CALL FOR PAPERS: Impact of Nanoscale Science on Disability

Posted on 29 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, Health, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Opportunities, Poverty, technology, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for papers On the impact of nanoscale science and technology on disability, community and rehabilitation.
[NOTE from We Can Do editor: The deadline for abstracts is October 30, 2008; full articles can be submitted later, for authors whose abstracts are selected. We Can Do readers will note that the areas of suggested possible focus may include the impact of nanotechnology on people with disabilities in low-income countries; on international development; and on relevant topics such as water and sanitation, the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, and others. Inquiries and abstracts should be directed to the journal, NOT We Can Do.]

For a special issue of the International Journal on Disability, Community & Rehabilitation (IJDCR) (http://www.ijdcr.ca/copyright.shtml)

Guest Editor: Gregor Wolbring, Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies Program, Dept of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary. <gwolbrin@ucalgary.ca>

Invitation
Nanoscale science and technology, while still in its infancy, describes a rapidly growing sphere of enquiry, with many and varied implications for the disability field. To establish a ‘benchmark’ of the current state of knowledge and conceptual understanding, the Editors of IJDCR decided a special issue should be devoted to the topic. Background information and potential topics are presented below.

We invite potential contributors, regardless of fields of study (discipline), to submit 250-word Abstracts that articulate the conceptual arguments and knowledge base to be covered in a critical analysis on some aspect of the impact of nanoscale science and technology on disability, community and/or rehabilitation. Please submit abstracts to the Guest Editor via e-mail by 30 October, 2008.

From selected abstracts, we will request full articles of 3000-5000 words (excluding figures and tables) of original research and scholarship on a range of topics. Note that an invitation to submit an article does not guarantee its publication. Every submitted article will be subject to blind peer review and recommendations arising.

Background
Nanotechnology in all its meanings allows for, among other things, the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale and enables a new paradigm of science and technology that sees different technologies converging at the nanoscale namely:

  • nanoscience and nanotechnology,
  • biotechnology and biomedicine, including genetic engineering,
  • information technology, including advanced computing and communications,
  • cognitive science (neuro-engineering),
  • synthetic biology;

hence, the designation “NBICS” (nano-bio-info-cogno-synbio).

Many lists of anticipated nanoproducts exist (Institute of Nanotechnology 2005;Kostoff et al. 2006). Applications for NBICS products are envisioned in areas such as the environment, energy, water, weapons and other military applications, globalization, agriculture, and health (e.g., more efficient diagnostics and genetic testing, cognitive enhancement; life extension and enhancing human performance in general) (M.Roco 2003). Many believe that advances in NBICS hold the key for extreme life extension to the level of immortality and the achievement of morphological (Anders Sandberg 2001) and genomic freedom(Wolbring 2003). NBICS-medicine is envisioned by some to have the answer to global problems of disease and ill medical and social health. Others argue for the pursuit of ‘morphological freedom’ (Anders Sandberg 2001)–allowing the human body to move beyond typical functioning of the species. Disabled people are often highlighted as the beneficiaries of NBICS-medicine products. NBICS applications and the selling of NBICS health products focuses mostly on offering disabled people medical solutions (prevention or cure/normative adaptation) and might move towards transhumanist solutions (augmentation, enhancement of the human body) but rarely offers social solutions (adaptation of the environment, acceptance, societal cures of equal rights and respect). Many NBICS applications/products for disabled people are envisioned and are under development(Wolbring 2005).

We chose this topic for an issue of IJDCR because of how the discourses around these new and emerging nanoscale science and technologies are emerging and their potential impact on people with disabilities, the communities linked to them and/or practitioners as well as others. Consumers and researchers linked to the disability discourse are involved will shape the positive or negative consequences for everyone involved.

Nanotechnology and NBICS have an impact on disabled people in at least four main ways.

Impact of NBICS on disabled people (Wolbring 2006)

NBICS may develop tools to adapt the environment in which disabled people live and to give disabled people tools that would allow them to deal with environmental challenges. This side of S&T would make the life of disabled people more liveable without changing the identity and biological reality of the disabled person

NBICS may develop tools that would diagnose the part of disabled people’s biological reality seen by others as deficient, defect, impaired and ‘disabled’ thus allowing for preventative measures

NBICS may develop tools that would eliminate that portion of disabled people’s biological reality seen by others as deficient, defect, impaired and ‘disabled’.

NBICS may be a target for – and an influence upon – the discourses, concepts, trends and areas of action that impact disabled persons.

Discourses:

  • The discourse around the term human security
  • The religious discourse
  • The politics of biodiversity
  • The politics of inequity
  • The politics of the ethics discourse.
  • The politics of law:
  • The politics of raising the acceptance level for a given technology
  • The politics of setting goals and priorities
  • The politics of language
  • The politics of self perception and identity (Body politics)
  • The politics of red herrings
  • The politics of interpreting International treaties
  • The politics of governance
  • The Politics of evaluation, measuring, analysis, and outcome tools

Concepts:

  • Self identity security
  • Ability security
  • Cultural identity/diversity
  • Morphological freedom and morphological judgement(Anders Sandberg 2001)
  • Freedom of choice and tyranny of choice
  • Duty to fix oneself
  • Duty to know
  • Parental responsibility
  • Societal responsibility

Trends:

  • Change in the concepts of health, disease and ‘disability’/’impairment’
  • The appearance of enhancement medicine and the acceptance of beyond species-typical functioning
  • Moving from curative to enhancement medicine; decrease in curative medicine and the appearance of the transhumanist/enhancement burden of disease
  • Moving from human rights to sentient rights
  • Moving from morphological freedom to morphological judgement
  • The appearance of the techno poor disabled and impaired
  • Moving from freedom of choice to tyranny of choice judgement

Areas of Action:

  • Nanotechnology/NBIC for development
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and the UN Millennium Development Goals
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and global medical and social health
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and accessibility
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and law
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and water and sanitation
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and disaster management
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and weapons/war
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and ethics/philosophy
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and social science/anthropology
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and community
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and networking

All of the above discourses, concepts, trends and areas of actions impact on disabled people[1] and others.

Potential contributors to this Special Issue might consider areas from the above table or one of the following topics:

1. What are the potential positive and negative impacts of envisioned nanoscale science and technology products and research and development on:

  • disabled people,
  • the community around them
  • practitioners, consumers and researchers linked to the disability discourse
  • community rehabilitation and the rehabilitation field in general
  • inclusive education and the education of disabled people in general
  • employability of disabled people
  • citizenship of disabled people
  • body image of disabled people
  • medical and social health policies and their impact on disabled people
  • health care for disabled people
  • the elderly
  • disabled people in low income countries
  • laws related to disabled people such as the UN Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
  • the concept of personhood
  • concept of health and health care
  • the measure of disability adjusted life years and other measurements used to guide health care dollar allocation
  • quality of life assessment

2. What are the potential positive and negative impacts of the new social philosophy of transhumanism that is seen as being enabled by nanoscale science and technology products and research and development?
3. What impacts of potential nanoscale science and technology products and research and development onto disabled people will impact other marginalized groups?

For more information about the International Journal of Disability, Community & Rehabilitation (IJDCR) please go to http://www.ijdcr.ca.

References
Anders Sandberg. Morphological Freedom — Why We not just Want it, but Need it. 2001. <http://www.nada.kth.se/~asa/Texts/MorphologicalFreedom.htm>

Institute of Nanotechnology (2005). Research Applications And Markets In Nanotechnology In Europe 2005 <http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reportinfo.asp?report_id=302091&t=t&cat_id=4>

Kostoff, Ronald et al. “The seminal literature of nanotechnology research.” Journal of Nanoparticle Research (2006): 1-21. <http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.1007/s11051-005-9034-9>

M.Roco, W. Bainbridge eds. Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance: Nanotechnology, Biotechnology, Information Technology and Cognitive Science. 2003. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht Hardbound. <http://www.wtec.org/ConvergingTechnologies/Report/NBIC_report.pdf> [PDF format]

Wolbring, G. “SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AND THE TRIPLE D (DISEASE, DISABILITY, DEFECT).” Ed. William Sims Bainbridge Mihail C.Roco National. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic, 2003. 232-43<http://www.wtec.org/ConvergingTechnologies/> <http://www.bioethicsanddisability.org/nbic.html>

Wolbring, G (2005). HTA Initiative #23 The triangle of enhancement medicine, disabled people, and the concept of health: a new challenge for HTA, health research, and health policy Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, Health Technology Assessment Unit, Edmonton, Alberta Canada <http://www.ihe.ca/documents/hta/HTA-FR23.pdf> [PDF format]

Wolbring, G (2006). Scoping paper on Nanotechnology and disabled people. Center for Nanotechnology in Society Arizona State University [On-line]. <http://cns.asu.edu/cns-library/documents/wolbring-scoping%20CD%20final%20edit.doc> [Word format]

——————————————————————————–
[1] The term ‘disabled people’, as used here, reflects the way in which environmental factors impact on the ability of individuals with sensory, motor, cognitive or other variations to participate in society, consistent with its usage by Disabled Peoples’ International.



Thank you to Gregor Wolbring for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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RESOURCE: Disability Rights Advocacy Workbook

Posted on 24 April 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

How can disability advocates explain to others the difference between the “charity,” “medical,” “social,” and “rights” model of disability? How can communities and allies educate themselves about the challenges faced by people with disabilities in their countries? How can people with disabilities learn about laws in their country that affect their lives? How can advocates teach other people about human rights for people with disabilities and the importance of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)?

People seeking answers to these questions can turn to the Disability Rights Advocacy Workbook (PDF format, 421 Kb), published by Survivors Corps (formerly known as Landmine Survivors Network).

Section 1, entitled “Advocacy for People with Disabilities,” explains why the charity and medical models of disability are often disempowering and how the social and rights model can help. It shares advice on prioritizing among the many challenges experienced by people with disabilities and how to choose the most effective strategies for advocating for long-lasting change. The section also encourages strong collaboration among like-minded organizations and offers ideas for locating useful information and statistics. A set of exercises can guide advocates and allies through brainstorming exercises to help them examine the advocacy work they are already doing and how they can improve.

Section two, entitled “How Does Human Rights Advocacy Work?”, explains what human rights are and how various human rights documents helps protect them. The exercises makes recommendations for the kind of information that advocates should know about and how advocates can locate this information.

Section three, entitled “How Do You Use International Human Rights Treaties for Advocacy?”, discusses how existing human rights instruments can help people with disabilities–including, but not limited to, the new international disability rights treaty, called the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). It offers advice on how people can advocate for their country to ratify and then implement the CRPD.

Download the full 30 page workbook in PDF format (421 Kb) at:

http://www.handicap-international.fr/kit-pedagogique/documents/ressourcesdocumentaires/apadoption/DisabilityRightsAdvocacyWorkbook2007.pdf

Find more resources related to the CRPD at:

https://wecando.wordpress.com/resources-toolkits-and-funding/#CRPD resources

And at the RatifyNow web site:

http://www.RatifyNow.org



We Can Do learned about the Disability Rights Advocacy Handbook (PDF format, 421 Kb) by browsing the AskSource.info database on health, disability, and development.

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RESOURCE: Brochure on People with Intellectual Disabilities and Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 22 April 2008. Filed under: Cognitive Impairments, Education, Families, Human Rights, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People with intellectual disabilities around the world face enormous challenges in realizing basic human rights such as access to education; legal capacity (the right to make their own decisions); the right to live with their families; and the right to live in the community–not an institution. The new disability rights treaty–the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)–is designed in part to help with these challenges. The CRPD, which has now been ratified by 24 countries, will enter into force on May 3, 2008 simultaneously with the Optional Protocol, which has been ratified by 14 countries.

But how can people with intellectual disabilities and their families use the CRPD to achieve their human rights? And how can people who create and implement policy support their efforts? A new brochure from Inclusion International (PDF format, 585 Kb) provides guidance. The eight-page brochure summarizes how people with intellectual disabilities and their families around the world helped to create the CRPD; how the CRPD helps address some of their key human rights concerns; and the important role of families in guiding, developing, and implementing policies.

The English version of the brochure can be downloaded in PDF format (585 Kb) at:

http://inclusion-international.org/site_uploads/File/HearOurVoices-Priority%20Web.08.pdf

The Arabic version of the brochure (without pictures) can be downloaded in Word format (515 Kb) at:

http://inclusion-international.org/site_uploads/File/CRPD%20arab.doc



We Can Do learned of this brochure through the Disabled People International (DPI) e-newsletter.

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TRAINING the Trainer in Community Based Rehabilitation

Posted on 2 April 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

TOT in Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR)
25th of August to the 5th of September 2008
The Netherlands

People interested in applying are urged to apply with Enablement well in advance.

Enabling CBR

General objective
You will acquire the theory, skills and tools to develop and implement effective training programmes.

Specific Objectives
At the end of the ToT you will:

  • be sensitive to issues encountered in the adult learning process;
  • be able to assess training needs and set learning objectives
  • be able to choose and use training methods and materials using the principles of adult learning;
  • have practiced using questions as a learning tool;
  • be able to design, plan and implement participatory training sessions;
  • have practiced training, using your own design;
  • have developed their personal action plan.
  • be able to design and convey important CBR messages to relevant publics
  • be able to integrate new insights about the state of the art of CBR in your training activities.
  • demonstrate an appreciation of diversity in communities, particularly in relation to people that are differently abled.
  • demonstrate effective communication skills.

Target group
The target group consist of CBR enthusiasts, who are motivated to broaden the implementation of CBR programmes in their respective communities. Therefore the course is targeted at the following people:

  • Trainers in CBR
  • Advocates of disability issues
  • Managers of CBR
  • Experienced persons in CBR and interested in becoming a trainer

These people will after the ToT CBR probably train:

  • CBR managers
  • CBR staff
  • Community key persons
  • Policy makers and planners
  • Politicians

Entrance criteria

  • 2 years experience in CBR
  • Attended CBR training (formal or non formal) or additional experience
  • Motivation letter to be send to the course coordinator of no longer than 2 pages A-4 size, double spacing
  • Training Needs Assessment questionnaire to be filled out in detail and returned to the course coordinator
  • Competence in both written and spoken English

Provisional Programme
Consult the Enablement web site at http://www.enablement.nl, or contact h.cornielje@enablement.nl by email, for a copy of the provisional programme.

Teaching staff
The course is conducted under leadership of Mr Huib Cornielje. A number of trainers with a vast amount of experience, both in disability service development as well as training and education, will be responsible for different subjects. The course has been developed by a team of experts who form also the teaching staff; i.e.

  • Henk van Apeldoorn
  • Huib Cornielje
  • Fiona Post
  • Hanneke Verhoeven
  • Roelie Wolting

Course fees and other expenses

  • Fees (including tea and coffee): Euro 1350,00
  • Accommodation (incl. all meals) approximately: Euro 1500,00
  • Pocket money: Euro 20,00 a day is advised: Euro 300,00
  • International travel: variable

Scholarships
At this moment in time no scholarships are available, however, we will do our utmost to ensure that a number of scholarship will be made available for those who are:

  • able to indicate an urgent need for training
  • unable to show that they are unable to pay full course expenses

We must stress however, that at this moment no such guarantees can be given. If scholarships are awarded these do not cover pocket money and travel costs as these costs need to be paid by the participant.

For more information contact:
Huib Cornielje
Enablement
h.cornielje@enablement.nl
www.enablement.nl



We Can Do received copies of this announcement from multiple sources including Ghulam Nabi Nazimani and also the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserv.

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REPORT: Violence Against Disabled Children

Posted on 8 March 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Reports, Resources, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

UNICEF has released a summary report entitled, “Violence Against Disabled Children” (PDF format 245 Kb), with the subtitle “UN Secretary Generals Report on Violence against Children, Thematic Group on Violence against Disabled Children, Findings and Recommendations.”

The first half of this report, released in July 2005, summarizes what is known about violence toward children with disabilities at home, in schools, in institutions, in the criminal justice system, within the broader community, and at work (in child labor situations). Children with disabilities are known to be at higher risk for abuse, partly because they may be perceived as “easy victims.” Also, abuse toward disabled children is less likely to be investigated or persecuted, which means abusers know it is easier to escape consequences even if the abuse is discovered.

Many children, with or without disabilities, may face adults who fail to listen or to believe them when they try to report abuse. But children with disabilities face additional barriers. As one example, some adults may mistakenly assume that a child with intellectual disabilities or psycho-social disabilities must surely be “confused,” or unable to tell right from wrong, or unable to make their own decisions about what is done to their bodies.

Disabled children may also be targeted for child murder, either because parents perceive them as bringing shame to the family or because adults may be convinced they will be “better off” dead than disabled. In countries where many men share the belief that sex with a virgin will “cleanse” them of HIV/AIDS, girls, boys, and adults with disabilities may be targeted for rape on the assumption that they do not have sex. Children with disabilities also may be forcibly sterilized, sometimes as early as the age of 8 or 9.

The report makes a series of 13 recommendations for families, communities, policy makers, governments, advocates, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) or Civil Society Organizations, United Nations agencies, and other stakeholders with an interest in preventing violence toward disabled children. These recommendations include, as a few examples: increasing public awareness; reforming legislation so that the laws can better protect children with disabilities; advocating change to improve inclusion of disabled people throughout society; improving reporting mechanisms so that people who become aware of abuse have a way to report it; closing down institutions and integrating disabled children into the community; but also improving government oversight of institutions for as long as they continue to exist.

The 33-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (245 Kb) at:

http://www.unicef.org/videoaudio/PDFs/UNICEF_Violence_Against_Disabled_Children_Report_Distributed_Version.pdf

People interested in the topic of violence against children may also wish to read an article on violence and disabled children in the 2003 issue of the joint Rehabilitation International and UNICEF newsletter, One in Ten:

http://riglobal.org/publications2/10_24.htm

Also of possible interest:

A recent report, Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities could give ideas to advocates and families for how they can use international human rights laws to protect the rights of children with disabilities.

Learn about a report on human rights abuses of disabled children and adults in Serbia, including the use of violence.

Read a paper on Violence Against Blind and Visually Impaired Girls in Malawi

Those interested in abuse and human rights violations in institutional settings may also wish to read the following first-hand accounts written by the same author, Amanda Baggs. These are well worth reading. Some talk about the more obvious kinds of violence that most people are used to thinking of as “abuse.” Some talk about forms of psychological manipulation that are so subtle that outside observers might miss them. But Amanda Baggs makes powerful arguments for why “outposts in our head,” or the uses of power nevertheless can be at least as important for anyone who cares about the well-being of children (and adults) with disabilities. Click on any title below to see Amanda Bagg’s post:

Why It’s So Hard to Write Directly About My Life
Outposts in Our Heads: The Intangible Horrors of Institutions that Must Not Be Forgotten
The Meaning of Power
Extreme Measures, and Then Some



We Can Do learned about the UNICEF report on violence against disabled children from the AskSource.info database. Asksource.info provides a library of information, resources, and toolkits related to people with disabilities and to health issues, particularly in developing countries.



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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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TRAINING: Planning and Management of CBR Programs, Bangalore, India

Posted on 10 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Rehabilitation, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , |

The training program will be April 7 to April 17th, 2008, in Bangalore, India. Read below for further details, then inquire directly with the organizers at cbrnet@airtelbroadband.in.

CBR NETWORK (South Asia)
— (A NGO Movement Bridging the Gaps ……

* UN ECOSOC Special Consultative Status since 2007
* Associate Member of Rehabilitation International (Advancing the rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities worldwide)

Human Resource Development (HRD) Programmes in Community Based Rehabilitation

Training Programme for CBR Managers

CBR Network (South Asia) is an international NGO (Non-Government Organisation) actively involved in Training, Research, Consultancy, Information exchange, Advocacy and Publishing activities in the field of Disability and Rehabilitation. Started in 1993 to break the isolation of NGOs, CBR Network believes in the holistic union of human needs and capacities, through Community Based Rehabilitation and focuses on meeting the needs of persons with disabilities, without disintegrating and isolating them from their families and communities. CBR Network has been very active in accomplishing the snowballing effect through Dissemination of information, Technical support, Training, Planning and Management of CBR programs as well as Research and Publications.

Rationale:
The needs of persons with disabilities are the same as their able bodied peers. Such needs cut across all sectors. Moreover, as the community represents disabled persons of all ages and different stages of life, different sectors come into play. No one sector on its own can respond to the comprehensive needs involved in the rehabilitation process. CBR programmes should seek to meet the needs of disabled persons of various aetiologies and of all ages with a cost-effective approach without underestimating how people and existing services within the communities can contribute.

UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is throwing new challenges .CBR has to change and will change to meet the millennium challenges. The proposed training for CBR managers helps to understand and develop strategies for the implementation using CBR philosophy.

In order to meet the challenge of establishing cross-disability CBR programs with Multi-sectoral approach the personnel involved should know how to develop a more comprehensive approach to rehabilitation making use of all the available human, material and infrastructure resources. Its philosophy is rooted in a realistic understanding of existing institutions, holding the middle ground between overloading and under-utilizing the communities, between horizontal and vertical, between purely center-based and home-based. There are no particular formulae for CBR. Such programmes require creative Managers with knowledge and vision on the true face of ‘disability’ and of ‘rehabilitation’ in their own country or region.

The Training Sessions for CBR Managers wish to promote this approach to CBR, incorporating Management and Social Work Principles and techniques alongside protecting the Rights of every individual in the society.

Course title: Planning and Management of CBR Programs

Date: 7th – 17 April 2008
The 10 day programme sessions and field visits in an urban as well as in a rural CBR program.

Venue: CBR Network, Bangalore, India

Language of the Course: English.

Target Group: Priority is given to CBR Managers, Coordinators, Staff & Representatives of CBR-Donor Organizations, Government Staff, Managers of other disability-related programs, UN Personnel and Members of Service Clubs. (Maximum 20 participants, Registration on a first-come-first served basis).

Cost and Fees:

Accommodation & costs for food: Rs.1000/- per day
Training & Materials: Rs.10000/- per person
No stipend is being paid to the participants

For further details please contact:

CBR NETWORK (South Asia)
134,1st Block,6th Main, BSK III Stage
Bangalore-560085
India
Email: cbrnet@airtelbroadband.in

Web: http\\www.cbrnetworksouthasia.org

Phone-91(India)-80(Bangalore)-26724273, 26724221

Registration Form:
I hereby confirm my participation for the training programme
My profile:
Name: ………………………………………………
Address: ………………………………………………
.…………………………………
………………………………………………
City: ……………………………..
State: …………………………………..

Email: ………………………………………………
Phone no. ……………………………..
Mobile: …………………………………
Accommodation required: YES / NO

Date of arrival: …………………………..
Date of departure: ………………………….



We Can Do learned about this opportunity through the Intl-Dev mailing list; people can subscribe to Intl-Dev via email for free.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



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