REPORT: Disability in 28 Asian-Pacific Countries

Posted on 28 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Policy & Legislation, Reports, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons (2003-2012) was meant to promote a rights-based approach toward disability in the Asian-Pacific Region, in place of the older welfare-based approach. The “Biwako Millennium Framework for Action towards an Inclusive, Barrier-free and Rights-based Society for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific (BMF)” was meant to provide countries in the Asian region with a set of principles to help them make the shift. How well has it succeeded?

In 2004, the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), a part of the United Nations system, conducted a survey to find out. The result is an 87-page publication entitled “Disability At a Glance: Profile of 28 Countries in Asia and the Pacific” (PDF format, 780 Kb), released in 2006. It is meant to provide disability-related data and policy information so that readers can compare definitions of disability; statistics; the implementation of the Biwako framework; and government commitments to disability issues across the Asian-Pacific region. The countries and regions covered in the publication include: China; Hong Kong; Japan; Mongolia; Republic of Korea; Cambodia; Indonesia; Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Malaysia; Philippines; Singapore; Thailand; Timor Leste; Vietnam; Afghanistan; Bangaldesh; Bhutan; India; Maldives; Nepal; Pakistan; Kazakhstan; Pacific Australia; Cook Islands; Fiji; Kiribati; and Solomon Islands.

Each country is represented with a one- or two-page table filled in with relevant statistics and one-paragraph summaries of disability-related legislation and policies in the country. This publication is not the place to seek out in-depth information about the complexities and nuances of daily life for people with disabilities in the Asian-Pacific region. But then, it is not meant to be. It’s strength is that it allows quick and easy comparison of certain specific types of information across many countries within the region. Or, people who wish to gain a broad sense of disability demographics, policies, and inclusion in the Asian-Pacific region as a whole will wish to read the section sub-headed “Key Findings,” starting near the bottom of page 9.

Download the full report (PDF format, 780 Kb) at http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/disability/publications/glance/disability%20at%20a%20glance.pdf.

People interested in reading reports about disability in the Asian-Pacific region will also want to browse the Social Policy Papers on disability listed on the ESCAP web page at http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/publications/index.asp. Two examples of additional reports and publications include Focus on Ability, Celebrate Diversity: Highlights of the Asian and Pacific Decade published in 2003, following the 1993 to 2002 decade; and Hidden Sisters: Women and Girls with Disabilities in the Asian-Pacific Region, 1995.

People also may wish to read the original Biwako framework on-line, or read the 2007 “Biwako Plus Five” update on progress since the Biwako framework was written.



I learned about this publication through the AsiaPacificDisability listserver, which people can subscribe to for free.

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NEWS: Australia Commits to Leading Disability Inclusion in Development in Pacific Region

Posted on 30 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, News, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Australian government agency devoted to international assistance programs, AusAid, released the following statement yesterday.

MEDIA RELEASE
BOB MCMULLAN MP
PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE
MEMBER FOR FRASER

——————————————————————————–
AA 08 60 29 September 2008
Australia Leads Support for People With Disabilities in Asia Pacific
Parliamentary Secretary for International Development Assistance, Bob McMullan, today committed Australia to a leadership role in supporting people with disability in the Asia Pacific.

An estimated 650 million people across the world have a disability and about 80 per cent of the population with a disability live in developing countries. The Asia Pacific region is home to two-thirds of this population.

“The Australian Government recognises that poverty is both a cause and consequence of disability and is committed to ensuring that the benefits of development reach those who are most excluded,” Mr McMullan said.

Australia is providing $45 million over two years to develop an avoidable blindness program and the development of a comprehensive disability strategy to guide Australia’s international development assistance program.

Mr McMullan said the Government’s new emphasis on disability reflected Australia’s commitment to increasing social participation for all.

Mr McMullan released the draft strategy for consultation today at the International Conference on Disability, Disadvantage and Development in the Pacific and Asia on 29 September – 1 October.

“This conference shows that there is a growing interest in disability across the region and increasing recognition that people with disability, who often count amongst the poorest of the poor, have an important role to play in national development.

“I am determined that Australia will take a lead in this respect,” said Mr McMullan.

He said the conference also represented a timely opportunity to discuss the draft disability strategy with disability representatives, many of whom have contributed to its development, before its official launch later this year.

The conference aims to exchange knowledge and promote action on disability in developing countries. Organised by the Australian Disability and Development Consortium, it has attracted over 200 participants from the region and will open at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra on 29 September.

Australia has recently ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and, in addition to a disability strategy for its aid program, is preparing a national disability policy to be released in 2009.

The text for the above statement statement was taken from the AusAid website at: http://www.ausaid.gov.au/media/release.cfm?BC=Latest&ID=1213_3874_2510_2635_942

More information about AusAid efforts to include disability issues in their assistance programs is available at: http://www.ausaid.gov.au/keyaid/disability.cfm

Looking to make your own mainstream international development organization more disability-inclusive? Check the page on Resources, Toolkits, and Funding for a listing of past We Can Do posts with links to resources related to inclusive development.



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I first received a copy of AusAids’ statement via the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group.

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Leadership Training, for Asia-Pacific Region, November 2-7, 2008, Seoul, Korea

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , |

The following text is taken from a recent issue of the Disabled People International newsletter.\

Leadership Training in Korea
DPI Korea will be holding its 4th Leadership Training Program 2-7 November 2008 in Seoul, Korea. The intent is to train future generations of leaders. This program will set the stage on disability issues in the Asia-pacific region, including Korea. Cost of attendance and registration are provided. For information, phone +82-2-457-0427 / Fax +82-2-458-0429 or email dpikorea@dpikorea.org.



As with all other announcements of this nature, any inquries should be directed to the organizers, NOT to We Can Do.

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Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship for Masters or Doctorate

Posted on 25 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship for Masters or Doctorate
[The application deadline for this scholarship for people in the Asia-Pacific region is June 30, 2008.]

The Australian Leadership Awards (ALA) Scholarships are a component of the Australian Leadership Awards, a regional program under the Australian Scholarships initiative. Australian Leadership Awards aim to develop leadership, build partnerships and linkages within the Asia-Pacific.

They are intended for those who are already leaders or have the potential to assume leadership roles that can influence social and economic policy reform and development outcomes, both in their own countries and in the Asia-Pacific region. The ALA program comprises of Scholarships and Fellowships.

ALA Scholarships are academically elite awards offered to high achievers from the Asia-Pacific region each year to undertake postgraduate study (Masters or Doctorate) and a Leadership Development Program in Australia.

Selection for ALA Scholarships is highly competitive, based on leadership qualities and on academic excellence.

ALA Scholarships are an investment in the future of the Asia-Pacific region. In this regard, ALA scholars are required to return to their home country or the region for two years after they have completed their studies.

In future years, ALA scholars will belong to a unique group – the Australian Scholarships Alumni Network (ASAN) – that will maintain strong and enduring links to Australia. Managed by AusAID as part of Australia’s overseas aid program, ALA Scholarships are open only to citizens of countries in the Asia-Pacific region with which Australia has a significant aid program.

Objectives of ALA Scholarships
ALA Scholarships aim to:

  • develop a cadre of leaders advancing regional reform, development and governance
  • increase exchange of knowledge and information within the region
  • build common purpose and understanding between Australia and the region
  • build capacity to address priority regional issues
  • build effective networks between Australia and the region
  • demonstrate the benefits of Australian education through the provision of high quality education.

Fields of study
Awards are open to all fields of study, however, study programs that relate to the priority themes of international trade, pandemics, security and climate change (including clean energy) are encouraged. Scholarships are not available for military training, or training in areas related to nuclear technology and flying aircraft.

Levels of study
An ALA Scholarship enables candidates to undertake studies leading to a Masters or Doctorate degree in Australia. It does not include Graduate Diplomas, with the exception of those Masters courses that require the completion of a Graduate Diploma as part of the Masters degree.

Who should apply
Outstanding applicants with:

  • a very high level of academic achievement at undergraduate and/or postgraduate level
  • a high level of English language proficiency
  • demonstrated leadership potential and good prospects to influence social and economic policy reform and development outcomes in their home country and in the Asia-Pacific region
  • a commitment to participate ASAN on their return home.

Scholarship benefits
An ALA Scholarship has a total value of up to A$110,000 for Masters degrees and A$220,000 for Doctoral programs, not including provisions for the leadership development program.

Benefits include:

  • return air travel
  • visa support
  • establishment allowance
  • full tuition fees
  • =

  • contribution to living expenses
  • Introductory Academic program (IAP)
  • Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) for the duration of the award (for award holder only).

Eligibility
To be eligible for an Australian Leadership Award (ALA) Scholarship, applicants must satisfy the eligibility requirements outlined below.

Applicants must be a citizen of one of the participating countries listed below.
Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Kiribati, Laos, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Nauru, Nepal, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Timor-Leste, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Wallis & Futuna.

Applicants must not have Australian or New Zealand citizenship or permanent residence status, nor be in the process of applying.

Application information
<a href=”Read the following information at the scholarship web site before you apply:

Frequently asked questions
Timeline for applicants
Eligibility
Selection criteria
Terms and conditions of the scholarship
How to apply
Further information

If the material found on http://www.ausaid.gov.au/scholar/ala.cfmthe website for the Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship does not provide the necessary help, please direct enquiries by email to: ala@ausaid.gov.au

More information is available at the Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship web site at: http://www.ausaid.gov.au/scholar/ala.cfm



We Can Do received this announcement via the AdHoc_IDC listserv. People interested in the program should please consult the web site for the Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship (click on this link). Any remaining questions not cleared up by their web site can please be directed to the parties involved with the scholarship at ala@ausaid.gov.au, NOT We Can Do.

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