youth

Disability and Development Online Consultations March 8-28, 2013

Posted on 13 March 2013. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, indigenous people, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, universal design, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

These online consultations (from March 8 to 28th, ie RIGHT NOW) are an opportunity to influence important decisions about how people with disabilities will be included in efforts to reduce poverty around the world.

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have been profoundly influential in making decisions on how to prioritize foreign assistance and government funds in more than 100 developing countries. The global community is now working to identify what goals should replace them after 2015. This means that the next few months will be critical for ensuring that people with disabilities are not again forgotten.  It is important for the global disability community, our constituency organizations, and professionals in the fields of international development and human rights be engaged.

Read below and follow the links for more detail on how individuals can participate in this on-line dialogue.

Online Consultations
As part of the preparatory process for the United Nations General Assembly High-level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD), the HLMDD Online Consultations (HOC) will be conducted from 8 to 28 March 2013. The consultations are co-organised by DESA and UNICEF under the existing platform of the World We Want 2015 (http://www.worldwewant2015.org/enable) in multiple languages.

Please register at: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/register.  If you have difficulty registering, then please email enable@worldwewant2015.org for assistance.

Simultaneous consultations will take place in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. The site is compatible with screen readers, however, if you are unable to access the site, please email your response to: enable@worldwewant2015.org. Please note that the forum is moderated, therefore your post will not appear immediately but will be posted within twenty-four hours.
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Training Opportunity: Digital Storytelling Project, June 8-12, 2009, for African Youth with Disabilities and Allies

Posted on 16 April 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Families, Funding, Media & Journalism, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD)
APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet
invite you to
Submit an application to participate in a Digital Storytelling Project
Application DUE 3 May 2009
Workshop dates 8 -12 June 2009

“It’s in the telling of our stories that we discover how much of our experiences and learning we have in common with others. Stories make our connection with others and with the world real. They weave together our individual experiences to reveal a picture of a community, a group and a country.”

Introduction

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) in partnership with APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet, invite you to submit an application to participate in a digital storytelling workshop. We are inviting people living and working in Africa who would like to empower others and affect change by documenting their journey and telling their story. Applicants must be:

(1) parents/carers of children with disabilities and youth
(2) young people with disabilities
(3) people working in organizations to promote the rights of children and youth with disabilities e.g. Advocates, students, CBR workers, teachers, journalists, information activists, content developers, programme officer/managers,

Participants will develop short videos reflecting the experiences of parents and youth with disabilities in particular with regards to challenges and successes in accessing inclusive education, health, employment and acceptance in their communities and country. Participants will also examine the power dimensions of story-telling and how we retain the authenticity of our own voice, as well as the voices of the people whose stories we document, preserve or disseminate.

Parents, youth and individuals working in the field have many stories to tell, but never have the time, knowledge, equipment and space to reflect, understand and tell their own stories, share their responses, understandings and experiences.

There is a large amount of information on the internet but very little that reflects the lived realities of those affected and people working in the field of disability in Africa.

The workshop aims to:
• document real-life stories of a cross-section of parents and youth with disabilities as well as those working in the field
• empower people to tell their own stories, while at the same time create a powerful advocacy tool that can be used in their country and beyond.
• develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills,
• enable parents and youth with disabilities to share and network amongst each other.

More about the workshop

In the workshop we will explore people’s own stories and learn how to develop a story line, use photo’s, video clips, and drawings to tell your story in an effective way.

There is space for twelve applicants who will participate in a five day digital storytelling workshop, 8 -12 June 2009.

In the month before the workshop delegates will need to join an online study group, collect content for their story (pictures etc) and begin to learn some of the software.

At the workshop participants will learn to use computer software and other equipment necessary for making a short (3-5 minutes) multimedia digital story.

The digital storytelling workshop is hands-on and computer intensive, requiring commitment and willingness to develop a short, personal story; learn new software and edit a short digital video of five minutes in length.

Digital storytelling is not like writing a formal document; it’s more like creative, autobiographical writing. To see an example, check out the website
http://www.takebackthetech.net
http://www.silencespeaks.org

In order to be eligible to participate, you must be able to attend all five days of the workshop, and be able to travel to South Africa to arrive by 7 June, departing 13 June 2009. Travel and accommodation will be sponsored by the SADPD. You must be willing to allow your story, or part of it, to be used in advocacy by SADPD and APC WNSP’s Take Back the Tech campaign. The workshop will be conducted in ENGLISH so other language speakers must have a good proficiency in English. Sign language and French / Portugese interpretation will be provided if necessary (Please motivate for this in application form).

This workshop is a chance to learn new skills and tell your story in a creative and visual format. It’s a lot of work . . . AND a lot of fun.

Copyright:
All stories are owned by the person who made them. The story is your story and will be licensed under a Creative Commons license. We are open to discussing a formula that respects your privacy and confidentiality should you be uncomfortable with the widespread sharing and dissemination of some parts of your story. We would like your stories to be part of a public effort promote the rights and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities and their families.

Who Should Apply?
• We are looking for stories told by parent, youth and individuals working in the field of Disability.
• Applicants must be living and working in Africa (preference will be given to women)
• Applicants must preferably be based in an organisation, institution or network, but individuals will also be considered.
• Youth should between the ages of 18 – 35
• The training is in English. Participants must speak and understand English but are welcome to produce their story in any language they choose. If however you require translation into French and Portuguese please motivate in your application.
• The story you tell has to be about you and your experiences. It can be about situations or events but it must be a personal story told in the first person
• The workshop requires a basic level of computer literacy.
• Applicants must be willing to avail themselves for future advocacy work or training in digital stories in their country.

Instructions:
Please complete the form below and email it as a file attachment to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za
DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING APPLICATIONS is 3 May 2009. If you have any questions, feel free to email or Skype Nafisa on nafisababoo. Incomplete forms will not be considered for selection.

APPLICATION FORM

Date:
Name:
Address:
Country:
Organisation:
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Age:
Date of birth:
Disability:
Support needs (Enlarge print, Braille, translation etc)

Please describe in a few sentences the main point of the story you would like to tell.

What issues does your story address?

What do you hope to get out of the digital storytelling workshop?

Have you talked to anyone about the story you’d like to share, or is this the first time you’ll be talking about it in a group?

If this is your first time talking about it, what do you think it’ll be like for you to share the story with a group of people ?

Please write a draft of the story you’d like to share, below. It should be no more than 500 words (about one and ½ pages, double-spaced, typed). Your story should be written in the first-person. Note: If you’d like to see examples of other people’s digital stories, you can go to http://www.silencespeaks.org or http://www.womensnet.org.za or http://www.takebackthetech.net

Please briefly describe to us what you use computers for.

What is your familiarity with the following Software Programs and Processes? Please put an “x” to the right of the statements that most apply.

Using a PC (Windows Operating System) or a Macintosh Computer
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Scanning Photos or Other Images
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Photoshop
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Premiere
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Do you know how to (please mark YES or NO)
Open software applications YES/NO
Save documents and find them again YES/NO
How to use a mouse, cut and paste, drag and drop. YES/NO

It would be useful to know the following applications – Microsoft office or Open office, and using web browsers such as Internet Explorer or Firefox.

There are a limited number of spaces in the workshop. So please note that the submission of an application is no guarantee that APC-Africa-Women will be able to support you to attend. Successful applicants will be notified 5th May 2009.

Thank You!

INFORMATION ABOUT THE ORGANIZATIONS

About the Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities
The African Decade of Persons with Disabilities was proclaimed by the African Union for the period 1999 – 2009. The main goals of the African Decade are to raise awareness about the situation of the estimated 60-80 million persons with disabilities in the region and to identify solutions tailored to the African Experience that enhance participation, equality and empowerment of Africans with Disabilities. The overall aims and priorities of the Decade are stipulated in an AU- Continental Plan of Action. A Secretariat was established to facilitate the realization of these objectives.
The Secretariat is an international Non Governmental Organisation, established in 2004 by all the major Regional Disabled People’s Organisations to give a new dynamism to the implementation of the Continental Plan of Action. It is hosted, at the request of African Union by South Africa in Cape-Town where its headquarters are located. The mission of the Secretariat of the African Decade is to empower Governments, DPO´s, Decade steering committee’s (DSC) and development organizations to work in partnership to include disability and persons with disabilities into policies and programs in all sectors of society. The strategy of action of the Secretariat is to
• Build the capacities of DPOs, persons with disabilities who are most vulnerable and the Decade Steering Committees to enable them to advocate and lobby their respective government so that they integrate disability into all their development processes.
• Advocate and lobby for mainstreaming of disability in the policies and programmes.
• Raise awareness around the main issues related to persons with disabilities in society.
Http://www.sadpd.org

About APC-Africa-Women

APC-Africa-women is the African regional network of the Association for Progressive Communications Women’s Networking Support Programme (APC WNSP). APC WNSP is a global network of women who support women networking for social change and women’s empowerment, through the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). We promote gender equality in the design, development, implementation, access to and use of ICTs and in the policy decisions and frameworks that regulate them. We have a special focus on redressing inequities based on women’s social or ethnic background – through the provision of research, training, information, and support activities in the field of ICT policy, skills-sharing in the access and use of ICT, and women’s network-building.
Http://www.apcwomen.org

APC-Africa-Women hosts Women’s Electronic Network Training (WENT) workshops every two years. WENT workshops aim to build the skills and capacities of women and their organisations to utilise ICTs in women’s empowerment, social development work and policy advocacy. In 2003 participants at WENT Africa developed skills in the repackaging of information through the convergence of old and new technologies using radio and in building websites using a Content Management System. Weaving through the training were sessions on gender and ICT policy issues. In 2005 WENT Africa was hosted in Kampala and using a two-track system, trained women technicians in the use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and women managers of NGOs in technology planning. More information can be viewed at http://wentafrica.blogspot.com/

About Women’sNet
Women’sNet works to advance gender equality and justice in South Africa through the use of ICTs by providing training and facilitating content dissemination and creation that supports women, girls, and women’s and gender organisations and networks to take control of their own content and ICT use. The organisation is one of the few working on technology for social change in South Africa, and the first to do this from a gender perspective our work has focused on technology for purpose – strengthening women’s organisations specifically and civil society in general – to use ICTs for achieving gender justice.
Http://www.womensnet.org.za



This announcement was disseminated on the EENET Eastern Africa listserver. All applications and inquiries should please be directed to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za , NOT to We Can Do.

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FUNDS For Humanitarian Programs Helping People Affected by Slavery

Posted on 23 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Funding, Health, Human Rights, Opportunities, Slavery & Trafficking, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Subject: Call for application: Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery; Appel à candidature: Fonds de contributions volontaires sur les formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

English; French

[Note to We Can Do readers: Organizations serving people with disabilities who have been affected by human trafficking, sexual slavery, child labor, forced marriage, or other forms of contemporary slavery may wish to consider this opportunity to devise an appropriate project targeted at, or incorporating, their needs. This fund is not specifically devised for people with disabilities, but grant seekers could argue for their need.]

Dear colleagues,

The United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery allocates project grants (for a maximum of 15 000 USD), for programmes of humanitarian, legal and financial assistance to individuals whose human rights have been severely violated as a result of contemporary forms of slavery.

Contemporary forms of slavery include trafficking, sexual slavery, child labour and child servitude, debt bondage, serfdom and forced labour, forced marriage and sale of wives ect.

Projects undertaken with previous Trust Fund grants include medical and psychological aid, food, shelter, and vocational training to victims of trafficking for sexual and economic exploitation; support to rehabilitation centres for sexually and physically abused street children and a project to identify and release bonded labourers in the carpet industry and stone quarries. Other projects have provided victims with the means to generate sustainable sources of income, such as sewing machines, hairdressing equipment, or farming tools.

Please consult the official web site to download the application form in English, French, or Spanish. Application forms should be duly completed and submitted by 31 March 2009.

If you need more information on the Fund, you can consult the website of the OHCHR: http://www2.ohchr.org/English/about/funds/slavery/index.htm.
You can also contact the OHCHR at MClerc@ohchr.org.

You are more than welcome to disseminate this message to oganisations working with victims of comtemporary forms of slavery.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French

*********************************************************************************************

Chers collègues,

Le Fond de contributions volontaires des Nations Unies pour la lutte contre les formes contemporaines d’esclavage octroi des subventions (pour un maximum de 15 000 dollars des Etats-Unis) aux projets fournissant une aide humanitaire, juridique et financière aux personnes dont les droits de l’homme ont été gravement violés par des formes contemporaines d’esclavage. Les formes contemporaines d’esclavage sont le trafic d’êtres humains, l’esclavage sexuel, le travail des enfants et la servitude des enfants, la servitude pour dettes, le servage, le travail forcé, les marriages forcés et la vente d’épouses ect.

Veuillez trouver ci-dessous le formulaire de demande de subvention en anglais, francais et espagnol. Les formulaires de demande doivent être complétés et soumis avant le 31 Mars 2009. Les projets financés par le passé grâce aux subventions du Fonds, ont pas exemple, permis aux victimes de la traite des êtres humains à des fins sexuelles et commerciales, d’obtenir de l’aide relative aux soins médicaux et psychologiques, à la nourriture, au logement et à la formation professionnelle. Ils ont permis aux enfants des rues abusés sexuellement et physiquement de bénéficier de soutien dans des centres de réhabilitation. Ils ont également permis d’apporter de l’aide à l’identification et à la libération des travailleurs en servitude pour dettes employés à la fabrication des tapis et dans les carrières de pierre. D’autres projets ont permis aux victimes d’obtenir les moyens de générer des sources de revenus durables comme l’achat de machines à coudre, équipements de coiffure et des outils agricoles.

Si vous avez besoin de plus d’information sur le Fond, vous pouvez consulter le site internet du HCDH: http://www2.ohchr.org/french/about/funds/slavery/index.htm Vous pouvez aussi nous contacter en répondant à MClerc@ohchr.org.

N’hésitez pas à diffuser ce message aux organisations travaillants avec les victimes des formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French



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US-Costa Rica Summer Exchange Program, June 26-July 10, 2009, Scholarships

Posted on 23 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Now Accepting Applications
Deadline: March 20, 2009
for the Costa Rica Program this Summer!

Live with a host family
Learn Spanish through immersion
Learn about disability rights and leadership
Go Abroad with Mobility International USA
June 26 to July 10, 2009
Generous Scholarships Available!
Applications available online now
First time travelers with disabilities who are between 18-24 years old, from cultural minority and low-income backgrounds are encouraged to apply. ASL staff interpreters and materials in alternative formats will be provided. Funding for personal assistants may also be available.
For more information:
apply@miusa.org
or
541-343-1284 (tel/tty)

http://www.miusa.org

The 2009 US/Costa Rica: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Disability Rights Leadership Exchange Program is funded by the New York Community Trust DeWitt Wallace/Youth Travel Enrichment Fund and administered by Mobility International USA to provide an educational travel opportunity to youth with disabilities from diverse communities.

Forward this email to a friend.

Mobility International USA, a non-profit organization founded in 1981, empowers people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

The MIUSA mailing address is:
Mobility International USA 132 E. Broadway Suite 343 Eugene, Oregon 97401, USA

MIUSA’s telephone:
541-343-1284 tel/tty

Please consult the official website on the US/Costa Rica program for further details, and to apply. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to MIUSA, NOT We Can Do. The official web site is at:

http://www.miusa.org/exchange/costarica09/index_html



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Intl Leadership Forum for Young Leaders, 1-9 August 2009

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Opportunities, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

International Leadership Forum Announcement – Call for Applications

[Note to We Can Do readers: This opportunity is not targeted at disability advocates, but young leaders with an interest in disability-related advocacy may wish to read the criteria below and consider whether their interests may usefully intersect.]

The UNESCO Chair & Institute of Comparative Human Rights at the University of Connecticut invites applications for the fifth annual International Leadership Programme: A Global Intergenerational Forum, to be held August 1 – 9, 2009 in Storrs, Connecticut, USA. Applications must be received by February 27, 2009.

The Forum seeks to empower young leaders by involving them in finding solutions to emerging human rights problems, and nurturing individuals to be effective leaders in the field of human rights.

To this end, the Forum will:

• Introduce participants to the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
• Build a network of solidarity among human rights leaders
• Expand the knowledge relevant to human rights practice
• Provide tools and a platform for open debates
• Provide programmes, activities and processes necessary for human rights leadership
• Promote the sharing of experiences and understanding
• Showcase speakers on such topics as: health and human rights, education, the environment, the plight of child soldiers, the use of media, fundraising, conflict resolution and transformation; litigation and advocacy

The UNESCO Chair will provide all conference participants with dormitory housing, meals, ground transportation in Connecticut, resource materials and a certificate of participation.

Young people between the ages of 18-30, with community service experience, and with demonstrated ability to work on solutions to human rights problems, should apply. Relevant issues include, but are not limited to, human trafficking, the plight of children, refugees, hunger, HIV/AIDs, gender discrimination, racism, classism, the environment and peace education.

Conference will be held in English only. Fluency in English is required. Applicants will be selected based on the strength of their application essay, demonstrated commitment to human rights (practical/hands-on experience), potential impact on the individual and their potential contribution to the Forum, regional and gender representation.

Programme details and application materials can be accessed by linking to www.unescochair.uconn.edu or http://www.unescochair.uconn.edu/upspecialevents.htm

Nana Amos
Program Manager
University of Connecticut
UNESCO Chair & Institute of Comparative Human Rights
UConn-ANC Partnership
233 Glenbrook Road, Unit 4124
Storrs, CT 06269-4124
860.486.3054 Phone
860.486.2545 Fax
www.unescochair.uconn.edu
–~–~———~–~—-~————~——-~–~—-~
Scholarship and Job are posted at
http://Cambodiajobs.blogspot.com



I received this announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability listserver. If you have inquiries about this opportunity or wish to apply for it, then please follow the relevant web links provided above and follow the instructions at the official web site. We Can Do is NOT able to assist you with your questions about this event–please contact the people organizing the forum directly. Thank you.

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World Bank International Essay Competition 2009: Climate Change (with Photo and Video Competitions)

Posted on 19 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Nominations or Applications, Call for Papers, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Events and Conferences, Fellowships & Scholarships, Funding, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The World Bank International Essay Competition 2009: Climate Change
[Also video competition and photo competition, with smaller prizes.]

[Note to We Can do readers: although this competition is not targeted specifically at disability issues per se, it could be an opportunity for talented young people with disabilities to consider competing. It also could be an opportunity for any young person with an interest in disability issues to consider how people with disabilities might be impacted differently from other people by climate change and how these challenges can be addressed.]

Open to youth ages of 18 and 25, from all countries of the world. Prizes range from US$200-US$3,000 for winning entries. Deadline to enter: February 22, 2009.

WANTED: The Next Generation of ‘Green’ Entrepreneurs

Climate change has been identified as one of the biggest global threats of our time. Scientists agree that global warming and extreme climate phenomena can be increasingly attributed to human activity – in particular, heavy emission of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, resulting from industrial processes.

Solutions to those pressing problems could lie in the rapidly growing ‘green economy’: environmentally sustainable enterprises, technological innovations (new sources of clean, renewable energy), energy efficiency measures, economic incentives for low-carbon choices, etc. How can youth contribute?

The Essay Competition 2009 invites youth to share ideas on:

How does climate change affect you?
How can you tackle climate change through youth-led solutions?

Please answer both questions:

1. How does climate change affect you, your country, town or local community? How do you think it will affect you in the future? Think about the consequences for employment, health, security and other areas of your life.

2. What can you do, working together with your peers, to address the problem of climate change in your country, town or local community? Think specifically about the role of youth-led initiatives in the ‘green economy’.

The International Essay Competition is open to all young people, students and non-students alike, between the ages of 18 and 25, from all countries of the world.

If you are older than 18 and younger than 25 on June 15, 2009, you are eligible to participate.

This year for the first time the Essay Competition also invites the submission of short videos and photos!

SUBMIT your entry.

February 22 – Deadline for submissions

Awards:

1. Essay
Eight finalists will participate in the Final Jury in Seoul, South Korea, in June 2009, and attend the Annual Bank Conference on Development Economics (ABCDE).
Money awards:
1st prize: 3,000 USD
2nd prize: 2,000 USD
3rd prize: 1,000 USD

2. Video
Author of the winning video will be invited for a screening at the occasion of the Annual Bank Conference on Development Economics (ABCDE), held in Seoul, South Korea, in June 2009.
Money awards:
1st prize: 2,000 USD
2nd prize: 1,000 USD
3rd prize: 500 USD

3. Photo

Money awards:
1st prize: 500 USD
2nd prize: 300 USD
3rd prize: 200 USD
Winners of the photo competition do not travel to the ABCDE Conference in South Korea, but will have their photos featured in the Essay Competition Summary Report, on the website of the Essay Competition and partner organizations’.

More details, including how to submit essays, at the official web site for the World Bank 2009 Essay Competition at http://www.essaycompetition.org/



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World Vision International Peace Prize NOMINATIONS Sought

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Opportunities, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

World Vision International Peace Prize

[It is my hope that We Can Do readers will consider whether they might know an individual with disabilities, or a disability-oriented organization, that might qualify for the World Vision International Peace Prize. The winning organization will receive $5,000; the winning individual will receive $1,000. The deadline to submit nominations is February 15, 2009. The following text is copy/pasted from the World Vision guidelines for the awards, which can also be downloaded in PDF format. The guidelines are also available in French and in Spanish.]

Guidelines

Purpose
The purpose of the World Vision International Peace Prize is to annually recognize and honor one individual who is a catalyst for peacemaking and one organisation which champions the integration of peacebuilding into relief, development and advocacy programmes.

Two award recipients shall be named annually under this World Vision International Peace Prize:
1. Peacebuilding Award – given to an agency or organisation that excels at integrating peacebuilding into relief, development or advocacy activities, and mobilising communities to build a durable peace
2. Peacemaking Award – given to an individual who has taken risks and excelled in being a catalyst in either bringing conflicted parties together to resolve a conflict or in enabling a peace process that engages peacemakers, mediators and people of moral authority who bring hope that a significant destructive conflict can be resolved.

The first award focuses on World Vision’s area of greatest expertise in peacebuilding, namely integrating peacebuilding in relief, development and advocacy. Key programmatic themes of World Vision include the role of children, youth and women in building peace.

The second award focuses on World Vision’s secondary area of focus, making a significant contribution to community-based peacemaking, serving as a catalyst and building bridges so that other organisations and individuals can assist in resolving destructive conflicts that put all development at risk.

Description of award
The World Vision International Peace Prize is given annually in honor and memory of Steve Williams (1951-2007), World Vision UK Senior Policy Advisor on Peace and Conflict. Steve brought vast experience in peacebuilding, conflict analysis and policy analysis to World Vision UK, and served as the Co-convener of PaxNet, the World Vision global peacebuilding network.

He distinguished himself not only within World Vision but within the peace community around the world as one who integrated his conflict analysis and policy work, was committed in his personal, family and work life to work for peace and reconciliation, strongly supported programmes of Children as Peacebuilders, and was a great advocate for peace with justice.

It is in this spirit that the World Vision International Peace Prize was established to honor his life, his work and his memory. The awardees each year may be little known to the public but each will serve as profound examples of peacemaking and peacebuilding in a world of conflict.

Nomination and selection process principles

Eligibility

Organisations and individuals that are external or internal to World Vision International may be nominated with equal consideration. Local community-based organisations as well as global humanitarian and development organisations are eligible for nomination.

Qualifications
The Awards Committee will give particular attention and consideration to nominees who mobilise children, youth and women in peacebuilding. A nomination will be strongest when the organisations or individuals demonstrate that their work and programme is built on careful context and conflict analysis, and produces credible policy and advocacy influence that contributes toward peace.

Monetary Prize and Trophy
Each organisation and individual who is awarded the World Vision International Peace Prize will receive both a monetary award ($5,000 for an organisation and $1,000 for an individual) and a physical trophy with the award designation.

Use of the award
The monetary award is to be used at the sole discretion of the awardees to further the work of the individual or the organisation in their continued role in peacemaking and peacebuilding.

Procedures for nomination
Nominees may come either from within or from outside World Vision. Self-nominations are accepted. The World Vision International Peace Prize Nomination Form can be found online at www.wvi.org/peaceprize. It should be completed in full and sent by email to: wvi_peaceprize@wvi.org by the final day for submission: February 15, 2009.

Selection process
The World Vision International Director of Peacebuilding and the Peacebuilding Unit will initially review all applications to determine which ones meet the criteria and are the strongest candidates. A vetting process will assess the nominations and develop a preliminary list of finalists. The entries from those finalists will be posted online for one month, allowing the global peacebuilding community to view, vet and rank the nominees. A short list of nominees for each prize will then be submitted to an International Peace Prize Awards Committee which will review the nominations and select the winner in each category. Decisions of the Committee will be final.

Peace Prize deadlines
September 21, 2008 International Day of Peace: Announcement and Solicitation of Nominations
February 15, 2009 Final Day for Submission of Nominations
June 30, 2009 Awardees informed privately of their selection
September 21, 2009 Announcement of Prize recipients, presentations and call for nominees for 2010 competition

Award presentation
Awards will be presented by the World Vision International President or designee on the International Day of Peace, September 21, 2009.

To find out more about World Vision’s Peacebuilding work and team, go to www.wvi.org/peaceprize.

[We Can Do readers should please note that the official web site for the World Vision International Peace Prize is at

http://www.wvi.org/wvi/wviweb.nsf/maindocs/AC6E33C8CE519993882574C50060CD3E?opendocument

People interested in learning more about the World Vision Peace Prize should please follow the link to their web site. Nomination forms can be downloaded at their web site in English, Spanish, or French. Any questions about the prize that are not adequately addressed by the World Vision Peace Prize website should please be directed to wvi_peaceprize@wvi.org, NOT to We Can Do.]



I learned about this prize via the Disabled Peoples’ International email newsletter.

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RESOURCE: Young People Share Views on Inclusive Education

Posted on 24 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Reports, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

A new publication is available from the Enabling Education Network (EENET). It is called “Young Voices: Young people’s views of inclusive education” (PDF format, 905 Kb).
 
This easy-to-read A5 booklet contains photographs and drawings taken by disabled and non-disabled students in Uganda and Tanzania, along with quotes from them about what they think makes a school inclusive. The booklet also summarizes some of the important ideas raised by the students. For example, it points out that many children say that the attitudes of teachers and the encouragement of parents are important to helping them feel included.
 
The booklet was published/funded by the Atlas Allliance (Norway), with the participatory work and book production being handled by EENET.
 
A Kiswahili version and a Braille version will be available before the end of 2008. There is also a short DVD (approx 15 minutes) which accompanies the booklet. Copies will be available from EENET in mid-September.
 
EENET hopes that this booklet/DVD will be useful for advocacy and awareness raising around both inclusive education and the importance of listening to children’s opinions. Please in future send EENET any feedback you have about the booklet/DVD, or how you have used it.
 
The booklet can be downloaded from the EENET website in PDF format (905 Kb):

http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Young%20Voices.pdf

People who need a print copy or the accompanying DVD mailed to them can contact EENET directly and give them their mailing address. People who will want the Braille version or the Kiswahili version when they become available also should contact EENET directly. People may either email info@eenet.org.uk or ingridlewis@eenet.org.uk



This announcement is modified from the text of an email circulated by Ingrid Lewis at EENET on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. EENET Eastern Africa discussions focuses on issues related to inclusive education in the Eastern Africa region and can be joined for free.

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News from Kyrgyzstan: Projects, Laws, Funding Opportunities

Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Families, Funding, Human Rights, News, Policy & Legislation, Uncategorized, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following newsletter was sent to We Can Do from Kyrgyzstan–thanks to Azat Israilov for passing this on. This contains news about projects for people with disabilities in Kyrgyzstan; a new law protecting the rights of people with disabilities; the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and announcements for a couple of funding opportunities. Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

We are for equal possibilities and better future!
INFORMATIONAL BULLETIN

The newsletter is published under the Health Prom project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund

July 2008
Content:
Letter from A.Israilov, national in-country project manager
Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Brief information about participants of the project
HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Young people: new horizons!
President signed the Decree “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The new law about social order accepted
Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for
people with disabilities

Projects on employment for disabled people
The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Grants

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Dear readers, colleagues and partners,

We welcome you on the pages of the first issue of the Informational bulletin which is published under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund. The important aims of the bulletin will be providing news that are related to children with special needs and their families, and also updating on the progress of the project. The bulletin will be published and distributed once a quarter. At the same time neither the project, nor the bulletin will be involved in political processes in the country. In the first issue you will find some information on the project, its participants and also learn about
some latest events in social sphere of Kyrgyzstan.

It is hoped that the bulletin as a specialist publication will continue its existence beyond the project, and will become a useful source of information for parents and concerned organizations and people. And to become so we will be delighted to publish your interesting news and helpful information which you would like to share with.
Sincerely,
A.Israilov, national in-country project manager

“Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”
Contacts: Bishkek, m/r Kok-Zhar, h. 1, p/p 4, Tel./fax (0312) 517634, aisrail@gmail.com

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Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Charitable organisation HealthProm, located in London, UK, together with the Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI) and Public Association “Shoola Kol” has started a project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in the Kyrgyz Republic” funded by the Big Lottery Fund. The project is for three years and will help to establish two rehabilitation and resource centres in two pilot localities – Bishkek and Issyk-Kul oblast with Bokonbaevo v. as a centre. The project aims to improve on improving health and well-being of young children with disabilities and their parents through rehabilitation services, informational support and consultations. The project will not be involved in politics.

Prior to the project beginning there were study visits and research done during which the distress of people with disabilities, especially children, was revealed, whose families belong to the group with the lowest incomes in the country. According to the Ministry of Labour and Social Development, there are about 117 thousand people with disabilities in the republic now, out of them more than nineteen thousand are younger than 18, and 66% out of general number live in rural areas. The number of the disabled makes up 2,1% of the whole population while in the developed countries this figure varies approximately from 10 up to 20% (for example, in
the UK it is about 15%, in Russia up to 10%).

The project will fill the gap in knowledge and information resources in the Republic about prevention of disability, alternative approaches to child disability. Various trainings based on current needs will improve knowledge and skills of people with disabilities as well as of medical and social professionals. There will be developed or translated and published a number of necessary materials, and a specialised web site on disability issues will be created. A specialised microbus for each centre will connect experts and volunteers with disabled children and their families in the remote areas.

“The project focuses on sustainable development of our partners and the centres, and also on cooperation with local communities, non-governmental organisations and relevant local government agencies.” – underlines Tatyana Buynovskaja, the project manager. – “It includes programs on early intervention and providing advisory and practical support to new families with disabled children.” Tamara Dyikanbaeva, ARDI chairwoman, adds: “The project was developed taking into account the needs and wishes of parents and disabled children, considering provision of complex and versatile support to children and their parents. The project activity is based on social model of disability which recognises, that disability is not an illness (and in the developed countries it was recognised and accepted), and disabled people do not need pity and constant
guardianship, but need possibilities to study, work and communicate to become useful members of society”.

As a result of project activities it is planned to reach out about one and a half thousand parents of disabled children, and these children can participate in joint social events together with other children. It is expected in the end of the project the rehabilitation and resource centres in cooperation with local communities and government agencies will become vital for work with disabled children and their parents, and that this experience can be replicated in other regions.

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Brief information about participants of the project
Partner organisations responsible for implementing the project:

HealthProm – a charitable non-commercial organisation, based in London, works since 1984 with local communities for improving health and social support for vulnerable women and children in the countries of the former Soviet Union (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Russia, Uzbekistan, Ukraine, Tajikistan and recently in Kyrgyzstan). The primary activities of the organisation are social and medical projects. Recently HealthProm has successfully finished similar (to Kyrgyzstan) a 3-year project in Altay region of Russia. Local authorities immediately supported the initiative and provided premises and financing for two centres.

The Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI), Bishkek, established in 1995, gives advisory support to parents of disabled children, and also aspires to realise capabilities of disabled children and youth by their development and integration into society.

Public Association Shoola Kol, Bokonbaevo v. in Issyk-Kul region, is the human rights organisation and engaged in educational activity and raise public awareness. Shoola Kol also advises and educates people with disabilities and helps them establish NGOs for advancement of interests and rights of disabled people.

People who are involved in the project:
* Tatyana Buynovskaya – HealthProm manager, as well as the project manager “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund.
* Jonathan Watkins – senior project expert, social worker, consultant.
* Mark Hunter – child disability consultant, paediatrician.
* Azat Israilov – in-country project manager in Kyrgyzstan.
* Tamara Dyikanbaeva – Association of Parents of Disabled Children chair, project officer in Bishkek.
* Antonina Lee – Shoola Kol chair, project coordinator in Issyk-Kul region, Bokonbaevo.

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HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Under the project funded by the Big Lottery Fund HealthProm delegation of three people (see list above) have visited Kyrgyzstan for meetings with the representatives of government agencies and international and local non-governmental organisations. Between 11 and 23d May, 33 meetings took place in Bishkek and Bokonbaevo, one of them was an interview to the newspaper “Vechernij Bishkek”. In addition HealthProm representatives visited homes of families with disabled children. The results of these meetings will help partners to define the area of specialization for new rehabilitation centres. These centres will work in close interaction with local authorities and government agencies. Currently through consultations with local authorities and additional meetings there is a search for premises for the future centres as one of overall
project objectives is sustainability of the centres.

Young people: new horizons!
The youth of the Association of Parents of Disabled Children is becoming more active in public life of the country, and has also achieved some successes in education. In June this year Seinep Dyikanbaeva, project and PR manager of ARDI, has been named one of the first New Heroes of Kyrgyzstan for the positive contribution to the development of our society, a nomination organised by NGO “Atool” (Karakol). More detailed information can be found at: http://www.atuul.kg/?pid=19&hid=3. In addition, recently Seinep, a first year student of the American University in the Central Asia, has passed through a rigid competitive selection for a year training in Japan, sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA).

Ukei Muratalieva, another active young volunteer of ARDI, a student of the Kyrgyz Technical University, has been chosen together with other two Kyrgyz citizens for another training program on leadership and building networks, also sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA). She leaves for a month for Tokyo to learn how to train and at the same time to learn how local disabled people live and the organisations of disabled people work. After returning home she will conduct a series of trainings and seminars.
Best wishes to them!

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President signed the Law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
President of the Kyrgyz Republic has signed the law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”.

This law aims to improve social protection of persons with disabilities, provide them with equal with other citizens of the Kyrgyz Republic possibilities to practice their rights and freedoms, avoid restrictions in their lives.
Source: 24.kg, 12 April 2008

UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The General Assembly of the United Nations in the beginning of June, 2008 approved the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. It became the first universal international legal document aiming to protect the rights of persons with various kinds of permanent physical, mental, intellectual or sensor limitations. The convention contains 50 articles that protect and encourage the rights of the disabled, decrease discrimination towards them, provide them with rights to work, health services, education and full participation in society life, and also access to justice, inviolability of person, freedom from exploitation and abuse, and freedom of movement.
Source: 24.kg, 16 June 2008

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The new law about social order accepted
The law accepted in the second reading on 5th June this year intends to involve non-commercial organisations in realisation of government social programs through placing on a competitive basis and implementation the government social orders. This will also allow the government to essentially increase the efficiency of implementation of social programs and to involve in social sphere additional human, material and financial resources from non-government sources and it will partially reduce dependence of the non-governmental organisations on foreign funding.

The Minister of labour and social development of the Kyrgyz Republic Uktomkhan Abdullaeva supporting the law, underlined that “now in Kyrgyzstan, some social establishments, children’s homes, boarding schools, houses for aged people opened by the donor funding and the international organisations are on the verge of closing because of the termination of their financing by the foreign organisations. So why can’t we support the efforts of non-governmental organisations and public associations which will render social services to the
population and care for certain number of the aged, homeless children or the disabled who cannot be accommodated in the formal establishments now since there are no places or shortage of funds?”.

Similar laws has been successfully working for a long time in the countries of Europe, in Kazakhstan and 6 federal areas of Russia. Source:
Source: “The third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for people with disabilities
“The Japanese agency for international cooperation (JICA) plans to open in Kyrgyzstan a centre for people with disabilities”, – informed today at a press conference Uktomkhan Abdullaeva, the Minister of labour and social development of KR. According to her, there is the Asian-Pacific centre on problems of the disabled located in Japan. It is going to expand its activities in Central Asia. “After a working visit by Kyrgyz delegation to Japan it decided to open a head office in Kyrgyzstan for the countries of CA. It will bring to the republic additional investments. After the discussion of details of opening of the centre in October 2008 an international conference will take place in which well-known people with disabilities will take part”, – says Uktomkhan Abdullaeva.

As Minister of labour and social development KP emphasizes, such decision was affected by the new law “About the rights and guarantees of people with disabilities” recently passed by the government. “We have excluded articles from it that this category of people cannot work. Their number in workforce should make not less than 5 percent”, – said Uktomhan Abdullaeva.
Source: 24.kg, 22.05.08

Projects on employment for disabled people
We have to break the stereotype that disabled people are defective, said Edward Vinter, the executive director of Eurasia Foundation in Central Asia (EFCA). According to his words, disabled people in Kyrgyzstan are especially vulnerable group of population as being full members of society they simply cannot get a job. Many businessmen, in his opinion, are just confident that the disabled cannot work properly. In this regard, there are now some projects in Kyrgyzstan aiming to render assistance to disabled people in work search. In particular, the Eurasia Foundation in CA together with the Republican independent association of disabled women has
started cooperation with businesses of Bishkek and their management in granting workplaces for disabled people. There will also be a vacancy fair in Bishkek for people with disabilities.

Besides that, today the World Bank and EFCA declared winners of the Program of small grants of 2008 in Kyrgyzstan. “It is intended for the local organisations of a civil society. For 1996-2007 we have given out 121 small grants for a total sum of $315 thousand”, – said the chief executive of Fund Eurasia in the Central Asia Edward Vinter. Thirteen organisations have become winners.
Source: 24.kg

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The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
The Minister of Education and Science Ishenkul Boldzhurova presented a law providing such a grant recently at a committee meeting on international affairs and inter-parliamentary communications of the parliament of KR. She said, that in 2005 the ministry of education and science requested the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to support children with disabilities. “This project is supported by the Japanese Fund on reduction of poverty which will allocate $1 million, $50 thousands are provided by our government”, – added Ishenkul Boldzhurova.

The minister informed, that in the republic there are now about 19 thousand disabled children of which 250 children study at comprehensive schools in KR, in addition three thousand children study at the special boarding schools.

Ishenkul Boldzhurova noted that grant money will go on preparation of methodical manuals for schools and future teachers for training children with disabilities. According to her, for implementing the future project 35 comprehensive schools all over the country have already been selected – 5 in each region of the country, and also four boarding schools (internats) and two kindergartens.
Source: 24.kg, 15.04.2008

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Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Thanks to allocated 50 holiday vouchers by the Kyrgyzstan Federation of Trade unions the Association of Parents of Disabled Children organised on 4 – 25 July holiday for members of the Association, including 50 children ith special needs. Children’s recreational centre “Ulan” located near Balykchy accommodated them, and under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund transportation expenses for all children have been covered.

The recreational centre can accommodate about 250 people. Besides swimming on lake, there were joint cultural events organised for children, which promoted integration of disabled children with other children, and also promoted tolerance among their peers.

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Grants
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) (Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan) on behalf of the Canadian Foundation announces call for applications for small grants program for Central Asia.

The main areas: poverty reduction, sustainable development, increase participation of women, protection the children’s rights, capacity building for organisations, environment.

The maximum size of a grant is $20,000. The general grant pool is $50,000.

Projects should be short-term ending and presenting a financial report until 1st March 2009. For additional information please write to Anna Zhugan on: Anna. Zhugan@international.gc.ca

Bradley Foundation contests
Bradley Foundation supports: conducting annual events, holding conferences and seminars, purchasing equipment, general support, training, investments related to a project, publications, researches, stipends, development of educational programs.

Applications accepted: 1 March, 1 July, 1 September, 1 December each year.

The size of a grant: from $100 up to $550,000.

Priority areas of support: development of civic sense – projects can be aimed at any sphere of public life (economy, politics, culture, civil society), but they should advance citizenship to the bottom idea of elections and vote. For example, these can be projects showing increased public participation, political or academic research, media projects and others. Building projects and individuals are not financed.

Application procedure can be found at the Fund’s site. Results of selection appear in February, May-June, September and November, depending on application submission. More information can be found at: http://www.bradleyfdn.org/
Source: “the Third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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This newsletter sent to We Can Do by Azat Israilov. People who wish to receive future issues of this newsletter, in PDF format, via email should inquire by email at aisrail@gmail.com (NOT with We Can Do)

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Disabled Girls in the Classroom: Finding What We Don’t Know

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Reports, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

A report entitled Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) discusses what we don’t know about girls with disabilities in relation to education, and what ought to be done about it.

Readers familiar with gender issues within education know that, in many countries, girls are still more likely to drop out of school–if they ever attend at all. They may be needed at home to fetch the water; they may be afraid of being sexually assaulted on the way to school; or they may be embarrassed about managing their menustration at schools where there is no separate bathroom for girls–or perhaps no bathrooms at all.

Regular We Can Do readers and others familiar with the education field may also recall that about 77 million primary school-aged children today are not enrolled in school–and about one-third of them have disabilities. Schools are reluctant to enroll disabled students; parents may fear subjecting children with disabilities to bullying from the community and thus keep them at home; or decision makers may simply assume that disabled students either cannot learn or would be unable to use their educational degree later on because “no one wants to hire disabled workers.”

But what of girls with disabilities? Being a double minority does tend to come with a triple whammy. Disabled girls are excluded because they have disabilities; they are excluded because they are girls; and then they are excluded yet again when programs might target girls without including disabled girls, or when programs might target children with disabilities without considering the impact of gender.

This would seem to imply that girls with disabilities may face a unique set of barriers when pursuing an education–barriers that neither non-disabled girls nor disabled boys need to consider. If a unique set of barriers, then surely a unique set of solutions would also be needed to ensure that the push to put the last 77 million children into school does not leave behind girls with disabilities. But, how can we tackle these barriers if we don’t have a clear picture of what they are?

The 35-page paper, Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb), is an attempt to pull together what is known about girls in education with what is known about disability in education, coupled with anecdotcal information about how girls with disabilities are affected differently. It provides recommendations for areas researchers should be focusing on and gives a few ideas for things that can help.

This paper was published in 2003. But, unfortunately, I doubt it is significantly dated. I don’t pretend to be intensively familiar with the literature on education among students with disabilities internationally. But a quick skim through a more recent report on disability in education, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), suggests that advancements since 2003 have been far from dramatic.

Perhaps one of the most important purposes of Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) is to help remind gender specialists that girls with disabilities are first and foremost, girls–but will be inherently excluded if not consciously targeted. For We Can Do readers already working on disability issues in education, another purpose is to remind that barriers excluding women and girls from full participation in society impact disabled girls and women just as much–if not more so.

If issues impacting girls with disabilities interests you, then you might also be interested in some of the following We Can Do posts:

Equalizing Educational Opportunity for the Nigerian-Ghanaian Blind Girl Child
Violence Against Blind/VI Girls in Malawi
Report on Violence Against Disabled Children (which I include in this list because violence against girls is often cited as a reason why some girls quit school)
Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children
Report on Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities (the referenced report includes brief references throughout to girls, including in the context of education)
Online discussion of inclusive education in Eastern Africa

Advocates working to promote more educational opportunities for girls with disabilities also may wish to consult, and cite, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), with particular attention to Article 6 (Women with Disabilities); Article 7 (Children with Disabilities); and Article 24 (Education).



I found this report by browsing the AskSource.info database.

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Philippines Youth Center Seeks Partnerships for Disabled Youth

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

From: Youth Center <philcoched_iyc@yahoo.com.ph>
Subject: PhilCOCHED – Inclusive Youth Center
Date: Monday, August 4, 2008, 4:16 PM

Dear Sir/Madam:

Greetings from PhilCOCHED – Inclusive Youth Center (IYC)!

IYC is a youth program component of Philippine Council of Cheshire Homes for the Disabled (PhilCOCED), which was awarded as one of the top ten accomplished youth organization (TAYO) all over the Philippines . It is called inclusive to bring together the disabled and non-disabled youth into youth-serving organization to help in the promotion of the rights of persons with disabilities.

IYC continues to promote the rights of persons with disabilities through school-to-school campaign showcasing basketball on wheels exhibition and dancing on wheels. We believe, through this advocacy we can achieve the following objectives:

• Promote social awareness on disability issues
• Inspire other people and build self-confidence among excluded disabled people
• Change the negative attitudes towards the disabled
• Active participation of the disabled in the community
• Capacity building of the youth
• Barkadahan of the disabled and non-disabled youth

With this, we would like to establish partnership with you through our programs and services such as leadership trainings, IT literacy, educational assistance, employment, advocacy, and community involvement or in any other events you are most interested. We believe that your favorable response would reflect your compassion for the youth with disabilities. For more information, you may contact us at (632) 411-5841/721-3620/413-4446 or email us at philcoched_iyc@yahoo.com.ph.

Thank you very much and God bless.

Very truly yours,

VIRGINIA S. RABINO
PhilCOCHED – IYC Project Coordinator
8 Saint Michael Street Cubao, Quezon City Philippines 1111
philcoched_iyc@yahoo.com.ph
Telefax: (632) 721-3620/411-5841/413-4446



This email was recently forwarded to the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group. People interested in communicating with the Philippines Youth Center should please contact PhilCOCHED directly, NOT We Can Do. Thank you.

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New Website Links Parents of Disabled Children to Information, Resources

Posted on 14 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Resources, South Asian Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

June 27, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Julie Holmquist 952-838-9000

julie.holmquist@PACER.org

New PACER Web site offers information, resources for children with disabilities and their parents across the globe

Parents of children with disabilities living in India, Uzbekistan and across the globe can find a new resource on the Internet.

A new PACER Web site (www.PACER.org/international) acts as a link to resources, organizations, program ideas and practices that can improve the lives of children with disabilities.

The site was recently launched by the nonprofit PACER Center, a National Parent Center for families of children with disabilities located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.

The Web site provides information on the history of disability rights in the United States, as well as a list of links to resources and organizations in the U.S.A. and other countries that focus on helping children with disabilities.

The idea for the site developed from PACER’s collaboration with professionals and government officials in India. This special connection with India began in 2005 when PACER Executive Director Paula Goldberg visited families in India, met with government officials and toured programs for children with disabilities.

Since that time, PACER has co-sponsored India’s first National Conference on technology for children and adults with disabilities, along with India’s National Institute for the Mentally andicapped. PACER has also supported the creation of a new center on assistive technology for children and adults, scheduled to open September 13 at the Spastics Society of Karnatka(SSK) in Bangalore, India.

Creating a Web site was a way to exchange even more information, Goldberg says. Because of PACER’s close ties with India, the site has a wealth of information about disability organizations and laws in that country. In the future, Goldberg says PACER hopes to expand the amount of resources on the Web site specific to other countries.

PACER has a global reputation for helping families of children with disabilities. More than 130 guests from 15 foreign countries have visited PACER in recent years, and in 2007, PACER staff made presentations on disability issues during a satellite conference with Uzbekistan disability leaders. The conference was hosted by the U.S. Embassy.

“We’ve hosted many international guests at PACER who are eager to find additional resources for children with disabilities,” said Shauna McDonald, PACER’s director of community resource development. “The Web site is another way to collaborate and work toward the goal of improving the lives of children with disabilities around the world.”

PACER Center is a National Parent Center for families of children and youth with any disability or special health need. PACER is located at 8161 Normandale Blvd., Minneapolis, MN 55437-1044. For information, call 952-838-9000 (voice); 952-838-0190 (TTY) or 888-248-0822 (toll-free). PACER’s Web site is www.PACER.org and its e-mail address is PACER@PACER.org



This announcement was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

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JOB POST: Inclusive Education Consultant Tibet Autonomous Region

Posted on 25 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Application deadline: July 4, 2008. Applications should be sent to hr@handicap-int.org.cn, NOT We Can Do.

TERMS of REFERENCE

Inclusive Education Consultant – Tibet Autonomous Region

1. Background Information
Handicap International (HI) has been operating in the Tibet Autonomous Region since 2000, in cooperation with the Tibet Disabled Persons’ Federation (TDPF) at regional level and the Lhasa, Shigatse and Chamdo Disabled Persons’ Federation at prefecture level. Four different projects have been established in the fields of orthopaedics, physiotherapy, support to deaf people’s association and community-based rehabilitation services (CBR).

The present consultancy will contribute to the CBR project. This project started in 2001, focusing on children and young adults with disabilities under 21 years old in Lhasa Urban District. Eight rehabilitation workers were trained in basic physical rehabilitation and are now well experienced. They follow-up children with disabilities at home, teaching the families with basic rehabilitation, providing counselling, referring the children to appropriate rehabilitation and
medical care services.

School inclusion for children with disabilities remains a major difficulty in the region, even at the level of primary education. While the rehabilitation workers are also in charge of referring the children into mainstream schools, it is done on a case-by-case basis and there is neither close accompaniment of the children in those schools nor adaptation of the school environment and teaching methods within the classrooms. 

During the last 2 years, the CBR project has changed its orientation to address other needs (e.g. access to leisure services) and get more participation and support from governmental bureaus and community members. It has also started acting in rural areas of Lhasa prefecture.
In addition to the rehabilitation workers, the current CBR team working on the project implementation includes an HI project manager, a physiotherapist (partner staff from the TDPF) acting as a team leader, and a representative of the partner at prefecture level (Lhasa Disabled
Persons’ Federation, Lhasa DPF) acting as a coordinator with the different governmental bureaus involved in the action. One person from the civil affairs bureau at County/Urban District level is also supporting the field coordination and monitoring process. When activities are related to education, the person in charge of the education sector at Lhasa DPF and a reference person from the research department of the relevant county/urban district education bureau also join the team.

In 2007, two primary pilot schools have been selected in Lhasa prefecture in collaboration with the regional and municipal education bureaus where to start inclusive education projects including building adaptation and development of child-to-child groups. One of the schools is located in Jia Er Duo, a rural village in Medrogonkha County, the other one being Zangre school in Lhasa Urban District. In September 2007, a seminar on inclusive education has been organized to present the basis of inclusive education concepts. Attendees were teachers from different primary schools as well as staff from education bureaus and Lhasa DPF.

2. Objective of the assignment
By the end of the assignment, the teachers of the two pilot schools will have gained the specific technical skills to better support and follow-up children with disabilities in their schools and start child-to-child support activities. The partners’ staff (Lhasa DPF representing the education sector, staff from research departments within education bureaus, civil affairs representatives, county education bureau representatives) will start monitoring efficiently the
implementation of the activities within the schools.

3. Methodology
First phase:  The first phase will focus on the following topics:

  • Conduct an assessment of the current situation in the pilot schools in terms of existing facilities and resources to analyze their capacity for integration of children with disabilities
  • Develop intervention and training strategies including monitoring and evaluation procedures in close collaboration with the partners. The intervention should consider the involvement of community members acting as volunteers within the school.

Second phase: The second phase will consist in trainings delivery. The trainees will be teachers and managers from the two pilot schools, staff from municipal education bureau, county/urban district education bureau, civil affairs, Lhasa DPF and TDPF. The reference team will consist in one person from Lhasa DPF in charge of education, one person from the research department of county/urban district education bureau, one rehabilitation worker in charge of supervising the social rehabilitation activities of the CBR project, one person from the county civil affairs and one person from each of the two pilot schools.

The trainings will cover, but will not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Identification of children in the schools with learning difficulties
    or in needs of a support
  • How to assess that a child is ready to go to school
  • Setting-up an individual curriculum for each of the child to be
    followed-up (Individual Action Plan)
  • How to organize, carry out and monitor child-to-child support
  • Training for the teachers on how to organize and provide awareness on
    disability for the students
  • Training of the reference team on how to follow-up and monitor the
    implementation (activities and needs analysis)
  • Possibly, if there is no time constraint, training on special teaching skills: Braille, sign language and intellectual disability. This will be organized in collaboration with other organizations (Tibet Deaf Association, Braille without Borders, Lhasa Special Education
    School).

Third phase: The third phase will be organized as follows:

  • Close follow-up of the implementation process with the trainees, implementation of corrective measures
  • Provide refresher training for all the trainees and reference team.

4. Duration
The assignment is expected to be conducted from July 1st to November 30th 2008 as follows:

  • First phase: 1 month
  • Second phase: 2 months
  • Third phase: 2 months
  • Restitution on the mission with key stakeholders (1 day).

5. Expected outputs

  • A first report containing an analysis of the situation and the description of the principles for the development of intervention and training strategies, monitoring and evaluation processes
  • Training handouts for the education professionals
  • Guidelines for the volunteers who can support inclusive activities within the schools
  • End of mission report with recommendations

The reports be submitted in English; handouts and guidelines will be submitted in Chinese.

6. Qualifications

  • University degree, preferably in the field of education or social sciences
  • Experience in working with Chinese governmental departments
  • Experience in working in rural and urban schools in China
  • Good knowledge of existing education policies and strategies for children with disabilities in China
  • Previous experience as a trainer in the field of education
  • Computer literacy (Word, Excel, Power Point)
  • Good English writing skills
  • Chinese national.

7. Submission requests
Handicap International invites experts to express their interest through submission of a current CV and a cover letter in English addressing each of the following:

a. Availability for the period
b. Major experiences in the field of inclusive education
c. Relevant work experience in China from previous
d. Consultancy fee in RMB (rate per day) with a detail on what it covers.

Please send your application at the following E-mail address: hr@handicap-int.org.cn

For more details on the job content, please contact Ms. Kalsang Dickyi at                0891 68 37 899        

Deadline for application: 4th July, 2008



We Can Do received this job posting via the listserve for the RatifyNow organization.

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LISTSERVE: On-line Discussion of Inclusive Education in Eastern Africa

Posted on 24 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear Colleagues,
 
To support the growing interest in the area of Inclusive Education throughout Eastern Africa, an Eastern Africa Discussion Group was set up to help facilitate discussions, networking and information sharing on this topic.  This discussion group is associated with EENET – The Enabling Education Network, which is a UK based information sharing network which promotes the inclusion of marginalized groups in education world wide.
 
The initial discussion group that was established was inundated with SPAM.  To overcome this problem the discussion group is now utilizing a Yahoo Group for discussion, which is free of SPAM.
 
If you would like to join the Eastern Africa Discussion Group, please send an email to eenet_eastern_africa-owner@yahoogroups.co.uk stating your interest to join the discussion group.   Or you may also join via the web at http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/eenet_eastern_africa/

If you join and decide later you do not want to be a part of the group any longer, you can unsubscribe at any time.
 
If you know any one else who you think might be interested in joining this group, please pass this message to them so as they have the information necessary to join.
 
Kind Regards,
 
Dimity Taylor
Coordinator
EENET Eastern Africa



Thank you to Dimity Taylor for submitting this announcement to We Can Do.

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Publication Seeks Stories by and about Children, Youth with Disabilities

Posted on 19 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Papers, Children, Cross-Disability, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Disabled Peoples’ International (DPI) is collecting articles related to children with disabilities for its next issue of Disability International. Disability International is an on-line magazine focused on the international disability community that publishes one or two issues each year, in English, Spanish, and French. The following kinds of submissions are welcome:

  • Written pieces and art work by children and youth
  • Stories about what it is like to be a young person with a disability, told in their own words
  • Stories from groups or organizations about a successful project they have done involving children or youth with disabilities. Please include pictures.

Stories should be about 450 words long. The deadline for submissions is July 31, 2008.

Prior issues of Disability International, from 2002 through 2008, can be downloaded for free on-line at http://v1.dpi.org/lang-en/resources/details.php?page=116. Themes for past issues have included: independent living (PDF format, 554 Kb); human rights (PDF format, 463 Kb); invisible disabilities (PDF format, 506 Kb); HIV/AIDS in Africa (PDF format, 1.63 Mb); a special edition on the launch of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in December 2006 (PDF format, 2.5 Mb); another issue on implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2007 (PDF format, 2 Mb); and, most recently, disability and the arts (PDF format, 1.5 Mb).

For inquiries, or to submit stories and pictures for the next issue, please contact Cassandra at Disabled Peoples’ International at info@dpi.org.



We Can Do first learned about DPI’s search for stories by or about children and youth with disabilities through the DPI weekly electronic newsletter. Thank you to Cassandra for supplying additional details about the guidelines for Disability International.

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VIII International Human Rights Colloquium

Posted on 18 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, Uncategorized, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , |

 

VIII International Human Rights Colloquium
“60th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: Challenges for the Global South”

8 to 15 november 2008, sao paulo, brazil

What is the International Human Rights Colloquium?
The Colloquium is an annual capacity building and peer-learning event designed for young activists from the Global South (Africa, Asia and Latin America). The objective of the VIII International Human Rights Colloquium is to strengthen the impact of human rights activists work and to offer the opportunity to build new collaborative networks among activists, academics and the Organization of the United Nations (ONU). 

Structure
The Colloquium offers lectures, seminars and working groups. In the morning sessions, participants will attend lectures, while in the afternoon sessions, they will take part in workshops and working groups, as well as visit human rights organizations.

Organization
The VIII Colloquium is organized by Conectas Human Rights together with Sur – Human Rights University Network. The VIII Colloquium is supported by Open Society Institute, the Ford Foundation, the United Nations Democracy Fund (UNDEF), among others.

Who can apply?
Young human rights defenders from the Global South who demonstrate commitment to the human rights cause as well as at least two-years of professional experience in the area. Additionally, criteria such as race, gender, and regional/social origin will be taken into
consideration during the selection process. Candidates who have participated in previous colloquia are not eligible for participation in 2008.

Fees and Scholarships
In order to cover costs, each participant must pay a participation fee.  A limited number of scholarships will be granted to guarantee participation of individuals. Candidates should submit a written request along with the application to be considered for a scholarship.

Applications
Required documents:

  • Application form;
  • 1 Reference Letter (to be sent by mail or e-mail);
  • Letter of Support from your organization;
  • Resume/C.V. (1 page);
  • Writing sample (1 page)

 Applications for the VIII International Human Rights Colloquium will be accepted until June 30th, 2008.

Candidates can apply on-line at www.conectas.org/coloquio (NOT at We Can Do) or download the application form (Word format, 155 Kb). The off-line version of the Application Form should be submitted by e-mail to coloquio@conectas.org. Candidates will be notified on August 1st, 2008.

Please, share this information with your colleges and partners!

 For more information, please visit: http://www.conectas.org/coloquio or email
coloquio@conectas.org (NOT We Can Do!)

Information is available in English, Portuguese, and Spanish.

I am not familiar with what accommodations the Colloquium organizers are able to offer to participants with disabilities. Interested parties are urged to communicate directly with them (email
coloquio@conectas.org, NOT We Can Do) regarding their needs.

Anyone with prior experience with this colloquium is encouraged to leave comments in the comments area below.



We Can Do received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD) listserve. Readers may join the GPDD listserve for themselves by contacting Maria Reina at mvreina@law.syr.edu.

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EENET Recruiting Steering Group Members to Promote Inclusive Education

Posted on 10 June 2008. Filed under: Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Opportunities, Volunteer Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Please note that applications should be directed to EENET, not to We Can Do; read carefully for links, email address, and instructions. The deadline is June 24, 2008.

EENET steering group: user group representatives

Background to EENET’s Steering Group
The Enabling Education Network (EENET) is a global information network that helps education practitioners and stakeholders to document and share their experiences of inclusive, child-friendly education. The network prioritises the information needs of southern countries. It aims to reach those who are often excluded from other international information systems or debates, or who cannot afford to buy information resources. EENET’s users include local and international Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), teachers, parents, students, government officials, academics, etc.

EENET has a very small co-ordination office in the UK, employing one staff member and a few volunteers, but still manages to support the information needs of thousands of people in 200 countries. Independent regional networks, based on EENET’s vision and mission, are also being developed in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

To find out more about EENET’s information sharing activities visit www.eenet.org.uk; email info@eenet.org.uk; or write to EENET, c/o ESI, School of Education, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK

EENET’s role is to champion inclusive education. But it also seeks to challenge the status quo, to ask difficult questions and encourage debates on controversial topics. To ensure that EENET fulfils this role, and continues to meet the information needs of its diverse target audience, the network has a Steering Group which has not been very active for several years, but is now being reformed.

EENET Steering Group function and role of members

  • The Steering Group will monitor EENET’s activities and makes suggestions for changes.
  • Steering Group members will represent the views of EENET’s founders, its regional networking partners, international NGOs/donors, and, very importantly, its target users.
  • Steering Group members will assist EENET staff with taking action in key areas of EENET’s development (e.g. fundraising) if they have skills and experience in a relevant area.

User group representatives
Two or three Steering Group representatives will be appointed from among EENET’s ‘grassroots’ users. While they will not be able to represent the full diversity of EENET’s users, they will bring to the Steering Group a valuable ‘reality check’ on the needs, challenges and potential contributions of EENET’s users.

These ‘grassroots’ Steering Group representatives will be selected based on the following criteria:

Essential

  • Good communication skills, preferably in English.
  • Able to communicate by email, and also if possible by telephone or using internet phone or chat systems.
  • Able to travel to the UK and other countries (e.g. must have a passport, or be able to obtain a passport and travel visas without difficulties).
  • Enthusiasm about the aims, values and principles of EENET, and a commitment to contributing as fully as possible to the Steering Group.

One or more of the following are desired:

    Awareness of:
  • child rights
  • education issues
  • disability and/or other diversity issues
  • community development issues.
  • First hand experience of inclusive education (as a student, teacher, parent, local education official, teacher trainer, etc).
  • Experience of being an activist or in other ways representing a marginlised, discriminated against or excluded group (e.g. women/girls; disabled people; refugees; working children, etc).
  • Awareness of EENET and/or an active member of EENET’s network.
  • Awareness of and/or an active member of other south-based, south-focused information sharing and advocacy networks.
  • Financial issues
    Steering Group members are unpaid volunteers. There is no salary for being a Steering Group member. However, EENET will cover all costs relating to attending meetings (e.g. travel, accommodation, meals and other essential daily living expenses) and participating in telephone conferences or internet chats.

    Application to become an EENET Steering Group member

    Closing date for applications: 24th June 2008

    Personal details
    Name:
    Nationality:
    Postal address:
    Tel. no:
    Fax no:
    Mobile no:
    Email:
    Other, e.g. Skype name:

    Do you have a passport?

    Are you aware of any possible restrictions to your freedom to travel to other countries?

    Are you available 8-12 September 2008 (the dates for the next Steering Group meeting)?

    Supporting information
    Describe your involvement with EENET so far (e.g. when did you first learn about EENET; when did you first read the newsletter; what communication have you had with EENET; what other EENET activities have you been involved in?)

    Why are you interested in becoming a member of EENET’s Steering Group?

    Explain any experience you have with the following (this can be experience gained through your personal life or through work):

    • education/inclusive education
    • child rights/human rights
    • community development
    • equality and diversity issues.

    Explain what you think inclusive education means.

    Why do you think it is important for EENET to promote inclusive education and help people to share information on inclusive education?

    Please provide any other information you think will support your application.

    References
    Please supply the names and contact details of 2 people who can provide references for you. At least one referee should know you in a professional or work capacity or have direct experience of your involvement in inclusive education activities/advocacy.

    Referee 1
    Name:
    Address:
    Email:
    Tel:
    Fax:

    Referee 2
    Name:
    Address:
    Email:
    Tel:
    Fax:
    Please return your completed form to:
    Email: info@eenet.org.uk
    Address: EENET, c/o ESI, School of Education, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
    Fax: +44 (0)161 275 3548



    We Can Do received this announcement via the EENET Eastern Africa listserv. Again, applications should please be directed to EENET in accordance to the instructions above, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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    International Conference: Inclusive Education, the Way of the Future

    Posted on 2 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Opportunities, Reports, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The International Bureau of Education is holding its 48th session of the International Conference on Education (ICE) this 25 – 28 November 2008 in Geneva, Switzerland. The theme will be “Inclusive Education: the Way of the Future.”

    The International Conference on Education is usually predominantly tailored for the needs of Ministers of Education who represent country governments around the world. However, other partners such as researchers, practitioners, representatives of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations also participate in the ICE dialogue.

    Debates at the November 2008 session of ICE are expected to focus on the following themes:

    (i) approaches, scope and content (to broaden the understanding of the theory and the practice of inclusive education);
    (ii) public policies (to demonstrate the role of governments in the development and the implementation of policies on inclusive education);
    (iii) systems, links and transitions (to create inclusive education systems which offer opportunities for lifelong learning);
    (iv) learners and teachers (to foster a learning environment where teachers are equipped to meet the learners’ diverse expectations and needs).

    As of this writing (June 2, 2008), I could not locate registration information at the ICE conference web site. However, even for people unable to attend the November conference, the web site still offers an abundance of materials that may be of interest to people involved in the education field.

    If you scroll down the page at the ICE conference site, you will see a listing of past Preparatory Meetings on Inclusive Education. Many of these include links to Executive Summaries or other reports based on the results of these past meetings. Further down the page, you will see links to reports from Working Groups of the International Bureau of Education Council regarding planning for the 48th ICE conference.

    For further (or upcoming) details on the November 2008 conference on Inclusive Education, please consult their web site directly at

    http://www.ibe.unesco.org/International/ICE48/English/index.html

    Let me please amplify that We Can Do is unable to respond to individual inquiries about this or any other event, toolkit, funding source, or other resource publicized at this site. Instead, please follow the above link.



    I first learned about this conference by browsing the Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development web site.

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    We Can Do Copyright
    This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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    NEWS: Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum Founded

    Posted on 8 April 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Ghulam Nabi Nizamani has asked that people circulate the following press release.

    COMMONWEALTH DISABLED PEOPLES’ FORUM

    Press Release

    A New Voice Shouts to the Commonwealth –
    Nothing About us Without Us.

    Disabled youth and adult people from 16 Commonwealth countries came together from 15-17 March, 2008 in London to launch a unique Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum (1), the purposes of which will be to provide a link between disabled people’s organisations in all Commonwealth countries and all the political structures of the Commonwealth.

    At the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in October 2007 the civil society challenge to CHOGM was to mainstream disability in sustainable development, to ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (CRPD) and to adopt disability inclusive policies. This cannot be achieved without a strong, democratic forum of disabled youth and adults to ensure implementation.

    We had a vibrant and dynamic series of meetings to consolidate the vision, constitution and activities of the Forum (2). The youth met separately to devise their own creative methods of self representation and organisation. We came together in a final agreement of how to go forward together. It is essential that the voice of young disabled people is heard clearly in the work of the CDPF. They are the future leaders and builders of our shared vision of a Commonwealth built on equality, human rights and respect for diversity.

    The major focus of our work in the next two years, including a major conference before CHOGM in 2009, will be to ensure that Commonwealth countries sign, ratify and implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. As Rachel Kachaje said at the Launch of the CDPF, hosted by the Commonwealth Foundation at Marlborough House,
    ‘Disabled people see that hope springs out of the convention – hope for a new, inclusive world where disabled people can be seen as fully human’

    We, All Sanghar Handicaps’ Association Pakistan are very proud to have part of this exciting new beginning and look forward to working with our disabled colleagues to ensure our full inclusion in all the nations of our shared Commonwealth.

    For further information contact:
    Ghulam Nabi Nizamani
    South Asia /South East Asia Regional Representative
    Bakhoro Road Sanghar-68100, Pakistan. (3)
    Ph # +92-333-2916281
    Email: ghulamnabi.nizamani@gmail.com (4)

    (1) This meeting was funded by the Commonwealth Foundation, DFID, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and ADD.
    (2) Officers elected were: Chair: James Mwanda (Uganda), Vice Chair: George Daniel (Tinidad & Tobago), Secretary: Javed Abidi (India), Treasurer: Richard Rieser (UK), Women’s Representative: Rachel Kachaje, (Malawi) Youth Representatives: Laura Kanusu (Uganda)
    George Kasara (Kenya), Regional Representatives: Ghulam Nabi Nizaamani (Pakistan), Lesley Emmanuel (Antigua), Setareki Macanawai (Fiji), Steve Estey (Canada) Thomas Ongolo (South Africa).
    (3) The registered office of the CDPF will be in India and there will be a liaison office in the UK to work directly with the Commonwealth Secretariat and Foundation.
    (4) This email address can be changed after website of CDPF.



    In addition to the above press release, Ghulam Nabi Nizamani also made the following note in mid March:

    The following countries from South Asia and South East Asia are member countries of Commonwealth. These Countries are invited to submit application for Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum (CDPF) Country Focal Point.
    Bangladesh
    Brunei Darussalam
    India
    Malaysia
    Maldives
    Pakistan
    Singapore
    Sri Lanka

    The Organization must be National Level Organization in respective country if in any country there will be no National Organization we will support to encourage to estabilish National organization in that country. Please also send establishment date of Organization, Network in the Country, Some credible work done in past. Please send information by mail or email before the first week of April 2008.

    Cheers!
    Ghulam Nabi Nizamani
    Regional Representative CDPF
    South and South East Asia

    Note: We have no contact from Brunei Darussalam please help us for finding National organization there.



    Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for sharing the above press release. Any inquiries should please be emailed to him directly at ghulamnabi.nizamani@gmail.com.

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    RESOURCE: African Union of the Blind Web Site

    Posted on 22 March 2008. Filed under: Blind, Democratic Participation, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Individuals who share an interest in the self-empowerment of blind people in Africa can turn to the African Union of the Blind (AFUB) web site for a range of information, publications, and helpful resources. The materials at this site will be particularly for people with an interest in HIV/AIDS; women; and youth.

    The AFUB website is meant to mobilize, empower, and disseminate information for individuals and organizations supporting people with visual impairments across Africa. AFUB is a pan-African umbrella non-government organization (NGO).

    On the page for AFUB publications, readers may download past issues of AFUB news in English or French. Issues of the news letter, Women’s Voices, contain a range of news, advice for independent living, and advocacy tips related to blind African women. Or readers may download manuals on training HIV/AIDS trainers; including blind people in HIV/AIDS education programs; training blind people to advocate and lobby for their rights at the local and national level; and empowering visually impaired youth. Some of these manuals could probably be usefully adapted for use outside of Africa as well.

    On the projects page, people may learn about AFUB’s HIV and AIDS Awareness and Training Project; its Gender And Youth Development; and its National Civic Education Program.

    The Reports and Policy page offers copies of AFUB’s annual reports and many reports from AFUB’s various training activities and other projects, particularly in the areas of HIV/AIDS awareness and in gender and youth development.

    Or, download reports from
    past conferences
    on HIV/AIDS and on Democracy and Development training.

    Begin exploring AFUB’s web site from their home page at:

    http://www.afub-uafa.org



    We Can Do first found the AFUB web site through the AskSource.info database. Further
    details about its contents were found by exploring the AFUB web site
    itself. I especially encourage the AFUB
    publications
    page for anyone seeking pragmatic materials they can use
    in the field.

    Subscribe to We Can Do
    Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

    We Can Do Copyright
    This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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    TRAINING: International Deaf Youth Leadership Camp

    Posted on 5 March 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

    Asia-Pacific Deaf Youth Leadership Camp will be held in Jakarta, Indonesia from 22nd – 27th June 2008 and run by the Indonesian Association for the welfare of the Deaf Youth.

    [Edited March 6 ’08: This announcement originally indicated that this was called the World Federation of the Deaf Youth Leadership Camp. However, it has been brought to my attention that this is not officially designated as a WFD camp, though WFD is aware of it. Rather, it seems to be primarily for the Asian-Pacific region. Interested individuals should contact Donny to inquire for further detail and clarification. Further corrections or clarifications will be made to this post if and when I receive them. Apologies for any inconvenience.]

    The theme of the camp is “WE ARE ONE”.

    The youth camp is aimed at identifying ways to advocate for Deaf people’s human rights and will involve training in leadership and organizational activities; stimulate networking so that Deaf people interchange rewarding experiences, access to communication and information. The camp will also provide an opportunity to Deaf youths around the world to participate in a gathering at international level and to gain experiences and exposure. For more information about this camp, kindly contact Donny in Indonesia on e-mail: info_4thapdyc2008@yahoo.com.

    Because the host country is still developing, it is very hard to offer financial support.

    Registration ends on 15th April 2008.

    Delegates from the Asia Pacific region pay a registration fee of 250 US Dollars while those from other countries pay a total of 300 US dolars. The registration fee includes meals and accomodation. The delegates are expected to meet their flight costs (air tickets) to and from Indonesia. The age limit is 17 – 35 years. Email Donny for further information.



    We Can Do first learned about this leadership camp through the free Disabled People International’s email newsletter.

    Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



    Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



    This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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    TRAINING: Youth Leadership, Summer Trip from US to Costa Rica

    Posted on 4 March 2008. Filed under: Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Young leaders with disabilities who are US citizens are being recruited for a 16-day leadership exchange program to Costa Rica this summer. The focus of the program, from June 27 to July 12, 2008, will be on youth leadership and cross-cultural perspectives on disability rights. Participants aged 18 to 24 will develop leadership skills, build self-confidence, make friends, learn Spanish, and experience Costa Rican culture by living with a local host family.

    This opportunity is offered by Mobility International USA (MIUSA). The application deadline is March 28, 2008.

    MIUSA strives to organize programs that include people with and without disabilities and people from diverse cultural backgrounds. First time travelers with disabilities who are from a cultural minority and of low socioeconomic status are included every year. MIUSA exchange programs are inclusive of people who are Deaf and hard of hearing, or have cognitive,visual, physical, psychiatric, systemic, non-apparent, or other types of disabilities.

    • ASL staff interpreters will be provided by MIUSA for the duration of the program.
    • Materials in alternative formats will be provided for all scheduled program activities.
    • Funding for Personal Assistants may be available for participants who need personal assistance during the program.

    Learn more about the program at:

    http://www.miusa.org/newsitems/costarica08

    Inquiries about the program should be directed to MIUSA, not We Can Do.



    We Can Do learned about this program via the Disabled People International (DPI) email newsletter.

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    CONFERENCE: Global Youth Enterprise

    Posted on 23 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Employment, Events and Conferences, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

    In developing countries alone, there are 1.3 billion youth, both with and without disabilities. Many of them need jobs. But young people, who may lack both skills and experience, find that a challenge.

    This September 15 to 16, 2008, in Washington, DC, USA, Making Cents International will convene practitioners, donors, educators, youth, members of the private sector, representatives of governments, and other partners in youth enterprise, entrepreneurship, and livelihood development for the Global Youth Enterprise Conference. This conference is for individuals who are committed to investing in young people. It is meant to give participants the opportunity to share lessons, good practice, and ideas for how they can create more economic opportunity for young people.

    Conference organizers are accepting session proposals for Breakout Sessions. All proposals should be submitted by April 4, 2008. Submit as early as possible. Their preferred mode of receiving session proposal is via email to conference@makingcents.com. This could be an opportunity for people involved with disabled youth to submit proposals for sessions focused on disability issues. As one possible example, perhaps you know about a project that has successfully helped young people with disabilities find or create jobs. Or perhaps you can share pragmatic tips with mainstream youth programs about how they can become more inclusive of disabled youth in their activities.

    For more information about criteria for proposals, or alternate means for submitting them, please follow the link to:

    http://www.youthenterpriseconference.org/themes.asp.

    The conference organizers also invites exhibitors to rent table space ($650 if you apply before April 18, 2008; $800 if you apply between April 18 and July 31, 2008). Interested exhibitors should read more detail at the conference web site at:

    http://www.youthenterpriseconference.org/exhibit_opportunities.asp#top.

    The main web site for the conference is at:

    http://www.youthenterpriseconference.org



    We Can Do first learned about this conference by browsing the World Bank disability “news and events” page.

    Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



    Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



    This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere else, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people.

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    ESSAY COMPETITION: Shape the City of Your Dreams

    Posted on 20 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Call for Papers, Fellowships & Scholarships, Urban Development, youth | Tags: , , , , |

    WANTED: YOUR practical ideas for improving the city you live in.

    The International Essay Competition 2008 for young people aged 18 to 25 has been launched. The theme is “Shaping the City of Your Dreams.” Essays can be submitted in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, or Portuguese. The maximum allowed length for each essay is 10 pages (4,000 words). Cash prizes are available for $5000 or $1000.

    Participating youth may be either students or non-students. Ph.D. (doctorate) students are NOT eligible.

    Essays may be submitted until March 23, 2008.

    Finalists will be announced April 30, 2008. Finalists will be invited to attend the ABCDE Conference in Cape Town, South Africa, in June 2008. All travel expenses for finalists will be paid by the World Bank. The final winners will be selected and awarded on June 11, 2008.

    This competition could be an opportunity for a young adult with disabilities in a developing country to win recognition for their ideas.

    This competition is not specific to disability issues. But perhaps participants could consider focusing their essay on how their city could be made more accessible to disabled people. If this interests you, then you might find it helpful to research the concept of “universal design.” Other We Can do blog posts relevant to universal design include one about New Delhi improving its accessibility and another about a free, on-line book on universal deisgn and visitability.

    For ideas on how to find further informational resources on universal design or other topics related to people with disabilities, try consulting Tips and leads on finding academic research, paper, resources, or statistics. Of course, also try searching at http://www.google.com or your preferred search engine.

    More information about the essay competition can be found at:

    www.essaycompetition.org

    Be sure to read the FAQ and rules carefully before submitting your essay. Participants should also carefully read more detail about the three questions that each essay is expected to answer.

    It is critical that you write a good-quality abstract (short summary) for your essay. Abstracts will be used to help the judges pre-select essays for the competition. Read all the instructions at www.essaycompetition.org carefully.

    Participants can submit your essays on-line at

    http://www.essaycompetition.org/content08_38_1

    One of the questions on their application form asks where you learned about their competition. When you answer this question, please be sure to click “other” and tell them that you learned about their competition at wecando.wordpress.com.



    Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nazimani for alerting me (and others) to this competition. I researched most of the detail for this blog post at the essay competition web site.

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    RESOURCE: Training Manual on HIV/AIDS Awareness and Disability Rights

    Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Young people with disabilities in Africa can now use a free training manual to learn how to become leaders in preventing HIV/AIDS in their country.

    The manual, entitled “HIV/AIDS Awareness and Disability Rights Training Manual” (Word format, 800 Kb), is targeted at: people in the disability community; government officials involved in disability and HIV; community leaders; and people working for HIV organizations. The manual is written in simple language to meet the needs of people who have little or no basic literacy skills.

    The first chapter clarifies the definition of disability; explains some of the barriers people with disabilities experience in gaining access to information that could save their life; and offers guidance on meeting the communication needs of disabled people.

    The second chapter explains what “HIV” and “AIDS” are and clarifies some common, incorrect beliefs about HIV/AIDS. It explains the common ways in which HIV/AIDS is transmitted (how people are infected) and why disabled people are at high risk for getting or spreading HIV. The chapter also provides information about the importance of being tested for HIV/AIDS; suggests how to deal with being HIV-positive; and how to prevent HIV/AIDS.

    The third chapter discusses the stigma and discrimination that people with disabilities experience and the causes and effects of stigma. It suggests possible strategies and solutions for addressing stigma and discrimination against persons with disabilities living with HIV/AIDS.

    The fourth chapter provides an overview of important international disability rights laws, including the new international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). It advises new leaders on how they can take steps to advocate for the rights of people with disabilities living with HIV/AIDS.

    The fifth chapter discusses how emerging leaders can continue to strengthen their leadership skills and learn the principles of good governance.

    The manual, “HIV/AIDS Awareness and Disability Rights Training Manual” (Word format, 800 Kb), was prepared by Rehabilitation International (RI), Disabled Organization for Legal Affairs and Social Economic Development (DOLASED), and Miracles in Mozambique, with support from the Swedish International Development Agency (Sida).

    It is available in two versions: one version is targeted at trainers whoplan to use the manual for leading activities to train others. The other version is targeted at people who plan to participate in training activities.

    The manual for training participants can be downloaded at:

    http://riglobal.org/advocacy/projects/RI_HIV-AIDS_PARTICIPANTS-MANUAL_10Dec07_FINAL.doc (Word, 700 Kb)

    The manual targeted at trainers can be downloaded at:

    http://riglobal.org/advocacy/projects/RI_HIV-AIDS_TRAINING-MANUAL_10Dec07_FINAL.doc (Word, 800 Kb)



    We Can Do learned about these manuals by browsing the Rehabilitation International web site.



    Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



    Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).


    </code
    This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (https://wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere OTHER THAN We Can Do, BlogAfrica, or RatifyNow, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people without their permission.

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