Conference: Working with Children with Special Needs and Their Families: Kyrgyzstan and Intl Experience

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Events and Conferences, Families, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

International conference 7-9 April 2009

[Note application deadline March 6, 2009.]

Dear colleagues!

The Association of Parents of Disabled Children of Bishkek and the Public Association “Shoola Kol” in partnership with HealthProm UK-based charity and the Ministry of Labor and Social Development organizes the 3-day International conference «Innovative approaches to working with children with special needs and their families: Kyrgyzstan and international experience» which will take place at the Dostuk Hotel, Bishkek, on 7-9 April 2009.

Conference aims:

* Present and discuss various approaches to providing support to children with special needs and their families
* Search for ways of cooperation between organizations that support children with special needs and their families in Kyrgyzstan and abroad
* Experience exchange

The conference will see the representatives of government and municipal agencies, nongovernmental local and international organizations that have practical experience in providing early support, education, social support and healthcare services to children with special needs, as well as in the advancement and protection of the rights of people with disabilities.

Conference format: reports, discussion, presentations, workshops, seminars.

During the conference there will be Kyrgyzstan and international experience presented on the following:

* latest models of providing early support to children with multiple disabilities
* innovative approaches of psychological and pedagogical support to children with special needs
* complex rehabilitation and socialization of children and young people with special needs
* protection and advancement of rights of people with disabilities and their families

The final programme of the conference will be developed on the needs and expectations of the participants that sent applications.

The conference invites: heads and specialists of social protection, educational and healthcare government and municipal agencies and nongovernmental organizations that provide support to children with special needs (including with multiple disabilities) and their families.

The selection of participants will based on the applications forms. The applications should be sent before the 6 March 2009 by email ardi.kyrgyzstan@gmail.com of fax: 0312 517634

Participants will be selected before 20 March 2009.

The working language of the conference is Russian, translators will be provided for international participants.

For more information please contact:

ARDI, Bishkek, m-r Kok-Zhar, h.1, polupodval 4, Tel/fax: +996 312 517634, e-mail: ardi.kyrgyzstan@gmail.com



Thank you to Azat Israilov for submitting this announcement to We Can Do. All inquiries, as always, should be directed to the people organizing the opportunity that interests you, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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Pakistan Art Competition for Children With Disabilities

Posted on 15 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Children, Events and Conferences, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Network of Organizations Working for People with Disabilities in Pakistan (NOWPDP) is sponsoring a national art competition for children with disabilities aged 12 to 16. The age limit is waived for participants with mental disabilities. All member and non-member schools are invited to participate. The competition will be held on the 1st of March 2009 in Karachi; and at a slightly later date in Lahore & Islamabad. However, names of children to compete should be submitted by February 19, 2009.

For further details about the competition, along with instructions for how to participate, please visit the NOWPDP web site at:

http://nowpdp.org/News/ArtCompitition.aspx



I learned about this competition via Ghulam Nabi Nizamani. All people who wish to make inquiries should please inquire directly with NOWPDP, according to the instructions on their web site, NOT with We Can Do. Thank you.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Life-Long Learning

Posted on 28 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Education, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Enabling Education Network (EENET) is looking for articles for the 2009 issue of its newsletter “Enabling Education”. (First draft and article ideas should be submitted by January 30, 2009.) The theme of the newsletter is life-long learning. If you could write an article about your experiences of inclusive education in relation to informal, non-formal, alternative, pre-school, vocational or higher education, EENET would love to hear from you.

EENET’s goal with the 2009 newsletter is to publish an entire newsletter that contains no articles that look purely at formal primary and secondary education. They hope you can help them achieve this! If you are not an experienced writer, don’t worry. Send EENET your ideas and they will try to help you to develop these ideas into an article. You may also find it helpful to look at some previous newsletter articles when you are developing ideas for your own article. If you don’t already have copies of “Enabling Education”, please look at the EENET newsletters on their website (click on the highlighted text in this sentence to follow the link).

EENET really encourages you to send them articles that have been researched/written by, or in collaboration with, children and young people. EENET also always welcome articles that make use of drawings, photos, etc.

Number of words: articles should be about 600 words long.

Deadline: first drafts or article ideas should be sent to us by
30th January 2009.

More details are available at: http://www.eenet.org.uk/events/call_for_articles_eenet_newsletter_2009.shtml

Or email: info@eenet.org.uk



I learned about this call for papers via EENET’s Facebook page. The text is copied from their original announcement and also from their more detailed call for articles. Inquiries and submissions should please be directed to EENET, NOT We Can Do.

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World Vision International Peace Prize NOMINATIONS Sought

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Opportunities, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

World Vision International Peace Prize

[It is my hope that We Can Do readers will consider whether they might know an individual with disabilities, or a disability-oriented organization, that might qualify for the World Vision International Peace Prize. The winning organization will receive $5,000; the winning individual will receive $1,000. The deadline to submit nominations is February 15, 2009. The following text is copy/pasted from the World Vision guidelines for the awards, which can also be downloaded in PDF format. The guidelines are also available in French and in Spanish.]

Guidelines

Purpose
The purpose of the World Vision International Peace Prize is to annually recognize and honor one individual who is a catalyst for peacemaking and one organisation which champions the integration of peacebuilding into relief, development and advocacy programmes.

Two award recipients shall be named annually under this World Vision International Peace Prize:
1. Peacebuilding Award – given to an agency or organisation that excels at integrating peacebuilding into relief, development or advocacy activities, and mobilising communities to build a durable peace
2. Peacemaking Award – given to an individual who has taken risks and excelled in being a catalyst in either bringing conflicted parties together to resolve a conflict or in enabling a peace process that engages peacemakers, mediators and people of moral authority who bring hope that a significant destructive conflict can be resolved.

The first award focuses on World Vision’s area of greatest expertise in peacebuilding, namely integrating peacebuilding in relief, development and advocacy. Key programmatic themes of World Vision include the role of children, youth and women in building peace.

The second award focuses on World Vision’s secondary area of focus, making a significant contribution to community-based peacemaking, serving as a catalyst and building bridges so that other organisations and individuals can assist in resolving destructive conflicts that put all development at risk.

Description of award
The World Vision International Peace Prize is given annually in honor and memory of Steve Williams (1951-2007), World Vision UK Senior Policy Advisor on Peace and Conflict. Steve brought vast experience in peacebuilding, conflict analysis and policy analysis to World Vision UK, and served as the Co-convener of PaxNet, the World Vision global peacebuilding network.

He distinguished himself not only within World Vision but within the peace community around the world as one who integrated his conflict analysis and policy work, was committed in his personal, family and work life to work for peace and reconciliation, strongly supported programmes of Children as Peacebuilders, and was a great advocate for peace with justice.

It is in this spirit that the World Vision International Peace Prize was established to honor his life, his work and his memory. The awardees each year may be little known to the public but each will serve as profound examples of peacemaking and peacebuilding in a world of conflict.

Nomination and selection process principles

Eligibility

Organisations and individuals that are external or internal to World Vision International may be nominated with equal consideration. Local community-based organisations as well as global humanitarian and development organisations are eligible for nomination.

Qualifications
The Awards Committee will give particular attention and consideration to nominees who mobilise children, youth and women in peacebuilding. A nomination will be strongest when the organisations or individuals demonstrate that their work and programme is built on careful context and conflict analysis, and produces credible policy and advocacy influence that contributes toward peace.

Monetary Prize and Trophy
Each organisation and individual who is awarded the World Vision International Peace Prize will receive both a monetary award ($5,000 for an organisation and $1,000 for an individual) and a physical trophy with the award designation.

Use of the award
The monetary award is to be used at the sole discretion of the awardees to further the work of the individual or the organisation in their continued role in peacemaking and peacebuilding.

Procedures for nomination
Nominees may come either from within or from outside World Vision. Self-nominations are accepted. The World Vision International Peace Prize Nomination Form can be found online at www.wvi.org/peaceprize. It should be completed in full and sent by email to: wvi_peaceprize@wvi.org by the final day for submission: February 15, 2009.

Selection process
The World Vision International Director of Peacebuilding and the Peacebuilding Unit will initially review all applications to determine which ones meet the criteria and are the strongest candidates. A vetting process will assess the nominations and develop a preliminary list of finalists. The entries from those finalists will be posted online for one month, allowing the global peacebuilding community to view, vet and rank the nominees. A short list of nominees for each prize will then be submitted to an International Peace Prize Awards Committee which will review the nominations and select the winner in each category. Decisions of the Committee will be final.

Peace Prize deadlines
September 21, 2008 International Day of Peace: Announcement and Solicitation of Nominations
February 15, 2009 Final Day for Submission of Nominations
June 30, 2009 Awardees informed privately of their selection
September 21, 2009 Announcement of Prize recipients, presentations and call for nominees for 2010 competition

Award presentation
Awards will be presented by the World Vision International President or designee on the International Day of Peace, September 21, 2009.

To find out more about World Vision’s Peacebuilding work and team, go to www.wvi.org/peaceprize.

[We Can Do readers should please note that the official web site for the World Vision International Peace Prize is at

http://www.wvi.org/wvi/wviweb.nsf/maindocs/AC6E33C8CE519993882574C50060CD3E?opendocument

People interested in learning more about the World Vision Peace Prize should please follow the link to their web site. Nomination forms can be downloaded at their web site in English, Spanish, or French. Any questions about the prize that are not adequately addressed by the World Vision Peace Prize website should please be directed to wvi_peaceprize@wvi.org, NOT to We Can Do.]



I learned about this prize via the Disabled Peoples’ International email newsletter.

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Masters of Advanced Studies in Children’s Rights

Posted on 26 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

Found in a recent issue of the Disabled Peoples International electronic newsletter:

“Applicants are needed for the 2009-2010 Master of Advanced Studies in Children’s Rights (MCR), an interdisciplinary part-time postgraduate programme in children’s rights, which is jointly organized by the Institut Universitaire Kurt Bösch (IUKB) in Sion and the University of Fribourg, both in Switzerland.

Program begins 16 February 2009 and the deadline for applications is 15 September 2008. Contact Sarah Bruchez through the website at http://www.iukb.ch/index.php?id=63

It is not clear from their web site to what extent the program will include content on the unique needs and situation of children with disabilities, or the unique needs of children in developing countries. Nor is it clear how well the program will accommodate the needs of participants with disabilities. However, nothing ventured, nothing gained: it is my hope that We Can Do readers with an interest in the human rights of children with disabilities will follow the link to the web page for the Master of Advanced Studies in Children’s Rights and inquire directly with Sarah Bruchez in regard to these questions:

Sarah Bruchez, Programme Secretary
Institut Universitaire Kurt Bösch (IUKB)
MAS in Children’s Rights
P.O. Box 4176 – CH-1950 Sion 4
Tel. +41 (27) 205 73 00
Fax +41 (27) 205 73 01
Email: mcr@iukb.ch

I would be interested in learning of the experience of We Can Do readers with this program; feel free to share in the comments area further below.



Quoted text borrowed from DPI Newsletter; Sarah Bruchez’s contact information taken from Masters of Advanced Studies in Children’s Rights’ website.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Child Injuries, Violence, Disability

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Cross-Disability, Health, Opportunities, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Dear colleagues,

The World Health Organization Bulletin will publish a special issue on
Child Injuries, Violence and Disability in May 2009.

A call has gone out for related articles, see
http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/media/news/whobulletin/en/index.html

Authors are encouraged to submit papers by 1 September 2008.

Please forward this call to groups or individuals that you think may be interested.

Thanks
Alana

Alana OFFICER
Coordinator
Disability and Rehabilitation (DAR)
Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability
World Health Organization

Interested authors should please follow the link to the official webpage on the call the papers in order to obtain all details, including guidelines for authors and instructions on how to submit your papers. We Can Do is unable to answer your inquiries. Thank you.



This announcement was circulated by Alana Officer at the World Health Organization. I found this announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group.

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New Website Links Parents of Disabled Children to Information, Resources

Posted on 14 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Resources, South Asian Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

June 27, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Julie Holmquist 952-838-9000

julie.holmquist@PACER.org

New PACER Web site offers information, resources for children with disabilities and their parents across the globe

Parents of children with disabilities living in India, Uzbekistan and across the globe can find a new resource on the Internet.

A new PACER Web site (www.PACER.org/international) acts as a link to resources, organizations, program ideas and practices that can improve the lives of children with disabilities.

The site was recently launched by the nonprofit PACER Center, a National Parent Center for families of children with disabilities located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.

The Web site provides information on the history of disability rights in the United States, as well as a list of links to resources and organizations in the U.S.A. and other countries that focus on helping children with disabilities.

The idea for the site developed from PACER’s collaboration with professionals and government officials in India. This special connection with India began in 2005 when PACER Executive Director Paula Goldberg visited families in India, met with government officials and toured programs for children with disabilities.

Since that time, PACER has co-sponsored India’s first National Conference on technology for children and adults with disabilities, along with India’s National Institute for the Mentally andicapped. PACER has also supported the creation of a new center on assistive technology for children and adults, scheduled to open September 13 at the Spastics Society of Karnatka(SSK) in Bangalore, India.

Creating a Web site was a way to exchange even more information, Goldberg says. Because of PACER’s close ties with India, the site has a wealth of information about disability organizations and laws in that country. In the future, Goldberg says PACER hopes to expand the amount of resources on the Web site specific to other countries.

PACER has a global reputation for helping families of children with disabilities. More than 130 guests from 15 foreign countries have visited PACER in recent years, and in 2007, PACER staff made presentations on disability issues during a satellite conference with Uzbekistan disability leaders. The conference was hosted by the U.S. Embassy.

“We’ve hosted many international guests at PACER who are eager to find additional resources for children with disabilities,” said Shauna McDonald, PACER’s director of community resource development. “The Web site is another way to collaborate and work toward the goal of improving the lives of children with disabilities around the world.”

PACER Center is a National Parent Center for families of children and youth with any disability or special health need. PACER is located at 8161 Normandale Blvd., Minneapolis, MN 55437-1044. For information, call 952-838-9000 (voice); 952-838-0190 (TTY) or 888-248-0822 (toll-free). PACER’s Web site is www.PACER.org and its e-mail address is PACER@PACER.org



This announcement was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

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Calling All Children and Youth: The CRPD for Young People

Posted on 22 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

UNICEF is calling all young people to share their ideas for the child-friendly text of the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The Convention is an agreement between countries to make sure that children and adults with disabilities are treated fairly and in the same ways as same as other people. UNICEF wants young people to know about it.

UNICEF has launched an online discussion. This discussion gives young people the opportunity to comment on the child-friendly text. Your contribution will help to put the Convention into the hands of children and young people. This way they will know what governments have promised to do to make sure that every child with disability has what he/she needs to grow, play, participate and go to school, and to reach its full potential as others. The discussion is continuing from now until November 9, 2007.

At the UNICEF web site, you can download the “child-friendly” text of the convention in PDF or in Word. If you are a facilitator conducting a focus group, then you can also downloand a Facilitator’s Guide.

You can also answer questions that ask what you thought about the child-friendly text and how it can be made better so that children and young people will understand it. Your answers can be entered at the UNICEF web site or via email to voy@unicef.org.

For more details, follow the link to http://www.unicef.org/voy/takeaction/takeaction_cfc_questionnaire.php


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Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities PART ONE

Posted on 29 July 2007. Filed under: Children, Deaf, Education, Multiple Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , |

A few years ago, I took a class on deaf children with additional disabilities at Gallaudet University. One project I did for that class was to reach out to some of my contacts in developing countries to gather what information they knew about the challenges experienced by deaf children with additional disabilities, particularly in relation to gaining access to an education.

The information I gathered is now three years old. I’m sure some details have changed since I conducted this project. But most of this is, unfortunately, still valid at least in its broad strokes. Deaf children in developing countries, with or without additional disabilities, too frequently don’t have access to an education.

The project I did for class is much too long to post in a single blog entry. Instead, I will be breaking it up into multiple parts, to be posted over the next few months or so.

Here, I post the introduction, as it was first written three years ago:

Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities in Developing Countries

Introduction: How This Project Fits Into the Big Picture

According to the World Bank, 98 percent of all children with disabilities in developing countries are not in school. About 40 million children with disabilities of primary school age are not receiving an education. This includes children who have only a single disability, for example sighted deaf children without mental retardation, learning disabilities, or mobility impairments. What then of deafblind children? Or deaf children with mental retardation? Or deaf children with any other combination of additional disabilities? (NOTE: The link that I originally provided as a source three years ago seems to be gone or revised now. But the World Bank page on education is at http://go.worldbank.org/GMDMICVFF0. If I’m able to re-locate something more specific later, I’ll come back and edit this paragraph accordingly.)

It is often difficult to find reliable, documented information on deaf children or adults in developing countries. Finding reliable information on specific sub populations, such as deaf children with additional disabilities, is even more difficult. This knowledge does exist–but in bits and pieces, locked away inside the heads of hundreds of people around the world who have worked directly with, or at least visited and observed, programs for deaf children in developing countries. I wanted to gather together some of these little pieces of information into one place, even if only in an informal fashion.

Finding the Information
This project began, primarily, as an informal survey of people I already knew via email who either live and work in developing countries or who live in developed countries but who have traveled extensively. Many of my initial contacts were not able to assist within the time frame available. Some may not have seen my email message at all. People in developed countries who work in the international field travel extensively and may be away from email contact for weeks or months at a time, while people in developing countries, for various reasons that I will not elaborate upon here, often have unreliable email access and may also go weeks at a time without being able to check email. Other contacts simply did not have the time to reply. Those who are actively working with deaf communities in developing countries often consider their work to be tantamount to a “calling” and may have little time to devote to any task that does not directly benefit the local deaf community. Also, people in developing countries are more likely to have two or more jobs simply to survive, and thus still have little or no time for email.

Nevertheless, some people did reply, either to share information or to suggest further contacts or to point me to resources on the web or elsewhere that might assist. Some of my “second generation” contacts referred me to still more possible contacts. During the past two weeks, I have sent out email messages to about 59 individuals around the world. I also sent email messages to three list servers: one, deafintl , is devoted to deaf people in developing countries; another is for deaf people in or from Africa; and a third is exclusively for women with various disabilities who participated in a recent leadership training program, Women’s Institute for Leadership and Development, that took place in Eugene, Oregon, last fall through the organization Mobility International USA.


My Sources

Ultimately, I gathered information from the following sources:

> More than a dozen individuals sent me partial or complete replies to my questions.
– Most emails were very brief.
– However, a few individuals were able to answer follow-up questions.
– One individual went the extra mile by personally visiting schools in Lahore, Pakistan, in an attempt to gather information.

> One individual sent me her 43 page masters thesis, written entirely in Spanish, which contained some relevant information. Her thesis is summarized in the section on Argentina.

> I also consulted some web sites that were recommended to me, but particularly the following:
Perkins School for the Blind
Sense International

Disclaimer
It should be noted that, for most countries, I only had one contact or other source of information. Even people who have been active for many years within the deaf community of a given country are not necessarily familiar with all resources available to that community, particularly when it comes to resources that might be available in a different part of the country, or resources outside their professional field, or resources targeted at a sub population within the deaf community in which they have not specialized. The information shared in this document, accordingly, should not be considered complete even in the few cases (e.g., Kenya) where I received responses from more than one person.

In some places, I included quotes from the people who shared information with me. In all of these cases, the quotes reflect the tone, opinions, attitudes, and sentiments of the person quoted. The inclusion of a given quote does not imply that I necessarily agree or disagree with the person’s position.

I have organized the information by country. I will put each country in a separate post at this blog over the next few weeks. When I do, I will edit this entry to include a direct link to each post .



Guest bloggers are welcome to submit essays, announcements, resources, articles, case studies, and opinion pieces of their own to “We Can Do.” I encourage you to first read the Introduction to We Can Do blog.I don’t have a written set of guidelines for guest bloggers–yet. But I’m working on them. In the meantime, if you’re interested, please contact me at ashettle [at] patriot.net and we can discuss.

(Replace [at] with the at sign @ and type the email address as one word with no spaces. Sorry to present my email address in such a cumbersome way. I’m trying to prevent my email address from being hijacked by even more spam harvesters than the five million who have already been flooding my email box.)


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