5th CONFERENCE South Asian CBR Network 5-7 Oct 2009 Kabul, Afghanistan

Posted on 30 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Events and Conferences, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

5th conference South Asian Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) Network

Dear All

Greetings. The South Asian CBR Network cordially invite you to actively participate in its 5th conference. It is organized from 5th-to 7th October 2009, Kabul, Afghanistan.

CBR NETWORK conference in the past has been an active forum to discuss the global trends and local applications of policies, legislation, programme, technology and other issues focusing on grassroots level issues.

Think globally -Act Locally has been main guiding principle for us.In the light of UN convention for persons with Disabilities the relevance of CBR as a strategy and as a principle for developing inclusive society is noted by both civil societies and the governments.

The challenges are multifold. Please join in the conference. Together with networking, sharing and working together we can make an impact .

Kindly see the website (www.cbrnetwork.af) for online registrations.

If you have questions please do write to us.

Email: secretariat@cbrnetwork.af

Or

cbrnet@airtelmail.in



We Can Do received this announcement via the <a href="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AsiaPacificDisability/Asia Pacific Disability email-based discussion group. All inquiries should please be directed to the conference organizers at the email addresses given above, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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JOB POST: External Consultant, Gender and Disabilities, Afghanistan

Posted on 30 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

TERMS OF REFERENCE

To identify best practices on how to include women with disabilities in the design of projects on disability

1. Introduction:

In 2005 and 2006 Handicap International has conducted a national survey on disability (NDSA, National Disability Survey in Afghanistan). In this study the number of persons with disability (PwD) in Afghanistan was estimated between 747,500 and 867,100, considering 2.7% as a prevalence rate of Afghan with disabilities. An average of 1 out of 5 households has at least one person with disability. More than half of persons with disabilities in Afghanistan are living in Central, Western and Southern regions of Afghanistan. The number of PwDs in Herat, Kabul and Kandahar Provinces are among the highest in the country. Many years of war, landmines, but also impairments acquired from birth, inadequate healthcare, congenital disabilities, accidents or malnutrition and preventable diseases such as polio or tuberculosis made hundred of thousands of Afghans disabled.

Considering Afghanistan contest Women with Disabilities (WWDs) suffer double vulnerability: first they are Women and second they are disabled

The government has limited programme interventions in addressing issues related with Disability and for the PwDs. For the last few years, a number of organizations in the non government sector have come up with programs and projects to the benefits of the PwDs. Little is know about Women with Disability and the constraints they face in their daily lives and the quality of life they enjoy in Afghanistan. That can be reliably need for designing understand projects.

2. Background

Handicap International is an international organization specialized in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, offering them assistance and supporting them in their efforts to become self-reliant. Since its creation, the organization has set up programs in approximately 60 countries and intervened in many emergency situations. It has a network of eight national associations (Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and USA) which provide human and financial resources, manage projects and raise awareness of Handicap International’s actions and campaigns.

Handicap International has been working for Afghan people since the mid-1980’s when it started its activities for the Afghan refugees in Pakistan. The Belgium branch of Handicap International started implementing projects in Afghanistan in the early 1990’s while the French one started in the beginning of 2002. In April 2006, the two programs merged under the leadership of HI France.

Today, in response to the pressing needs of persons with disabilities, Handicap International Afghanistan works in the Southern (Kandahar), Western (Herat) and Central (Kabul) regions of Afghanistan, which covers more than half of the people with disabilities in the country. Handicap International in Afghanistan currently operates 8 development projects managed by more than 200 national staff and 7 expatriates. Hl works in four main sectors:

• Disability advocacy and awareness
• Physical rehabilitation and physiotherapy
• Socio-economic inclusion
• Mine risk education

At the advocacy level, HI coordinates its activities with the major international organizations working on disability issues in Afghanistan: Swedish Committee for Afghanistan (SCA), SERVE, and International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). At the local level, HI provides technical assistance to CCD (Community Center for Disabled), is a member of the advocacy committee of the Afghan Civil Society Forum, and supports local DPOs in Herat by providing them technical support and materials, and conducting joint projects on disability awareness.

For the past three years, Handicap International provided rehabilitation services (physiotherapy and orthopedic devices) to an average of 20 000 individuals per year in the Southern region and Herat Province. Our inclusion programs in Herat and Kabul directly provided working opportunities, trainings and referral to other relevant services to an average of more than 3000 persons with disabilities per year. Our teams in Helmand and Kandahar provinces delivered awareness sessions on mine and UXOs related risks to over 200 000 persons at community level, in IDP camps, encashment centers and to Kochies populations (nomads). HI conducted awareness campaigns all over the country to raise awareness on the situation of people with disabilities through photo exhibitions, radio programs and TV spots broadcasted on the main national Medias.

3. Justification of support

Due to lack of expertise in HI Afghanistan and the time needed to complete this work an expert in Gender and Disability is needed to identify best practices on how to include women in the design and implementations of projects on disability”.

4. Ideal candidate

The ideal candidate
• An expert in Gender and Disability. Due to cultural sensitivities, the consultant must be female.
• Teaching, production of guideline and Capacity building supervision experience with DPOs/PwDs,
• Working experience in developing country (preferable)

5. Objectives:

5.1 General objective
To provide a guidelines on best practices on how to include women in the design and implementations of projects on disability

5.2 Activities:
• Review documentations on the situation of women with disabilities (WWDs) in Afghanistan
• Review HI Afghanistan projects documents
• To meet different stakeholders relevant to this study
• To visit Hi projects according to security.
• Assess the attitude and perception of the WWDs by Women with Disabilities themselves, their relatives, Communities and local authorities
• Identify the opportunities and barriers WWD face when accessing services.

6. Expected result:

• Guidelines on best practices on how to include women in the design and implementations of projects on disability
• An example of leaflet and booklet on best practices designed in English.

7. Preparation for the Mission
From HI-Afghanistan
1. To sign and send the contract to the resource person
2. To provide the consultancy fee
3. To provide HI projects
4. To organise all logistic and administrative arrangements for the resource person
5. To provide accommodation in the HI guesthouse in Kabul and Herat
6. To provide an HI support letter for the visa
7. To pay for the travel costs
8. To pay for the visa costs

From the consultant
1. To fulfil requirements of the TOR
2. To secure the visa for Afghanistan with the support of the HI letter
3. To provide insurance for herself
4. To sign the contract.

8. Background documentation required

1. All documents to be supplied upon request.

9. Duration of the mission

6 weeks consultancy excluding travel time, 3rd week of February 2009 in agreement with the HI Gender and Disability Consultant

10. Budget
TITLE LOCAL CURRENCY EURO CODE PCAS CODE PCAF
Consultancy fee 125 USD per day of consultancy plus 2 days of travel plus 3 days preparation prior arrival
International Transport HI
Local Transport HI
Accommodation HI
TOTAL

Signature DP Signature Consultant

Sami ul Haq Sami
Advocacy and Awareness Coordinator
Handicap International
Mobile No.: 00 93 (0)799 30 61 32
Add: House # 548, Street # 5th, Qala-e-Fatullah, Kabul, Afghanistan
Email: samiulhaq@hiafgha.org
samiulhaq_sami@hotmail.com
Web: www.handicap-international.org



Thank you to Sami ul Haq Sami for passing along this job post announcement.

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REPORT: Disability in 28 Asian-Pacific Countries

Posted on 28 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Policy & Legislation, Reports, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons (2003-2012) was meant to promote a rights-based approach toward disability in the Asian-Pacific Region, in place of the older welfare-based approach. The “Biwako Millennium Framework for Action towards an Inclusive, Barrier-free and Rights-based Society for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific (BMF)” was meant to provide countries in the Asian region with a set of principles to help them make the shift. How well has it succeeded?

In 2004, the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), a part of the United Nations system, conducted a survey to find out. The result is an 87-page publication entitled “Disability At a Glance: Profile of 28 Countries in Asia and the Pacific” (PDF format, 780 Kb), released in 2006. It is meant to provide disability-related data and policy information so that readers can compare definitions of disability; statistics; the implementation of the Biwako framework; and government commitments to disability issues across the Asian-Pacific region. The countries and regions covered in the publication include: China; Hong Kong; Japan; Mongolia; Republic of Korea; Cambodia; Indonesia; Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Malaysia; Philippines; Singapore; Thailand; Timor Leste; Vietnam; Afghanistan; Bangaldesh; Bhutan; India; Maldives; Nepal; Pakistan; Kazakhstan; Pacific Australia; Cook Islands; Fiji; Kiribati; and Solomon Islands.

Each country is represented with a one- or two-page table filled in with relevant statistics and one-paragraph summaries of disability-related legislation and policies in the country. This publication is not the place to seek out in-depth information about the complexities and nuances of daily life for people with disabilities in the Asian-Pacific region. But then, it is not meant to be. It’s strength is that it allows quick and easy comparison of certain specific types of information across many countries within the region. Or, people who wish to gain a broad sense of disability demographics, policies, and inclusion in the Asian-Pacific region as a whole will wish to read the section sub-headed “Key Findings,” starting near the bottom of page 9.

Download the full report (PDF format, 780 Kb) at http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/disability/publications/glance/disability%20at%20a%20glance.pdf.

People interested in reading reports about disability in the Asian-Pacific region will also want to browse the Social Policy Papers on disability listed on the ESCAP web page at http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/publications/index.asp. Two examples of additional reports and publications include Focus on Ability, Celebrate Diversity: Highlights of the Asian and Pacific Decade published in 2003, following the 1993 to 2002 decade; and Hidden Sisters: Women and Girls with Disabilities in the Asian-Pacific Region, 1995.

People also may wish to read the original Biwako framework on-line, or read the 2007 “Biwako Plus Five” update on progress since the Biwako framework was written.



I learned about this publication through the AsiaPacificDisability listserver, which people can subscribe to for free.

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Disability in Non-Western Societies: A Bibliography of Bibliographies

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Middle East and North Africa, Poverty, Resources, signed languages, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Researchers who need to locate journal articles and other publications about people with disabilities throughout history in developing countries face significant barriers. People with disabilities outside of North America and Europe tend to be invisible in much of the published literature and throughout history.

Researchers can consult a list of annotated bibliographies at the Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange (CIRRIE) as a starting point in seeking out thousands of articles that may meet their needs.

These bibliographies do not directly link to the articles in question. In many cases, I suspect these articles may not exist on-line. But the bibliographies could be used to help researchers know what publications they should seek out through the inter-library loan program at their university library.

A few examples of annotated bibliographies include: Disability in the Middle East; Disability and Social Responses in Some Southern African Nations; Disability and Social Response in Afghanistan and Pakistan; Disability & Deafness in North East Africa; Disability and Deafness in East Asia: Social and Educational Responses, from Antiquity to Recent Times; Sign, Gesture, and Deafness in South Asia and South-West Asian Histories; Social Responses to Disability & Poverty in Economically Weaker Countries: Research, Trends, Critique, and Lessons Usually Not Learnt; and more.

Researchers may begin exploring the various bibliographies (by author M. Miles) at

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/bibliography/index.php



I found the page listing M. Miles’ various bibliographies by browsing the CIRRIE web site.

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This page also accessible via http://tinyurl.com/atp4tn

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25th Annual Pacific Rim International Conference on Disabilities, Honolulu, Hawaii, 4-5 May 2009

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Events and Conferences, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for Proposals
25th Annual Pacific Rim International Conference on Disabilities

May 4-5, 2009
Honolulu, Hawai‘i
Hawai‘i Convention Center
Note that proposals for workshops need to be submitted by December 12, 2008.

Working toward a brighter future

The Center on Disability Studies (http://www.cds.hawaii.edu) at the University of Hawai‘i cordially invites you to the 25th Annual Pacific Rim International Conference on Disabilities on May 4-5, 2009 in Honolulu, Hawai‘i. Celebrate the collective achievements of the past and look forward to create an inclusive vision for the 21st century. As we face economic uncertainty and global challenges, it is even more important to honor tradition, and use this foundation to navigate our futures.

In the tradition of PacRim, the 2009 conference will revisit familiar themes and explore new directions through scholarship, best practice, and international networking. Join us, and continue this extraordinary journey. We will have several pre and post conference sessions,
including an accessible sports Sunday at the beach; an international film festival; and the 2nd Annual International Forum: Securing the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Eradicating Poverty.

Envisioning the Future

· To achieve human and social progress we will address poverty.

· To maximize human potential we will highlight indigenous/native peoples; girls and women; and veterans with disabilities.

· To realize our dreams for inclusion and self-determination, we will ensure all people have access to services and opportunities: transition to adulthood, employment, family support, independent living.

· To create an accessible world, we will showcase Universal Design for Learning and Living and feature products and design elements for home, school, play and office.

· To ensure our future we will prepare our youth to take responsibility for the future by bringing them together to dialogue about experiences, visions, insights, and futures.

· To support your attendance PacRim 2009 will provide an early acceptance notice within 2-3 weeks of your submission. Conference rates are very reasonable and we have secured room blocks for under $160 per night. We will also help facilitate room-shares if you are trying to
keep your costs low. We all need to be together!

If you are only able to attend one conference this year, choose PacRim 2009 in Waikiki, Hawaii at the beautiful Hawaii Convention Center.

Traditionally this conference is one of the most exciting for attendees and presenters – providing a unique balance of cultures, and issues of local, national and international importance. This year’s conference will seek to better these efforts and provide you with a most unique and exceptional experience – we hope to be seeing you in Honolulu in
May.

Robert Stodden
Director, the Center on Disability Studies

Charmaine Crockett
Co-Chair, PacRim 2009

Valerie Shearer
Co-Chair, PacRim 2009

People interested in learning more about the conference should please follow the web links listed below. Any inquiries regarding the conference should please be directed to the people organizing PacRim 2009, NOT to We Can Do.

Web Site Links
Text Only version of the Call for Papers:http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/ad/callforpapers2009/text.html
About PacRim: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/
PacRim Themes: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/pacriminfo/pacrim2009/topics/
Submission: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/submissions/
Registration: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/registration/
About the Convention Center: http://www.hawaiiconvention.com/



I received this conference announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group. Again, all official information on the conference is on their web site, including information on how to contact the organizers as needed.

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Volunteer Opportunities in International Disability Field

Posted on 21 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Jobs & Internships, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Volunteer Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Please note that a wide range of short- and long-term volunteer opportunities are listed below. Some offer a limited salary; some do not, but cover expenses related to volunteering. Posts range from 4 to 18 months. People seeking volunteer opportunities should read carefully to understand the qualifications for each individual position, the relevant deadline, and how to apply. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to the organization sponsoring the opportunity, NOT to We Can Do.

Project Officer, Solomon Islands; Assistant Coordinator, Solomon Islands
Handicap International Positions: Background on Handicap International
Project Manager in Rehabilitation, in Herat, Afghanistan
Disaster Risk Reduction Project Manager, Uzbekistan
Disability Expert–Trainer, Uzbekistan
Physiotherapist Supervisor in Amman, Jordan
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Project Officer (Services for Visually Impaired and Blind Unit) – Ministry of Health and Medical Services – Solomon Islands
An incredible opportunity to develop programs to improve services for people who are blind and visually impaired and promote an inclusive society.

Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) department of the Ministry of Health and Medical Services in Honiara promotes independence, rehabilitation, equalisation of opportunities and inclusion for all people with disabilities.

The Services for Visually Impaired and Blind unit seeks a Project Officer to assess the services being provided by CBR and develop new programs that will improve services for people who are blind and visually impaired.

To be considered for this 18 month assignment starting in January 2009 you will have:

· Qualifications in Social Welfare and/or Education
· Extensive experience in a similar field
· Strong program development skills
· Good management experience

Experience delivering programs and services to people who are vision impaired is highly desirable.

The Ministry Of Health and Medical Services is also seeking a suitably experienced Assistant Coordinator to work with the National Coordinator and to provide technical support to the rurally based Rehabilitation Aides. This will involve the introduction of a reporting system and various training functions that need to be refreshed or created.

The successful applicant will be able to demonstrate significant work experience in this sector along with management and training experience.

You will be supported by Australian Volunteers International with airfares, accommodation, briefing and orientation, health and travel insurance, living allowance and ongoing support throughout the assignment.

For full assignment descriptions or to apply for these positions, please visit www.australianvolunteers.com/work
or contact Erika Drury on +61 3 9279 1729 or e-mail edrury@australianvolunteers.com

Applications close 31st August 2008

Source:  Erika Drury, Recruitment Consultant, Australian Volunteers International

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Handicap International Positions:
Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability.  Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, offering them assistance and supporting them in their efforts to become self-reliant. Since its creation, the organisation has set up programmes in approximately 60 countries and intervened in many emergency situations. It has a network of eight national associations (Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA) which provide human and financial resources, manages projects and raises awareness of Handicap International’s actions and campaigns.

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Project Manager in Rehabilitation, Heart, Afghanistan, 6 months to 1 year
Job context :

Being present in Afghanistan since 1996 with a comprehensive approach to respond to the needs of persons with disability and to participate in the reconstruction of the Afghan Health System, Handicap International holds an important geographic position in Afghanistan, implementing inclusion as well as physical rehabilitation projects in the provinces of Kabul, Herat and Kandahar and
 
Job description  :

At regional level, the expatriate would work mainly in Herat to improve the technical abilities of the physiotherapists in the Herat Regional Hospital and in the outreach program run by HI. The 7 physiotherapists working for health public system have received technical, financial and management support since 2003.  HI currently employes 5 physiotherapists plus one as technical assistant.  In regards to technical skills, the main problem is the gap of skills within the team. Clinical reasoning, assessment-reassessment skills and the range of treatment options have to be generally improved.

The project manager would provide consultation on management aspects for the new physiotherapy Centre recently build together with the burn unit in the hospital which is in the process of being handed over to the head of the physiotherapy centre.

S/he would also consult on technical and management aspects the outreach physiotherapy service. HI has also committed to supporting the government’s plan to mainstream disability services within healthcare through Basic Package of Health Services and as such is working with
several NGOs to provide training, screening or direct physiotherapy in certain districts around Herat province.

Beside, the project manager will have to participate to the development of the handover strategies for both rehabilitation projects.

Post constraints :

Security: Afghanistan remains in a post-conflict situation. Kabul and Herat cities are currently stable but there are security constraints especially for women. Outside of Herat city, security is relatively stable compared to the rest of Afghanistan. Travel to Kandahar is especially subject to review of the security situation because it is less stable.

Housing : the person usually shares a house with the other expatriates from HI

Isolation : reliable Internet access and satellite TV

Profile sought :

3 years practical experience in a variety of areas of physiotherapy; experience in teaching and training of physiotherapists, preferably in a developing country

Comprehensive understanding of capacity building issues

Ability to plan own work and manage conflicting priorities;

Good communication (spoken and written) skills, including the ability to draft/edit a variety of written reports and to articulate ideas in a clear, concise style; Good computer skills (Excel …)  

Extremely flexible

Languages : English essential, French an advantage

 Remuneration : Volunteer or salaried status based on experience

Volunteer : 750 or 850€ + allowance, accommodation, medical coverage and insurance

Salaried : 2000 € to 2300 € monthly gross salary + benefits 

Length of Mission : 6 months to 1 year

Start date : 1/09/08 (September 1, 2008)

Closing date for applications: ASAP

For more information, refer to website : www.handicap-international.org

Please send cover letter and resume preferably by e-mail, with as object the ref. :  HS/READHRTAFG

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A Disaster Risk Reduction Project Manager, Uzbekistan, 15 months
Job context :

The project establishment is based on mainstreaming disability issues in Disaster Risk Reduction planning. Disabled People Organizations (DPOs) are the first key partners to mainstream disability issues to DIPECHO partners further to training and working group organized with HI..

DIPECHO partners are the partners that throught their DRR project will mainstream Disability issues within the community further to training and sensitization provided by the DPOs and material published.

The Location for the implementation of the activities are in Tachkent and in Fergana Valley

Duties :

The Project Manager will have to set up and manage the project called : Mainstreaning of Disability issues into Disaster Risk Reduction Planning funding by ECHO.(DIPECHO).

Under the supmpervidion of the Uzbekistan Coordinator, the Project Manager will be supported and will line manage a Disability expert for a period of 6 months.

He/She will line managed a Project Assistant Translator

The PM is responsible for :

PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION

1/ setting up of a DPOs working group with the support of the Disability Expert

2/ The coordination of the training cycle

3/ In link with the Disability Expert, overall coordination  of a survey on ‘Disability confidence’ among DIPECHO DRR trainers for the purpose to measure the ” impact” of the trainings in DRR plan.implementation

4/ monitoring into the community of disability issues in the DRR plan set up

5/ the setting up by DIPECHO partners in 2 institution for children with disabilities of a comprehensive disaster preparedness plan

6/ ensure efficient and fruitfull collaboration with all project partners, in strong link with the Country coordinator.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

1/ Ensure the respect of the commitments of expenditure as defined by
the Head Office

2/Responsible of the budget for the activities ( Budget follow up, cash
forecast,)

TEAM MANAGEMENT

Management of a Project Assistant Translator and of a Disability Expert
(6 months contract)

REPORTING

1/ Prepare  montly report on project implementation (activities,
indicators, partners elationships,..)

2/ Prepare narrative ECHO report ( intermediary and final)

Profile sought :

Diploma in Occupational Therapy or economic, social or management degree.

Essential competencies :

Strong Project Management skills

Diplomatie, public relation

Experience in working in partnership and to develop network

Knowledge of Disaster Risk reduction and of Disability

Desirable competencies or competencies to be acquired :

Monitoring and evaluation

Budget management

Previous experience in central Asia

Previous experience with HI

Languages : English and Russian

Conditions : Volunteer or salaried status, according to experience
Volunteer status : 750 or 850 euros per month according to experience+
benefits

Salaried status : 2100 to 2400 euros per month according to experience
+ benefits

Length of mission : 15 month

Start date :  01 October 2008

Closing date for application : 15th September 2008

Please send CV and covering letter asap to : Ref. PMDRRUzbek

Handicap International
14, avenue Berthelot
69361 LYON CEDEX 07
Or by email:  recrut11@handicap-international.org

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Disability Expert – Trainer, Uzbekistan, 6 months

Job context :

The project establishment is based on mainstreaming disability issues
in Disaster Risk Reduction planning. Disabled People Organizations
(DPOs) are the first key partners to mainstream disability issues to
DIPECHO partners further to training and working group organized with
HI..

DIPECHO partners are the partners that throught their DRR project will mainstream Disability issues within the community further to training and sensitization provided by the DPOs and material published.

The Location for the implementation of the activities are in Tachkent and in Fergana Valley

Duties :

The stake of this post is to provide the technical expertise and
trainings on disability issues to DPOs and DIPECHO partners in order
that the communities are sensitized and include disability issues in
their Disaster Risk Reduction plan.

The Disability Expert will have to support the DPOs to mainstream
Disability issues into Disaster Risk Reduction plan from DIPECHO
partners

Objectives :

1/ Provide expertise and facilitate within the DPOs working group to

2/ Organize a training for 30 trainers of trainers ( members of DPOs)
on inclusive DRR:

3/ Mentor the Trainers of Trainers  and provide guidance in their first
trainings implementation to DIPECHO partners trainers.

4/Design the framework of a survey to carry out on ‘Disability
confidence’ among DIPECHO DRR trainers for the purpose to measure the ”
impact” of the trainings in DRR plan.implementation:.(Survey carried
out with trained and not trained trainers on Disability issues)

5/ Provide support to the DRR Project Manager whenn needed, notably on
monitoring and evaluation issues.

6/ Other tasks could be added according to the needs of the project and
the program.

Profile sought :

Occupational therapist or physiotherapist, or social degree

Essential competencies :

Strong training skills

Knowledge of Disaster Risk reduction

Wide understanding of Disability issue

Desirable competencies or competencies to be acquired :

Autonomy

Previous experience with HI

Experience in working with partner

Languages : English and Russian

Conditions : Volunteer or salaried status, according to experience

Volunteer status : 750 or 850 euros per month according to experience+
benefits

Salaried status : 1900 to 2200 euros per month according to experience + benefits

Length of mission : 15 month

Start date : 01 November 2008

Closing date for application : 15th September 2008

 Please send CV and covering letter asap to : Ref. DETDRRUzbek

Handicap International
14, avenue Berthelot
69361 LYON CEDEX 07
Or by email:  recrut11@handicap-international.org

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Physiotherapist Supervisor, Amman, Jordan, 4 months

Job context :

A surgery programme has been opened by MSF in August 2006 in Amman, targeting Iraqi war victims in need of reconstructive surgery. In order to strengthen physiotherapy as a crucial aspect of care, HI was requested to set up a proper physiotherapy section.

A physiotherapist advisor has been working since November 2007, acting as a supervisor for the physiotherapy team, made of 3 Jordanian physiotherapists. Some lacks in the skills and the general rehabilitation approach have been identified and now need to be addressed.

The physiotherapist supervisor will act both as a supervisor for the 3 physiotherapists and as an on-the-job trainer.

Duties :

Under the responsibility of the Head of Mission, the physiotherapist
supervisor will be in charge of :

–          providing technical training to  physiotherapy staff

–          improving the referral system for patients

–          reinforcing collaboration with surgeons

–          optimizing data collection

Particularities of the post :

Short-term mission.

Profile sought :

Recognized qualification in Physiotherapy essential ; additional
background in Education, Public Health or other relevant fields
desirable.

An experience in a developing country would be an advantage.

 Essential recruitment criteria :

–          Experience as physiotherapist (at least 3 years)

–          Experience in orthopaedic complex cases management

–          Experience in physiotherapy teaching and on-the-job training

–          networking and communication skills (spoken and written)

Desirable competencies or competencies to be acquired :

–          Experience in a developing country is an advantage;

–          Computer skills (Pack Office, Internet etc…)

Languages :

Excellent written and spoken English, Arabic is a plus

Conditions :

Volunteer or salaried status, according to experience

Volunteer status : 750 or 850€ + allowance, accommodation, medical
coverage and insurance

Salaried status : 1800 to 2200€ monthly gross salary + benefits

Length of mission : 4 months

Start date : September 2008

Closing date for applications : 31st August 2008

Please send CV and covering letter asap to : Ref. NC/READJord

Handicap International
14, avenue Berthelot
69361 LYON CEDEX 07
Or by email:  recrut07@handicap-international.org

 Source:  Marly Revuelta, Assistante GRH Programme, Handicap International

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Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for circulating these listings via email.

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Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship for Masters or Doctorate

Posted on 25 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship for Masters or Doctorate
[The application deadline for this scholarship for people in the Asia-Pacific region is June 30, 2008.]

The Australian Leadership Awards (ALA) Scholarships are a component of the Australian Leadership Awards, a regional program under the Australian Scholarships initiative. Australian Leadership Awards aim to develop leadership, build partnerships and linkages within the Asia-Pacific.

They are intended for those who are already leaders or have the potential to assume leadership roles that can influence social and economic policy reform and development outcomes, both in their own countries and in the Asia-Pacific region. The ALA program comprises of Scholarships and Fellowships.

ALA Scholarships are academically elite awards offered to high achievers from the Asia-Pacific region each year to undertake postgraduate study (Masters or Doctorate) and a Leadership Development Program in Australia.

Selection for ALA Scholarships is highly competitive, based on leadership qualities and on academic excellence.

ALA Scholarships are an investment in the future of the Asia-Pacific region. In this regard, ALA scholars are required to return to their home country or the region for two years after they have completed their studies.

In future years, ALA scholars will belong to a unique group – the Australian Scholarships Alumni Network (ASAN) – that will maintain strong and enduring links to Australia. Managed by AusAID as part of Australia’s overseas aid program, ALA Scholarships are open only to citizens of countries in the Asia-Pacific region with which Australia has a significant aid program.

Objectives of ALA Scholarships
ALA Scholarships aim to:

  • develop a cadre of leaders advancing regional reform, development and governance
  • increase exchange of knowledge and information within the region
  • build common purpose and understanding between Australia and the region
  • build capacity to address priority regional issues
  • build effective networks between Australia and the region
  • demonstrate the benefits of Australian education through the provision of high quality education.

Fields of study
Awards are open to all fields of study, however, study programs that relate to the priority themes of international trade, pandemics, security and climate change (including clean energy) are encouraged. Scholarships are not available for military training, or training in areas related to nuclear technology and flying aircraft.

Levels of study
An ALA Scholarship enables candidates to undertake studies leading to a Masters or Doctorate degree in Australia. It does not include Graduate Diplomas, with the exception of those Masters courses that require the completion of a Graduate Diploma as part of the Masters degree.

Who should apply
Outstanding applicants with:

  • a very high level of academic achievement at undergraduate and/or postgraduate level
  • a high level of English language proficiency
  • demonstrated leadership potential and good prospects to influence social and economic policy reform and development outcomes in their home country and in the Asia-Pacific region
  • a commitment to participate ASAN on their return home.

Scholarship benefits
An ALA Scholarship has a total value of up to A$110,000 for Masters degrees and A$220,000 for Doctoral programs, not including provisions for the leadership development program.

Benefits include:

  • return air travel
  • visa support
  • establishment allowance
  • full tuition fees
  • =

  • contribution to living expenses
  • Introductory Academic program (IAP)
  • Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) for the duration of the award (for award holder only).

Eligibility
To be eligible for an Australian Leadership Award (ALA) Scholarship, applicants must satisfy the eligibility requirements outlined below.

Applicants must be a citizen of one of the participating countries listed below.
Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Kiribati, Laos, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Nauru, Nepal, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Timor-Leste, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Wallis & Futuna.

Applicants must not have Australian or New Zealand citizenship or permanent residence status, nor be in the process of applying.

Application information
<a href=”Read the following information at the scholarship web site before you apply:

Frequently asked questions
Timeline for applicants
Eligibility
Selection criteria
Terms and conditions of the scholarship
How to apply
Further information

If the material found on http://www.ausaid.gov.au/scholar/ala.cfmthe website for the Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship does not provide the necessary help, please direct enquiries by email to: ala@ausaid.gov.au

More information is available at the Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship web site at: http://www.ausaid.gov.au/scholar/ala.cfm



We Can Do received this announcement via the AdHoc_IDC listserv. People interested in the program should please consult the web site for the Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship (click on this link). Any remaining questions not cleared up by their web site can please be directed to the parties involved with the scholarship at ala@ausaid.gov.au, NOT We Can Do.

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NEWS: Afghan Disabled Union Now Named Development & Ability Organization (DAO)

Posted on 17 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, News, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

The following notice is being circulated by the newly-renamed Development & Ability Organization (DAO), formerly named the Afghan Disabled Union

Dear All:

Hope that you will be in good health.

The Afghan Disabled Union ADU has been renamed to Development & Ability Organization (DAO). This was done to ensure that we are no longer using negative words for persons with disabilities such as “Disabled”, which in English language can also mean “unable” and Mayoub/Mayoubin in Afghanistan’s national languages.

DAO will present a copy of our new registration certificate with the Ministry of Economy to the donors and the Ministry of Labor, Social Affairs, Martyrs and Disabled with an official letter explaining the change of our name from Afghan Disabled Union ADU to Development & Ability Organization DAO.

However please note that our official emails will remain the same as before until 25/4/2008 and then it will be changed to director@daoafghanistan.org, admin@daoafghanistan.org and info@daoafghanistan.org.

For further information on DAO please refer to our website www.daoafghanistan.org although it is now under construction. Please also forgive me for any duplicate posting.

Kind regards,

Omara Khan Muneeb
Director DAO which was
Formerly Afghan Disabled Union ADU.



Thank you to Omara Khan Muneeb for submitting this notice to We Can Do.

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RESOURCE: Disability Survey Toolkit for Researchers

Posted on 10 March 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability advocates who work in the field know first hand there is never enough money for the projects they want to run for disabled people. One reason is because society may undervalue people with disabilities. But another is lack of data. Policy makers and funders are reluctant to release valuable funds unless there is a clearly documented need.

Household surveys on disability can be immensely helpful in collecting the data needed to persuade policy makers to commit resources to programs that include, or target, disabled people. But such surveys can be highly variable in quality depending on the researchers’ familiarity with disability-specific research issues. For example, surveys that simply ask, “Are you or someone in your household disabled?” tend to significantly underestimate true disability prevalence.

Researchers who intend to conduct household surveys on disability can begin with a resource released from Handicap International, entitled “Conducting Surveys on Disability: A Comprehensive Toolkit” (PDF format, 1.1 Mb).

This toolkit offers guidance in designing, conducting, implementing, and analyzing household surveys meant to help understand disability within a specific social, political, cultural, and religious context. Researchers can learn appropriate methodologies for this type of research, including selecting samples, designing questionnaires, training interviewers,
conducting field operations to collect the data, and analyzing and disseminating the results.

The toolkit is targeted at anyone with an interest in data collection, surveys, disability, and development. It was inspired in part by a National Disability Survey that was conducted in Afghanistan from November 2004 to July 2005. The NDSA was carried out by Handicap International for the government of Afghanistan to obtain more accurate information on the
prevalence rates, living conditions, and coping strategies of people with disabilities.

This survey brought together researchers with prior experience with the particular challenges of researching disability and stimulated discussions about the sampling process and tools that should be used. The resulting document includes their recommendations and presents these debates.

People may download the full disability survey toolkit in PDF format (1.1 Mb) for free at:

http://www.handicap-international.fr/uploads/media/Final_pdf_for_Web__2__01.pdf




We Can Do learned about this resource from AskSource.info. AskSource is a comprehensive database on health, disability, and development.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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TRAINING for Women with Disabilities in South Asia

Posted on 13 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Education and Training Opportunities, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Project: Creating Space for Women With Disabilities to Communicate & Advocate for their Rights
Project Partners: AWWD (India), SARPV (Bangladesh), AKASA (Sri Lanka), HLWW (UK), Supported by: DFID, UK

REGIONAL LEADERSHIP TRAINING FOR WOMEN WITH DISABILITIES

“Currently our rights are not understood or heard. We need to mobilize our girls and women to take the challenge and responsibility to make our presence felt. A new generation of leaders is essential to make change happen”
Kuhu Das, Director, Association of Women with Disabilities – India

OBJECTIVE
The initial ‘master’ training will facilitate a group of 25 Women with Disabilities (WWD) from the South Asia region including India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan, Afghanistan and the Maldives in leadership & advocacy skills within a rights based framework. Those attending will in turn be supported to organize and run national level leadership and advocacy trainings when they return home. They will also develop country strategic advocacy plans, and be offered small seed grants to enable the implementation.

The participants will engage in a 7 day training process which will enable them to:

  • Share their country level situations
  • Deepen their understanding of a rights based approach to issues affecting WWD
  • Design & plan their adapted leadership and advocacy training at national level based on the initial ‘master’ training
  • Form a regional network of WWDs
  • Design & plan national advocacy and communication strategies for the rights of WWDs
  • Develop WWD leadership training modules including a resource base of materials

PARTICIPANTS (Criteria for selection):
The training is open to WWDs and organizations, who will be able to carry out the national level trainings in their respective countries after this initial workshop. They should be well networked and able to mobilize people and resources. They will need some experience of leadership and an ability to motivate others. A working knowledge of English is required, as is the ability to organize and host training events.

Priority will be given to WWD themselves and organizations working to further the rights of WWD

CONTENT OF TRAINING:

Regional Leadership Training: (TOT): 7 days.

  1. Sharing of project and training objectives, finalizing draft schedule and participatory agenda setting
  2. Leadership
    • Meaning, Necessity
    • Quality of a leader
  3. Communication – Advocacy – Lobbying
    • Meaning/Importance/Necessity
    • Good / effective communication
    • Communication tools
    • Development of Advocacy frameworks
    • Advocacy & lobbying – what, why & how
  4. Social Mobilisation
    • Understanding rights, including human rights, rights of women, rights of disabled
    • Significance of human rights instruments (national & international) – CEDAW, UNCRPD, BMF etc.
    • Use and limitations of these instruments
    • Social mobilization to achieve rights
    • Analysis of legislation and policies
  5. Group Mobilisation
    • Meaning/Importance/Necessity
    • Organizing people in groups
    • Mobilizing and managing groups
    • Strengthening group dynamics
    • Setting targets for group
  6. Networking
    • Why? The benefits and challenges
    • Making it effective & sustainable
    • Setting vision and target activities
  7. Planning & designing training
    • Adapting ‘master’ training to national level
    • Content development / modification
    • Quality assurance – M&E
  8. Facilitation skills
    • Participatory approaches
    • Skills development
  9. Working with the Media
    • How to engage with media
    • How to promote issues
    • Media literacy
  10. Action planning for national level training and advocacy activities
    • Strategy development
    • Integrating into existing national and local initiatives
    • Monitoring and Evaluation

TRAINING STYLE
The training will be highly participatory, drawing on the experience of the participants to develop and improve our collective knowledge base. Trainers will be from a variety of backgrounds and specialisms including advocacy expertise, network strengthening, media, project planning and management and leadership skills development.

COSTS
25 places will be fully supported including travel, food, accommodation and a small allowance.

Workshop Venue – Kolkota (to be confirmed)
Dates – mid February 2008 (to be confirmed)

APPLICATION PROCEDURE:
If you are interested to attend this workshop please email a one page letter outlining:
your interest in this field of work
your experience in disability activism and rights based approaches
your experience and capacity to take the work forward at national level
to:
Ms Kuhu Das: info@awwdindia.org (Regional coordinator – AWWD India)
and Mr David Curtis: curtis.d@healthlink.org.uk (Head of Programme and Capacity Development, Healthlink Worldwide, UK)

Closing date for applications: January 5th 2008.

A selection committee comprising members from the four lead organizations will assess each application. Please remember that after the initial ‘master’ training, there will be national level trainings in each of the countries in the region so there will be further opportunities to engage at national level.

This workshop is part of the ‘Creating Spaces – for women with disabilities (WWD) to communicate and advocate for their rights’ project – a collaborative initiative from Association of Women with Disabilities (AWWD) – India, Association for Women with Disabilities (Akasa), Sri Lanka, Social Assistance for the Rehabilitation of the Physically Vulnerable (SARPV) Bangladesh and Healthlink Worldwide, UK

The project is funded by UK Department for International Development (DfID)


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FUNDING for South Asian Projects on HIV/AIDS Stigma and Discrimination

Posted on 12 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Funding, Health, HIV/AIDS, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Reach this page at http://tinyurl.com/yv79vu

South Asia Regional Development Marketplace: Tackling HIV/AIDS Stigma and Discrimination
For further information please go to:
http://www.worldbank.org/sardm2008

On November 26, 2007 the South Asia Development Marketplace on AIDS related stigma and discrimination was launched. Proposals for innovative ideas to tackle stigma can be submitted until January 31, 2008 by community based organizations (CBOs), non-government organizations (NGOs), foundations, private sector groups, universities and schools, local municipal bodies and government institutions – in collaboration with (other) NGOs and CBOs. The 75 candidates who will be selected from India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Sri Lanka, will be invited to the regional Development Marketplace in Mumbai 15 May, 2008, and there 25 winners will be selected and awarded up to US$40,000 each for an 18 month implementation period.

To know about the South Asia Regional Development Marketplace: Tackling HIV/AIDS Stigma and Discrimination, please visit the website http://www.worldbank.org/sardm2008.



This annoucement was recently distributed on both the GPDD and the Intl-Dev email distribution lists.



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IDCS Newsletter: Deaf Children, Families, and Schools

Posted on 1 October 2007. Filed under: Case Studies, Children, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Families, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Thank you to the International Deaf Children’s Society (IDCS) for granting their permission to repost their newsletter at We Can Do. This newsletter contains information about a range of programs targeted at deaf children and their families and schools in Burkino Faso; Zimbabwe; Somaliland; Kazakhstan; Afghanistan; and India.

Note that IDCS would like to receive stories about your experiences in supporting families in improving their ability to communicate with their deaf children for possible use in their next newsletter. Their deadline is October 10, 2007; see the bottom of this post for more detail.

August 29, 2007
Learning from Each Other: An Update from the IDCS Network
The International Deaf Children’s Society (IDCS) is the international development wing of The National Deaf Children’s Society in the UK.

Families and schools

In this issue of Learning from Each Other you can find out more about how schools can involve families and communities in their work.

Education is central in promoting every child’s development. It is a Millennium Development Goal to achieve universal primary education, because it is recognised that education broadens opportunities and choices for young people and helps to fight poverty. As one third of the out-of-school children are disabled – it will be impossible to meet this goal without deaf children getting into school. IDCS believes that this will be impossible without family and community involvement.

Research by academics like Desforges in the UK have shown that the support children receive from their family makes a big difference to their success at school. The case studies in this newsletter highlight the role that families play globally. Over 90% of deaf children are born into families who are not deaf and who may have little understanding of how they can support their child. That’s why it’s important for schools and families to work together. Read on for some brilliant examples of how this can work in practice!

For example, you can read a case study from Burkina Faso showing how schools can help families learn the skills they need to support their children more effectively. In addition, parental involvement can really benefit the school by using parents’ unique knowledge, skills and motivation – both in the classroom like in the example from Afghanistan, and at school management and policy level like the project for families in Kazakhstan.

As so many deaf children are out of school, it’s essential that schools consider how they can reach those parents in the community whose children are not in school. Again, with the right support, other parents whose deaf children have been to school can be the best people to reach out, like the inspiring parent trainers in Zimbabwe.

Later this year, IDCS will publish Family Friendly! a book of case studies and practical tips about involving families and communities in work with deaf children. Some of the case studies in this newsletter are also featured in the book – so look out for our email publicising the book later in the year! Some existing resources to help you think about how you can improve the way you work with families and communities are featured below.

Teachers training parents in Burkina Faso

In order for deaf children to do well at school, it really helps if families are actively involved in their education, and are able to communicate, play or help their children with homework. However it’s not always easy for parents to know what to do.

After asking parents what they needed, IDCS’s partner CEFISE, a mainstream school where lots of deaf children study, trained a group of teachers to carry out workshops for parents at three other schools for the deaf. During these workshops, teachers provide parents with information about deafness and lots of creative ideas to make learning fun. Using creative techniques proved to be a great way to provide parents with practical skills and motivation to spend more time with their child!

Follow the link to find out more about this Burkina Faso project, as well as great examples of games and activities.

Parents outreaching to other parents in Zimbabwe

Nyadire Primary School is located in a rural area of Zimbabwe where there is little awareness of deafness. With support from IDCS and the NZEVE centre for deaf children, Nyadire School trained two parents to be outreach workers.

Being visited at home was a great way for parents of out-of-school deaf children to find out more about deafness and their children’s potential. The parent trainers encouraged parents to send their deaf child to school and provided them with information about how they could support learning in the home. The families felt comfortable discussing personal issues with someone who had faced similar challenges and the parent trainers became a real community resource. The school also organised workshops to provide parents with more information and training to help them communicate with their deaf child.

Follow the link to find out more about this innovative approach to working with parents

Establishing a parents’ group in Somaliland

In Somaliland there are only two schools for the deaf. The Hargeisa School for the Deaf is working with parents to support them to advocate for the rights of their child. Getting parents together is also an effective and sustainable way of establishing support networks and a forum to share ideas and experiences.

The Hargeisa School found that, in order for parents to have an impact, it was important to set up a formal organisation. They provided a group of parents with the necessary skills to organise and register a parents’ group. This group now meets regularly and, together with the school and a group of young deaf people, has carried out advocacy and awareness raising activities.

Find out more about the process of setting up a parents group

Working together for children’s rights in Kazakhstan

Children living in institutions in Kazakhstan are often denied their rights. In addition, many find that communicating with their families is very difficult. With limited parental involvement, professionals have a lot of power over children’s lives. To create change in such a context meant that everyone needed to be involved – that’s why the project working to improve the lives of deaf children in institutions was called Rights for All.

Using the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child as a tool, this project tried to involve teachers, children and parents. An important achievement was the establishment of an ongoing parents’ group which have quarterly meetings with school directors and are working with the Deaf People’s Association to lobby for policy changes. A resource room staffed by a parent volunteer also helps to provide parents with practical support when they visit the school.

Read more about how this project aimed to make Rights For All a reality

A father’s story – getting involved in education in Afghanistan

Getting involved in their children’s education can radically change parents’ attitudes towards their child’s deafness. As they witness first-hand their child’s capacity for learning and educational success, they can become advocates for other children’s rights.

Abdul Ghani is the father of six children, four of whom are deaf. He worked for an inclusive education project run by the International Rescue Committee in Afghanistan which helped deaf children, previously denied access to education, to stay in school. His valuable contribution and change of attitude towards his deaf children’s potential shows how parent involvement benefits both schools and families!

Find out more about our work in Afghanistan.

Real inclusion requires a supportive family

In India, the Persons with Disabilities Act says that every disabled child should be able to study in a regular school if that is their choice. Snigdha talks about how she fought to make the act a reality for her deaf daughter, Sneha. This would not have been possible without the support she received in the early days from a family-focused organisation in West Bengal. Snigdha’s story shows why IDCS’s focus on parent-support is so important and gives practical tips for regular schools wishing to include deaf children.

Read Snigdha’s story to find out more about parenting a deaf child in India and why family support is so important.

Member spotlight

IDCS Network member the Loto Taumafai Society in Samoa worked with UNESCO to pilot the Toolkit for Creating Inclusive, Learning Friendly Environments. The second chapter focuses on involving families and communities. It is a very useful tool for any school. However, IDCS thinks that as deaf children have less opportunity than other children to learn incidentally in their community, the ideas presented in this UNESCO publication are even more important for schools where deaf children learn!

You can read an extract and download the booklet

More resources

EENET, the Enabling Education Network is an international information sharing network which promotes the inclusion of marginalised groups in education. Membership is open to all.

The EENET website contains resources about working with parents including the Family Action for Inclusion book. This tells the stories of family-based advocacy organisations which have contributed to transform education systems in southern Africa, South Asia, Europe and Australia. It has been written for family and community members who may feel isolated and want to form a support group, advocacy organisation, or want to challenge exclusion. It will also be of relevant to those interested in promoting inclusive practices in education, such as teachers, teacher educators and policy makers.

Find out more about EENET

Improving family communication

For our next issue of Learning from Each Other, we would like to focus on family communication. As the articles presented here have shown, communicating with a deaf child at home is extremely important for his or her emotional and educational development. We would be delighted to hear of your experiences of supporting families to improve their ability to communicate with their deaf child.

What challenges do you face in communicating with deaf children? Have you received support from an organisation or parents of deaf children? Are there any games or exercises that you have found particularly useful? Are you involving deaf adults in family communication exercises?

As always, please do not worry if you don’t have much experience of writing about your work, just get in touch with any contribution, long or short. We will do our best to include it in the newsletter or publish on our website to share with The IDCS Network.

Please send us your stories by 10 October 2007 by email, post or fax

The IDCS Network
15 Dufferin Street
London, EC1Y 8UR
United Kingdom
idcs@idcs.info
Fax + 44 (0)20 7251 5020

http://www.idcs.info



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Organizations in Afghanistan, Asia, Kenya, Uganda

Posted on 28 August 2007. Filed under: Blogroll, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

In an earlier blog post, I pointed to the web sites for a few, major, international cross-disability organizations that are involved in developing countries (and often developed countries as well). If you’re looking for far smaller organizations that work with more specialized disability communities, or within a specific country or state or province, the mega-sized organizations are often the best starting point. In many cases, the big organizations know how to find the smaller ones that share an interest with them.

I don’t ever expect to replace any of the big organizations in helping people find the smaller, more specialized organizations relevant to your interests. People will still need to turn to the more centralized organizations particularly for finding organizations that do not yet have Internet access. Given that 1.6 billion people around the world still do not have electricity, much less an Internet connection, it is probably safe to assume that most smaller, local disability organizations in developing countries don’t have even an email account, and certainly not a web page.

But I do, from time to time, learn about a web site established by a “DPO” (organization run by disabled people) in a developing country. Here are a few examples listed below. Please do let me know of more (including your own); I’d be happy to link to them in a future post.

http://www.aduafghanistan.org/
The Afghan Disabled Union (ADU) works to ensure the participation of
disabled people in development. They are working on plans to offer
vocational training and small loans to disabled people. Look under
“publications” for their curriculums for advocacy training and capacity
building workshops, and also for a survey conducted among disabled Afghans
on accessibility issues. Cultural restrictions in Afghanistan prohibit
mixed-gender gatherings; accordingly, ADU plans to encourage female
trainers to join them and provide training to female participants.

http://www.apcdproject.org/
The Asian Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD)Project is
coordinated between the governments of Japan and Thailand to promote the
empowerment of people with disabilities and a barrier-free society in the
Asia Pacific region. They have offered workshops in Information and
Communication Technologies for people with print disabilities (vision
impairments, dyslexia etc)and training in Community Based Rehabilitation
(CBR). Although some of their training is provided regionally, many of
their programs seem to be targeted at people in Thailand.

http://www.disabilitykenya.org
Disability Kenya, this cross-disability web site has what appears to be a growing collection of news and information about blind people, people with mobility impairments, and Deaf people in Kenya. (If they also include other disabilities then I didn’t see them in my quick glance at their web site.) Do see their links on health (which emphasizes HIV/AIDS prevention, particularly among Deaf people), education, and policy.

http://www.unadug.net/general/index.php
The Uganda National Association of the Deaf is devoted to educating and
empowering Deaf people in Uganda. They have launched a sign language
training program for teachers of deaf children in Gulu, as well as a
training program for sign language interpreters and other activities.

If you know of more web sites of interest to poor people with disabilities in developing countries, or to people who work with them, please leave a comment here with the full URL link. Or, if you prefer, you may email me at ashettle[at]patriot.net (Where it says [at] substitute the @ at sign, no brackets; I’m presenting my email address in this cumbersome way to fool automated spam harvesters.)

As mentioned elsewhere in this blog, I also encourage submissions of essays; opinion pieces; case studies of projects that have succeeded–or that have failed–and why; resources and training materials that might be helpful to people working out in the field with disability communities in developing countries … whatever you have that you think might fit the purpose of the We Can Do blog. (See the pages on “About We Can Do” and also “Why We Can Do” — you can link to them from the top navigation bar from any page in this blog site). If I agree with you that it is appropriate to We Can Do, and if I like it, then I might publish it right here as a fresh blog post–credited, of course, to you as the author.



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