UNDP’s Task Force on Disability

Version française
Chers Collègues et Partenaires,

L’ adoption de la Convention sur les Droits des Personnes Handicapées marque le renouvellement de l’engagement des Nations Unies à améliorer les conditions de vie des personnes handicapées, où qu’ils soient. Un homme, une femme ou un enfant affecté par une forme d’handicap court plus que d’autres, en pleine possession de leurs moyens, le risque d’être pauvre, sans emploi ou victime de discrimination. La différence est encore plus frappante dans les pays en développement.

Au cours des dernières années, plus de 50 bureaux de pays du PNUD ont mis en œuvre des programmes visant à reconnaître et respecter les droits des personnes handicapées, à leur fournir la formation nécessaire à pouvoir mieux se diriger dans la vie et être plus en mesure d’être recruté pour emploi, à augmenter leur participation dans la prise de décision, à répondre aux besoins de millions de personnes qui sont devenues victimes d’un handicap à la suite de conflits et catastrophes dévastateurs. Cette année, c’est à l’échelon le plus élevé que le PNUD s’est engagé à consolider et renforcer notre travail d’appui aux personnes handicapées. En outre, c’est aussi en tant qu’employeur que nous examinons le rôle du PNUD et nous sommes déterminés à faire en sorte que notre organisation soit plus accessible aux employés, partenaires et hôtes souffrant d’un handicap.

Dans ce contexte, nous vous invitons à une discussion sur le thème de L’Intégration et le Handicap hébergée sur un blog et prévue du 9 Juin au 9 Juillet 2008. Une discussion à partir d’un blog se démarque de méthodes traditionnelles de discussion. Elle sera hébergée sur un espace collaboratif interactif aménagé par le Centre Régional de Bratislava du PNUD et donne à chaque participant l’occasion de partager son point de vue et ses ressources. Les principaux modérateurs seront:

  • Lance Clark, Représentant Résident PNUD et Coordonateur Résident de l’ONU, PNUD Serbie
  • Milena Isakovic, Administrateur de Programme, PNUD Serbie
  • Marielza Oliveira, Conseiller pour les Programmes, Bureau régional d’Amérique Latine et des Caraïbes
  • Louise Nylin, Conseiller pour les Droits de l’Homme, Centre Régional de Bratislava
  • Susanne Milcher, Conseiller en matière d’Intégration Sociale, Centre Régional de Bratislava
  • Ronald Wiman, auteur du Manual on Inclusive Planning, (Manuel de Planification de l’Intégration) Conseiller principal en matière de Développement Social, Ministère des Affaires Etrangères et STAKES, Finlande
  • Geraldine Glassman, Associé RH, BOM/OHR/Staff Wellbeing Unit (cellule de bien-être du personnel)

Nous vous encourageons à enrichir la discussion en invitant vos collègues et partenaires d’agences onusiennes, de la société civile, des gouvernements et des médias.

Les résultats de cette discussion contribueront tant à l’élaboration d’un document d’orientation de politique et de programmation du PNUD, qu’à la formulation d’une stratégie de ressources humaines plus intégrante au sein du PNUD.

Pour participer ou contribuer à la discussion, prière de nous en avertir en envoyant un mail à pr-net@groups.undp.org ou à martin.santiago@undp.org.

Les détails spécifiques sur les modalités de participation seront communiqués le lundi 9 Juin.

Dans l’attente de votre participation.

Meilleures salutations,

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Directeur, Pratique de la Lutte contre la Pauvreté
Directeur, Bureau des Ressources Humaines

Co-présidents de l’équipe spéciale duPNUD œuvrant sur les personnes handicapées

Version Español
Estimados colegas y socios,

La adopción de la Convención sobre los Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad marca un compromiso renovado de las Naciones Unidas a mejorar la situación de las personas con alguna discapacidad, sean de donde sean. Es mucho más probable que un hombre, mujer o niño que padezca cualquiera discapacidad sea pobre, desempleado o discriminando que una persona sin ninguna discapacidad. La disparidad es incluso más dura en los países en vías de desarrollo.

Durante los últimos años más de 50 oficinas de la UNDP en diferentes países han implementado programas para reconocer y respetar los derechos de las personas con alguna discapacidad, para suministrarles la formación necesaria para ayudarles a navegar por la vida con más facilidad y para que tengan más oportunidades de empleo, para su mejor participación en la toma de decisiones, y además los programas tratan de dirigirse a las necesidades de los miles de personas que son discapacitadas por causa de conflictos y desastres devastadores.

Este año la UNDP se está comprometido al nivel más alto, para consolidar y reforzar nuestro trabajo de apoyo a personas discapacitadas. Por otro lado, estamos también viendo a la UNDP como empleador y estamos decididos en hacer que nuestra organización sea más accesible a empleados, socios e invitados con discapacidades.

En este contexto, os invitamos a una discusión basada en un blog sobre Inclusión y Discapacidad, que tendrá lugar desde el 9 de junio hasta el 9 de julio de 2008. La discusión en un blog se desvía de los métodos tradicionales de discusión. Se encuentra en un espacio interactivo colaborativo presentado por el Centro Regional de la UNDP en Bratislava y permite que cada participante pueda compartir sus puntos de vista y sus recursos. Los moderadores clave serán:

  • Lance Clark, UNDP Representante Residente y Coordinador Residente, UNDPSerbia
  • Milena Isakovic, Oficial de Programa, UNDP Serbia
  • Marielza Oliveira, Asesor de Programa, Agencia Regional para América Latina y el Caribe
  • Louise Nylin, Asesor Derechos Humanos, Centro Regional de Bratislava
  • Susanne Milcher, Asesor de Inclusión Social, Centro Regional de Bratislava
  • Ronald Wiman, autor delManual on Inclusive Planning, Asesor Superior de Desarrollo Social, Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores y STAKES, Finlandia
  • Geraldine Glassman, Asociada de Recursos Humanos, BOM/OHR/Unidad del Bienestar de Empleados

Para enriquecer la discusión, os animamos a invitar a vuestros colegas y socios de las agencias de la ONU, la sociedad civil, los gobiernos y la prensa.

Los resultados de esta discusión ayudarán a desarrollar un documento de orientación de política y programación además de ayudar a formular una estrategia de recursos humanos de la UNDP más inclusiva.

Para participar o contribuir a la discusión, por favor, notificarnos con un correo electrónico a pr-net@groups.undp.org o responder a martin.santiago@undp.org.

Los detalles específicos de cómo participar estarán disponibles el lunes 9 de junio.

Esperamos vuestra participación.

Saludos

Selim Jahan
Martin Santiago
Director, Poverty Practice
Director, Office of Human Resources
Co-chairs of UNDP’s Task Force on Disability



We Can Do first learned about the UNDP blog-based discussion on Inclusion and Development via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserv.

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NEWS: Disability Rights Fund Launches Website

Posted on 2 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Funding, Human Rights, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund Launches Website

May 28, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Diana Samarasan, Director
Telephone: 617-261-4593
Email: dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund, a groundbreaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities, has launched its website at http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org

With a clear and easy to use design, the website provides information on the Fund’s history and strategy, governance, as well as its advisors and donors. In mid-June, the site will also publish information about the Fund’s first request for proposals.

A unique partnership between donors and the worldwide disability community, the broad objective of the Disability Rights Fund is to empower disabled persons organizations around the world to effectively implement and monitor the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Fund’s structure reflects the international disability community’s slogan, “Nothing About Us Without Us.” A global advisory panel, made up of 12 individuals, most of whom are persons with disabilities, provides recommendations on grantmaking strategies for the Fund; four of the Panel members also serve on the Fund’s grantmaking decision body—the Steering Committee. The members of the panel come from five continents and reflect a broad cross-section of the disability community. The majority were nominated by international and regional disabled persons’ organizations. Detailed biographies of advisors are available on the website.

In 2008, the Disability Rights Fund will be seeking grant proposals from disabled persons’ organizations in seven countries. Grants will support the human rights work of disabled persons’ organizations in Bangladesh, Ecuador, Ghana, Namibia, Nicaragua, Peru, and Uganda.

“2008 is the Disability Rights Fund’s pilot grantmaking year,” stated DRF director Diana Samarasan, “as the Fund develops, the website will become a dynamic source of information on human rights grantmaking within the global disability community.”

For more information on the Disability Rights Fund, see www.disabilityrightsfund.org or write to info@disabilityrightsfund.org


____________________________________________

Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this press release for publication at We Can Do.

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JOB POST: Making it Work Program Manager, Handicap International, USA

Posted on 26 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

Handicap International is recruiting for a new position in the U.S. office.

Making it Work Program Manager – Washington DC Metropolitan Region
Handicap International (HI), an NGO that works to improve living conditions of people living in disabling situations in post-conflict or low income countries, is launching Making it Work, a multi-stakeholder initiative to create an international knowledge management platform to support the implementation of the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The ratification of the UNCRPD sets a major challenge: how to bridge the huge gap between the standards set by this international convention and existing services, systems and policies in developing countries. The central aim for Making it Work is to reduce this gap through information dissemination and exchange, and in doing so, to promote a model for rights-based inclusive development.

Making it Work (MIW) is a two -year initiative that will:

  • Build capacities to research services and practices in developing countries as a means to influence national systems and policies;
  • Build capacities at local, national and regional levels to promote disability rights and implement policies; and
  • Raise awareness on key disability issues and present solutions to the barriers faced by persons with disabilities.

HI is seeking a Program Manager to oversee the successful completion of the three phases of the initiative. Willingness to travel essential. Fluency in Spanish highly desired. People with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Duration of contract: Six month full-time contract from July to December 2008 & planned extension through March 2010 funding permitting. Salary: $40-$50,000 commensurate with experience. Excellent benefits.

Deadline to apply: May 30, 2008.

Click on this link to read the full job description for the “Making it Work” Program Manager.

Also review the Handicap International US web site at http://www.handicap-international.us

Send resume/CV, cover letter and salary history as email attachments to Ed Kenny at recruitment@handicap-international.us



We Can Do received this announcement via several sources, including the Intl-Dev listserv. Please note that any inquiries or applications should be directed to Handicap International, not to We Can Do.

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Report on RI=USCID Seminar on Implementation of Draft UN CRPD

Posted on 29 April 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Reports, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Today, the international disability rights treaty, more commonly known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is on the verge of entering into force this May 3, 2008. But a mere year ago, in March 2007, the CRPD had only just been opened for countries to sign and ratify. And in August 2006, negotiations for the CRPD had just come to a conclusion.

Before the ink had dried on the latest agreed-upon text, Rehabilitation International and the United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD) convened a Seminar on Implementation of the Draft UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. A 20-page report from the seminar (PDF format, 144 Kb) summarizes the views presented there by government officials and members of civil society and academia on how to develop programs and policies that incorporate the CRPD. It identifies key goals, discusses best practice, and discusses how to ratify and implement the CRPD. Participants called upon people with disabilities to hold, not only individual governments, but also international organizations such as the World Bank accountable for being more inclusive.

The report presents a series of recommendations for how the United Nations, country governments, civil society organizations (especially disabled people organizations), and others can raise awareness for the CRPD, advocate for its ratification and implementation, and otherwise ensure that people with disabilities are able to enjoy their human rights in their daily lives.

The CRPD, as the first international, legally binding human rights instrument to protect the rights of people with disabilities, will help protect a wide range of rights such as access to education and health services; the right of people with disabilities to live in the community (not institutions); equal access to justice; the right to vote; and more. Learn more about the CRPD and how it is meant to help people with disabilities around the world by taking a few minutes to read the RatifyNow FAQ.

Download the full report in PDF format (144 Kb) at:

http://www.riglobal.org/meetings/Report_ImplementationSeminar_TxtOnly.pdf



We Can Do learned about the RI-USCID Seminar report by browsing the AskSource.info database on health, disability, and development.

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Bangkok Event Marks Entry into Force of Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 29 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

United Nations in Bangkok to Mark Entry into Force of Treaty on Disability Rights
Special Event to be Held on Wednesday, 30 April 2008

Bangkok (United Nations Information Services) – A ground-breaking new international treaty, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, will enter into force on 3 May 2008 – one month after it was ratified by the twentieth country.

In Asia and the Pacific, which is home to about 400 million persons with disabilities, Bangladesh, India and the Philippines are the three countries which have already ratified the Convention. Thailand is expected to do so soon.

The Convention is the first ever international treaty on the human rights of persons with disabilities. It was adopted by the UN General Assembly in December 2006, and it aims to ensure that people with disabilities enjoy human rights on an equal basis with others.

To celebrate the Convention’s entry into force, three UN bodies in Bangkok will organize a special event on Wednesday, 30 April 2008, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 a.m., at the United Nations Conference Centre.

It is being jointly organized by the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the International Labour Organization (ILO).

Noeleen Heyzer, UN Under-Secretary-General and ESCAP’s Executive Secretary, will address the event, which will feature a keynote speech by Senator Monthian Buntan of Thailand – who is blind – on the impact of the entry into force of the Convention and the importance of its ratification for countries in the region. Ms. Syeda Saiyidain Hameed, a member of the
Government of India’s Planning Commission, will also speak.

A related photo exhibition, entitled “Decent Work for Persons with Disabilities,” will be on display featuring various prize-winning photographs. The special event will also include a live musical performance by a group from Thailand, “The Network of Music and Arts of Persons with Disabilities.”

About ten per cent of the world’s total population – around 650 million people – are estimated to be living with various forms of disabilities. The percentage is even higher among the world’s poorest people, around 20 per cent of them having some kind of disability. People with disabilities are mostly marginalized and among the poorest of the poor, with limited access to education, employment, housing, transportation and health services. They represent a significant, but generally overlooked, development challenge.

Ensuring equality of rights and access for all persons with disabilities would have a beneficial impact on the social and economic conditions of each country, by enhancing their participation in education, employment, cultural, social and political activities and increasing their consumer power.

The new Convention marks a significant step in this direction. It encourages States to stop viewing persons with disabilities as passive recipients of charity, medical treatment and social protection. Instead, it casts persons with disabilities as active members of society and “subjects” who have rights and are capable of claiming those rights, being also able to make key decisions based on their free and informed consent.

NOTE TO THE MEDIA: Media representatives are cordially invited to attend this special event on Wednesday, 30 April, 2008, at 11:00 a.m. at the Reception Hall, Ground Floor, United Nations Conference Centre, at ESCAP’s headquarters in Bangkok.

***

For further information, please contact:

Ms. Aiko Akiyama
Population and Social Integration Section
Emerging Social Issues Division
ESCAP
Bangkok
Tel: 662-2882315
Mobile: 66-81-8309176
Fax: 662-2881030 or 2881009

or

Mr. Ari Gaitanis
United Nations Information Services
ESCAP
Bangkok
Tel: 662-2881862
Fax: 662-288-1052
Email: unisbkk.unescap@un.org

Aiko Akiyama
Social Affairs Officer
Emerging Social Issues Division (ESID)
UNESCAP
RAJDAMNERN NOK AVENUE,
BANGKOK 10200
THAILAND
Tel: 66-2-288-2315
Fax: 66-2-288-1030
Cellular: 66-81-830-9176
Email akiyama@un.org
http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/disability/index.asp



This announcement was recently circulated on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

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RESOURCE: Disability Rights Advocacy Workbook

Posted on 24 April 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

How can disability advocates explain to others the difference between the “charity,” “medical,” “social,” and “rights” model of disability? How can communities and allies educate themselves about the challenges faced by people with disabilities in their countries? How can people with disabilities learn about laws in their country that affect their lives? How can advocates teach other people about human rights for people with disabilities and the importance of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)?

People seeking answers to these questions can turn to the Disability Rights Advocacy Workbook (PDF format, 421 Kb), published by Survivors Corps (formerly known as Landmine Survivors Network).

Section 1, entitled “Advocacy for People with Disabilities,” explains why the charity and medical models of disability are often disempowering and how the social and rights model can help. It shares advice on prioritizing among the many challenges experienced by people with disabilities and how to choose the most effective strategies for advocating for long-lasting change. The section also encourages strong collaboration among like-minded organizations and offers ideas for locating useful information and statistics. A set of exercises can guide advocates and allies through brainstorming exercises to help them examine the advocacy work they are already doing and how they can improve.

Section two, entitled “How Does Human Rights Advocacy Work?”, explains what human rights are and how various human rights documents helps protect them. The exercises makes recommendations for the kind of information that advocates should know about and how advocates can locate this information.

Section three, entitled “How Do You Use International Human Rights Treaties for Advocacy?”, discusses how existing human rights instruments can help people with disabilities–including, but not limited to, the new international disability rights treaty, called the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). It offers advice on how people can advocate for their country to ratify and then implement the CRPD.

Download the full 30 page workbook in PDF format (421 Kb) at:

http://www.handicap-international.fr/kit-pedagogique/documents/ressourcesdocumentaires/apadoption/DisabilityRightsAdvocacyWorkbook2007.pdf

Find more resources related to the CRPD at:

https://wecando.wordpress.com/resources-toolkits-and-funding/#CRPD resources

And at the RatifyNow web site:

http://www.RatifyNow.org



We Can Do learned about the Disability Rights Advocacy Handbook (PDF format, 421 Kb) by browsing the AskSource.info database on health, disability, and development.

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RESOURCE: Brochure on People with Intellectual Disabilities and Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 22 April 2008. Filed under: Cognitive Impairments, Education, Families, Human Rights, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People with intellectual disabilities around the world face enormous challenges in realizing basic human rights such as access to education; legal capacity (the right to make their own decisions); the right to live with their families; and the right to live in the community–not an institution. The new disability rights treaty–the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)–is designed in part to help with these challenges. The CRPD, which has now been ratified by 24 countries, will enter into force on May 3, 2008 simultaneously with the Optional Protocol, which has been ratified by 14 countries.

But how can people with intellectual disabilities and their families use the CRPD to achieve their human rights? And how can people who create and implement policy support their efforts? A new brochure from Inclusion International (PDF format, 585 Kb) provides guidance. The eight-page brochure summarizes how people with intellectual disabilities and their families around the world helped to create the CRPD; how the CRPD helps address some of their key human rights concerns; and the important role of families in guiding, developing, and implementing policies.

The English version of the brochure can be downloaded in PDF format (585 Kb) at:

http://inclusion-international.org/site_uploads/File/HearOurVoices-Priority%20Web.08.pdf

The Arabic version of the brochure (without pictures) can be downloaded in Word format (515 Kb) at:

http://inclusion-international.org/site_uploads/File/CRPD%20arab.doc



We Can Do learned of this brochure through the Disabled People International (DPI) e-newsletter.

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NEWS: Disability Advocate, Gladys Charowa, Dies

Posted on 21 April 2008. Filed under: Children, Education, Human Rights, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following email was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC listserv, an email discussion group devoted to disability rights and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), as a tribute to fellow listserv member and disability rights advocate, Gladys Charowa.

Hi folks,

The vast majority of you will have seen many posts here from Gladys Charowa from the DWSO. She was a great supporter of the Convention and worked hard to ensure that her group were not going to be excluded from the Convention nor from the process.

It is with great sadness to that I have to inform you of Gladys Charowa who was the Executive Director of Disabled Women Support Organisation (Zimbabwe). Gladys suffered a stroke on the 6th of March and her health subsequently deteriorated leading to her death on the 7th of March, 2008 in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Gladys Charowa was involved in the disability movement since February 2002 during her rehabilitation in Harare after breaking her back in a car crash in December 2001. She was released from hospital in April 2002 after experiencing the conditions tolerated by the women who were also being rehabilitated. She decided to set up the Disabled Women Support Organisation (DWSO) after helping some of the service users at the centre; for example, she successfully petitioned an education examination board to allow a student with disabilities additional time to sit her examinations. Gladys wanted to challenge the traditional view that there is nothing that can be done to support women and girls who are spinally injured.

DWSO works alongside hospitals, often in rural areas, to provide support for individuals and their families to become both physically and financially independent; this includes training to sensitise the community, peer group education and micro-finance projects. DWSO is one of the first disability organisations to have projects in each of the 10 provinces of Zimbabwe.

DWSO also works with schools, setting up Disability Clubs and projects to help children and parents to increase their understanding of the needs of disabled people. Since 2002, she worked tirelessly as a disability activist fighting for poverty reduction, particularly among disabled women. Gladys was an active disability activist at both national and international level, and contributed immensely to disability related literature. Gladys will be greatly missed in disability activism and may her soul rest in peace after working so hard for a good cause.

Some of Gladys Charowa’s publications

(i) Reply to a statememt for discussion: investing in education for children with disabilities is economically not interesting

March 1, 2006 – Published by: Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development (DCDD), Available at http://www.dcdd.nl/default.asp?2905

(ii) Body blows: in the thick of Zimbabwe’s current turmoil, women with disabilities face hellish prejudice, hunger and rape. Gladys Charowa bears witness.(POVERTY & GENDER)(Column) – Published in New Internationalist, November 1, 2005

Best wishes,

Frank

Frank Mulcahy



Thank you to Frank Mulcahy of Ireland for sharing this sad news with the AdHoc_IDC listserv.

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RESOURCE: Tips, Strategies for Implementing Disability Rights Convention

Posted on 17 April 2008. Filed under: Children, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The international disability rights treaty, called the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), is about to enter into force this May 3, 2008. But a treaty is only a piece of paper–until and unless it is fully implemented. So how can the disability community, international development professionals, governments, and others ensure that the ratifying countries implement the CRPD?

The disability community and its allies can turn to another human rights community that has experience in successfully encouraging the implementation of another international human rights treaty–the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

In October 2007, a regional Middle East and North Africa consultation was held on children and the new CRPD in Sana’a, Yemen. On the final day of that consultation, international child rights advocate Gerison Lansdown gave tips and strategies for implementing the United Nations CRPD based on lessons learned from similar efforts in implementing the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The result of her lecture, and the subsequent question and answer session, was a fact sheet, now posted at the web site for the Child Rights Information Network.

The fact sheet outlines the obligations of governments and lists suggestions for how advocates, professionals, and other individuals and their organizations can take action and make change. For example, the public and the government should be taught about people with disabilities (including children) and their entitlement to equal recognition and dignity. Also, alliances should be built across various groups to work together on advocating for disability rights and the CRPD. This alliance could work on an “alternate report” on the human rights situation for disabled people in their country to be submitted to the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Read the full fact sheet on-line at:

http://www.crin.org/resources/infoDetail.asp?ID=15312&flag=news

We Can Do readers who read the fact sheet for themselves will notice that the recommendations include suggestions for working closely with the media. One training guide for African journalists might also be helpful for journalists in other regions.

We Can Do has descriptions and links to other CRPD-related resources and toolkits. For still more resources and background information about the CRPD, explore the RatifyNow.org web site and the Enable web site.



We Can Do first learned about this fact sheet on tips and strategies for implementing the CRPD by browsing the AskSource.info database on health,
disability, and development.

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FREE Websites for Disabled People Organizations (DPOs)

Posted on 16 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Funding, Human Rights, Opportunities, Resources, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following notice is being circulated by DANISHKADAH.

Greeting from DANISHKADAH (an organization for empowerment of Persons with Disabilities and Deafness)!

We at DANISHKADAH pleased to offer FREE websites for Disabled People Organizations (DPOs), this include hosting, domain, and development of accessible Web Pages. (Initially for Pakistani DPOs, but request from DPOs from other country may be entertained)

The aim of this project is to;

1. give exposure to least developed DPOs, who do not have resources to build and maintain their websites. And bring them up to be introduced.
2. making an accessible web based network of local / national DPOs and join that with international organizations.
3. keep everyone update about the activities of these DPOs, and promote collaboration among DPOs.
4. motivate and support DPOs for building pressure for ratification and implementation of UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), and monitor the changes.

By this letter we are inviting all of the DPOs to send their request for website, on predefined form. Please fill the form and email us at danishkadah@gmail.com, those who do not have access to internet can post filled form on given address.

Offer Detail:
FREE webhosting
FREE domain 1
FREE website (4-6 pages) 2
Added advantage:
– website will be built according to the web accessibility standards
– Possibility of having website in local language as well in English
– Get indexed on search engines and have better visibility of your organization on Internet
– More exposure in disability movement at national and international level
– build a better image of your organization, for donors and volunteers.

1 Sub-domain
2 you have to provide text and image (photos, logo) for your website

Regards
Muhammad Akram
Founder & Chairman
DANISHKADAH
http://www.danishkadah.org.pk/Projects/NetworkingDPO/index.html

WEB BASED NETWORKING OF DPOs
A project of DANISHKADAH
( FREE Accessible Web hosting and developing for DPOs )
REQUEST FORM

Our organization ____________________________________________________
(organization’s name)
would like to request DANISHKADAH for FREE hosting and development of accessible website for our DPOs.

From our side the contact person will be _________________________________
(name)
__________________________________, and he/she will provide the content for the website.

We understand that this offer is purely on voluntarily basis from DANISHKADAH and may be terminated, modified at anytime without any prior notice. We also understand that DANISHKADAH may add any link or content in our web pages, however the content provided by us may not be amended without our permission. And we affirm that we shall not hold or blame DANISHKADAH for any error or other reasons whatsoever.

_____________________ DPOs’ STAMP _____________________
Signature President General Secretary
Send to – danishkadah@gmail.com or post to

M. Arkram
Founder & Chairman
DANISHKADAH
Address: D-63, Blcok 8, Gulshan-e-Iqbal, Karachi-75300
Fax : ___________________

HOME | INTRODUCTION | PROJECTS | ACTIVITIES ARCHIVE | CONTACT
HOME: you can post recent news, invitation for your programs, and etc.
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1. Introduction
1.2. Vision, Mission, Objectives
1.3. Services (i.e special education, public awareness rising, rehabilitation, etc.)
1.4. Governing body (i.e. board of trustee, managing committee, whatever)
1.5. Membership (procedure detail and membership form if any)
1.6. Facts sheet
1.1.1. Established in _______
1.1.2. Registered with ______________ or non-registered NGO
1.1.3. Organization type – exclusively of / for deaf/blind/physically challenged, or mixed for all PWDs, or inclusive organization for PWDs and Non-PWDs
1.1.4. Total members, Male members, Female members, youth members (male / Female)
1.2. Wish list (if any)
2. PROJECTS (if any)
2.1. Existing project
2.1.1. Project 1, detail etc
2.1.2. Project 2, detail etc
2.2. Future project (planned)
2.2.1. Project 1 detail etc
2.2.2. Project 2 detail etc
3. ACTIVITIES AND NEWS ARCHIVE
3.1. 2008 Date wise activities such as;
3.1.1. December 3, 2007,
Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities
a very brief one paragraph report and a
PHOTO.
3.2. 2007
3.2.1. December 3, 2007,
Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities
a very brief one paragraph report and a
PHOTO.
3.2.2. September 11, 2007
Walk for the cause on International Day of Deaf Persons
a very brief on paragraph report and a
PHOTO
4. CONTACT
4.1. Address: _________________________________________
Phone: ____________________Fax: __________________
Mobile: __________________________________________
Email: ___________________________________________
Web: ____________________________________________

EXAMPLE
INTRODUCTION
Danishkadah is an NGO with a difference. Danishkadah means a place to learn / where wisdom excels. Danishkadah was established to empower persons with disabilities and deafness, and to work as a think-tank on disability related issues.

Danishkadah is not an ordinary Disabled People Organization (DPO) to chant slogans, or protest without proposing solutions. It is a non-political organization, which concentrates on issues and solutions. Our approach is inclusive working with all segments of the society.

We at Danishkadah believe in inclusion and collaboration with all the segments of society, i.e. Persons with Disabilities & Deafness (PWDDs), government, universities, media, corporate sector and general society. Without such collaboration, the ultimate goal of “accessible, barriers-free, and right base society” cannot be achieved.
Vision, Mission, Objectives
Our Vision
In our vision “knowledge is power”
Our Mission
Our mission is to empower Persons with Disabilities and Deafness (PWDD), so they can live better and independent lives. And our ultimate goal is “inclusive, barrier-free, and right based society” (Biwako Millennium framework – UNSCAPE)
Objective
1. Empower persons with Disabilities
2. Enhance technical skill in PWDs
3. Etc etc.
Services (i.e special education, public awareness rising, rehabilitation, etc.)
We offer following ;
• Basic literacy
• English Language
• Computer literacy
• Counseling
Governing body
Board or Trustee
• Mr. Muhammad Akram – Founder & Chairman
• Mr. Imranullah Shairrf – Member
• Mr. Muhammad Ashraf Member
Executive Committee
Mr. abc Secretary
…… …….
Membership (procedure detail and membership form if any)
Any one can become member by filling the given form and paying annual fee of Rs.10/-per year.
Facts sheet
Established in 2006
Registered with Registrar South Karachi
Organization type – an inclusive organization that welcome PWD and non-PWD alike
Total members 200, 150 Male , 50 Female, youth 100 male, 20 Female)
Wish list (if any)
– Computer laboratory
– Books
– etc
Note: You can attach a photo of your organization or group photo of your team to be displayed at top of introduction, and individual photo of your governing body to be displayed with each name.



Thank you to DANISHKADAH for circulating this notice. Please remember that applications or inquiries related to this opportunity should all be directed to DANISHKADAH at danishkadah@gmail.com, not We Can Do.

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FORUM: Disability Rights Treaty and ICT Standards

Posted on 15 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Opportunities, technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies
An Advocacy Initiative of the United Nations Global Alliance for ICT and Development

In conjunction with the

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION UNION

INVITATION

Joint ITU and G3ict Forum 2008
The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Challenges and Opportunities for ICT Standards

Monday, April 21, 2008
ITU Headquarters, Geneva

Please find a detailed agenda for the Forum on the subsequent pages of this invitation.

For further information, please contact:
Francesca Cesa Bianchi, Director of External Relations, G3ict
By Phone: +1 404-446-4160 By E-mail: fcesabianchi@g3ict.com

Advanced registration kindly requested

Introduction
The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is one of the fastest human rights treaties ever adopted. It was developed with the active participation of country delegations and NGOs representing persons with disabilities, and includes a number of detailed mandates related to accessible and assistive Information and Communication and Information Technologies (ICTs).

Today, ICT devices such as personal computers, fixed and mobile telephones and television are widespread, with over one billion people, globally, having access to the Internet. An increasing number of applications and services for e-commerce, e-government, transportation, public services, health services, cultural life and leisure are delivered electronically. However many of these services are developed without consideration of the needs of the 10 per cent of the world population with disabilities. This directly impacts the rights of these persons. The Forum will explore the likely impact of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on the evolution of ICT standards with the active participation of industry, Standards Development Organizations (SDOs), NGOs, and other interested parties. It is addressed to leaders overseeing accessibility standards issues, representatives from the industry, SDOs, NGOs representing persons with disabilities, research institutions, assistive technology developers, governments and academia.

Objectives
* Review existing and in-progress technology standards and standardization of product development methodologies.
* Discuss the role of public policy and procurement in support of standardization and the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
* Identify follow-up actions to facilitate the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Expected Outcome of Meeting
Review and document the areas of standardization which match the mandates of the Convention and explore critical gaps. Receive feedback and suggestions from industry, policymakers and NGOs to explore how they can best support the work of SDOs in fostering greater accessibility of ICTs.

Information and Documentation
Registration for this event will be carried out exclusively online at the following URL:
http://itu.int/ITU-T/worksem/accessibility/200804/registration.html

ITU-T Web site for the event: http://itu.int/ITU-T/worksem/accessibility/200804

G3ict Web site: www.g3ict.com

ITU Headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland (Rue de VarembÈ 2)

AGENDA

8:30 ñ 9:00 Registration
9:00 ñ 10:00 Opening Session

Session Chair: Pierre-AndrÈ Probst, Chairman ITU-T Study Group 16

* Welcome address, Malcolm Johnson, Director, ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector
* Remarks, Yury Grin, Deputy to the Director, Telecommunication Development Sector (BDT)
* Importance of accessible ICTs to developing countries, ITU Standardization Development Sector (TBC)
* Greetings from G3ict supporting organizations
* The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in the context of global market demographics, Axel Leblois, Executive Director, G3ict
* Latest developments in harmonization and standardization of accessible and assistive ICTs and the SWG-A standards inventory, JosÈe Auber and Alex Li, ISO/IEC SWG-A

10:00 ñ 11:00 Session 1 – Human interfaces: design for accessible ICTs.
Recent evolution of accessibility features and standards, standards supporting assistive technologies, gaps, and opportunities.

Session Chair: Whitney Quesenbery, President, Usability Professionalsí Association
* ISO work on Ergonomics for accessible ICTs, Tom Stewart, Chairman, TC 159/ SC†4, “Ergonomics of human-system interaction”

* Pluggable user interfaces and virtual AT and RTF initiative: a new approach to user interface, Gregg Vanderheiden, Ph.D., Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Chair, INCITS/V2 and Vice-chair, ISO/IEC, JTC 1/SC35
* ETSI Human Factor activities in the European context, Stephen Furner, Chairman, ETSI Technical Committee Human Factors
* Designing for universal accessibility, Bill Curtis-Davidson, Business Development and Solutions Leader, IBM Worldwide Human Ability and Accessibility Center

11:00 ñ 11:15 Coffee break

11:15 ñ 12:30 Session 2 – Accessible contents and services: addressing information deprivation
W3C initiatives, globalization of web standardization efforts, issues in ensuring compliance with accessibility standards (lack of awareness, speed of technology development, lack of training of web developers etc.); digital television and digital radio opportunities.

Session Chair: Eric Velleman, Director, BartimÈus Accessibility Foundation

* An analysis of the effects of content deprivation, Martin Gould, Director of Research and Technology, National Council on Disability
* DAISY Consortium, Hiroshi Kawamura, President, DAISY Consortium
* Web Accessibility Initiative, WAI/W3C, Judy Brewer, Director, Web Accessibility Initiative, World Wide Web Consortium (WAI/W3C) (via Web cast from Beijing, P.R. China)
* IPTV standardization, features and gaps, Clive Miller, Technical Broadcasting and Engineering Consultant, RNIB

12:30 ñ 14:00 Lunch break and knowledge fair

14:00 ñ 15:00 Session 3 – Mobility: Wireless Devices and Phones, accessibility and assistive functionalities.

Session Chair: Jim Tobias, President, Inclusive Technologies

* A mobile operatorís perspective in Japan, Yoshinobu Nakamura, NTT DoCoMo
* Windows Mobile, Sean Hayes, Incubation Lab Accessibility Business Unit, Microsoft
* Open source opportunities for accessibility and assistive functionalities – Android, Clayton Lewis, Ph..D., Professor of Computer Science, Scientist in Residence, Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities, University of Colorado
* Perspectives from hand-sets manufacturer (TBC)

15:00 ñ 16:00 Session 4 – Product development methodologies.
Ensuring that products are designed with accessibility features at an early stage, use of universal design methodologies.

Session Chair: Chiara Giovannini, Program Manager, European Association Representing Consumers in Standardization (ANEC)

* ITU-T SG 16 work on accessibility guidelines in standards, Gunnar Hellstrˆm, ITU
* Good practices perspective: development methodologies can take into account accessibility, Roman Longoria, Vice President, Computer Associates
* Extension of ISO 9000 product quality standards for accessibility in products, Sean McCurtain, Head, Conformity Assessment, ISO

16:00 ñ 16:15 Coffee break

16:15 ñ 17:15 Session 5 – The role of government in supporting accessibility standards.
Public procurement, regulations, and incentives in support of accessibility standards for ICTs.

Session Chair: Kevin Carey, Director, humanITy, and Vice Chair, Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB)

* Survey of government actions in supporting accessibility, Cynthia D. Waddell, Executive Director, International Center for Disability Resources on the Internet (ICDRI)
* U.S. Telecommunications and Electronic and Information Technology Advisory Committee (TEITAC) work on accessibility standards, Jim Tobias, Co-chair, TEITAC and President, Inclusive Technologies
* EU work on accessibility standards, Inmaculada Placencia Porrero and Martina Sindelar, European Commission Directorate General Employment, Social Affairs, and Equal Opportunities

17:15 ñ 18:00 Conclusions, recommendations and suggested follow-up

Session Chair: His Excellency Luis Gallegos, Ambassador of Ecuador to the United States; Past Chair of the UN General Assembly Ad-hoc Preparatory Committee for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and Chair, G3ict

1) Conclusions by session chairs
2) Feedback from Industry, Frances West, IBM Human Ability and Accessibility Center
3) NGOs, Standards Development Organizations and Government leaders on follow-up steps

Summary of conclusions and recommendations, His Excellency Luis Gallegos, Ambassador of Ecuador to the United States and Chair, G3ict

G3ict is a Flagship Advocacy Initiative of the
United Nations Global Alliance for ICT and Development
led by the Wireless Internet Institute
50 Hurt Plaza SE, Suite 806 Atlanta, GA 30303, U.S.A.
Tel: +1 404 446-4160 Fax: +1 404 446 4173
Web site: www.g3ict.com



The above announcement is taken in full from a notice circulated recently on the <a href=”http://www.worldbank.org/disability/gpddGlobal Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) listserv.

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NEWS: Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum Founded

Posted on 8 April 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Ghulam Nabi Nizamani has asked that people circulate the following press release.

COMMONWEALTH DISABLED PEOPLES’ FORUM

Press Release

A New Voice Shouts to the Commonwealth –
Nothing About us Without Us.

Disabled youth and adult people from 16 Commonwealth countries came together from 15-17 March, 2008 in London to launch a unique Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum (1), the purposes of which will be to provide a link between disabled people’s organisations in all Commonwealth countries and all the political structures of the Commonwealth.

At the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in October 2007 the civil society challenge to CHOGM was to mainstream disability in sustainable development, to ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (CRPD) and to adopt disability inclusive policies. This cannot be achieved without a strong, democratic forum of disabled youth and adults to ensure implementation.

We had a vibrant and dynamic series of meetings to consolidate the vision, constitution and activities of the Forum (2). The youth met separately to devise their own creative methods of self representation and organisation. We came together in a final agreement of how to go forward together. It is essential that the voice of young disabled people is heard clearly in the work of the CDPF. They are the future leaders and builders of our shared vision of a Commonwealth built on equality, human rights and respect for diversity.

The major focus of our work in the next two years, including a major conference before CHOGM in 2009, will be to ensure that Commonwealth countries sign, ratify and implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. As Rachel Kachaje said at the Launch of the CDPF, hosted by the Commonwealth Foundation at Marlborough House,
‘Disabled people see that hope springs out of the convention – hope for a new, inclusive world where disabled people can be seen as fully human’

We, All Sanghar Handicaps’ Association Pakistan are very proud to have part of this exciting new beginning and look forward to working with our disabled colleagues to ensure our full inclusion in all the nations of our shared Commonwealth.

For further information contact:
Ghulam Nabi Nizamani
South Asia /South East Asia Regional Representative
Bakhoro Road Sanghar-68100, Pakistan. (3)
Ph # +92-333-2916281
Email: ghulamnabi.nizamani@gmail.com (4)

(1) This meeting was funded by the Commonwealth Foundation, DFID, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and ADD.
(2) Officers elected were: Chair: James Mwanda (Uganda), Vice Chair: George Daniel (Tinidad & Tobago), Secretary: Javed Abidi (India), Treasurer: Richard Rieser (UK), Women’s Representative: Rachel Kachaje, (Malawi) Youth Representatives: Laura Kanusu (Uganda)
George Kasara (Kenya), Regional Representatives: Ghulam Nabi Nizaamani (Pakistan), Lesley Emmanuel (Antigua), Setareki Macanawai (Fiji), Steve Estey (Canada) Thomas Ongolo (South Africa).
(3) The registered office of the CDPF will be in India and there will be a liaison office in the UK to work directly with the Commonwealth Secretariat and Foundation.
(4) This email address can be changed after website of CDPF.



In addition to the above press release, Ghulam Nabi Nizamani also made the following note in mid March:

The following countries from South Asia and South East Asia are member countries of Commonwealth. These Countries are invited to submit application for Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum (CDPF) Country Focal Point.
Bangladesh
Brunei Darussalam
India
Malaysia
Maldives
Pakistan
Singapore
Sri Lanka

The Organization must be National Level Organization in respective country if in any country there will be no National Organization we will support to encourage to estabilish National organization in that country. Please also send establishment date of Organization, Network in the Country, Some credible work done in past. Please send information by mail or email before the first week of April 2008.

Cheers!
Ghulam Nabi Nizamani
Regional Representative CDPF
South and South East Asia

Note: We have no contact from Brunei Darussalam please help us for finding National organization there.



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for sharing the above press release. Any inquiries should please be emailed to him directly at ghulamnabi.nizamani@gmail.com.

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RESOURCE: AIFO, DPI Release Training Manual on Human Rights for Persons with Disabilities

Posted on 4 April 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

In recent months, many new training manuals have been released targeted at those who wish to train themselves or others in the human rights of people with disabilities, with a particular focus on the new international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The latest of these, entitled “The Training Manual on Human Rights for Persons with Disabilities,” (PDF format, 617 Kb) was launched in March by AIFO (Italian Association Amici di Raoul Follereau) and DPI (Disabled Peoples International) Italy in collaboration with the Mongolian National Federation of Organizations of Persons with Disabilities, with financial contributions from the United Nations.

The new training manual, available in both English and Mongolian, is meant to promote the participation of people with disabilities and their families in ratifying and implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). AIFO and DPI also are supervising the translation of the manual into French, Spanish, and Portuguese. (I was unable to find the Mongolian text on-line; if someone knows of a link, please let me know using the comments area below.)

Some of the front material (foreword, introduction, etc.), to my mind at least, is marred by clumsy writing. Either the foreword or the introduction or both should, for example, clarify precisely the intended audience for the training manual. Yes, the description given by Disabled People International states that the manual is meant to help people with disabilities and their families. But are they meant to read the training manual directly? Or is the manual meant to be read by trainers who then use the manual as a guide in training the target audience? From reading the main body of the manual I would guess the latter. But this information is not made immediately clear for the casual reader.

However, The Training Manual on Human Rights for Persons with Disabilities (PDF format, 617 Kb) does have some redeeming content. For example, it begins with a brief history of the United Nations and other international institutions related to disability and human rights. It then reviews why human rights conventions matter and in what ways they can help create change. It provides a history of people with disabilities and explains how the more modern human rights perspective differs from older attitudes. This kind of information provides helpful background content for the reader that can help in understanding the relevance and importance of the CRPD. It then guides the reader through a summary of the 50 articles of the CRPD with suggested teaching points for each. Perhaps the most helpful part of the manual are its extensive appendices, which point readers at a rich collection of documents and web sites on human rights, including disability rights.

Some of the guidance this manual offers for would-be trainers is very broad. For example, one passage says this, “Underline the importance of statistics concerning disability [….] Illustrate the condition of the people with disabilities of the country in various areas related to rights using the available data, publications and reports.” (Section 2.4.1) However, the manual does not–at least in my admittedly superficial review–point readers to resources that could help them locate statistics relevant to their country. Nor does it suggest how trainers might improvise if relevant statistics for their country are either non-existent or of poor quality.

The vagueness of its advice suggests that this training manual may be most helpful to people who are already very knowledgeable about disability and disability rights, including how to locate additional information relevant to the training they wish to provide. It is probably also most helpful to individuals who already have prior experience in independently designing their own lectures and workshop activities with minimal guidance. Because minimal guidance is all it provides.

Would-be trainers who need concretely detailed teaching content, a suggested training schedule, or other structured guidance may be better off consulting some of the other materials that have become available within the past year. (See further below for suggested links.)

The Training Manual on Human Rights for Persons with Disabilities (617 Kb) can be downloaded for free in PDF format at:

http://www.aifo.it/english/resources/online/books/cbr/manual_human_rights-disability-eng07.pdf

Those of you who prefer to draw upon more structured lesson plans, or who have too little time to develop your own handouts or power point programs, may wish to consider linking to one or both of these (click on the relevant title that you want):

Training Manual in Disability Human Rights
Teaching Kit on International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Also consult the guide to

Resources and Toolkits on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)



We Can Do learned about the AIFO/DPI Training Manual on Human Rights for Persons with Disabilities (PDF format, 617 Kb) via the Disabled Peoples International electronic newsletter, which is available for free.

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NEWS: 20th Nation Ratifies International Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 4 April 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

RatifyNow has reported that Ecuador became the 20th nation to ratify the international disability rights treaty, known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), earlier today on April 3, 2008. It also became the 13th nation to ratify the accompanying Optional Protocol. Accordingly, both the CRPD and the Optional Protocol will enter into force 30 days from now. This means that countries ratifying the CRPD will now be obligated to obey it, as will countries ratifying the Optional Protocols.

RatifyNow has a story about the newest ratification; why this is a historic milestone for the international disability community; how countries and people with disabilities will be affected; how ordinary citizens like YOU can help push for more countries to ratify the CRPD and then implement it fully; and how you can become involved in the ratification movement at:

http://ratifynow.org/2008/04/03/ecuador-the-20th-country-ratifies-the-crpd-…-now-what/

Also, the United Nationas, the International Disability Alliance, and RatifyNow are all planning events to celebrate the CRPD entering into force in both New York City and Washington DC on May 12. 2008. Return to the RatifyNow.org web site for further details.

Also, read the official United Nations (UN) story, including a quote from the Secretary General of the UN, Ban Ki-moon, at:

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=26199&Cr=disab&Cr1=convention



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NEWS: Tunisia 19th to Ratify Intl Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 2 April 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, News | Tags: , , , , , , |

RatifyNow has announced that Tunisia ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) earlier today. This North African nation is the 19th country to ratify the first legally-binding international human rights instrument. Thirty days after the 20th nation ratifies the CRPD, the human rights treaty will go into force–meaning that all ratifying nations will be obliged to obey it from that point on.

The 20th ratification is expected to happen very, very soon. The milestone ratification will be announced at RatifyNow.org as soon as possible after it occurs and is confirmed with trusted sources.

Among the 19 countries to ratify the CRPD, 11 also have ratified the accompanying Optional Protocol. The Optional Protocol gives people with disabilities in ratifying countries the option to pursue redress (justice) at the international level if their rights continue to be violated under the CRPD. The Optional Protocol will enter into force at the same time as the CRPD, 30 days after the 20th ratification of the CRPD.

Both the CRPD and the Optional Protocol will be legally binding only for countries that choose to ratify them. However, 126 countries have signed the CRPD and 71 have signed the Optional Protocol. Signing either treaty is a country’s way of signaling interest in ratifying it at a future date. Becoming a signatory country also obligates a nation to avoid pursuing any new action that could directly violate the treaty.

Find out if your country is among the signatories at

http://www.un.org/disabilities/countries.asp?navid=12&pid=166

Learn more about the CRPD by reading the RatifyNow FAQ at:

http://ratifynow.org/ratifynow-faq/

And learn about the Optional Protocol at:

http://ratifynow.org/un-convention/the-optional-protocol/

Check the RatifyNow.org web site soon to learn about upcoming events to celebrate and promote the CRPD on or near May 12.

Are you planning an event related to the CRPD in your country? RatifyNow would like to know at RatifyNow@gmail.com!

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NEWS: International Coalition Launches Groundbreaking Disability Rights Fund

Posted on 2 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

PRESS RELEASE

International Coalition Launches Groundbreaking Disability Rights Fund
MARCH 31, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Diana Samarasan, Director
Telephone: 617-261-4593
Email: dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org

BOSTON, MA – The Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the United Kingdom Department for International Development, and an anonymous donor today announced a groundbreaking collaborative to support the human rights for people with disabilities.

Launched on the first anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD), the Disability Rights Fund will provide financial support for human rights advocacy in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union. The broad objective of the Fund will be to empower disabled persons organizations around the world to effectively implement and monitor the CPRD. The Fund is a project of Tides.

“The Fund is a unique partnership among donors and the worldwide disability community,” said Emily Martinez, Director of Special Initiatives at the Open Society Institute. “It will directly support the human rights work of disabled persons organizations in the developing world.”

The CRPD recognizes that self-representation is essential to the enjoyment of human rights. It underscores the importance of including people with disabilities in the development of disability law, policies and programs. Through its unique governance structure, the Disability Rights Fund incorporates this principle.

A global advisory panel, made up of 12 individuals, most of whom are persons with disabilities, will provide recommendations on grantmaking strategies for the Fund; four of the Panel members will also serve on the Fund’s grantmaking decision body. The members of the panel come from five continents and reflect a broad cross-section of the disability community. The majority were nominated by international and regional disabled persons organizations.

The structure of the Fund not only reflects the international disability community’s slogan, “Nothing About Us Without Us,” it also reflects a growing trend within the grantmaking community to better listen to the communities they seek to serve and to redefine the relationship between grantmaker and grantee in the interest of more effective grantmaking.

Grants disbursed by the Disability Rights Fund will be centered on three major areas: increasing the participation of persons with disabilities in their communities through trainings and networking opportunities; developing awareness of the CPRD among stakeholders; and supporting advocacy projects that promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights by persons with disabilities. The Fund expects to make its first grants in late spring/early summer 2008.

“The broad, international support for the Disability Rights Fund is a remarkable characteristic of this grantmaking enterprise. It is our hope that this diversity in funding sources will expand as the Fund develops,” said Diana Samarasan, Director of the Fund.

####



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for sending this press release to We Can Do.

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NEWS: Jordan Ratifies CRPD

Posted on 1 April 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, News | Tags: , , , , , , , |

RatifyNow has now announced that Jordan ratified the international disabilities rights treaty, called the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) yesterday, March 31, 2008.

Regular We Can Do readers will know that the CRPD is the first international legally binding human rights instrument to protect people with disabilities. It protects the rights of people with disabilities to have access to education and health services; to be free from torture and other forms of abuse; to have the right to make their own choices about what medical treatment they will accept or refuse; the right to live in the community; and more.

As of this writing (April 1 … and, no, not April Fool’s), the United Nations Enable web site has not yet announced Jordan’s ratification. But contacts within the ratification movement were able to verify the news with the UN Secretariat.

The CRPD needs to be ratified by a total of 20 countries before it can become legally enforceable, then it will go into effect 30 days later. Jordan is the 18th country to ratify since the treaty was opened for countries to sign and ratify. The other 17 ratifying countries include Bangladesh, Croatia, Cuba, El Salvador, Gabon, Guinea, Hungary, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Namibia, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, San Marino, South Africa, and Spain.

In addition to 18 ratifications, 126 countries have signed the CRPD. Signing an international treaty does not oblige a country to obey it. In order to be legally bound by a treaty, a country must ratify it. However, signing a treaty does send a signal that the country is interested in ratifying the treaty in the future. It also commits the country to avoiding any action that would violate the spirit of the treaty.

Keep watching this space for the next two ratifications, possibly within a week. Also watch for upcoming announcements on how RatifyNow plans to celebrate and promote the CRPD when it goes into effect 30 days after the 20th ratification.

Consult the RatifyNow FAQ to learn more about the CRPD, how it is meant to help people with disabilities, and how the ratification process works.



This text is taken with slight modifications from the RatifyNow.org web site with permission of author.

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Read the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008 on the International Disability Rights Treaty!

Posted on 29 March 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Mobility Impariments, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

From Australia … from the USA … from India … from New Zealand … from Fiji … from the Philippines …

Writers and bloggers from around the world joined together to help celebrate and promote the first legally binding international human rights instrument to protect the rights of people with disabilities — the international disability rights treaty, called the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

They celebrated by writing blog posts for the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008, which can now be read at
http://ratifynow.org/2008/03/29/ratifynow-crpd-blog-swarm-2008/

What did they write about? Some of the topics include …

… The story of one advocate who watched the birth of the CRPD among grassroots advocates with disabilities and others in the 1990s …
… How the CRPD could deliver new hope for people in India with mental disabilities …
… How the CRPD represents an evolution from the charity/medical model of disability to the social or human rights-based model …
… How the CRPD could make travel go a little more smoothly for tourists with disabilities …
… Why the CRPD matters for people who use personal assistance services or who are seeking the freedom to explore their own sexual expression …
… An allegorical tale about farmers, spoons, and plows: Why the CRPD is well worth celebrating and why our work isn’t done just because the CRPD is about to take full legal force …
… And more …

All at the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008, and all available by following the link to:

http://ratifynow.org/2008/03/29/ratifynow-crpd-blog-swarm-2008/

Celebrate and learn about the CRPD through the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008.

Then invite other people to do the same. Please circulate this notice or post it at your blog or web site — with, of course, a link to the blog swarm at

http://ratifynow.org/2008/03/29/ratifynow-crpd-blog-swarm-2008/

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OPINION: The Farmer, the Spoon, and the Plow

Posted on 29 March 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

The Farmer, the Spoon, and the Plow: Why the International Disability Rights Treaty (CRPD) is Worth Celebrating

This allegorical tale is meant to highlight why the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is well worth celebrating—and why our work isn’t done just because it’s about to enter into force.

Historical Note: The CRPD is an international treaty intended to protect a wide range of human rights for people with disabilities, including the right to live in the community (not an institution), to have access to public services, to be free of discrimination, and more. It does not create new rights. Rather, it is meant to ensure that people with disabilities are able to access the same rights that other people in their country already enjoy. This tale was written a month before the CRPD first entered into force on May 3, 2008, with 20 ratifying countries. Today, in October 2009, more than 70 countries have ratified the CRPD and more than 140 countries have signed it. The full text of the CRPD, and a full list of countries signing or ratifying the CRPD, is available at http://www.un.org/disabilities. A country is not fully obligated to obey the treaty until after it not only signs but also ratifies the CRPD.

Before the CRPD Was Created
Once upon a time, there were 650 million farmers who tended to thousands of fields in 200 nations. Some of the fields were more fertile than other fields. Some received more rain and sun than others. Some fields were filled with rocks and other obstacles that made it very hard for farmers to plant and harvest food. In order to do any plowing, the farmers first had to remove the stones. All the fields were very large: it could easily take a farmer many years to finish plowing or harvesting even the smallest field. But even in size, the fields varied greatly.

It was not only the fields that were so dramatically different from each other. Each farmer also had a different set of tools. Some farmers had only tiny teaspoons, some of which were broken and not even working properly. Some farmers had table spoons or even large stirring spoons. A few farmers had been taught how to make shovels and were able to use those.

Farmers with shovels were usually able to plow their fields more quickly than farmers with teaspoons. But sometimes a farmer with a shovel had to clear away so many stones from her field that she would finish far less plowing than a farmer with only a teaspoon but an easier field.

But all the farmers were frustrated. No matter how easy their field was to plow, or how fertile it was, or how much dirt their spoons could hold, all their fields were simply too large to complete with the tools they had. Some farmers despaired of their task, gave up completely, and starved. Some farmers continued to work in grim determination and were able to grow a little food for their trouble. But it was never enough—not because they were lazy or greedy but simply because their tools weren’t powerful enough.

Creating the CRPD; Signing it; Ratifying it
Some of the farmers decided to do something about their deplorable living conditions. These farmers worked together to build a set of plows and agreed to make all the plows available to any farmer who needed them. They named their set of plows the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Sometimes they referred to them more informally as the international disability rights treaty. Or they refered to them as the CRPD for short.

Some of the farmers lived in governments that usually did little to invest in the needs of their farmers. Consequently, these governments choose not to allow their farmers to use the new plows at all. Some of the farmers who had been forbidden to use the plows banded together into various national and international organizations, such as RatifyNow, to pressure their governments to deliver the plows to them. In some cases, the farmers have had success and can now use the CRPD. In other cases, the farmers are still fighting but are experiencing progress.

Some governments made promises to buy these new plows for their farmers. But then they locked the plows into a shed and never got around to allowing the farmers to actually use them. In some cases, farmers in these countries decided the plows were useless for them. After all, their government had bought the plows, but the plows accomplished nothing for them.

In other cases, the farmers realized that the plows themselves were not flawed–the real problem was in the fact that the plows were not being used. They, too, organized themselves to put pressure on their governments to make better use of the plows. After many years of hard work, they convinced their governments to unlock the plows so they could be used.

Now We Have the CRPD, Our Work is Done. Or is it?
Some farmers were allowed to use the plows but did not understand why they would want to. “Look, we already have tools for plowing our fields,” they said. “And what good have they done for us? They still take forever to use. Why would a plow be any better?” They ignored the plows and continued using the tools they knew. They continued to have all the same troubles they had before the plows were built.

Other farmers, at first, were thrilled to have the plows. They allowed the plow to sit in their fields and immediately stopped working. “The plow will take care of all our problems now,” they said. “After, that’s what it’s meant to do, isn’t it? It will fight our poverty and starvation for us. When our governments try to oppress us with harmful laws and regulations, it will fight back for us. When schools deny our children the right to enter the classroom, or when clinics refuse to provide us with health services, then the plows will tell them to stop discriminating against us. The schools and clinics will immediately obey the plows and give us our rights. It’s as simple as that.”

After a few years of allowing their plows to sit untended in their fields, these farmers realized that their fields were still unplowed. The farmers, for their part, were still poor and hungry, their children were still uneducated, and their families were still sick.

They became angry and blamed the plows for being faulty. They sneered at the plows and at the people who had built them. “These plows sure look pretty, but what good are they?” These farmers said. “What do they actually accomplish? If these plows are so wonderful then why are we still poor, hungry, uneducated, and sick?” They abandoned the plows, and so the plows did nothing for them.

Why Do We Need to Learn About the CRPD?
Another group of farmers started using the plows, but they didn’t read the instruction manual that came with them. They did the best they could without the instruction manual. Sometimes they found that they did accomplish more with the plows than they ever had with their spoons and shovels. But still, they were severely disappointed. The plows were not nearly as productive for them as they had initially hoped. They continued using the plows because it was what they had, but they became angry that the plows accomplished so little for them.

Fully Implementing the CRPD
Yet another group of farmers were careful to read the instruction manual thoroughly. They used every feature the plows had in every situation for which these features were helpful.

Farming still did not become magically easy for any of the farmers. They still had to work very hard. Some farmers still had far larger fields than other farmers, and thus took longer to finish their work. Some farmers had to work very slowly because they had to spend so much time clearing away stones before they could use their plows at all. These farmers, too, took longer than other farmers to finish their work.

But all the farmers found that their plows were a vast improvement over the tools they had used before. They were thrilled with the plows and decided to celebrate them.

The Moral of the Tale
So what’s the moral of this allegorical tale?

First, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is potentially a very powerful tool that could accomplish a great deal for people with disabilities around the world. That’s a good thing because the world’s 650 million disabled people are far more likely to live in poverty, or be targeted for violence, or be left behind during natural disasters and wars. The CRPD, if properly understood and properly used, could help with all of these challenges.

But, second, it is only a tool and nothing more. It’s not a magic wand or an instant cure for all that ails. A plow cannot help a farmer if the farmer has no access to it; similarly, the CRPD will be of limited help to people with disabilities if not enough countries ratify it. 

A plow continues to be useless if it is locked up in a shed. Similarly, even a ratified human rights treaty is useless if governments fail to take responsibility for implementing it. Governments must not merely ratify the CRPD but also create and pass laws that are consistent with the CRPD. Governments must abolish laws that are inconsistent with its intent and spirit. And governments must enforce its laws by taking action when they are violated.

The Importance of Grassroots Action
But it is not only governments that must take responsibility for the success of the CRPD. Ordinary citizens, with or without disabilities, must take responsibility for reading the instruction manual—in other words, educating themselves about the CRPD. Then they must learn how to use the CRPD to its maximum potential.

For example, if they realize that disabled people in their country are being denied the chance to go to school, they can go to their government and to the schools and teachers themselves to argue, “The CRPD requires that disabled people have the right to an education. This country has ratified the CRPD. Therefore, if disabled people still face barriers to obtaining an education, then the government and schools are failing in their legal obligations.” This argument could help persuade governments to create better laws, persuade schools to create better policies, and teachers to reconsider their teaching practices.

But organizations can only use these arguments if they first understand that the CRPD addresses the right to an education (see article 24 in the CRPD).

Removing Stones From the Field
Furthermore, people must be prepared to identify and remove obstacles that make it harder to fully implement the CRPD. In other words, they still need to find and remove the stones from their field. The CRPD cannot do this for them.

For example, attitudes and beliefs about disabled people are often a barrier to the full achievement of human rights even after good-quality laws might be put in place. If too many people mistakenly believe that people with disabilities cannot be productive, then few employers will give jobs to disabled people no matter what the law says. This is an obstacle that must be removed before the CRPD can be fully effective.

Article 8 of the CRPD, in fact, clearly acknowledges the importance of attitudes as a potential barrier to the success of the CRPD. This article calls upon ratifying governments to raise awareness in general society about the rights of persons with disabilities.

But the best teachers about the true capability of people with disabilities are people with disabilities themselves. The government can only support the work of educating the public and provide the resources to help make it happen. The disability community still needs to take the lead.

Achieving Human Rights
Just like farmers could still tend to their fields without a plow, disability advocates could still advocate for their rights without the CRPD. But in both cases, their work will be much harder without the proper tools.

Farmers who fail to use their plows will fail to accomplish anything with them. And farmers who fail to remove the stones from their fields will not get very far either. Similarly, disability advocates will not benefit from the CRPD if they do not learn how to use it, or if they neglect to remove the barriers that are blocking the CRPD from success.

But once they do these things, they will start to unleash the true power of the CRPD. It will still take many long years of hard work to realize the full potential of the CRPD. But during these years of sweat and tears, disability advocates can potentially accomplish far more with the CRPD than they could without it.

That’s why it’s worth celebrating the CRPD.



This blog post was written as a contribution for the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008, which was organized to help celebrate and promote the CRPD. A blog swarm is an event in which multiple bloggers or writers agree to write about the same topic at about the same time—in this case, about the CRPD. Please follow the link to read the other entries in the blog swarm.

http://ratifynow.org/2008/03/29/ratifynow-crpd-blog-swarm-2008/

You can also educate yourself about the CRPD by reading the RatifyNow FAQ.

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Write to Celebrate and Promote the International Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 26 March 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , |

You may recall from earlier publicity that RatifyNow.org is organizing a “blog swarm” in which bloggers/vloggers and writers agree to write or vlog about the same topic at about the same time. In this case, the purpose is to celebrate, promote, and educate people about the international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). I am posting this announcement here because I hope to entice more people from AFRICA, ASIA, LATIN AMERICA, the MIDDLE EAST, and elsewhere to participate. Perhaps you could write about how the CRPD relates to your work in fighting poverty or promoting human rights among people with disabilities in your country.

For those of you who are thinking about writing a contribution for the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008, RatifyNow posted a small “taste” of what a few of the early contributers have submitted already at:

http://ratifynow.org/2008/03/25/sneak-preview-for-the-upcoming-ratifynow-crpd-blog-swarm-2008/

This is not the real thing. The actual blog swarm is still scheduled to go live on March 30 in New Zealand time. (In the rest of the world, it will still be the 29th.) RatifyNow is sharing this small sampling from among the early submissions in the hope that they will help inspire others to write more blog posts to supplement them.

Learn more about the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008 and how YOU can participate at:

http://ratifynow.org/latest-news/blog-swarm/

Contributions can be submitted to RatifyNow@gmail.com. Please use the phrase “BLOG SWARM” somewhere in your subject line. If you have a blog, send the exact URL for your vlog or blog post, your name (or screen name), and the name of your blog. If you don’t have a blog then send the full text of your blog post, your name (or desired screen name), and a SHORT suggested title for your blog post. RatifyNow will try to find a home for it.

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RESOURCE: How to Develop Civil Rights Law for Disabled People in Your Country

Posted on 25 March 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Democratic Participation, Human Rights, Policy & Legislation, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Every day in your country, people with disabilities experience discrimination and human rights violations. This discrimination prevents disabled people from obtaining an education, receiving health care, finding jobs, and participating in community events. You know that some countries have civil rights laws that make it illegal to discriminate against disabled people. Would these kinds of civil rights laws be useful for your country as well? If so, how do you write an effective law and persuade your government to pass it?

A guide from the UK-based Disability Awareness in Action (DAA), entitled Civil Rights Law and Disabled People, can help you answer these and other associated questions. The answers may not be what you think. For example, some people assume a law will be helpful in their country because it has worked well in another country. But different historical and cultural contexts can mean that different countries may need different combinations of approaches to ending discrimination. Civil rights law is not the only approach.

If you do decide that your country needs a civil rights law, then the DAA guide offers advice on how you can campaign to make other people recognize disability as an important issue. If your country allows citizens to write legislation, then the Civil Rights Law and Disabled People guide can advise on how to write an effective law. It is important, for example, to offer a clear definition of who is “disabled,” or what it means to “discriminate,” or how a business, government agency, or other entity can stop discriminating against disabled people.

Toward the end of the guide, you can read several examples of how civil rights laws from several different countries have defined “disability” or “disabled person.”

You can read the complete guide at

http://www.daa.org.uk/publications/Reskit7.htm

In addition, it may also be helpful to read civil rights laws protecting people with disabilities from other countries around the world. There are several resources on-line that can help you find out what other the law says about people with disabilities in other countries:

https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/01/15/resource-finding-disability-related-laws-and-policies/

Has your country ratified the international disability rights treaty, called the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)? If so, your country may be legally obligated to abolish laws that discriminate against disabled people, or to create laws that protect your human rights.

Signing the CRPD is not the same as ratifying it. When a country signs the CRPD, it is not legally bound by it. But, signing the CRPD does show that a country is interested in ratifying it later. It also commits the country to avoiding any actions that would be against the spirit of the CRPD. Also, in some cases, the country may need or want to change its laws before it ratifies the CRPD.

If your country has signed or ratified the CRPD, you may be able to use this information to help you campaign for better laws in your country. Find out if your country has signed or ratified the CRPD at http://www.un.org disabilities/countries.asp?navid=12&pid=166.

Also, learn more about the CRPD and how it can help you at www.RatifyNow.org and also at www.un.org/disabilities.



We Can Do first discovered the Civil Rights Law and Disabled People guide through the AskSource.info database on disability and development.

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Writing to Promote Disability Rights!

Posted on 21 March 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Calling all Writers for the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008!
Are you good with words? Do you care about protecting the human rights of people with disabilities? Are you looking for a way to celebrate the first anniversary of the international disability rights treaty, called the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), on March 30, 2008?

Please participate in the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008!

What’s a Blog Swarm?
A blog swarm is when many bloggers agree to write blog posts on the same theme at about the same time. Writers who don’t have a blog can ask someone who does to publish their post for them. A blog swarm can increase public awareness of an issue.

Why Celebrate the CRPD?
Does it make you angry when people with disabilities are denied equal access to educational opportunities or good quality healthcare? Does it horrify you when people with disabilities are left behind during times of natural disasters and war? Does reading about the abuse and torture of people with disabilities make you want to do something about it? These are all human rights violations.

When countries ratify the international disability rights treaty (CRPD), this obligates them to create laws to protect the human rights of people with disabilities. With these laws in place, the disability communities of ratifying countries will be in a stronger position to advocate for themselves—and be heard. That’s worth celebrating.

So, What’s the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008?
Writers are being asked to submit blog posts about the CRPD via email to RatifyNow@gmail.com at any time between now and March 27, 2008. If you don’t have a blog, we’ll try to find a home for your blog post.

For more details about the CRPD and the celebratory blog swarm, please follow the link to:

http://ratifynow.org/latest-news/blog-swarm/

Here, you will find links to the original announcement about the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008 and how you can participate; a page that can help you educate yourself about the CRPD before you start writing about it; suggested topic ideas for you to consider; and suggested guidelines for people who are not familiar with how to write blog posts.

Then What Happens?
On March 30, 2008, come to http://www.RatifyNow.org to start reading what all the participating writers and bloggers say about the CRPD!

What Else?
Please help make the RatifyNow CRPD Blog Swarm 2008 a success by making sure people know about it! You may post this notice at your blog or other web site, or pass it along to people you know.



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INFORMATIONAL RESOURCE: UN Human Rights Disability Section

Posted on 21 March 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) has launched a disability section within their web site. Its purpose is to strengthen the work of the United Nations OHCHR on disability-related issues. It will promote the development of long-term projects to integrate disability issues into international treaty monitoring bodies, including the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. It is available in English, Spanish, and French.

At the OHCHR disability section web site, readers can find information about a range of human rights treaties that touch upon disability issues; the text of a study on human rights and disability; information about various committees that monitor how well human rights are implemented and what is being done to ensure that disability issues are integrated into their activities; links to disability-related speeches by the high commissioner of human rights; and links to statements by disability leaders and country government representatives on the occasion that the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was first opened for countries to sign and ratify.



We Can Do learned about the disability section of the OHCHR web site via the AskSource.info data base of resources related to development, disability, and health issues.

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Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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RESOURCE: Training Manual in Disability Human Rights

Posted on 20 March 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The University of Minnesota Human Rights Resource Center has released a manual that people with disabilities can use to train themselves and their peers about their own human rights. The manual, entitled “Human Rights. YES!,” is based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

Human Rights. YES! is designed to be used by people who are not necessarily experts in human rights, and can be used with as few as two or three participants. People may download the manual in PDF format for free or purchase print copies from the University of Minnesota. People may reproduce any part of the manual they wish without permission for educational purposes only. But excerpted and adapted material must include a full source citation.

Part One, “Understanding Disability as a Human Right,” provides an overview of who is responsible for human rights and quickly summarizes the international disability rights treaty (CRPD). It makes links between disability, human rights, and effective advocacy.

Part Two, “The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,” reviews the CRPD in much more detail. Each of the 17 chapters discusses one set of human rights covered in the CRPD. Each human right is explained in a simple way. The manual also suggests several participatory exercises that people can use to improve their understanding of their human rights and think constructively about how they can take action. Users can also read illustrative examples of advocacy strategies, helpful facts, and other information. People interested in learning more about a specific topic can consult a short list of additional resources at the end of each chapter.

The chapters in Part Two include: Equality and Non-discrimination; Accessibility; The Right to Participation in Political and Public Life; Freedom of Expression and Opinion; The Right to Life and Protection in Situations of Risk; Freedom from Torture and Other Forms of Abuse; Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family; The Right to Health; The Right to Habitation and Rehabilitation; The Right to Work; Living Independently and with Dignity in the Community; Access to Justice; The Right to Education; The Right to Participation in Sport and Culture; The Human Rights of Children with Disabilities; Non-discrimination and Equality for Women with Disabilities; and, The Rights of Other Populations.

Part Three, “Advocacy! Taking Action for the Human Rights of People with Disabilities” gives examples of how participants can take action in advocating for the human rights of people with disabilities.

The Annexes include the full text, plain-language text, and summary of both the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The second annex gives tips on how to facilitate human rights education in an interactive way. It also gives some sample models for how a facilitator might wish to organize half-day or full-day training workshops.

Translations in French, Spanish, and Arabic are forthcoming and will be available from the University of Minnesota Human Rights Resource Center. Organizations interested in producing their own translations into other languages should contact the University of Minnesota at humanrts@umn.edu.

Learn more about the manual, download it for free, or find how to purchase it, by following the link to:

http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/edumat/hreduseries/TB6/index2.html

Inquiries about the manual can also be directed to the University of Minnesota Human Rights Resource Center at humanrts@umn.edu.



We Can Do learned about the Human Rights. YES! manual by browsing the AskSource.info database on disability and development.

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RESOURCE: Implementing the Disability Rights Treaty, for Users, Survivors of Psychiatry

Posted on 19 March 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Psychiatric Disabilities, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (WNUSP) has released a manual that can guide users in implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), with people who have used or survived psychiatry.

People with all types of disabilities may experience human rights violations at one time or another. People who have used or survived psychiatric services, however, may be particular targets for certain types of violations. For example, they may be more commonly denied the right to make their own choices about accepting or refusing medical care or entering the hospital. They may be required to take certain drugs or submit to other treatments even if they hold the strong opinion that the potentially harmful side effects outweigh the benefits.

WNUSP’s implementation manual highlights aspects of the interational disability rights treaty (CRPD) that are particularly relevant to users and survivors of psychiatry. These include the areas of legal capacity, liberty, right to live in the community, freedom from forced psychiatric interventions, and the right to participate in enforcing the CRPD.

The manual also explains relevant terminology. For example, the CRPD uses the term “people with mental impairments” to refer to people with mental health problems, or who have mental disabilities, or who have used or survived psychiatry. This term was chosen with WNUSP’s agreement during the process of negotiating the international disability rights treaty. However, WNUSP prefers the use of the phrase “psychosocial disability.”

WNUSP’s manual explains and summarizes each article of the CRPD, with particular attention to its relevance for people with psychosocial disabilities. The manual also makes recommendations for how to address common concerns that governments and others may express about certain aspects of the CRPD as they apply to people with psychosocial disabilities. It describes an array of alternate approaches to healing, treatment, or supporting people in making and expressing their own choices that have been used in various countries. The manual ends with an explanation of how user/survivor organizations can be involved with monitoring the implementation of the CRPD.

Learn more about WNUSP’s implementation manual for the CRPD, or download it in Word format (289 Kb), at:

http://www.wnusp.net/UnitedNations_MMtmp03630c55/UnitedNationsConventionfortheRightsofPersonswithDisabilities.htm



We Can Do first learned about WNUSP’s implementation manual for the CRPD via the Disabled People’s International email newsletter. Further detail was obtained from the manual itself.

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CONFERENCE: International Seminar on CRPD with Special Focus on Disability in Development

Posted on 19 March 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

CRPD Added Value? -Seminar in Helsinki 20-21 May 2008

VIKE – The Center for Human Rights of Persons with Disabilities is organizing an International Seminar on the Implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – with Special Focus on Disability in Development. The Seminar will be held in English and translation into Finnish will be available.

The seminar is open to all actors in the field. Especially persons with disabilities, organizations of persons with disabilities, government representatives, researchers, students, and other persons interested in the situation and rights of persons with disabilities, are warmly welcomed to participate.

The seminar registration will be handled through by receiving bookings via e-mail to seminar@vike.fi. Please submit your e-mail booking by 9th May 2008. In paying the registration fee – 40 € – each place for attending the seminar will be validated. Please note that the registration fee is non-refundable and that there is a limited amount of places. General assistance is available at the seminar location. Please inform the conference organizers if you have your own personal assistant as you book.

More information about this event is available at the VIKE website:
www.vike.fi

Juha-Pekka Konttinen
Lawyer, The Threshold Association,
The Center for Human Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Siltasaarenkatu 4, 5.floor
00530 Helsinki, Finland
tel. + 358 45 7731 0106
fax. + 358 9 6850 1199
email. juha-pekka.konttinen@kynnys.fi
internet. www.vike.fi



We Can Do learned about this conference through the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group, which focuses on the CRPD and disability rights.

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