JOB POST: QuickBooks Training for Sub Grantees, Kenya, Handicap International, Dec 15-19, 2008

Posted on 5 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, autism, Blind, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This short-term consultancy position requires someone to provide a five-day training workshop in the use of QuickBooks from December 15 to 19, 2008. Profiles and proposals must be submitted by December 10, 2008.

TERMS OF REFERENCE: QUICKBOOKS TRAINING FOR THE SUB GRANTEES

BACKGROUND

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL (HI) is an international NGO engaged in the field of disability and development. A strong emphasis, however, is placed on empowering people with disabilities through their integration into mainstream development activities and the provision of appropriate health and rehabilitation services to ensure equal opportunities for all.

Currently, HI is working with 6 partner organizations in the USAID/AED funded projects in the field of Disability and HIV & AIDS. The group represents a cross section of disabilities including the deaf, blind and low vision, physically and intellectually disabled.

The main thematic areas of the project activities include;
• Policy and advocacy
• Behavior change communication
• Appropriate IEC materials for the PWD
• Stigma reduction

One focus of the project is to provide technical support, build the capacities of the partner organization and provide funding to enable them implement HIV& AIDS activities.

JUSTIFICATION

Good financial management practice helps an organization to attain effective and efficient use of resources and be more accountable to donors and other stakeholders. Hence, HI would wish to commission training in QuickBooks for her partners as a requisite to ensuring quality and accurate financial record keeping and reporting on usage of donor funding. HI further wishes to install QuickBooks accounting packages for all the partner organizations that are not yet compliant to the package and final set up a cut-off period for compliance by all the organization.

BACKGROUND OF PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

We have detailed as underneath a brief profile of each of the organizations that we are currently collaborating with as a basis of your understanding the scope of each partner. However, it may be worth noting that the proposed training may also include other partners we are yet to bring on board.

DDSHG (DANDORA DEAF SELF HELP GROUP)

Dandora is an organisation of deaf people that was formed over 10 years ago; Structural formation was very minimal in the initial years. Thus, Handicap international organized governance training which has since increased cohesiveness among the group membership. This is expressed through an increase of paid membership, while several board members who were also employees of the organization resigned as employees to pave for a clear segregation of interests. The organization is situated in Dandora area of Nairobi province.

On overall, the organization has sound and consistent financial management and reporting systems. In the period under review the organization was funded to a tune of Ksh. 1,996,453.00 (one million nine hundred ninety six thousand four hundred fifty three only)

BLINK (Blind and Low Vision Network)

Blink’s beneficiaries are primarily blind and/or persons with very low vision. A key issue for this organisation is that their beneficiaries are in different geographical locations. However, they have focal persons in each district that they meet weekly to discuss the needs of the communities. The board members are also representatives of different Community Based Organizations. They function as resource persons and may have their expenses reimbursed and allowances for services provided.

The organisation refers to itself as a Community Based Organization network that helps the individual Community Based Organisations provide support and care to their communities through awareness creation activities on HIV/AIDS. The discussions in the communities are generally broader than the HIV/AIDS, so the meetings are used as an opportunity to discuss other issues.

Blink has received training in project design and management including M&E frameworks, resource mobilisation, programme reporting, financial management, and managing special needs projects (e.g. reproductive health, HIV/AIDS counselling for disabled people, VCT testing). The counsellors are now better equipped to inform visually impaired people about their test results. Their reporting has also improved.

As regards the governance function, both board members and staff members now understand their roles and what is expected of them thanks to the capacity building initiatives by HI. The board members are also informed about the organisation’s activities by the Director on a regular basis.

The backbone of the spending in the organization is mainly logistical, thus the need for well tailored internal checks and balances mechanism that ensures prudence in the commitment of expenditure. In the current grant period the organisation was obligated to spend Ksh.2,728,962.00(two million seven hundred twenty eight thousand nine hundred sixty two only).

KEDAN (Kenya Disabled Action Network)

KEDAN is a youth organisation which is only 4 years old and covers several types of disability, contrary to most of the other disabled people’s organisations that target a particular category of disability (blind, deaf, physically impaired, and albinos – for capacity reasons they are currently unable to include mentally handicapped. The organisation started out with mobilisation, awareness creation and experience sharing and has only actively implemented programme activities since 2005. . They have developed an action plan for the next couple of years which they intend to implement, despite their limited resources, with the help of their motivated supporters.

As regards the needs of the organisation, KEDAN’s staff feels that they need to strengthen their competencies in the area of resource mobilisation, in particular proposal writing. They also need help to manage their existing resources better. Finally, they wish to develop their staff competencies in areas such as leadership and management, IT, and income generating activities.

In the current grant period the group is obligated to spend Ksh. 2,388,811.00 (two million three hundred eighty eight thousand eight hundred and eleven only).

NFSS (Nairobi Family Support Services)

NFSS was started in 1982 by Actionaid and registered as a local NGO in 1996. The Programme Coordinator has been the leader ever since. The organisation receives funding from HI France and from the AED-programme and is also supported by Sense International and the Liliane Foundation.

The mission of the organisation is to raise awareness on HIV-AIDS and disability through their work with community groups and attempt to change the stigma of disabled people in the community and their low-self esteem. The peer educators meet twice a month to exchange experiences.

NFSS has strong networking capacity. The organisation partners with different institutions, especially through referrals: the Liliane foundation (support for disabled people’s surgery), specialised schools (educational assessment), the Ministry of Health, government hospitals, networks of therapists. This gives the organisation high credibility in the communities.

NFSS would like to support “merry-go-rounds” (revolving credit systems), but as most of their beneficiaries are not working, it is difficult to collect the funds.

Until 2005, Action Aid funded a microfinance programme for the parents of disabled children. These loans were considered by some as grants. After having received several loans, and hence being allowed to loan greater sums, gradually, some of the beneficiaries disappeared with their funds. Only about 50% of these parents are able to continue repaying their microloans.

NFSS has an internal control manual but it has not enhanced its usage. There is therefore need to educate the staff on the importance of these procedures and its implementation. In the current grant period the organization is obligated to spend Ksh. 2,211,847.00 (two million two and eleven thousand eight hundred forty seven only).

DIGROT (Disabled Group of Trans Nzoia)

DIGROT was started in 1990 as a self help group of 50 members on the concept of a merry go round. Since 1998, the group has operated a bank account with Kenya Commercial Bank, Kitale Branch. The group started a micro finance lending system; Members were given loans of ksh.500 to Ksh 2,000 at an interest rate of 10% p.a.

In 2000, they received a grant from District Social Development Officer (Poverty Eradication Programme) which they used to loan their members. 14 members were successfully loaned through this programme and 7 defaulted to repay back. DIGROT was trained by HI in 2004 on micro-credit management.

In the year 2001-2003 they approached HI on HIV/AIDS awareness and in 2004 they wrote a proposal to HI on HIV and AIDS and Disability which was funded in May 2006.

DIGROT has representatives from different locations in Trans Nzoia district and was registered as a Community based Organization (CBO) in 2007. DIGROT is a network of DPOs (Disabled Persons Organizations) in Trans Nzoia district and usually conducts quarterly meetings with representatives from these DPOs.

It currently has 224 registered members and each member pays 524 shillings registration fee with a renewal fee of 200 shillings annually. Not all members are fully registered and the money is kept in a savings account.

The organization lacked well defined operational systems and procedures but has been subjected to vigorous capacity building initiatives, the organizations has also just finalized a recruitment exercise where competent and qualified staff have been brought on board.

In the current partnership agreement the organization is obligated to spend Ksh. 1,131,139.00 (one million one thirty one thousand one hundred thirty nine only)

UDPK (United Disabled Persons of Kenya)

United Disabled Persons of Kenya (UDPK) is an umbrella network of persons with disability in Kenya and was established in 1989 with a membership of the following organizations – Kenya Union of the Blind (KUB), Kenya National Association of the Deaf (KNAD) and Kenya Society of the Physically Handicapped (KSPH), Kenya Society for the Mentally Handicapped (KSMH). Kenya Autism Society joined later to champion issues of parents of mentally challenged Albinos and autism.

Currently UDPK has about 200 member organizations. UDPK was formed so that disabled persons could be united and speak with one voice, advocacy and lobbying remains the core objective.

Membership is both by organizations of and for disabled person. UDPK has five full time staff and 13 Field Officers working in different regions and is headquartered in Westlands, along Waiyaki Way. The mission of UDPK is to unite all persons, groups of Persons with Disabilities (PWDs) to advocate for disability issues on a united front. The vision for the organization is a barrier free society where Persons with Disabilities (PWDS) enjoy access to services in all spheres of life.

In the current grant agreement the organization is mandated to spend Ksh.2, 542,345.00 (two million five forty two thousand three hundred forty five only).

GENERAL OBJECTIVE

The general objective of this consultancy is to conduct an application based QuickBooks Training for management and finance staff of Handicap International partners so as to reflect through proper recording keeping and accurate financial reporting an accountable and effective use of donor funds as outlined in the individual budgets of the funded organizations and based on properly defined internal control systems, proper administrative and logistical management.

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE
• To design and develop a training programme that will equip the trainees with relevant skills and knowledge in Quickbooks

PROPOSED METHODOLOGY

HI proposes to hold a five day residential application based training for management and financial staff from each of the partnering organizations.

HI also proposes that the consulting firm shall at all times seek clarifications and/or guidelines from HI on all issues that are not clear and/or appear ambiguous in their opinion. For the purposes of this Training, the contact person for HI is Mr. Erick Karani, the Project Finance Officer.

TASKS OF THE CONSULTANT

1. Development of a training curriculum that shall conform to the afore-mentioned specific and general objectives and/or all other related aspects of QuickBooks financial package.

2. Carry out an evaluation of the training and produce a training report.

EXPECTED RESULTS

At the end of the training, the trainees will be able to:-
• Explain the essence and challenges of QuickBooks.
• Understand the usage and benefits of QuickBooks in financial management.
• Establish the relationship between QuickBooks reports and external reporting.
• Outline the QuickBooks main menu.
• Set up Accounts in the Quickbooks software
• Key in data and prepare accounting documents.
• Record General Journals.
• Prepare Bank Reconciliations.
• Develop Internal and Donor Reporting formats.
• Prepare monthly/annually reports.
• Correct Errors.

TIME FRAME

The training is expected to commence on 15th and end on 19th December, 2008 close of business.

QUALIFICATIONS

The consultant should have :-
• Relevant educational back ground and experience in teaching QuickBooks in a reputable institution.
• Relevant experience in working as a consultant/ lecturer is added advantage.
• Excellent analytical, writing and communication/facilitation skills.

APPLICATION PROCESS

All interested applicants must submit their profiles and proposals on or before 10th December, 2008 5.00 pm by email to the Project Finance Officer at: ekarani@handicap-international.or.ke

The email subject line should be marked: “QuickBooks training for the Sub grantees”



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) mailing list. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to Handicap International as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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Disability Awareness Action newsletter, Our Rights, Issue 2, August 2008

Posted on 3 September 2008. Filed under: Children, Cognitive Impairments, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Our Rights – issue 2, August 2008

DAA’s newsletter for Disability Lib.

In the interest of solidarity, this newsletter is sent around by email to disabled people and their organisations across the world, and we invite you to forward it freely. We have provided links to internet sites, web pages and video clips, but understand that not all links are technically accessible to all users. From October Our Rights will be available in electronic format and on our website. For our contact details follow this link http://www.daa.org.uk/

Contents
Welcome Hello from DAA
Disability LIB partners
• Central Office
ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth
Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Mind Politics
Stigma
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
Being an Un-Person
Sceptical about The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
60 years of UN Convention on Human Rights
Inclusion means … being given a £50 token?
International News
Canada says ‘go home’ to disabled child
Sex in the City, and world wide
From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
Sit-in at Nursing Home
And Finally …

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******************
Welcome Hello from DAA
Thank you to all of you who took the time to respond to our first issue. We are delighted to be back! We have had replies from around the world.

“I am very happy indeed to get the DAA Newsletter – this is one newsletter that I eagerly look forward to. The articles provided me with new insights and sharpen my understanding.”
“Great newsletter!”
“I access DAA website regularly and will disseminate DAA newsletter to all my contacts.”
“Have just read your first bulletin and I am impressed with its coverage.”
“thanks a lot for your nice news letter. Hope it can help my people in bangladesh.”

Thank you for all your comments. We have improved our technical set-up, so fewer newsletters should land in Junk or Spam email boxes. From October you can access the newsletter on our website. You can request picture supported and word versions. We continue to strive to make our articles interesting, relevant and accessible. Please let us know how we are doing. This edition has two main themes: the body politics of bio-ethics and inclusion. We will also tell you again who we are and what we hope to achieve. Enjoy!
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

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Disability LIB partners
The project has its own website and central office. www.disabilitylib.org.uk
Disability LIB
6 Market Road
London
N7 9PW
England UK
Telephone: 0844 800 4331
Email: contact@disabilitylib.org.uk

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ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
The Social Inclusion Campaign Award from the Sheila McKechnie Foundation was given to the director of ALLFIE, Tara Flood. Tara is also chair of DAA. Tara and the Alliance run a campaign ‘We know inclusion works’. This is in response to the negative reporting in the media. You are invited to send your stories about how inclusion works to info@allfie.org.uk

“Inclusion for me is about society, which respects the humanity of its people.” says a disabled young person in Nottinghamshire. “Inclusion happens when everyone feels appreciated and welcome to participate.”
Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education.

Inclusion is going to school with your friends. “I kept asking myself what words a mother would use to explain to her daughter why they did not want her at her school. Except that she was disabled. If my daughter had only been black, and not disabled too, would the school have been able to do the same?”
Preethi Manuel mother of Zahrah.

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Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth

The media reported that a nine-year-old girl called Lin was moving her lips, but did not actually sing at the opening of the Olympic Games in China. The beautiful voice we all heard was from a different girl, the seven year-old Yang Peiyi. Apparently Yang was not shown on stage nor on television, because she has crooked teeth. Her face and her smile were regarded as not photogenic enough, so she was hidden to avoid damaging China’s international image.

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Often we find disabled people are hidden, out-of-sight and at the margins of society. Society’s underlying cultural preferences in terms of the body and mind is for a particular image of beauty and health: a superficial one.

Our impairment difference is treated like a ‘stigma’, a characteristic that is deeply discredited within one’s society and for which we are rejected. Our difference, it seems, is challenging.

“I experienced a nervous breakdown 20 years ago. Despite recovering from that, then going on to achieve academically and build a good marriage, my family remain wary of me. My sister is bringing up her child to refer to me as “crazy”. She even considers it funny to do so. I have tried to express how hurtful I find this, but my feelings have been overlooked.”
7th August 2008, Guardian ‘Stigmatised by my own family’

In a unique research called ‘Shout’ almost 4,000 mental health service users were involved. The charity Rethink found that 87% of people said they had direct personal experience of stigma and discrimination and reported the negative impact of stigma on their lives.

The damage caused was wide-ranging; the areas affected include employment, family, friendships, neighbours, accessing education, reporting crime, relationships with health professionals, and feeling confident enough to visit the shops, go to the pub or take part in activities in the community, it says.
The Stigma Shout report can be found at http://www.rethink.org/how_we_can_help/campaigning_for_change/moving_people/stigma_shout.html

But this problem goes deeper. If a girl can be excluded for crooked teeth, where does it end? Our society allows science and law to de-select disabled lives.
For impairment reasons they tamper with genetics in an attempt to screen out difference. We have laws that allow late abortion because of so called ‘defects’.We allow bio-ethics to de-select impairment.

In 2004, UKCPD (formerly the British Council of Disabled People) asked “Can human rights apply if we select children or value people’s quality of life on the basis of their genetic make-up or impairment?” http://www.bcodp.org.uk/library/genetics/3disabhr.pdf
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/06/mentalhealth
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/07/mentalhealth.familyandrelationships

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Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
on last month’s theme: Forced Interventions
Being an Un-Person… (8’47’’)
“This is from a handout I gave while speaking at training for staff who work with people who have developmental disabilities. It is about what it means to be dehumanized and it applies to a far greater group of people than the original audience. It is, to make it clear, something that is done to us by other people, not something intrinsic to who we are.

Being an Un-person means that people talk in front of you as if you aren’t there… It means that your existence seems to fill people with disgust and fear. … If you communicate with behaviour, you will be punished, restrained, drugged or put in a behaviour program.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c5_3wqZ3Lk

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Sceptical
A sceptical view was expressed about the usefulness of the Convention. How does it protect the rights of people with mental health issues?

“My organization are skeptical on the UN Convention re Legal Intervention for people with mental health issues and the sense of disabled people being able to join the armed forces.”

For a discussion of how different Articles in the Convention can work together, go to page 47 in this 2007 publication: http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_WORDversion.doc
The text of Article 12 can be accessed at http://www.mindfreedom.org/kb/mental-health-global/united-nations/article-12-un

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The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
This year (2008) we celebrate 60 years of the United Nations Convention on Human Rights, the first international commitment on human rights.

A web campaign http://www.everyhumanhasrights.org/ urges us to embrace the values and goals of the Declaration. To protect the rights of our fellow global villagers and to encourage others to do the same in our communities, workplaces and schools. We are asked to affirm these principles:

“Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, lanaguage, relition, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.” Every Human has Rights

However, our rights as disabled people are not spelled out specifically. It makes no specific mention of the meaning of rights as disabled people. Our experience is that we are often invisible, excluded or forgotten. We are not always included into the general phrase of ‘human’ inhuman rights.

That is why we needed a specific convention and why we are campaigning for our countries to ratify the Convention of the Rights of Disabled Persons.

UN Convention text resources:
Details of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People can be found at
http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=12&pid=150
http://www.un.org/disabilities/convention/conventionfull.shtml
Easy Read version of the Convention
http://www.officefordisability.gov.uk/docs/international-agreement-rights-disabled-people.pdf
For Easy Read versions of the Convention’s extra agreements (Optional Protocols) go to
http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/convention/nz.htm
A child-friendly text of the Convention can be accessed at
http://www.unicef.org/Child_friendly_CRPD.pdf

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Inclusion means … being given a £50 gift token?
A grammar school in Lincolnshire, England, did not listen to a boy with Autism when planning and arranging the 11-plus entrance exam. Under the Disability Discrimination Act any barriers to learning have to be removed, for example by making alternative arrangements or providing reasonable adjustments.

His mother said: “We knew he would struggle with the change in surroundings. Our primary school head teacher suggested we ask if he could sit the test there, or at least in a room on his own. But when I went to the school I was told, ‘No, we don’t make any allowances’.”

As the barriers of unfamiliar surroundings, a crowded room full with unfamiliar people were not removed, the boy was extremely distressed and failed the exam.

The ombudsman Anne Seex said the school had not considered its duties under the Disability Discrimination Act.

The boy was admitted to another grammar school on the basis of his exam results at the end of primary school (called SATs) and his junior school’s recommendation.

The school has apologised, has given the boy a £50 gift token and agreed to handle future cases differently.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/lincolnshire/7542948.stm
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/article4460621.ece

International News

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Canada
Paul and Barbara-Anne Chapman had sold their home in Britain and bought a farmhouse in Nova Scotia, Canada. The local authorities supported and welcomed them.

However, when the family arrived at the airport a border guard refused them entry. Several questions were raised about their work permit, clearance for their black Labrador and about their daughter Lucy, who has Angelman syndrome.

The family claim they were told by a border guard that because Lucy is disabled she would never be allowed into the country, and that she had a lifetime ban.

Mrs Chapman said: “My dog was allowed to stay. My dog has a higher status than my daughter in Canada, just because she is disabled.”

Canada’s immigration rules in section 38 do have a clause that states that you are not eligible for immigration if you would make an excessive demand on health and social services. Presently, “excessive demand” is usually defined as exceeding $15,000 of publicly funded health care costs over the next 5 years. However, in certain family applications, children are exempt from this rule of no entry due to health care costs.

The Convention on the Rights of Disabled People places obligations on countries to protect disabled people’s rights and freedoms. This includes the right to free movement and residency.

Entry to one’s own country is specifically mentioned in Article 18 of the Convention: “Are not deprived, arbitrarily or on the basis of disability, of the right to enter their own country.”

Entry into another country is protected in Article 18, where it says that disabled people should “not be deprived, on the basis of disability, of their ability to obtain, possess and utilize … relevant processes such as immigration proceedings, that may be needed to facilitate exercise of the right to liberty of movement.”

Mr and Mrs Chapman hired a Canadian lawyer to fight the decision.

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=278
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/canada/2519496/Canada-refuses-entry-to-disabled-girl.html

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Sex in the City… and world-wide.
Research has shown that disabled people are being denied the choice to full sexual relationships.

“I want to meet a girl I can become friends with, take to the pub and the cinema and then after a couple of months see where it goes,” Joseph Greene, 23.

The national charity Family Planning Association FPA has organised an information and poster campaign about the right to have sex and relationships. FPA gives people information and advice about sexual health. This is particularly important in view of the continuing rise and impact of HIV (see reports below).

Easy Read, posters and campaign info at
http://www.fpa.org.uk/news/campaigns/current%5Fcampaigns/detail.cfm?contentid=1021
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7540103.stm
http://www.fpa.org.uk/products/learning_disabilities_publications/detail.cfm?contentid=1037

‘Let’s talk About Sex’ was launched in June 2008 for young people with life-limiting health conditions, in a bid to open up a taboo subject and to better support these young people to have the opportunity to experience relationships and explore their sexuality, in a safe, supportive and empathetic environment.
http://www.act.org.uk/content/view/153/1/

Our rights and dignity in connection with these personal areas are protected in the Convention. Article 23 of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People specifically refers to forming relationships and accessing age-appropriate information, reproductive and family planning education.

As part of their obligations, countries who have ratified the Convention, have a duty to develop and change customs or practices. This includes working towards a change in attitude towards disabled people and sex.

Article 4 of the Convention asks governments to develop or change customs and practices which contradict the rights. Community norms, customs and practices of what people believe or how professionals deal with disabled people may go against the ideals laid down in the Convention.

“What is acceptable in the community is for a disabled person to marry another disabled person so that together they share their curse”, says a disabled local councillor in Uganda.
http://www.disabilitykar.net/docs/stories_women.doc

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From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
On August 6th a very important international panel discussion took place. ‘Beyond Barriers: Disability and HIV/AIDS’ gave information about studies from across the world – Brazil, South Africa, Cameroon, and Canada.

Disabled people were found to be consistently more vulnerable to infection. People with learning difficulties and disabled women are often exposed to riskier situations; women in particular experience more unprotected sex than the general population, often as a result of sexual violence.

A researcher in Kwa Zulu-Natal, where there is no disability-specific sex education, encountered a “let sleeping dogs lie” attitude in schools. As a result, she found that disabled children had little access to education or legal protection and were more vulnerable to abuse and infection.

n Cameroon, a study focused on a young deaf population, found that sexual debut was on the whole earlier and riskier than in the general population.
http://eliminateaids.blogspot.com/2008/08/beyond-barriers-disability-and-hivaids.html

The Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV/AIDS is an advocacy tool for all Campaign partners and supporters. We invite you to download this printer-ready version in English, French and Portuguese to disseminate at your various meetings and conferences!
http://www.africacampaign.info/a-nos-lecteurs-francais/index.html
http://www.africacampaign.info/recent-publication/index.html
http://www.dcdd.nl/data/1208782834413_Kampala%20Declaration%20on%20Disability%20and%20HIVAIDS.pdf

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A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
This article argues that despite national laws and certain improvements towards disability rights, El Salvador has only made nominal progress in implementing disability legislation and awareness.

In the context of El Salvador’s twelve-year armed conflict, 70,000 individuals were killed and another 300,000 people were disabled as a result of war.

However, this estimate conflicts with official statistics released by the Ministry of Economy in August 2008. Jesus Martinez, Director of the Landmine Survivors Network-El Salvador is extremely uncomfortable with the results of this 2008 Census.

“It should include accurate and trustworthy statistics about all of the disabled individuals living in this country.” he says.

Disabled people need to be counted in order to be visible in policy action, planning and prioritisation. Article 31 asks countries to find out about disabled people. State parties need collect appropriate information, including statistical and research data, to enable them to formulate and implement policies, which make a reality of the rights in the Convention.

If the Convention marks “a paradigm shift” in attitudes and approaches, then disabled people are not objects that are being counted, but subjects, who have rights and freedoms. As a result of this shift in thinking, ratification of the Convention should also mark a shift in creating a more inclusive society in El Salvador.
http://upsidedownworld.org/main/content/view/1384/74/

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Sit-in at Nursing Home
Demonstrators organised a sit-in and called for closure of a nursing home in Philadelphia. “There is no justice for someone in a nursing home,” read a sign held by one of the demonstrators.

The group’s goal was to persuade Mayor Nutter to help find homes for 50 or so disabled residents over the next six months, then get out of the nursing-home business. They were successful! Details at:
http://www.adapt.org/ http://www.philly.com/philly/hp/news_update/20080818_Protesters_seek_to_close_Phila__nursing_home.html

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And Finally …
Discrimination is a putrid shade of yellow
It tastes like stale vomit
It smells like rancid fish
Discrimination reminds me of corruption, anger and despair
And sounds like a hooded coward running scared
Discrimination feels like nobody cares …
Extract from Bipolar works blog, 2007

Thank you for your time.
We are pleased to hear from you.
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

Supported by the National Lottery through the Big Lottery Fund.



Thank you to Disability Awareness Action for giving open permission to disseminate and re-publish their newsletter.

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Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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South Asian CONFERENCE on Autism

Posted on 1 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, autism, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Invitation for Participation in Conference & Training on Autism

SOUTH ASIAN REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON AUTISM: BUILDING BRIDGES
TRAINING WORKSHOP IN STRUCTURED TEACHING

15 – 18 Janaury 2008 NEW DELHI

Action For Autism with support from the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment is proud to host the South Asian Conference on Autism in New Delhi over 15 and 16 January 2008. This will be followed by a two-day practical hands-on training workshop in Structured Teaching on the TEACCH approach over 17 and 18 January 2008.

THE CONFERENCE will have a number of speakers who have Autism and who will speak on growing up and living with autism. There will be national and international presenters on Social Understanding, Adolescent Issues, Employment, Communication, Education, Marriage and Sexuality, among others.

The conference will also provide a professional platform to share and exchange knowledge and learning about various issues affecting the Autism community in South Asia. Academicians, researchers, professionals from the UK, USA, Denmark, Germany and India and SAARC countries from a range of fields have been invited to share and exchange the latest in research and practice.

THE WORKSHOP following the conference will aim to train mainstream teachers, special needs teachers, OTs, SLPs, vocational trainers, Parents, and anyone involved in helping individuals with autism receive an education and life skills training. The training on the TEACCH approach out of North Carolina will address the need for structure in a lifespan perspective, from the classroom right up to employment and future life.

The training workshop only has space for 40 participants.

We would like to invite all of you, researchers, professionals, parents, students, as well as anybody interested in knowing more about the field of Autism to attend the conference and the post conference workshop in Structured Methods.

Details about the conference and the post conference workshop can be viewed at our website www.autism-india.org as well as the August 2007 issue of our journal ‘Autism Network.’ Registration forms may be downloaded from the website.

The list of presenters along with their topics will be posted on our website shortly. For outstation participants, January is a busy season in Delhi, so please book your accommodation well in advance.

Looking forward to welcoming you to Delhi in January!

Warm regards
The Conference Coordination Team
Action For Autism (AFA)
Sector 5 Jasola Vihar, Behind Sai Niketan
New Delhi 110025 Tel: 91 11 40540991, 91 11 40540992, 91 11 65347422
Email: actionforautism@gmail.com autism@vsnl.com
Website: http://www.autism-india.org

Even those unable to attend the conference may wish to follow the link to the Action for Autism web site to explore their information and resources related to autism in India, including links to material in Hindi, Tamil, and other Indian languages.


We Can Do learned about this conference through the Intl-Dev email news distribution service, which people can subscribe to for free by following the link.


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NEWS: Human Rights Abuses of Disabled Children, Adults in Serbia

Posted on 17 November 2007. Filed under: Blind, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

MENTAL DISABILITY RIGHTS INTERNATIONAL

Embargoed Until November 14th, 2007

Contact: Laurie Ahern – 202.361.1402
Eric Rosenthal – 202.361.9195
Email: Lahern@mdri.org
Email: Erosenthal@mdri.org

HUMAN RIGHTS GROUP ACCUSES SERBIA OF TORTURE AND ABUSE AGAINST CHILDREN AND ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES

Belgrade, Serbia – November 14, 2007 – Following a four year investigation, Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI) released its findings today in a report detailing the human rights abuses perpetrated against children and adults in Serbia with disabilities, forced to live out their lives in institutions. Torment not Treatment: Serbia’s Segregation and Abuse of Children and Adults with Disabilities describes children and adults tied to beds or never allowed to leave their cribs – some for years at a time. In addition, filthy conditions, contagious diseases, lack of medical care, rehabilitation and judicial oversight renders placement in a Serbian institution life threatening for both children and adults. The children and adults had a range of disabilities including Downs Syndrome, deafness, visual impairment, autism, and mobility impairments.

“These are Serbia’s most vulnerable citizens. Thousands confined to institutions are subjected to inhuman and degrading treatment and abuse. Children and adults tied down and restrained over a lifetime is dangerous and painful treatment tantamount to torture – clear violations of the European Convention on Human Rights,” said Attorney Eric Rosenthal, Executive Director of MDRI and an expert on human rights law.

“We call on the government of Serbia to stop these abuses immediately and to respect the human rights of all people with disabilities,” concluded Rosenthal.

For more information visit www.mdri.org, where you can download a copy of the full report in PDF format, videos, and photos. The video footage does not have captions available. As a deaf person, I found that if you read the executive summary of the report and look at some of the photos before viewing the video then most of the images in the video speak for themselves. I’m guessing that there is probably no audio description for blind people; as a sighted deaf person, I’m afraid I’m not in a position to judge how much sense the video will make without it. Readers who are deaf or blind–or who support their interests–may wish to contact MDRI to encourage them to make their video materials available with both captions and audio description.

MDRI is an international human rights and advocacy organization dedicated to the full participation in society of people with mental disabilities worldwide. We Can Do published an earlier press release from MDRI reporting on similar human rights abuses in Argentina; the Argentina report, entitled Ruined Lives, can still be downloaded from the front page of the MDRI web site (scroll down the page). More reports about human rights abuses of people with disabilities in Turkey, Peru, Uruguay, Mexico, Kosovo, Russia, and Hungary can be downloaded in PDF format from http://www.mdri.org/publications/index.htm

Most of the text of this blog post comes from the MDRI press release, which can be retrieved at www.mdri.org.


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CONFERENCE: Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Posted on 15 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Cognitive Impairments, Events and Conferences, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Most of the text for this announcement is taken from the web site for the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC).

Certain types of disabilities, such as deafness, speech impairment, cerebral palsy, autism, or auditory processing disorders can affect the way a person communicates. Certain technologies and strategies can enable people with these or other disabilities to communicate with each other and the wider world. These technologies and strategies are collectively referred to as “augmentative and alternative communication.”

“Leading the way” is the theme of ISAAC’s 13th biennial meeting, which will be held in Montréal, Canada in August 2008. ISAAC and its members have been leaders in AAC around the world for almost 25 years! ISAAC officially began in 1983 with a small group of individuals and has grown into an organization that is recognized internationally for the expertise, dedication, and creativity of its members.

We have much to celebrate in 2008, ISAAC’s 25th anniversary. The field of AAC has changed enormously in the last 25 years, and will continue to evolve in the future. Technological advances and new perspectives on human communication have shaped the evolution of AAC. Individuals who use AAC for their daily communication have increasingly taken on leadership roles in many different ways. Examples of leadership will be showcased as part of the 2008 conference program.Papers, presentations, and discussions of research projects, clinical and educational concerns, and issues of interest to individuals who use AAC systems will round out the program.

The conference committees are preparing an exceptional event! In addition to the exciting main conference program, there will be pre-conference workshops on current topics in AAC, and the research symposium following the main conference will be a must for AAC researchers. Montréal is the perfect site for the 2008 conference. A city with an interesting history and a bright future, Montréal is a lively place to visit, especially in the summertime. There will be opportunities to take advantage of all Montréal has to offer!

We are looking forward to welcoming ISAAC to Montréal in 2008!
See you there!

Your conference co-chairs,
Ann Sutton and Jeff Riley
isaac2008@jpdl.com

Pre-conference workshops will be held August 2 and 3, 2008. The main conference will be August 4 to 7. A research symposium will be held August 8 and 9. A reduced registration fee is available for individuals who use augmentative or alternative communication systems, students, and individuals from developing countries. However, the conference is not able to provide financial assistance.

Please note that, at this time, ISAAC chapters all seem to be located in industrialized countries. We Can Do is unable to determine the extent to which workshop presentations would be sensitized to the needs and challenges of people using augmentative or alternative communication methods in developing countries. Those who are interested in the conference should explore their web site at http://www.isaac2008.org/index.html. Remaining concerns or questions should be directed to the conference organizers at:

ISAAC 2008 Conference Secretariat – JPdL
isaac2008@jpdl.com
1555 Peel, Suite 500
Montréal (Québec) H3A 3L8, Canada

Tel: +1 (514) 287-1070
Fax: +1 (514) 287-1248


If you have been to We Can Do before then you may have noticed that this blog has a new appearance and structure. How do you like it? Do you find it easier, or harder, to navigate and find the information you’re looking for? Any other feedback on how to improve the We Can Do blog in general? Whether you’re a new-comer or repeat visitor, please share your thoughts in the comments area at the post where I describe We Can Do’s new presentation or email me at ashettle at patriot dot net.


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Pacific Rim CONFERENCE on Disabilities

Posted on 6 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

[ADDENDUM, November 1, 2008: Please note that this is an annual event. The text below refers to the conference that was held in 2008. I have left it here for historical interest. However, people interested in attending this conference should consult the more recent announcement for the May 2009 event.]

I received this text via the Disability Information Dissemination Network:

24TH ANNUAL PACIFIC RIM CONFERENCE ON DISABILITIES

NEW DATES!!!!

24TH ANNUAL PACIFIC RIM CONFERENCE ON DISABILITIES
April 14 & 15th, 2008
Sheraton Waikiki Hotel & Resort
Honolulu, Hawaii

Due to concerns related to holiday travel, the 2008 Pacific Rim Conference has
been rescheduled for April 14th & 15th, 2008. We apologize for any
inconvenience, and we thank you for your understanding. Please visit our
website at www.pacrim.hawaii.edu for proposal submission.

CDS will be celebrating 20 years of academic and community excellence.
Building on the overwhelmingly positive outcomes of previous Annual Pacific
Rim Conferences and harnessing the excitement of this special anniversary,
this will be a conference you wont want to miss.

As a part of that celebration, we have broadened our program topics to reflect
the diversity that the field of Disability Studies encompasses. Your
participation and proposals are vital to make the 2008 Pacific Rim Conference
the most successful yet.

Program topics are chosen each year based on suggestions from previous
conferences, the latest industry trends, and community need. Proposals from
around the world are accepted and should address best practices and innovation
within the selected program topic.

This years program format is designed to address multiple topics including:
X                 Autism
X                 Differentiated Instruction
X                 Disability Studies: Envisioning our Future
X                 Employment
X                 Family Supports
X                 Hidden Disabilities
X                 International Disability Rights
X                 Native Hawaiian Education
X                 Pacific Footprints of Change: Walking the Talk
X                 Teach to Reach All Learners
X                 Technologies for Realizing Potential and Building
Community
X                 Transition to Adulthood

We will have numerous pre and post conference meetings, workshops and forums
including International Forum 2008: Securing the Rights of Persons with
Disabilities.

Now is the time for you and your colleagues to consider submitting to the Pac
Rim Call for Papers.  Please visit http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu and click on
Call for Papers for complete details.

If you have attended previous Pac Rim Conferences, we look forward to seeing
you again. If you have considered attending before but havent, this is the
year for you to visit our lovely islands and experience one of the countrys
largest conference on disabilities.

***********************************************

Pac Rim Strand – Disability Studies: Envisioning Our Future

“Disability studies is us looking out at the world and seeing
how that looks to us.”

-Simi Linton, Advocate, Scholar, Author

In recent years, the focus of Disability Studies has become increasingly
interdisciplinary and multicultural. The Pacific Rim Conference program on
Disability Studies seeks proposals for presentations that envision the
possibilities of future collaboration between Disability Studies and other
fields of study. The topic leaders are particularly interested in
presentations that focus on disability as a sociological and cultural
phenomena within the context of the social sciences, humanities, arts and
sciences. This topic area will feature: noted speakers, breakout sessions,
panel discussions, and poster display/presentations.  (The submissions
deadline is Monday, November 12, 2007).

For more information or to submit a proposal visit:
http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/submissions or contact the topic leaders: Megan
Conway at mconway@hawaii.edu, Steve Brown at sebrown@hawaii.edu, or Norma Jean Stodden at nstodden@hawaii.edu. For information about the Pacific Rim 2008
Conference please contact prinfo@hawaii.edu or call 956-7539

______________________________________

We Can Do received the above information from the “Disability Information Dissemination Network,” which is managed by the ”Centre for Services and Information on Disability”(CSID), Bangladesh and currently sponsored by Sightsavers International.  People who wish to receive mailings like this one directly in their email can contact csid@bdmail.net or csid@bdonline.com with the word “join” in the subject line of your email message.



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