Women

Disability and Development Online Consultations March 8-28, 2013

Posted on 13 March 2013. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, indigenous people, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, universal design, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

These online consultations (from March 8 to 28th, ie RIGHT NOW) are an opportunity to influence important decisions about how people with disabilities will be included in efforts to reduce poverty around the world.

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have been profoundly influential in making decisions on how to prioritize foreign assistance and government funds in more than 100 developing countries. The global community is now working to identify what goals should replace them after 2015. This means that the next few months will be critical for ensuring that people with disabilities are not again forgotten.  It is important for the global disability community, our constituency organizations, and professionals in the fields of international development and human rights be engaged.

Read below and follow the links for more detail on how individuals can participate in this on-line dialogue.

Online Consultations
As part of the preparatory process for the United Nations General Assembly High-level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD), the HLMDD Online Consultations (HOC) will be conducted from 8 to 28 March 2013. The consultations are co-organised by DESA and UNICEF under the existing platform of the World We Want 2015 (http://www.worldwewant2015.org/enable) in multiple languages.

Please register at: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/register.  If you have difficulty registering, then please email enable@worldwewant2015.org for assistance.

Simultaneous consultations will take place in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. The site is compatible with screen readers, however, if you are unable to access the site, please email your response to: enable@worldwewant2015.org. Please note that the forum is moderated, therefore your post will not appear immediately but will be posted within twenty-four hours.
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Apply for 6th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD)

Posted on 20 January 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, indigenous people, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
Invites women with disabilities around the world to apply for the
6th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD)
August 6 – 27, 2012 (Tentative)

Eugene, Oregon, USA

ABOUT MIUSA:
Mobility International USA (MIUSA) is a U.S.-based, non-profit organization whose mission is to empower people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

ABOUT THE WILD PROGRAM:
MIUSA’s Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD) will bring together approximately 30 women leaders with disabilities from approximately 30 different countries, to strengthen leadership skills, create new visions and build international networks of support for inclusive international development programming.

During the three-week program, participants will take part in workshops, seminars and discussions, conduct on-site visits, and participate in team-building activities, to explore challenges and exchange strategies for increasing leadership opportunities and participation of women and girls with disabilities in international development programs.

WHO CAN APPLY: ELIGIBILITY
Women with disabilities who are from:

  • South Pacific
  • Middle East
  • Latin America
  • Caribbean
  • Eurasia
  • Asia
  • Africa

Women with disabilities who are:

  • Established leaders and/or professionals
  • Emerging young leaders, ages 21 and above

Women with disabilities who speak or use at least ONE of the following languages:

  • Conversational English (minimum)
  • Spanish
  • Arabic
  • Sign Language; preferably familiar with American Sign Language (ASL)

•    MIUSA uses ASL sign language interpreters who are experienced and skilled at providing interpretation for individuals who use different sign languages.
•    Spoken and sign language interpretation will be provided during formal program activities, workshops, discussions and site visits only.

WHO CAN APPLY: QUALIFICATIONS
Women leaders with disabilities who demonstrate:

  • Personal experience with disability, an understanding of issues, and a commitment to working for the rights of women and girls with disabilities
  • Membership in an organization led by and for people with disabilities, or by and for women, with particular attention to issues of women and girls with disabilities; or civil society organization committed to the inclusion of women and girls with disabilities
  • Commitment to and capacity for increasing leadership opportunities of women with disabilities in the community and/or country
  • Commitment to and capacity for increasing the participation of women and girls with disabilities in international development programs

MIUSA will strive for diversity of geographic region, age, ethnic background, and types of disability in final selection of qualified participants. MIUSA will give priority to qualified women with disabilities who:

  • Are from rural communities
  • Are members of indigenous groups
  • Have not participated in a MIUSA exchange program
  • Have not visited the United States

PROGRAM OVERVIEW:
The WILD program will include interactive workshops, site visits and practical activities on priority issues for women with disabilities, including:

•    National and International Policies and Legislation, including the UN Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Disability Policy
•    Educational rights and opportunities including specialized and inclusive schools, policy and legal rights, services and accommodations for accessibility
•    Leadership for economic empowerment, including higher education, training models, supported employment, microenterprise, private sector partnerships, career mentorship, skill-building, employment policy, and career development.
•    Health and family issues including parenting, health care, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health and violence prevention
•    Using the media
•    Coalition building
•    Organizational development and sustainability, including funding resources and strategies, and fostering partnerships with community organizations and businesses
•    Goals and action plans to promote collaborative relationships with other organizations for the inclusion of women and girls with disabilities in international development programs.
•    Inclusive international development, including exchanging strategies for inclusion with representatives from U.S-based international development organizations and/or human rights organizations
•    Cultural and team-building experiences
•    Mentorship and networking

LODGING AND TRANSPORTATION:

•    Simple but comfortable lodging with a local host family will be provided. During one-week of the program, shared lodging will be provided at a simple outdoor retreat center.
•    Breakfast, lunch and dinner will be provided each day. All supplemental meals, snacks, or personal incidentals (including laundry) will be at the expense of each delegate.
•    Accessible public transportation will be provided.
Note: Please do not expect “luxury” accommodations, meals, or transportation.

PROGRAM COST:
Accepted participants will be responsible for:
1.    $250 USD program fee.  Limited scholarships may be available based on applicant’s demonstrated financial need. Applications for a scholarship will be provided upon acceptance to the WILD program.
2.    Obtaining a current, valid passport and U.S. visa, including all related costs such as travel to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in the home country

MIUSA will provide:
1.    Roundtrip airplane tickets for participants to travel from home countries to Eugene, Oregon, USA
2.    Travel health insurance during the WILD program
3.    Food, lodging, program activities and accessible public transportation during the WILD program
4.    Disability-related accommodations, including sign language interpreters, funding for personal assistants, etc.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 1, 2012

APPLY EARLY!
We receive a large number of applications for a limited number of openings.
Send your application by e-mail (preferred), or fax:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) / 2012 WILD
Email: womenleaders@miusa.org
Fax:  +1-541-343-6812 / Website: www.miusa.org

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Disabled women activists change the world through YouTube music video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)

Posted on 6 January 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, News, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mobility International USA
Website: www.miusa.org

Disabled women activists change the world through YouTube music video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)

January 6, 2011 – Signing and singing with passion in Arabic, Spanish and English, 54 disabled women activists from 43 countries celebrate the achievements, pride and solidarity of women with disabilities around the world. These leaders are revolutionizing the status of women and girls worldwide. Filmed during MIUSA’s 5th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD), the Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)  music video release marks the beginning of MIUSA’s 30th Anniversary year-long celebration.

Please share the YouTube link to Music Video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxxomUVsSik

Our goal is to reach 2,500 views and to raise funds through donations for the next WILD program empowering women and girls with disabilities. Every donation large or small brings us closer to that goal! To donate, visit http://www.miusa.org/donate/wild.

WILD delegates in the video come from Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Bangladesh, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria, Palestinian Territories, Peru, Philippines, South Africa, Sri Lanka, St. Lucia, Syria, Turkey, Uganda, United States of America, Vietnam, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The video is captioned. For the text video description in English click here.

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to empower people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development. For more information visit www.miusa.org.

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Report: Pacific Sisters with Disabilities at the Intersection of Discrimination

Posted on 4 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Employment, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Policy & Legislation, Rehabilitation, Reports, Resources, signed languages, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , |

Both people with disabilities and also women experience discrimination in countries around the world, including within the Pacific region. Women with disabilities experience a double dose of discrimination. A newly released report, entitled Pacific Sisters with Disabilities: at the Intersection of Discrimination (PDF format, 981 Kb), reviews the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. It includes discussion on the challenges of discrimination against women with disabilities; laws among Pacific Island governments; and policies and programs within disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), women’s organizations, and mainstream international development partners. The report concludes with recommendations for improving the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. This April 2009 report, by authors Daniel Stubbs and Sainimili Tawake, covers the situation of 22 Pacific countries and territories. It was published by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Pacific Center.

The research leading to this report found that a few helpful laws, policies, and systems of practice do exist in some countries. However, disabled women do still tend to fare more poorly compared to disabled men or compared to non-disabled women. Specifically, they are often less educated, experience more unemployment, face more violence and abuse, encounter more poverty, are more isolated, have less access to health care, and have lower social status. Women with disabilities also have less access to information about education, health care, their reproductive rights, recreation, politics, or even the weather.

Unfortunately, very limited documentation on the situation of women with disabilities exist in any region, including the Pacific. This report relies partly on extrapolation from what is known about women with disabilities in other regions. This information is supplemented, where possible, with local data, statistics, anecdotes, and other information specific to disabled women in the Pacific.

The full 90-page report can be downloaded for free, in PDF format (981 Kb) at: http://www.undppc.org.fj/_resources/article/files/Final%20PSWD%20BOOKLET.pdf.



I learned about this report via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development email discussion list.

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Training Opportunity: Disability and Development Module, November 23 to December 19, 2009, VU University, Netherlands

Posted on 23 April 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Education and Training Opportunities, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Opportunities, Poverty, Rehabilitation, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability and Development Module at the VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Athena Institute, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University (Amsterdam), together with Enablement (Alphen aan den Rijn) and the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT, Amsterdam) are pleased to announce a 4-week module on Disability and Development to be held from November 23th to December 19th 2009 at the VU University. This course, a 4-week elective module, which is part of an academic Master degree programme, is open to external participants also. Students will learn in a highly participatory environment built around a problem-based learning approach. Lecturers have extensive international experience in disability and related fields. An overview of the course content can be found on the VU website: http://studiegids.vu.nl/ (type ‘disability’ as search term). The course was offered for the first time in 2008 and was very positively evaluated by the first batch of students.

The following topics will be covered in Module I:
Disability models and stereotypes, culture and disability, ICF conceptual framework, experience of having a disability, frequencies and distribution of disability, determinants of disability, including stigma and discrimination, poverty, gender and HIV/AIDS, rights of persons with disabilities, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, measurement of disability, disability-relevant research methods, survey methods, examples of disability research and an introduction to community-based rehabilitation.

In 2010, a second elective module will be offered on the subject of Disability & Development. This module will have the same duration as Module I

Module II will cover the following additional topics:
Project planning and management, monitoring and evaluation of community-based rehabilitation (CBR) programmes, management information systems, CBR as a preferred strategy for rehabilitation, organisational and institutional development, Disabled People’s Organisations, educational and economic empowerment of disabled people, the role of specific rehabilitation services, and sports and disability.

Interested candidates should apply well in advance and contact Huib Cornielje as soon as possible.

TARGET GROUP: rehabilitation professionals and professionals with an interest in disability and development.

REQUIREMENTS: good comprehension of the English language; bachelor degree or equivalent (in terms of experience and thinking capacity)

COURSE FEES: Euro 1,000 (excluding board & lodging); students who wish to gain official study credits (ETCS) will have to register as external students at the VU University. This will cost an additional €1,200 for 4 weeks, approximately.

DATES: November 23 to December 18, 2009

FURTHER INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED FROM:

Huib Cornielje
Langenhorst 36
2402PX Alphen aan den Rijn
The Netherlands
Tel: 0031-172-436953
Fax: 0031-172-244976
E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl



Thank you to Huib Cornielje for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do. All inquiries about this training opportunity should please be directed to Huib Cornielje at h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT to We Can Do. Thanks.

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Training Opportunity: Digital Storytelling Project, June 8-12, 2009, for African Youth with Disabilities and Allies

Posted on 16 April 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Families, Funding, Media & Journalism, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD)
APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet
invite you to
Submit an application to participate in a Digital Storytelling Project
Application DUE 3 May 2009
Workshop dates 8 -12 June 2009

“It’s in the telling of our stories that we discover how much of our experiences and learning we have in common with others. Stories make our connection with others and with the world real. They weave together our individual experiences to reveal a picture of a community, a group and a country.”

Introduction

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) in partnership with APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet, invite you to submit an application to participate in a digital storytelling workshop. We are inviting people living and working in Africa who would like to empower others and affect change by documenting their journey and telling their story. Applicants must be:

(1) parents/carers of children with disabilities and youth
(2) young people with disabilities
(3) people working in organizations to promote the rights of children and youth with disabilities e.g. Advocates, students, CBR workers, teachers, journalists, information activists, content developers, programme officer/managers,

Participants will develop short videos reflecting the experiences of parents and youth with disabilities in particular with regards to challenges and successes in accessing inclusive education, health, employment and acceptance in their communities and country. Participants will also examine the power dimensions of story-telling and how we retain the authenticity of our own voice, as well as the voices of the people whose stories we document, preserve or disseminate.

Parents, youth and individuals working in the field have many stories to tell, but never have the time, knowledge, equipment and space to reflect, understand and tell their own stories, share their responses, understandings and experiences.

There is a large amount of information on the internet but very little that reflects the lived realities of those affected and people working in the field of disability in Africa.

The workshop aims to:
• document real-life stories of a cross-section of parents and youth with disabilities as well as those working in the field
• empower people to tell their own stories, while at the same time create a powerful advocacy tool that can be used in their country and beyond.
• develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills,
• enable parents and youth with disabilities to share and network amongst each other.

More about the workshop

In the workshop we will explore people’s own stories and learn how to develop a story line, use photo’s, video clips, and drawings to tell your story in an effective way.

There is space for twelve applicants who will participate in a five day digital storytelling workshop, 8 -12 June 2009.

In the month before the workshop delegates will need to join an online study group, collect content for their story (pictures etc) and begin to learn some of the software.

At the workshop participants will learn to use computer software and other equipment necessary for making a short (3-5 minutes) multimedia digital story.

The digital storytelling workshop is hands-on and computer intensive, requiring commitment and willingness to develop a short, personal story; learn new software and edit a short digital video of five minutes in length.

Digital storytelling is not like writing a formal document; it’s more like creative, autobiographical writing. To see an example, check out the website
http://www.takebackthetech.net
http://www.silencespeaks.org

In order to be eligible to participate, you must be able to attend all five days of the workshop, and be able to travel to South Africa to arrive by 7 June, departing 13 June 2009. Travel and accommodation will be sponsored by the SADPD. You must be willing to allow your story, or part of it, to be used in advocacy by SADPD and APC WNSP’s Take Back the Tech campaign. The workshop will be conducted in ENGLISH so other language speakers must have a good proficiency in English. Sign language and French / Portugese interpretation will be provided if necessary (Please motivate for this in application form).

This workshop is a chance to learn new skills and tell your story in a creative and visual format. It’s a lot of work . . . AND a lot of fun.

Copyright:
All stories are owned by the person who made them. The story is your story and will be licensed under a Creative Commons license. We are open to discussing a formula that respects your privacy and confidentiality should you be uncomfortable with the widespread sharing and dissemination of some parts of your story. We would like your stories to be part of a public effort promote the rights and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities and their families.

Who Should Apply?
• We are looking for stories told by parent, youth and individuals working in the field of Disability.
• Applicants must be living and working in Africa (preference will be given to women)
• Applicants must preferably be based in an organisation, institution or network, but individuals will also be considered.
• Youth should between the ages of 18 – 35
• The training is in English. Participants must speak and understand English but are welcome to produce their story in any language they choose. If however you require translation into French and Portuguese please motivate in your application.
• The story you tell has to be about you and your experiences. It can be about situations or events but it must be a personal story told in the first person
• The workshop requires a basic level of computer literacy.
• Applicants must be willing to avail themselves for future advocacy work or training in digital stories in their country.

Instructions:
Please complete the form below and email it as a file attachment to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za
DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING APPLICATIONS is 3 May 2009. If you have any questions, feel free to email or Skype Nafisa on nafisababoo. Incomplete forms will not be considered for selection.

APPLICATION FORM

Date:
Name:
Address:
Country:
Organisation:
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Age:
Date of birth:
Disability:
Support needs (Enlarge print, Braille, translation etc)

Please describe in a few sentences the main point of the story you would like to tell.

What issues does your story address?

What do you hope to get out of the digital storytelling workshop?

Have you talked to anyone about the story you’d like to share, or is this the first time you’ll be talking about it in a group?

If this is your first time talking about it, what do you think it’ll be like for you to share the story with a group of people ?

Please write a draft of the story you’d like to share, below. It should be no more than 500 words (about one and ½ pages, double-spaced, typed). Your story should be written in the first-person. Note: If you’d like to see examples of other people’s digital stories, you can go to http://www.silencespeaks.org or http://www.womensnet.org.za or http://www.takebackthetech.net

Please briefly describe to us what you use computers for.

What is your familiarity with the following Software Programs and Processes? Please put an “x” to the right of the statements that most apply.

Using a PC (Windows Operating System) or a Macintosh Computer
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Scanning Photos or Other Images
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Photoshop
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Premiere
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Do you know how to (please mark YES or NO)
Open software applications YES/NO
Save documents and find them again YES/NO
How to use a mouse, cut and paste, drag and drop. YES/NO

It would be useful to know the following applications – Microsoft office or Open office, and using web browsers such as Internet Explorer or Firefox.

There are a limited number of spaces in the workshop. So please note that the submission of an application is no guarantee that APC-Africa-Women will be able to support you to attend. Successful applicants will be notified 5th May 2009.

Thank You!

INFORMATION ABOUT THE ORGANIZATIONS

About the Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities
The African Decade of Persons with Disabilities was proclaimed by the African Union for the period 1999 – 2009. The main goals of the African Decade are to raise awareness about the situation of the estimated 60-80 million persons with disabilities in the region and to identify solutions tailored to the African Experience that enhance participation, equality and empowerment of Africans with Disabilities. The overall aims and priorities of the Decade are stipulated in an AU- Continental Plan of Action. A Secretariat was established to facilitate the realization of these objectives.
The Secretariat is an international Non Governmental Organisation, established in 2004 by all the major Regional Disabled People’s Organisations to give a new dynamism to the implementation of the Continental Plan of Action. It is hosted, at the request of African Union by South Africa in Cape-Town where its headquarters are located. The mission of the Secretariat of the African Decade is to empower Governments, DPO´s, Decade steering committee’s (DSC) and development organizations to work in partnership to include disability and persons with disabilities into policies and programs in all sectors of society. The strategy of action of the Secretariat is to
• Build the capacities of DPOs, persons with disabilities who are most vulnerable and the Decade Steering Committees to enable them to advocate and lobby their respective government so that they integrate disability into all their development processes.
• Advocate and lobby for mainstreaming of disability in the policies and programmes.
• Raise awareness around the main issues related to persons with disabilities in society.
Http://www.sadpd.org

About APC-Africa-Women

APC-Africa-women is the African regional network of the Association for Progressive Communications Women’s Networking Support Programme (APC WNSP). APC WNSP is a global network of women who support women networking for social change and women’s empowerment, through the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). We promote gender equality in the design, development, implementation, access to and use of ICTs and in the policy decisions and frameworks that regulate them. We have a special focus on redressing inequities based on women’s social or ethnic background – through the provision of research, training, information, and support activities in the field of ICT policy, skills-sharing in the access and use of ICT, and women’s network-building.
Http://www.apcwomen.org

APC-Africa-Women hosts Women’s Electronic Network Training (WENT) workshops every two years. WENT workshops aim to build the skills and capacities of women and their organisations to utilise ICTs in women’s empowerment, social development work and policy advocacy. In 2003 participants at WENT Africa developed skills in the repackaging of information through the convergence of old and new technologies using radio and in building websites using a Content Management System. Weaving through the training were sessions on gender and ICT policy issues. In 2005 WENT Africa was hosted in Kampala and using a two-track system, trained women technicians in the use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and women managers of NGOs in technology planning. More information can be viewed at http://wentafrica.blogspot.com/

About Women’sNet
Women’sNet works to advance gender equality and justice in South Africa through the use of ICTs by providing training and facilitating content dissemination and creation that supports women, girls, and women’s and gender organisations and networks to take control of their own content and ICT use. The organisation is one of the few working on technology for social change in South Africa, and the first to do this from a gender perspective our work has focused on technology for purpose – strengthening women’s organisations specifically and civil society in general – to use ICTs for achieving gender justice.
Http://www.womensnet.org.za



This announcement was disseminated on the EENET Eastern Africa listserver. All applications and inquiries should please be directed to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za , NOT to We Can Do.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24, 2009

Posted on 9 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I am re-posting the following announcement, partly as a reminder for people who wish to register but also to correct and clarify the instructions for registration:

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24

Posted on 4 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, accessibility, Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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NEWS: US Secretary of State Clinton on International Disability Rights

Posted on 25 February 2009. Filed under: Human Rights, News, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This was from a State Department town hall meeting on February 4, see: http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2009a/02/116022.htm)

QUESTION: Good afternoon, Madame Secretary. It’s an honor to be working under your leadership, and I look forward to the challenges that you present. My name is Stephanie Ortoleva. I work in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

I basically wanted to ask you a question about what do you think can be the role that we can play, which you’ve illuminated – you’ve given us a little bit of illumination on that – but also what role can our colleagues who work in women’s rights organizations and disability rights organizations, what role can those colleagues play in supporting you in your efforts to advance the rights of women and the rights of people with disabilities as part of an integral part of United States foreign policy?

SECRETARY CLINTON: That’s a wonderful question. I thank you for it. You know, I think it was 1997, I came to this auditorium, the Dean Acheson Auditorium, with Madeleine Albright, who was Secretary of State, and addressed a large crowd like this about the commitment that the Clinton Administration had to including women as an integral part of foreign policy, not as an afterthought, not as an adjunct, but in recognition of the fact that we know from a myriad of studies and research that the role of women is directly related to democracy and human rights. And I feel similarly about people with disabilities.
It’s important to recognize that expanding the circle of opportunity and increasing the democratic potential of our own society, as well as those across the world, is a continuing process of inclusion. And I look forward to working on behalf of the rights of women and people with disabilities, and others as well, as we pursue our foreign policy. Because I think it sends a clear message about who we are as a people, the evolution that we have undergone.

I remember as First Lady traveling to many countries that had no recognition of the rights of people with disabilities. They were literally warehoused, often in the most horrific conditions. There were no laws. There were no requirements for education or access. And it struck me then and – we’ve made some progress, but insufficient. It certainly is part of my feeling now that we have to always be hoping and working toward greater inclusion as a key part of what our values are and what we believe democracy represents. So I’m going to look to working with those of you in the Department and at USAID and with our allies and friends outside who have carried on this work over the years. And you can count on my commitment to you on that.



I first received this quote via Joan Durocher.

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9th Intl Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific 9-13 August 2009, Bali, Indonesia

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, East Asia Pacific Region, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , |

9th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific (ICAAP 9): “Empowering People, Strengthening Networks”

August 09-13, 2009
Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia

The 9th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific in Bali in August 2009 aims to address, among others, issues of mobility, migration, as well as gender and people with disabilities in order to empower the people and strengthen networks to effectively respond to AIDS.

Read more at the official conference web site at http://www.icaap9.org/

Those who wish to present may submit up to two abstracts; the deadline is March 15, 2009. (Under strictly limited circumstances, some abstracts may be accepted as late as June; please consult the official web site for details, NOT We Can Do.)

A limited number of scholarships are available for a few participants to attend the conference.

All people with questions, or who wish to apply to participate in the conference, should please consult the official conference web site at http://www.icaap9.org/ for instructions on how to communicate with the people organizing the conference (NOT We Can Do!), thank you.



I first learned of this conference via an email forwarded from the AWID mailing list. I gathered additional information and links at the official conference web site.

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FUNDS For Humanitarian Programs Helping People Affected by Slavery

Posted on 23 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Funding, Health, Human Rights, Opportunities, Slavery & Trafficking, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Subject: Call for application: Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery; Appel à candidature: Fonds de contributions volontaires sur les formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

English; French

[Note to We Can Do readers: Organizations serving people with disabilities who have been affected by human trafficking, sexual slavery, child labor, forced marriage, or other forms of contemporary slavery may wish to consider this opportunity to devise an appropriate project targeted at, or incorporating, their needs. This fund is not specifically devised for people with disabilities, but grant seekers could argue for their need.]

Dear colleagues,

The United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery allocates project grants (for a maximum of 15 000 USD), for programmes of humanitarian, legal and financial assistance to individuals whose human rights have been severely violated as a result of contemporary forms of slavery.

Contemporary forms of slavery include trafficking, sexual slavery, child labour and child servitude, debt bondage, serfdom and forced labour, forced marriage and sale of wives ect.

Projects undertaken with previous Trust Fund grants include medical and psychological aid, food, shelter, and vocational training to victims of trafficking for sexual and economic exploitation; support to rehabilitation centres for sexually and physically abused street children and a project to identify and release bonded labourers in the carpet industry and stone quarries. Other projects have provided victims with the means to generate sustainable sources of income, such as sewing machines, hairdressing equipment, or farming tools.

Please consult the official web site to download the application form in English, French, or Spanish. Application forms should be duly completed and submitted by 31 March 2009.

If you need more information on the Fund, you can consult the website of the OHCHR: http://www2.ohchr.org/English/about/funds/slavery/index.htm.
You can also contact the OHCHR at MClerc@ohchr.org.

You are more than welcome to disseminate this message to oganisations working with victims of comtemporary forms of slavery.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French

*********************************************************************************************

Chers collègues,

Le Fond de contributions volontaires des Nations Unies pour la lutte contre les formes contemporaines d’esclavage octroi des subventions (pour un maximum de 15 000 dollars des Etats-Unis) aux projets fournissant une aide humanitaire, juridique et financière aux personnes dont les droits de l’homme ont été gravement violés par des formes contemporaines d’esclavage. Les formes contemporaines d’esclavage sont le trafic d’êtres humains, l’esclavage sexuel, le travail des enfants et la servitude des enfants, la servitude pour dettes, le servage, le travail forcé, les marriages forcés et la vente d’épouses ect.

Veuillez trouver ci-dessous le formulaire de demande de subvention en anglais, francais et espagnol. Les formulaires de demande doivent être complétés et soumis avant le 31 Mars 2009. Les projets financés par le passé grâce aux subventions du Fonds, ont pas exemple, permis aux victimes de la traite des êtres humains à des fins sexuelles et commerciales, d’obtenir de l’aide relative aux soins médicaux et psychologiques, à la nourriture, au logement et à la formation professionnelle. Ils ont permis aux enfants des rues abusés sexuellement et physiquement de bénéficier de soutien dans des centres de réhabilitation. Ils ont également permis d’apporter de l’aide à l’identification et à la libération des travailleurs en servitude pour dettes employés à la fabrication des tapis et dans les carrières de pierre. D’autres projets ont permis aux victimes d’obtenir les moyens de générer des sources de revenus durables comme l’achat de machines à coudre, équipements de coiffure et des outils agricoles.

Si vous avez besoin de plus d’information sur le Fond, vous pouvez consulter le site internet du HCDH: http://www2.ohchr.org/french/about/funds/slavery/index.htm Vous pouvez aussi nous contacter en répondant à MClerc@ohchr.org.

N’hésitez pas à diffuser ce message aux organisations travaillants avec les victimes des formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserver.

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Intl Leadership Forum for Young Leaders, 1-9 August 2009

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Opportunities, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

International Leadership Forum Announcement – Call for Applications

[Note to We Can Do readers: This opportunity is not targeted at disability advocates, but young leaders with an interest in disability-related advocacy may wish to read the criteria below and consider whether their interests may usefully intersect.]

The UNESCO Chair & Institute of Comparative Human Rights at the University of Connecticut invites applications for the fifth annual International Leadership Programme: A Global Intergenerational Forum, to be held August 1 – 9, 2009 in Storrs, Connecticut, USA. Applications must be received by February 27, 2009.

The Forum seeks to empower young leaders by involving them in finding solutions to emerging human rights problems, and nurturing individuals to be effective leaders in the field of human rights.

To this end, the Forum will:

• Introduce participants to the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
• Build a network of solidarity among human rights leaders
• Expand the knowledge relevant to human rights practice
• Provide tools and a platform for open debates
• Provide programmes, activities and processes necessary for human rights leadership
• Promote the sharing of experiences and understanding
• Showcase speakers on such topics as: health and human rights, education, the environment, the plight of child soldiers, the use of media, fundraising, conflict resolution and transformation; litigation and advocacy

The UNESCO Chair will provide all conference participants with dormitory housing, meals, ground transportation in Connecticut, resource materials and a certificate of participation.

Young people between the ages of 18-30, with community service experience, and with demonstrated ability to work on solutions to human rights problems, should apply. Relevant issues include, but are not limited to, human trafficking, the plight of children, refugees, hunger, HIV/AIDs, gender discrimination, racism, classism, the environment and peace education.

Conference will be held in English only. Fluency in English is required. Applicants will be selected based on the strength of their application essay, demonstrated commitment to human rights (practical/hands-on experience), potential impact on the individual and their potential contribution to the Forum, regional and gender representation.

Programme details and application materials can be accessed by linking to www.unescochair.uconn.edu or http://www.unescochair.uconn.edu/upspecialevents.htm

Nana Amos
Program Manager
University of Connecticut
UNESCO Chair & Institute of Comparative Human Rights
UConn-ANC Partnership
233 Glenbrook Road, Unit 4124
Storrs, CT 06269-4124
860.486.3054 Phone
860.486.2545 Fax
www.unescochair.uconn.edu
–~–~———~–~—-~————~——-~–~—-~
Scholarship and Job are posted at
http://Cambodiajobs.blogspot.com



I received this announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability listserver. If you have inquiries about this opportunity or wish to apply for it, then please follow the relevant web links provided above and follow the instructions at the official web site. We Can Do is NOT able to assist you with your questions about this event–please contact the people organizing the forum directly. Thank you.

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Recursos Españoles: Women’s Health Handbook; and Helping Deaf Children (en ingles y español)

Posted on 10 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Deaf, Health, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Texto español

Hesperian announces two new titles in Spanish and a spiffy new Spanish Web Site:
Un Manual de salud para mujeres con dispacidad, the Spanish version of A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities, arrived to our offices today and we are very excited to have this wonderful material now available in Spanish. Un manual de salud para mujeres con discapacidad, will help women with disabilities overcome these barriers and improve their general health, self-esteem, and abilities to care for themselves and participate in their communities.

We also released the Spanish version of Helping Children Who are Deaf, Ayudar a los niños sordos. Packed with simple activities, this book is a great resource for parents, caregivers, health promoters, and others in teaching children who do not hear well how to communicate to the best of his or her ability.

Both titles can be downloaded http://espanol.hesperian.org/Bienvenidos_de_Hesperian.php and purchased from our brand new Spanish website. This user-friendly, easy-to-navigate web site offers all of the features of our website in English – current health news, information on upcoming publications, and free down-loadable versions of most of our titles. Plus a complete bookstore, all in Spanish, ready to ship anywhere in the world. At http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php


Hesperian anuncia dos nuevos libros en español y nuestra nueva página web

Con el libro Un manual de salud para mujeres con discapacidad, Hesperian les ofrece a las mujeres con discapacidad una manera práctica de conocer sus derechos para gozar de buena salud. Combinando las experiencias y consejos de mujeres con discapacidad de 42 países, con información sobre la salud, profesional y al corriente, este manual es fácil de entender, esta plenamente ilustrado y tiene mucha información útil.

También nos complace presentar el libro Ayudar a los niños sordos, el título más reciente de la Serie de asistencia temprana. Este libro está lleno de actividades sencillas y será un gran recurso para las personas que cuidan a niños sordos, ya sean padres, otros cuidadores y/o promotores de salud, ya que ofrece herramientas para enseñarle a la niña o niño a comunicarse lo mejor que pueda.

Estos libros, además de todos los títulos de Hesperian, pueden ser descargados http://espanol.hesperian.org/Bienvenidos_de_Hesperian.php o adquiridos desde nuestra ¡NUEVA PÁGINA WEB EN ESPAÑOL,! Ahora puede descargar nuestros libros, buscar traducciones en otros idiomas, ver nuestros proyectos actuales y comprar libros en nuestra tienda virtual, listos para ser enviados a cualquier parte del mundo — ¡Todo esto y más ahora en español! A http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php



Thank you to the Hesperian Foundation for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do. The Hesperian Foundation first became famous for their publication, Where There is No Doctor (Donde No Hay Doctor). This book has been used to save lives in hundreds of rural communities throughout developing countries around the world—precisely in places where there is no doctor. Since then, the Hesperian Foundation has produced a growing collection of publications targeted at people with developing countries who may have few other resources that they can use to treat their health or to learn how their community can become a happier place for children with disabilities. Anyone who lives or works in a rural community with few local resources is strongly urged to explore their web site. (http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php en español, http://www.hesperian.org in English).

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JOB POST: External Consultant, Gender and Disabilities, Afghanistan

Posted on 30 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

TERMS OF REFERENCE

To identify best practices on how to include women with disabilities in the design of projects on disability

1. Introduction:

In 2005 and 2006 Handicap International has conducted a national survey on disability (NDSA, National Disability Survey in Afghanistan). In this study the number of persons with disability (PwD) in Afghanistan was estimated between 747,500 and 867,100, considering 2.7% as a prevalence rate of Afghan with disabilities. An average of 1 out of 5 households has at least one person with disability. More than half of persons with disabilities in Afghanistan are living in Central, Western and Southern regions of Afghanistan. The number of PwDs in Herat, Kabul and Kandahar Provinces are among the highest in the country. Many years of war, landmines, but also impairments acquired from birth, inadequate healthcare, congenital disabilities, accidents or malnutrition and preventable diseases such as polio or tuberculosis made hundred of thousands of Afghans disabled.

Considering Afghanistan contest Women with Disabilities (WWDs) suffer double vulnerability: first they are Women and second they are disabled

The government has limited programme interventions in addressing issues related with Disability and for the PwDs. For the last few years, a number of organizations in the non government sector have come up with programs and projects to the benefits of the PwDs. Little is know about Women with Disability and the constraints they face in their daily lives and the quality of life they enjoy in Afghanistan. That can be reliably need for designing understand projects.

2. Background

Handicap International is an international organization specialized in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, offering them assistance and supporting them in their efforts to become self-reliant. Since its creation, the organization has set up programs in approximately 60 countries and intervened in many emergency situations. It has a network of eight national associations (Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and USA) which provide human and financial resources, manage projects and raise awareness of Handicap International’s actions and campaigns.

Handicap International has been working for Afghan people since the mid-1980’s when it started its activities for the Afghan refugees in Pakistan. The Belgium branch of Handicap International started implementing projects in Afghanistan in the early 1990’s while the French one started in the beginning of 2002. In April 2006, the two programs merged under the leadership of HI France.

Today, in response to the pressing needs of persons with disabilities, Handicap International Afghanistan works in the Southern (Kandahar), Western (Herat) and Central (Kabul) regions of Afghanistan, which covers more than half of the people with disabilities in the country. Handicap International in Afghanistan currently operates 8 development projects managed by more than 200 national staff and 7 expatriates. Hl works in four main sectors:

• Disability advocacy and awareness
• Physical rehabilitation and physiotherapy
• Socio-economic inclusion
• Mine risk education

At the advocacy level, HI coordinates its activities with the major international organizations working on disability issues in Afghanistan: Swedish Committee for Afghanistan (SCA), SERVE, and International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). At the local level, HI provides technical assistance to CCD (Community Center for Disabled), is a member of the advocacy committee of the Afghan Civil Society Forum, and supports local DPOs in Herat by providing them technical support and materials, and conducting joint projects on disability awareness.

For the past three years, Handicap International provided rehabilitation services (physiotherapy and orthopedic devices) to an average of 20 000 individuals per year in the Southern region and Herat Province. Our inclusion programs in Herat and Kabul directly provided working opportunities, trainings and referral to other relevant services to an average of more than 3000 persons with disabilities per year. Our teams in Helmand and Kandahar provinces delivered awareness sessions on mine and UXOs related risks to over 200 000 persons at community level, in IDP camps, encashment centers and to Kochies populations (nomads). HI conducted awareness campaigns all over the country to raise awareness on the situation of people with disabilities through photo exhibitions, radio programs and TV spots broadcasted on the main national Medias.

3. Justification of support

Due to lack of expertise in HI Afghanistan and the time needed to complete this work an expert in Gender and Disability is needed to identify best practices on how to include women in the design and implementations of projects on disability”.

4. Ideal candidate

The ideal candidate
• An expert in Gender and Disability. Due to cultural sensitivities, the consultant must be female.
• Teaching, production of guideline and Capacity building supervision experience with DPOs/PwDs,
• Working experience in developing country (preferable)

5. Objectives:

5.1 General objective
To provide a guidelines on best practices on how to include women in the design and implementations of projects on disability

5.2 Activities:
• Review documentations on the situation of women with disabilities (WWDs) in Afghanistan
• Review HI Afghanistan projects documents
• To meet different stakeholders relevant to this study
• To visit Hi projects according to security.
• Assess the attitude and perception of the WWDs by Women with Disabilities themselves, their relatives, Communities and local authorities
• Identify the opportunities and barriers WWD face when accessing services.

6. Expected result:

• Guidelines on best practices on how to include women in the design and implementations of projects on disability
• An example of leaflet and booklet on best practices designed in English.

7. Preparation for the Mission
From HI-Afghanistan
1. To sign and send the contract to the resource person
2. To provide the consultancy fee
3. To provide HI projects
4. To organise all logistic and administrative arrangements for the resource person
5. To provide accommodation in the HI guesthouse in Kabul and Herat
6. To provide an HI support letter for the visa
7. To pay for the travel costs
8. To pay for the visa costs

From the consultant
1. To fulfil requirements of the TOR
2. To secure the visa for Afghanistan with the support of the HI letter
3. To provide insurance for herself
4. To sign the contract.

8. Background documentation required

1. All documents to be supplied upon request.

9. Duration of the mission

6 weeks consultancy excluding travel time, 3rd week of February 2009 in agreement with the HI Gender and Disability Consultant

10. Budget
TITLE LOCAL CURRENCY EURO CODE PCAS CODE PCAF
Consultancy fee 125 USD per day of consultancy plus 2 days of travel plus 3 days preparation prior arrival
International Transport HI
Local Transport HI
Accommodation HI
TOTAL

Signature DP Signature Consultant

Sami ul Haq Sami
Advocacy and Awareness Coordinator
Handicap International
Mobile No.: 00 93 (0)799 30 61 32
Add: House # 548, Street # 5th, Qala-e-Fatullah, Kabul, Afghanistan
Email: samiulhaq@hiafgha.org
samiulhaq_sami@hotmail.com
Web: www.handicap-international.org



Thank you to Sami ul Haq Sami for passing along this job post announcement.

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Training Course: Women in Politics, Governance, Decision Making–March; July; November 2009

Posted on 24 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Democratic Participation, East Asia Pacific Region, Education and Training Opportunities, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note to We Can Do readers: This opportunity is not specifically focused on women with disabilities. But readers who wish to encourage more women with disabilities in their country to become involved with politics may wish to consider the following course. I am not familiar with the extent to which the Center for Asia Pacific Women in Politics has had experience in accommodating the needs of students with disabilities. Disabled people interested in this course will wish to communicate with them carefully about their needs.]

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

The Center for Asia Pacific Women in Politics (CAPWIP)
http://www.capwip.org/
is a non-partisan, non-profit and
non-governmental regional organization dedicated to promoting equal participation of women in politics, governance and decision-making. CAPWIP is happy to announce the 2009 training schedule for the course on “Making Governance Gender Responsive” (MGGR): 20-27 March, 23-30 July, and 20-27 November 2009. The courses will be held at the Asian Institute of Management Conference Center (ACCM) http://www.accm.aim.edu.ph/ in the Philippines.

This course is targeted at Parliamentarians, legislators (national and local) political parties, local governments (city/municipality)
and the government bureaucracy, training institutes, international and local agencies/organizations human rights and other civil society organizations.

Making Governance Gender Responsive (MGGR)
is a generic course that can be adapted and modified to suit the needs of the different countries. Specifically, the participants are expected to:

§ Enhance their understanding of Gender and Development (GAD), and
governance concepts.
§ Gain appreciation of gender-related and governance issues, and concerns.
§ Identify gender biases in governance.
§ Acquire skills in identifying and analyzing gender biases and
concerns through case examples of strategies and practices to address gender biases.
§ Identify gender biases in the participant’s sphere of influence – A
Change Management Approach.
§ Formulate Action Plans: Institutional and Individual.

Join the hundreds of MGGR graduates ….during the last 9 years…from all over the world who have found this course most effective!

Sincerely yours,

(signed)
Sylvia Munoz-Ordonez
Executive Director
CAPWIP

You may also download a more extensive information sheet in Word format from the CAPWIP website:
http://www.capwip.org/training/mggr.htm

CENTER FOR ASIA-PACIFIC WOMEN IN POLITICS (CAPWIP)
4227-4229 Tomas Claudio Street, Baclaran, 1700 Parañaque City, Metro Manila, Philippines
Telephones: (632)8514954; 8522112;
TeleFax: (632)8522112;
Mobile Phone: +63 9189403711
e-mail: capwip@capwip.org; mggr09@gmail.com; mggrtraining09@capwip.org

http://www.capwip.org/
http://www.onlinewomeninpolitics.org/



I received this announcement via the email-based Network of Women with Disabilities, a free listserv targeted at women with disabilities from around the world.

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Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan

Posted on 19 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Pakistan Disabled People’s Organization

Subject: Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan

Respected All,

Greetings from Pakistan Disabled Peoples’ Organization (PDPO/DPI – Pakistan),

The issue of disability is gaining more and more importance all over the world as well as in Pakistan due the disability movement for a “rights based society” initiated by organizations of PWDs themselves since almost two decades. World Bank, World Health Organization and other donor and development agencies have included this issue in their mandates. Governments have framed various policies for PWDs including reservation of jobs, concession facilities in travelling, special training institutions etc. The Government of Pakistan has made efforts to support the rights of Persons with Disabilities in the view of BMF and National Policy on disability and now Alhamdurillah Pakistan has signed the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

However, despite these efforts, the sad fact is that most people with disabilities especially women with disabilities and their families remain completely un-served by government, NGOs and even DPOs.

Women with disabilities are disadvantaged in several key areas when compared with other women, men with disabilities, and the society as a whole. These women face a triple handicap and discrimination due to their disability, gender and developing world status. At the same time, Stigma remains in society at large, within communities, and even, in many cases of uneducated segments of society, within families who see disabled women as a loss of productive potential and a drain on family resources. So, while on the one hand, the strong cultural family network ensures their financial security, on the other, the stigma often results in their remaining invisible members of society.

The major barrier to employment and other socio-economic benefits for Women with Disabilities in our society continues to be attitudinal barriers; stereotypical thinking and assumption about what women with disabilities can and can’t do.

The truth is that, the range of abilities of persons within any disabilities group is enormous, we have a large number of women with disabilities in Pakistan who are taking part in the activities of daily life with courage, there is dire need to involve that women as a role model or highlight their efforts to understand the social and economic realities and possibilities with regards to disability.

We need to get rid of our stereotypical images and view each “individual” as just that “an individual”. Access to and sharing of information resources can build the capacity of local and national disability organizations, promote advocacy by and for people with disability and improve the quality of life experienced by women with disabilities.

The fist humble step of this forum is to bridge the information and communication gap between all the leading women with disabilities in Pakistan.

On behalf of PDPO/DPI – Pakistan, I would like to request you all to share your short profile with us by the end of this week, after the completion of selection process of forum members, we will decide the date for Coordination Meeting.

Your feedback and coordination will assist us to make it successful

Looking forward to hear from you,

Regards,

Abia Akram,
Women Coordinator – PDPO/DPI, Pakistan
Abia.m.ilc@gmail.com
92-321-5278021



This email from Abia Akram came to me via Ghulam Nabi Nizamani. People or organizations who wish to network with the Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan should communicate directly with Abia Akram, NOT We Can Do.

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Call for Papers, Women with Disabilities

Posted on 17 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Journal for Disability and International Development – Call for Contributions
Issue 01-2009
Deadline: 31.01.2009 (January 31, 2009)
Topic: Women with Disabilities: Identification and Participation in the Women’s and Disability Movement
Since the early 1990s, women with disabilities have increasingly been calling for the recognition and inclusion of the gender dimension to disability, both in disability politics and in the women’s movement.

The women’s movement as such has been emphasising on the multiple dimensions that make up the diverse situations of women around the world. While it therefore could have been key to addressing the specific concerns of women with disabilities, it has fallen short of acknowledging disability as an added liability in the past. As such, disability has long been ignored by the mainstream women’s movement both in theory and practice.

At the same time, the disability movement has, in its beginnings, conveyed disability as a homogeneous aspect: In its efforts to bring disability to the public’s attention, individual diversities in impairments and other dimensions to disability such as the gender dimension, were largely neglected which finally led to limited agendas, excluding women with disabilities over long periods.

Where do we stand now and how has the situation for women with disabilities changed?

Since recent years the international legal framework for women with disabilities has changed positively. Global and regional networks of disabled women have been formed and are now actively promoting their agenda in both the women’s as well as the disability movement. Stakeholders of both movements are increasingly engaging in dialogue or are openly recognising and even including the perspective of women with disabilities.

This issue 01-2009 of the Journal of Disability and International Development intends to look at how these changes have been translated into practice and how these developments have impacted on the identification and participation of women with disabilities in both movements.

Suggestions for contributions:

We welcome contributions especially with a regional or country-specific perspective on:

 What are lessons learned/success stories in bringing/including women with disabilities onto the agenda of both movements?
 How does culture influence the promotion and perception of the rights of women with disabilities in these movements?
 What are barriers for women with disabilities in becoming active participants/actors in the disability and/or women’s movement? Which developments have the disability and/or women’s rights movement undergone with regards to women with disabilities?
 What are ways and means for ensuring the integration of the rights of disabled women and participation of disabled women in these movements?
 What is the impact of these developments on identity and self-perception of women with disabilities as individuals as well as in organisations?
 What are the developments with regard to women with disabilities in these movements in the academic field/research and teaching?
 What has been the influence of including a gender dimension in disability and development on the policy and programming work of international development organisations, especially those working in the field of disability in development of women in development?

Contact: Dr. Christiane Noe: Noe.Christiane@web.de , Susanne Wilm: Susanne_Wilm@yahoo.de

About us
The Journal for Disability and International Development is published by the forum ‘Disability and International Development’. Since 1990, it is published three times a year. The target group of the journal are scientists, activists, professionals and interested people from all over the world.
It aims to be a forum for international exchange about the disability. Beside this, it promotes professional discussions on educational, social, developmental and intercultural issues in the context of disability and development. Each issue of the journal has a leading topic that brings together different articles and views.

The journal team and the advisory board try to win experts from all continents to contribute to the journal. The journal is published in German and English and available online at: http://www.zbdw.de.



Thank you to Joan Durocher for circulating this call to papers. Authors should please submit their papers directly to the journal as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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IntraHealth Seeks Information on Access to Sexual Reproductive Health in Developing Countries

Posted on 16 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Health, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

IntraHealth International is seeking both facts and personal stories on access to Sexual Reproductive Health in developing countries.

IntraHealth International, a global health organization, wants to increase awareness about the importance of inclusion of people with disabilities in sexual and reproductive health programs in developing countries. They need:

— Facts on what is being done currently to increase access to health care services,
— Information on local disability organizations in developing countries
— What are the specific barriers and problems that limit access to health care services in general and to SRH in particular
— Any relevant data
— Personal stories about disabled persons and their experiences accessing, or trying to access, sexual and reproductive health care services in developing countries

Please send any info or resources you may have to Cornelia Kip Lee, or to Jim McMahan at:

Cornelia Lee: corneliakip@mac.com U.S. phone: 919-428-3335
Jim McMahan: jmcmahan@intrahealth.org



I received this notice via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list.

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NEWS: Bangladesh Women with Disabilities Hold National Dialogue

Posted on 16 December 2008. Filed under: News, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Press Release on “National Dialogue on the Rights of Women with Disabilities”
A “National Dialogue on the Rights of Women with Disabilities” was held at the Dhaka Press Club VIP Lounge in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 27 November 2008 between 10.00 am to 01.00 pm. The conference was well attended, with over 120 participants, from a wide range of backgrounds— individuals living with disabilities and their families, political leaders, foreign mission/high commission representatives, National/International NGO representatives, providers of disability and social support services. A Number of important government officials and media personnel were also present. The conference opened with a welcoming address from Mr. Abdus Sattar Dulal, the founder and Executive Director of BPKS, the sponsoring agency for the event. Ashrafun Nahar, Coordinator of the Women with Disabilities Network at BPKS presented the key note paper for the program. Also addressing the participants were Mr. Bill Winkley, Executive Director, One Family International and Charles Whitley, First Secretary of the European Commission to Bangladesh, Kamar Munir, Joint Secretary and Alimusshan, Additional Secretary, NGO affairs Buroue. The program was organized by BPKS, with support from the European Union. Mr Rezul Karim, Secretary for Forest and Environment Ministry of Bangladesh spoke as chief guest that we should do our duty properly concerning WWDs right and they should included in mainstream development process strongly. They are the part of our society and nation also.

Information was also provided about the situation for Women with Disabilities, their needs and their rights. The objective of the dialogue was to provide an opportunity for participants to learn about the complex issues facing WWDs at the individual, social and national levels.

The Dialogue resulted in the generation of a number of key recommendations in relation to Women with disabilities and;
• Women’s Development policy
• Women Rights
• Accessible environment
• Education
• Employment and Economic independence
• Political empowerment
• Economical participation
• Justice in relation to violence against women

Established in 1985, BPKS works all over the country. Nationally and internationally, BPKS provides information, guidance and support in forming representative disabled people’s organizations and promoting the self confidence and capacity building of individuals and groups at the grassroots level. It is replicating its own approach, called PSID (Persons with Disability Self Initiative to Development) to build the self-reliance and strength of persons with disabilities. BPKS networks with a variety of other agencies to motivate persons with disabilities so that maximum development impact can be achieved. With the support of its donors, BPKS works improve the quality of life of persons with disabilities throughout the country. To find out more about the work of BPKS and how you can get involved, please visit www.bpksbd.org or call 880-2-2892 3915.

Recommendations on the Rights of Girls and Women with Disabilities

For girls and women with disabilities in Bangladesh to live life with dignity, the following recommendations for action are made;
1. Barriers should be removed so that women with disabilities can access the justice system when crimes or incidents of discrimination are committed against them.
2. Perpetrators of crimes against women should be appropriately trialed and punished and where a crime results in disability, the victim should have access to rehabilitation services and due compensation.
3. Women with disabilities should have access to vocational training programs that take into account their skills and abilities as well as their support needs.
4. Girls and women with disabilities should have access to affordable education. They should also be provided with assistive devices to assist in their social integration and their learning. More scholarships should also be available to support girls with disabilities from poor family backgrounds.
5. Girls and women with disabilities should be actively encouraged to participate in cultural, artistic and sporting activities.
6. Vocational skills training should be provided to women with disabilities so that they may participate more competitively in the labor market.
7. Women with disabilities should have access to appropriate employment that matches their skill and education level. Further job opportunities should be created and current employment quotas should be preserved and adhered to.
8. Based on assessment of need, girls and women with disabilities should be provided with assistive devices to assist them in activities of daily living.
9. Women holding positions of leadership in political parties or other organizations should be supported to maintain their roles in the event that they should become disabled.
10. Quota systems prioritizing employment of women with disabilities should be more widely applied to the labor market.
11. All girls and women with disabilities should have access to affordable and appropriate health care services.
12. All new built environments, including cyclone shelters should be accessible to women with disabilities and those that are not should be modified to accommodate them.
13. Women’s participation in agriculture, fisheries, livestock and forestation sectors should be actively encouraged and likewise, those sectors should also be encouraged to involve women.
14. Publicity in the media that portrays women in an undignified or disempowering manner should be stopped. The media should be encouraged to portray women in ways that demonstrate their contribution to society, their abilities, their power and their agency.
15. Women with disabilities should have equal access to skills training in the mass communication sector so that they can participate more widely in television, radio and print media.
16. Women with disabilities should be actively encouraged and supported to participate in the Women’s Development Implementation and Evaluation Committee.
17. Women with disabilities should be actively encouraged and supported to participate in district and Upazila level committees.
18. Women with disabilities should be actively encouraged and supported to participate in grassroots organizations.
19. The needs and rights of women with disabilities should be incorporated into the work plans and schedules of Government Ministries, National planning bodies, as well as International and National NGOs.

TODAYS RECOMMENDATION

20. All women throughout the country should have access to quality pre and post natal maternal care and additional support should be available for families where there is a child with a disability. Maternity leave should also be more widely available and extended to six months.
21. WWDs should have greater access to public transport. This should be guaranteed in law, but also addressed through a public awareness raising campaign for the general public.
22. Awareness raising campaigns are also needed to help address the widespread discrimination faced by WWDs. This should also focus on changing attitudes amongst men.
23. Awareness raising campaigns are also needed to encourage families to support their girls with disabilities to attend school.
24. A national survey is needed on the situation of people with disabilities throughout the country. This is essential to assist in district and National level planning processes.
25. A new act is needed for WWD’s and PWDs.
26. Fruitful counseling needed for PWDs and WWDs.
27. Role of media in raising awareness and educating the community should be strengthened.
28. Independent hospital for acid burned women is needed.
29. Day long consultation meeting for Govt. And NGO institute about PWDS rights and needs.



The press release and set of recommendations was recently circulated by Bangladesh Protibandhi Kallyan Somity (BPKS).

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Filipino Women with Disabilities Wishes to Network

Posted on 30 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Poverty, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Hello,
I’m sharing the website of WOWLEAP- Women With Disabilities Leap to Social and Economic Progress- an organization organized by Filipino Women with disabilities and working towards the empowerment of women with disabilities since 2000. We are slowly getting the participation of women with disability leaders in creating our voice to be heard and be a part of the national advocacy movement for persons with disabilities. Please visit our page http://wowleap2000.tripod.com/index.html and we will be happy to establish network with organizations who are willing to help us in achieving our vision.
Thank you,
Carmen Zubiaga



Carmen Zubiaga recently circulated the above email on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion list.

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World Vision International Peace Prize NOMINATIONS Sought

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Opportunities, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

World Vision International Peace Prize

[It is my hope that We Can Do readers will consider whether they might know an individual with disabilities, or a disability-oriented organization, that might qualify for the World Vision International Peace Prize. The winning organization will receive $5,000; the winning individual will receive $1,000. The deadline to submit nominations is February 15, 2009. The following text is copy/pasted from the World Vision guidelines for the awards, which can also be downloaded in PDF format. The guidelines are also available in French and in Spanish.]

Guidelines

Purpose
The purpose of the World Vision International Peace Prize is to annually recognize and honor one individual who is a catalyst for peacemaking and one organisation which champions the integration of peacebuilding into relief, development and advocacy programmes.

Two award recipients shall be named annually under this World Vision International Peace Prize:
1. Peacebuilding Award – given to an agency or organisation that excels at integrating peacebuilding into relief, development or advocacy activities, and mobilising communities to build a durable peace
2. Peacemaking Award – given to an individual who has taken risks and excelled in being a catalyst in either bringing conflicted parties together to resolve a conflict or in enabling a peace process that engages peacemakers, mediators and people of moral authority who bring hope that a significant destructive conflict can be resolved.

The first award focuses on World Vision’s area of greatest expertise in peacebuilding, namely integrating peacebuilding in relief, development and advocacy. Key programmatic themes of World Vision include the role of children, youth and women in building peace.

The second award focuses on World Vision’s secondary area of focus, making a significant contribution to community-based peacemaking, serving as a catalyst and building bridges so that other organisations and individuals can assist in resolving destructive conflicts that put all development at risk.

Description of award
The World Vision International Peace Prize is given annually in honor and memory of Steve Williams (1951-2007), World Vision UK Senior Policy Advisor on Peace and Conflict. Steve brought vast experience in peacebuilding, conflict analysis and policy analysis to World Vision UK, and served as the Co-convener of PaxNet, the World Vision global peacebuilding network.

He distinguished himself not only within World Vision but within the peace community around the world as one who integrated his conflict analysis and policy work, was committed in his personal, family and work life to work for peace and reconciliation, strongly supported programmes of Children as Peacebuilders, and was a great advocate for peace with justice.

It is in this spirit that the World Vision International Peace Prize was established to honor his life, his work and his memory. The awardees each year may be little known to the public but each will serve as profound examples of peacemaking and peacebuilding in a world of conflict.

Nomination and selection process principles

Eligibility

Organisations and individuals that are external or internal to World Vision International may be nominated with equal consideration. Local community-based organisations as well as global humanitarian and development organisations are eligible for nomination.

Qualifications
The Awards Committee will give particular attention and consideration to nominees who mobilise children, youth and women in peacebuilding. A nomination will be strongest when the organisations or individuals demonstrate that their work and programme is built on careful context and conflict analysis, and produces credible policy and advocacy influence that contributes toward peace.

Monetary Prize and Trophy
Each organisation and individual who is awarded the World Vision International Peace Prize will receive both a monetary award ($5,000 for an organisation and $1,000 for an individual) and a physical trophy with the award designation.

Use of the award
The monetary award is to be used at the sole discretion of the awardees to further the work of the individual or the organisation in their continued role in peacemaking and peacebuilding.

Procedures for nomination
Nominees may come either from within or from outside World Vision. Self-nominations are accepted. The World Vision International Peace Prize Nomination Form can be found online at www.wvi.org/peaceprize. It should be completed in full and sent by email to: wvi_peaceprize@wvi.org by the final day for submission: February 15, 2009.

Selection process
The World Vision International Director of Peacebuilding and the Peacebuilding Unit will initially review all applications to determine which ones meet the criteria and are the strongest candidates. A vetting process will assess the nominations and develop a preliminary list of finalists. The entries from those finalists will be posted online for one month, allowing the global peacebuilding community to view, vet and rank the nominees. A short list of nominees for each prize will then be submitted to an International Peace Prize Awards Committee which will review the nominations and select the winner in each category. Decisions of the Committee will be final.

Peace Prize deadlines
September 21, 2008 International Day of Peace: Announcement and Solicitation of Nominations
February 15, 2009 Final Day for Submission of Nominations
June 30, 2009 Awardees informed privately of their selection
September 21, 2009 Announcement of Prize recipients, presentations and call for nominees for 2010 competition

Award presentation
Awards will be presented by the World Vision International President or designee on the International Day of Peace, September 21, 2009.

To find out more about World Vision’s Peacebuilding work and team, go to www.wvi.org/peaceprize.

[We Can Do readers should please note that the official web site for the World Vision International Peace Prize is at

http://www.wvi.org/wvi/wviweb.nsf/maindocs/AC6E33C8CE519993882574C50060CD3E?opendocument

People interested in learning more about the World Vision Peace Prize should please follow the link to their web site. Nomination forms can be downloaded at their web site in English, Spanish, or French. Any questions about the prize that are not adequately addressed by the World Vision Peace Prize website should please be directed to wvi_peaceprize@wvi.org, NOT to We Can Do.]



I learned about this prize via the Disabled Peoples’ International email newsletter.

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New Global Email Network of Women with Disabilities Launches

Posted on 30 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear friends,

As you may know, a group of over 50 participants from 20 countries and various sectors (civil society, governments, academia, international organizations and private sector) met in Quebec, Canada on August 26-27 for a Global Summit on the Rights of Women with Disabilities. All Interational Disability Alliance organizations were invited to send a representative, and were actively engaged in the discussions.

The Summit was a great opportunity to talk about the key challenges facing women with disabilities worldwide, network, exchange ideas and take actions for us to “claim our rights”. Together, the Summit participants decided to form a new global network of women with disabilities and allies, charged with raising awareness and carrying out advocacy.. Attached and below is the Call for Action presented at the close of the Summit.
As the Call to Action say, this network aims to be inclusive of women of all ages from all parts of the world with ALL types of disabilities.

In order to move forward, an email list for the “International Network of Women With Disabilities” (INWWD) has been set up, and interested individuals are invited to join the email list by sending a message to: inwwd-subscribe@yahoogroups.com In this email, please include your name, affiliation and whether you agree to following principles:

Provisional guidelines for membership in the INWWD email list:
– Members accept the principle that this is a network OF women with all types of disabilities from all over the world, led by women with disabilities.
– Members of this email list are committed to the philosophy of women with disabilities advocating for themselves and identifying the issues of women with disabilities.
– Members support the principles in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
– Members of this email list support the goals of this network, which include sharing our knowledge and experiences, speaking up for our rights, bringing about change and inclusion in our communities, and empowering women with disabilities to be leaders of today and tomorrow.
– Members agree that the work of the network should be equally relevant to all women with disabilities irrespective of the type of disability or geographical location.
– Members agree to be respectful and constructive.

If you’d like to join an allied group of men with disabilities, please email mszporluk@disabilityrightsfund.org

The Summit participants also created a Working Group to develop the terms of reference for our network – to be finalized by the network over email by the end of the year. We are now reaching out to other networks, interested women and allies, and look forward to this partnership to promote the rights of women with disabilities around the world!

Best,
Shantha (a member of the INWWD)

GLOBAL SUMMIT on the Rights of Women with Disabilities
A Call for Action: Claiming Our Rights

Women with disabilities have been the world’s forgotten sisters. There are over 300 million women with disabilities around the world, representing a huge and important part of society. We face multiple forms of discrimination.

We, the participants in a global Summit on the Rights of Women with Disabilities, held in Quebec, Canada, in August 2008, have come together to claim our rights, through the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the human rights framework. Today, we take the first, historic step by creating a global network of women with disabilities, which must include women with ALL types of disabilities from ALL over the world.

We will use this network to share our knowledge and experiences, speak up for our rights, bring about change and inclusion in our communities, and empower women with disabilities to be leaders of today and tomorrow. We invite ALL women with disabilities to join us and we will achieve these goals TOGETHER.

Adopted on August 27, 2008, Quebec, Canada



This announcement was circulated by Shanta Rau of Rehabilitation International via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) email list. Queries about the new email network of women with disabilities, and allied men, should please be directed to inwwd-subscribe@yahoogroups.com or to mszporluk@disabilityrightsfund.org, NOT to We Can Do.

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Disabled Girls in the Classroom: Finding What We Don’t Know

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Reports, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

A report entitled Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) discusses what we don’t know about girls with disabilities in relation to education, and what ought to be done about it.

Readers familiar with gender issues within education know that, in many countries, girls are still more likely to drop out of school–if they ever attend at all. They may be needed at home to fetch the water; they may be afraid of being sexually assaulted on the way to school; or they may be embarrassed about managing their menustration at schools where there is no separate bathroom for girls–or perhaps no bathrooms at all.

Regular We Can Do readers and others familiar with the education field may also recall that about 77 million primary school-aged children today are not enrolled in school–and about one-third of them have disabilities. Schools are reluctant to enroll disabled students; parents may fear subjecting children with disabilities to bullying from the community and thus keep them at home; or decision makers may simply assume that disabled students either cannot learn or would be unable to use their educational degree later on because “no one wants to hire disabled workers.”

But what of girls with disabilities? Being a double minority does tend to come with a triple whammy. Disabled girls are excluded because they have disabilities; they are excluded because they are girls; and then they are excluded yet again when programs might target girls without including disabled girls, or when programs might target children with disabilities without considering the impact of gender.

This would seem to imply that girls with disabilities may face a unique set of barriers when pursuing an education–barriers that neither non-disabled girls nor disabled boys need to consider. If a unique set of barriers, then surely a unique set of solutions would also be needed to ensure that the push to put the last 77 million children into school does not leave behind girls with disabilities. But, how can we tackle these barriers if we don’t have a clear picture of what they are?

The 35-page paper, Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb), is an attempt to pull together what is known about girls in education with what is known about disability in education, coupled with anecdotcal information about how girls with disabilities are affected differently. It provides recommendations for areas researchers should be focusing on and gives a few ideas for things that can help.

This paper was published in 2003. But, unfortunately, I doubt it is significantly dated. I don’t pretend to be intensively familiar with the literature on education among students with disabilities internationally. But a quick skim through a more recent report on disability in education, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), suggests that advancements since 2003 have been far from dramatic.

Perhaps one of the most important purposes of Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) is to help remind gender specialists that girls with disabilities are first and foremost, girls–but will be inherently excluded if not consciously targeted. For We Can Do readers already working on disability issues in education, another purpose is to remind that barriers excluding women and girls from full participation in society impact disabled girls and women just as much–if not more so.

If issues impacting girls with disabilities interests you, then you might also be interested in some of the following We Can Do posts:

Equalizing Educational Opportunity for the Nigerian-Ghanaian Blind Girl Child
Violence Against Blind/VI Girls in Malawi
Report on Violence Against Disabled Children (which I include in this list because violence against girls is often cited as a reason why some girls quit school)
Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children
Report on Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities (the referenced report includes brief references throughout to girls, including in the context of education)
Online discussion of inclusive education in Eastern Africa

Advocates working to promote more educational opportunities for girls with disabilities also may wish to consult, and cite, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), with particular attention to Article 6 (Women with Disabilities); Article 7 (Children with Disabilities); and Article 24 (Education).



I found this report by browsing the AskSource.info database.

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NEWS: Women with Disabilities in Pakistan Hold Empowerment Seminar

Posted on 20 August 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, News, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for circulating the following report.

Seminar on empowerment of women with disabilities, Karachi – Pakistan
Held on 2nd August 2008.

A joint seminar organized by Social Welfare Department Government of Sindh and Association of Physically Handicapped Adults (APHA) member organization of Sindh Disability Forum (SDF) and Pakistan Disabled Peoples’ Organization (PDPO) DPI Pakistan.

Centuries ago, as you all know, in most societies of the world women occupied a secondary position to their male counterparts. It was a common feature that women got very little opportunity to voice their opinion even in matters, which concerned their own lives. They were considered to have no opinions of their own but merely adhere to the decisions made first by their fathers, then their husbands and at a later stage of their lives by their sons. But society has progressed from the discriminating attitude towards women. This is not to say that even today women stand equal with men. Discrimination against women persists even till date, the only change being that in some situations take place at a more subtle level.

Women’s movements have been instrumental in bringing about this change. These movements attempt to empower and equip women to fight for equality and stand equal with men.

But this is not the case when we turn our attention to women with disabilities. The mainstream women’s movements have remained completely oblivious to the needs of this group. The disability movements too have not paid much attention to the particular needs of disabled women. Hence these women remain at the periphery of all rights movements. Being a neglected segment they lack in self-esteem and self-confidence. They are conceived as not having part to play in society they are role-less people. Thus arises the imperative need to develop the image they have of themselves. Empowerment of disabled women therefore becomes the need of the hour.

SPEAKERS
1. Ms. Shagufta Shehzadi Chairperson Special Education Department, University of Karachi

2. Ms. Nasreen Aslam Shah Chairperson Women Study Centre University of Karachi

3. Ms. Musarrat Jabeen Women Development Department,Govt. of Sindh

4. Keynote Presentation By M. Zeeshan Taqi Finance Secretary A.P.H.A

5. Mr. S.M Nishat General Secretary A.P.H.A

6. Ms. Shama Dosa Active Social Worker

7. Mr. Shariful Muzaffar President A.P.H.A

8. Mrs. Riaz Fatima.Social Welfare Training Institute

9. Ms. Farzana WWD member of APHA

10. Ghulam Nabi Nizamani DPI Pakistan/Asia Pacific

Speakers highlighted issues related to women with disabilities specially WWDs based in rural areas. They discussed about:

1. Position in the family,

2. Access to education and health care facilities,

3. Opportunities to find employment,

4. Knowledge regarding existing legislation and facilities for disabled people and Women with disabilities.

5. Fulfilling the role generally ascribed to women including mainstreaming of WWDs.

6. Reproductive health of Women with Disabilities.

7. Violence against Women with Disabilities.

Delegates of the seminar recommended that:

  • Self-help groups of disabled women need to be organized. These women are to be made aware of the rights through training in self-advocacy.
  • Media campaign for spreading awareness regarding the rights of the disabled in general and disable women in particular.
  • Creation of Awareness on the Rights of Women with Disabilities according to Article 6 of UN Convention on the Rights of Person with Disabilities (CRPD).
  • Government to frame policies specifically catering to the interest of women with disabilities.
  • Training for women with disabilities needs to be geared towards developing a positive self-concept and self-image. They are to be empowered to recognize that they too are contributing and responsible members of society.
  • To fill the gape between WWDs of Urban and Rural area.
  • Job quota for WWDs be raised by Government from 2% to 15% because for women without disabilities have 10% quota in Government’s Jobs



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Siyanda Database: Publications on Gender and Disability

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Opportunities, Poverty, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , |

Researchers, international development professionals, and disability advocates who have an interest in gender issues may wish to explore the many gender-related publications at http://www.siyanda.org/.

The Siyanda database offers a wide range of articles and other publications related to gender and international development. Many are in English, but some materials are also available in other languages. Some of the materials available at Siyanda relate to people with disabilities in developing nations. Try a keyword search for words such as “disabilities” and “disabled” (note that each of these words brings up a slightly different set of results). Or try more specific key words such as “blind” or “mental illness.”

(Side note: the World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry prefers the term “people with psychosocial disabilities.” However, many existing publications continue to use other terms such as “mental illness.”)

Siyanda also has a database of experts and consultants. Three names turned up when I tried plugging in the search term “disabilities.”

Authors will want to submit their own publications to the Siyanda database.

Start exploring at: http://www.siyanda.org/.



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NEWS: Disability Advocate, Gladys Charowa, Dies

Posted on 21 April 2008. Filed under: Children, Education, Human Rights, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following email was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC listserv, an email discussion group devoted to disability rights and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), as a tribute to fellow listserv member and disability rights advocate, Gladys Charowa.

Hi folks,

The vast majority of you will have seen many posts here from Gladys Charowa from the DWSO. She was a great supporter of the Convention and worked hard to ensure that her group were not going to be excluded from the Convention nor from the process.

It is with great sadness to that I have to inform you of Gladys Charowa who was the Executive Director of Disabled Women Support Organisation (Zimbabwe). Gladys suffered a stroke on the 6th of March and her health subsequently deteriorated leading to her death on the 7th of March, 2008 in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Gladys Charowa was involved in the disability movement since February 2002 during her rehabilitation in Harare after breaking her back in a car crash in December 2001. She was released from hospital in April 2002 after experiencing the conditions tolerated by the women who were also being rehabilitated. She decided to set up the Disabled Women Support Organisation (DWSO) after helping some of the service users at the centre; for example, she successfully petitioned an education examination board to allow a student with disabilities additional time to sit her examinations. Gladys wanted to challenge the traditional view that there is nothing that can be done to support women and girls who are spinally injured.

DWSO works alongside hospitals, often in rural areas, to provide support for individuals and their families to become both physically and financially independent; this includes training to sensitise the community, peer group education and micro-finance projects. DWSO is one of the first disability organisations to have projects in each of the 10 provinces of Zimbabwe.

DWSO also works with schools, setting up Disability Clubs and projects to help children and parents to increase their understanding of the needs of disabled people. Since 2002, she worked tirelessly as a disability activist fighting for poverty reduction, particularly among disabled women. Gladys was an active disability activist at both national and international level, and contributed immensely to disability related literature. Gladys will be greatly missed in disability activism and may her soul rest in peace after working so hard for a good cause.

Some of Gladys Charowa’s publications

(i) Reply to a statememt for discussion: investing in education for children with disabilities is economically not interesting

March 1, 2006 – Published by: Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development (DCDD), Available at http://www.dcdd.nl/default.asp?2905

(ii) Body blows: in the thick of Zimbabwe’s current turmoil, women with disabilities face hellish prejudice, hunger and rape. Gladys Charowa bears witness.(POVERTY & GENDER)(Column) – Published in New Internationalist, November 1, 2005

Best wishes,

Frank

Frank Mulcahy



Thank you to Frank Mulcahy of Ireland for sharing this sad news with the AdHoc_IDC listserv.

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RESOURCE: Disabled Women’s Organizations in Pacific-Asia

Posted on 7 April 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following list of Disabled Women’s Organizations, Groups, and Committees in the Asia/Pacific Region (plus a few in Africa) was developed at the International Labour Organisation in Bangkok in December 2007. We Can Do readers should note that contact information can change quickly. If you try contacting an organization and cannot seem to reach them with the contact information given here, try googling the name of the contact person, or the name of the organization, or both. You can also consult other resources that can help you find more disability-oriented organizations around the world.

List of Disabled Women’ Organizations/Groups/Committee
Date: 19-12-2007

Annie Parkinson
President of Women with Disabilities Australia (WWDA)
Post Office Box 605 Rosny Park, Tasmania 7018 Australia
Tel: + 61 3 62448288
Fax: + 61 3 62448255
E-mail: wwda@wwda.org.au
Web: http://www.wwda.org.au

Sabina Hossain Kochi
Chair Person of
Women with Disabilities Development Foundation BPKS complex, Dhakkhinkhan, Uttara, Dhaka 1230. Bangladesh
Tel: + 880-8923915,8960077
E-mail: bpks@citechco.net

Ashrafun Nahar Misti
Deputy coordinator of Women with Disabilities Development Network
BPKS complex, Dhakkhinkhan, Uttara, Dhaka 1230, Bangladesh
Tel: +880-8923915,8960077
E-mail: cotoed@bpksbd.org
Champa Dash
Chairperson of
Disabled Women’ Development Committee
PSID center Narail
Moheshkhola Narail PSID Center
Post: Narail, Upzilla & dist: Narail, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Mob: +880-8901713196017

Shucithra Rani Shaha
Chairperson of Disabled Women ‘s Development Committee,
Nagarpur Disabled Peoples Organizations Tangail Bangladesh
Vill & Post : Mamud Nagar
Upazilla: Nagarpur, District: Tangail
Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01711`512295, 01712078249

Mah,uda Khatun
Chairperson of Disabled Women Committee Narshindi
Narshindi Disabled People Organization to Development
Vill: Ashrafpur (Near Sub registry Office )
Upazilla: Shibpur, District : Narshingdi
Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01712078247, 01713196024

Hafsa Akter
Chairperson of
Disabled Women Development Committee
Chandpur
Chandpur Disabled People Organizations to Development
Vill: Charbashanto, Upazilla: Faridgonj
District Chandpur, Bangladesh
Mob: +8801712o78245

Soyada Shahina
Disabled Women’s Development Committee
NDDS Protibandhi Kallayan Society (PKS)
24, R K Mission Road, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Mob:+880-01712069686
e-mail: pks-bd@agnionline.com

Naznin Nahar
Coordinator of
Disabled Women’s Development Committee, Meherpur
SPD Complex, Post: Mujibnagar
Dist: Meherpur-7100
Bangladesh
Tel:+880-2-07923-74011
Fax: +880-2-8332924
e-mail:spd@bdonline.com

Nasima khatun
Chairperson of Disabled Women’s Development Committee, Disabled People Organizations to Development Moulovibazar, Bangladesh
Vill: natissar, Post: Giash Nagar ,
Upazilla & Dist: Moulovibazar , Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01712078248

Lovely akter Shapla
Chairperson of Disabled Women’s Development Committee, Monmanshingh Disabled Peoples Organizations to Development
Vill: Voradoba Klab bazaar, Upazilla: Valuka
Dist: Moimanshingh, Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01713196029

Women with Disabilities Project Centre for Services and Information on Disability (CSID)
House # 715, Road # 10,
Baitul Aman Housing Society
Adabor
Dhaka- 1207 Bangladesh
Tel: 9129727, 8143882
Fax: 8125669
E-mail: csid@bdonline.com, csid@bdmail.net
Web: www.csidnetwork.org

Disabled Women’s Committee
Fiji Disabled People Association 355 Waimanu Road, Suva G.P.O. Box 15178, Suva, Fiji
Phone: +679- 331-1203
Fax: +679- 330-1161.

Association of Women with Disabilities Hong Kong
Room 11-12, G/F, Wang Cho House
Wang Tau Hom Estate Kowloon,
Hong Kong, China
Fax: +852-2337-1549
Email: women@awdhk_conf.org
For all disabilities.

Miss Berhane Daba
President of Ethiopian Women with Disabilities National Association (EWDNA)
P.o. Box 43128
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Tel: + 252-1-0911-451717
Email address berhanedaba@yahoo.com

Regina
Secretary of Sadhana Women with Disabilities Association Tamil Nadu
ADD India
Kallukadai Steet, Sathyamoorthy Nagar
Keeranur Pudukottai District
Tamil Nadu, India
Email: addindiatn@rediffmail.com
All disabilities

Kuhu Das,
Director of Association of Women with Disabilities 6/J, Surah 2nd Lane, Phoolbagan, Kolkata-700010, India
Tel: +91-64535802
Fax: +91-23639115
Mobile: +91-9830226718
E-mail: sawwd@vsnl.net

Shampa Sengupta
Representative of Women with Disability, Sruti Disability Rights Centre
Sruti disAbility Rights centre
5A R.K. Ghosal Road
Kolkata 700 042, India
Tel: +91- 9433174978

Sobhagya Goyal
Vice President of National Forum for Visually Impaired Women
All India Confederation of the Blind Ghasety Bazar Ajmer
Rajasthan, India
Tel. : +91- 0145-2621185
Mob. : +91 – 9414708018

Ms. Lidya Miranita
Indonesian Association of Women with Disabilities (HWPCI)
Jl. Cempaka Putih raya No. 1, Jakarta – Pusat
Jakarta – 10510 – Indonesia
Tel/Fax : +62-21-42879844
E-mail : ariani_0704@yahoo.com
website : www.hwpci.org

Indonesian Blind Women Union (PERTUNI)
Gedung Inkoppol, Gd II, lt. 2
Jl. Tambak No. 2, Jakarta – Pusat
Jakarta – 10320, Indonesia
Tel/fax : +62-21-31931704
email : pertuni_dpp@yahoo.co.id

Ms. Kimie Nagumo
President of DPI Women with Disabilities Network Japan
Japan
nagumo-kimie@mwe.biglobe.ne.jp

Kim, Mi Joo
Representative of Women with Disabilities Arts and Culture and Network
Seoul Women’s Plaza 3F NGO Center 345-1
Daebang-dong Dongjak-gu Seoul 156-808 Korea
Tel: +82-02-823-8360
Cell: 011-746-2196
Email: kim_mijoo@yahoo.com
Web: http://www.kkipan.com

Koo Gwi Hoi
Coordinator of Organizing Committee for the Global Summit of Women with Disabilities
Swon Bdg, IF, 877-13, Shinjeong5-dong, Yangcheon-gu,
Seoul, Korea
Tel: +82-2-2692-2293
Mobile: +82-19-285-5447
Email: koohj19@hanmail.net

Lee Ye-ja
Korean Differently Abled Women United Organization
Rm 811, Chritian Building
136-46 Yonci-dong, Chongno-Ku, Seoul
Korea (110-736)
Tel: +82-2-3675-9935
Email: kdawu@hanmail.com
leeyeja@shinburo.com
Web: http://www.kdawu.org

Catherine Mwayoga
Women’s Committee
United Disabled Persons of Kenya (UDPK) Waiyaki Way; P.O. box 13488; Nairobi, Kenya
Tel.: +254-2-443915
Fax: +254-2-446065,
E-mail: disability@wananchi.com

Ms. Daloonny Souvannavong
Director of Lao Disabled Women Development Center
Ban Dongphosy, Hatsayfong District Vientiane
PO Box 6751, Thadeua Rd, Hatsayfong District
Vientiane Capital, Lao
Tel : +21 812282
Fax : +21 812282
Email : ldwdc@laotel.com

Shusila Poudel
President of Nepal Disabled Women Society (NDWS)
Pulchowk, Lalitpur:3; PO Box 5445, Nepal
Tel: +997-1- 535770, 531324
Fax: +997-1- 535770, 535142
E-Mail: sushila@coho.wlink.np
ndws@coho.wlink.com.np

Indira Chapagain
President of Nepal Disabled Women Association (NDWA)
NPC 8973,00560
Kathmandu, Putalisadak, Nepal
Tel: +977-1-6635926
Email: ndwa_ndwa@hotmail.com
Nara Kumari Karki
President of National Association for Disabled Women-Nepal (NADW-Nepal)
P.O. Box 7268 Koteshwor
Kathmandu Nepal
Tel: +977-14496664
E-mail: nadw@hotmail.com

Shrijana Singh
President of Deaf Women Development Committee (DWDC)
P.O. Box 4601 Putalisadak Kathmandu
Tel: +977-1-415-568
Fax: +977-1-416-200 Deaf and hard of hearing

Ola Abu Alghaib
Stars Of Hope Center ‘Empowerment of women with Disabilities’ Palestine
Palestine-Mamalloh-Al Elsal-Bazar Commercial Center-4th Floor
Tel: +972-2-2972345
Mobile: +972-599-026260
Email: starofhope2007@gmail.com

Miss N.G. Kamalawathie,
President of Association of Women with Disabilities (AKASA)
Pahalagama Road , Kongollewa,
Talawa, Sri Lanka
Tel: +94 25 5670329
Fax : +94 25 2275022
Mobile :+94 773121062
E-mail : akasa7@sltnet.lk

Savina Nongebatu
Member of Disabled Women’s Committee Solomon
Disabled People Organization Solomon DPASI(DPO) Solomon
Tel: +677- 24863, 677- 36062
savina_nongebatu@yahoo.com.au
cbr@moh.gov.sb

Association of Blind Women Thailand 94/4 Moo 13 Sihaburanukit Road
Minburi, Bangkok, 10510, Thailand
Tel: +66-2-233-6079
Email: abwt@tab.or.th

Ms. Supattraporn Tanatikom
Disabled Peoples’ International Asia Pacific Regional Office
92 Phaholyothin 5 Road, Samsennai, Phayathai Bangkok 10400 THAILAND
Telephone numbers: (662) 271 2123
Fax : (662) 2712124
E-mail: sarahmaithai@gmail.com,
supattraporn@dpiap.org
Website: www.dpiap.org

Ms. Hellen Asamo
African Women with Disabilities
P.O. Box 8567, Kampala, Uganda
Tel.: +256-41-540179
Fax: +256-41-540178
E-Mail: nudipu@starcom.co.ug

Ms. Duong Thi Van
Women’s Committee of Bright Future Group for People with Disabilities
124 A Dai La Street, Hanoi, Vietnam
Tel: +844 628-0527
E-mail: van@netnam.com

Ms. Nguyen Hong Oanh
Director of Hanoi Women with Disabilities Club 112B5, 46B Pham Ngoc Thach alley, Hanoi (the front gate), Vietnam
Tel: +84-4-8522 778
Email: phunuthudo@nguoikhuyettat.org
lananhdf@gmail.com



Thank you to Bishnu Maya Dhungana for passing along this list.

Do YOU have a list of disability-oriented organizations in developing nations or regions? Please share with We Can Do readers by submitting it to me at ashettle [at] patriot.net.

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CONFERENCE: Women, Faith, and Development Summit to End Global Poverty

Posted on 27 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Events and Conferences, Poverty, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following announcement is being circulated by the Women’s Faith and Development Alliance. It is not a disability-specific event. But if any We Can Do reader is able to attend, then it could be an opportunity to informally remind other participants at the event about the needs of women and girls with disabilities in international development. If you are already in Washington DC then it is free to attend. But you do need to register in advance.


Attend the Breakthrough Summit!

***YOU ARE INVITED***
Sunday, April 13, 2008 (2:30-5:30pm)
Washington, DC, USA

Washington National Cathedral and the Women, Faith and Development Alliance Present
Breakthrough: The Women, Faith, and Development Summit to End Global Poverty

70% of the world’s three billion poor people are women and girls. We must act now to empower women and end poverty!

Come to the Breakthrough Summit, the first high-level event bringing together the women, faith, and international development communities—as well as policymakers and other global leaders— to launch the Women, Faith, and Development Alliance’s (WFDA) global campaign to make investing in women and girls a priority in the fight against global poverty.

Join our distinguished Breakthrough Co-Chairs as they issue a call-to-action to assembled guests and all global citizens, urging them to join the campaign and get actively involved:

  • The Honorable Madeleine Albright, Former U.S. Secretary of State
  • The Right Honourable Kim Campbell, Prime Minister, Canada (1993)
  • Her Excellency Mary Robinson, Former President, Republic of Ireland; Former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (1990-1997)
  • The Reverend Doctor Ishmael Noko, General Secretary, Lutheran World Federation
  • Sheikh Shaban Mabuje, Grand Mufti, Uganda
  • Ashley Judd, Global Ambassador, YouthAids (invited)

Hear from our honorary Co-Chairs, who are offering important support for our efforts:

  • Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan, Chair, King Hussein Foundation
  • Her Excellency Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, President, Republic of Liberia (Honorary)
  • His Grace Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Anglican Archbishop Emeritus, South Africa (Honorary)
  • Dr. Muhammad Yunus, Founder Grameen Bank, Bangladesh (Honorary)

Individuals, families, colleagues, community groups, clubs, and members of all religious communities are invited to attend the April 13th event, learn more about the global plight of women and girls, hear commitments for women and girls from key public figures, participate in interfaith prayer, listen to live music, and visit an exhibition area to see and purchase Fair Trade and women-made products from around the world.

For more Summit information, to obtain your free ticket to the Summit, or to sign up for WFDA updates, please visit www.wfd-alliance.org or call (202) 537-3184.

Be part of this once-in-a-lifetime gathering. Attend the Breakthrough Summit and join WFDA. Help change the lives of millions of women and girls around the globe.



We Can Do received the above announcement through contacts at Mobility International USA (MIUSA).

Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere else, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people.

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PUBLICATION: Human Rights Africa Newsletter

Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Media & Journalism, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Readers interested in human rights issues affecting Africans with disabilities can catch up with past issues of the newsletter Human Rights Africa. Issues are available in both English and French, and in both Word format and PDF format. This publication from the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities was published four times in 2006 and two times in 2007.

All past issues may be worth browsing for people with a special interest in disabled Africans. But readers may particularly want to note the following (this is NOT a comprehensive list of articles):

The first issue of 2006 has an article that lists five challenges and seven opportunities for the Secretariat of the African Decade on Persons with Disabilities.

The second issue of 2006 focuses on HIV/AIDS among people with disabilties. This includes a story about how genocide helped spread HIV in Rwanda, and a story about efforts to prevent HIV/AIDS among women in Ethiopia. There is also a story about a new African Network of Women with Disabilities that is meant to help regional and national organizations share experiences in improving the lives of disabled women. Also see the article on how you can help influence development projects in your area so they will better include poor people with disabilities.

The third issue of 2006 has an article that lists practical tips for how you can approach journalists and persuade them to cover issues that matter to the disability community in your country. Another article discusses how sports can be used to help meet the Millennium Development Goals.

The fourth issue of 2006 has many articles about war and conflict in Africa with a focus on disability issues. Also see the article on how you can become involved in helping your country develop a Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) that is inclusive of people with disabilties.

The first issue of 2007 provides more information about the campaign against HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities in Africa and an article about violence against women.

The second issue of 2007 contains articles on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; a new African Federation of the Deafblind; and
lessons learned from lobbying in Uganda.

You can download copies of Human Rights Africa for free at:

http://www.africandecade.org/humanrightsafrica



We Can Do first learned about this newsletter after reading the Disabled People International (DPI) newsletter and exploring the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities.

A modified version of this article has now been posted at RatifyNow with permission of author.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

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REPORT: World Disasters Report 2007: Focus on Discrimination

Posted on 29 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Human Rights, Inclusion, Reports, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The World Disasters Report (2007) examines what happens to various vulnerable groups during disaster situations, particularly women, elderly people, minorities, and people with disabilities. This report from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies includes many stories of how discrimination and exclusion has made it harder for some people to survive or meet their needs during and after disaster situations. It also includes guidance and recommendations on how agencies, governments, and communities can improve efforts to ensure that emergency aid reaches the most vulnerable people. Discrimination can occur on the basis of ethnic or social origin, language, religion, gender, age, physical or mental disability, and sexual orientation.

The World Disasters Report points out that, although discrimination exists before disaster, an emergency can exacerbate it. However, that discrimination is often invisible because official data on older people, ethnic minorities or people with disabilities may not exist. Furthermore, aid agencies often do not even analyze the needs of vulnerable people when they carry out emergency assessments. And vulnerable groups are usually not included in the disaster planning process before, during, or after emergencies. This accummulative discrimination can be life-threatening during a crisis. Even after the crisis, people who have suffered discrimination may take longer to recover or to regain their livelihoods.

The World Disasters Report calls for agencies to do better in planning for the needs of vulnerable populations, saying bluntly, “One-size-fits-all relief planning is unhelpful in overcoming discrimination” (p. 15).

We Can Do readers will clearly have a particular interest in the chapter that focuses on the needs of people with disabilities during disasters. Information for this chapter was gathered from both industrialized and developing countries. Stories of discrimination are presented, including stories of how emergency shelters and emergency relief agencies have sometimes contributed to the problem. But you can also find stories highlighting the valuable contributions people with disabilities could make for everyone when they are included in disaster planning efforts. This chapter provides an overview of the barriers that can make it harder for people with disabilities to survive disasters or recover their lives afterwards. And it reviews how agencies and others can remove these barriers.

However, even people who wish to focus primarily on the needs of disabled people may still wish to read the full report. In particular, some of the needs of elderly people are similar to some of the needs of people with disabilities. Also, all the issues covered in this report are cross-cutting issues: any population of disabled people will clearly have people among them who are elderly, or women, or children, or gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender, or ethnic minorities, or other minorities. Disabled people who also belong to some other minority group may experience dual or triple discrimination that can create additional barriers during crisis situations.

Read chapter summaries, download individual chapters for free, or order print copies of the report at:

http://www.ifrc.org/publicat/wdr2007/summaries.asp

The full report can be downloaded in PDF format (4 Mb) at:

http://www.ifrc.org/Docs/pubs/disasters/wdr2007/WDR2007-English.pdf



We Can Do learned about the World Disasters Report through the Disabled People’s International newsletter. Further information was gathered from the report itself.

This article has been cross-posted, with some modifications, at the RatifyNow web site with permission of author.

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CASE STUDY: Strengthening Disabled Women Organizations in Nicaragua

Posted on 26 January 2008. Filed under: Capacity Building and Leadership, Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Latin America & Caribbean, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A publication entitled “Learning from experience: strengthening organisations of women with disabilities” (PDF format, 1.3 Mb) shares lessons learned about organizing, personal empowerment, awareness raising, and incorporating a gender perspective. The publication focuses on work done by a Nicaraguan non-governmental organization (NGO), Solidez, that works to strengthen the capacity of local disabled women’s organizations and integrate women with disabilities into society. Solidez aims to help independent organizations improve their ability to manage their own decisions and self development.

In particular, this profile about Solidez is meant to analyze the lessons they have learned in organizational work and projects, empowerment and personal growth, awareness raising, and advocacy. It describes some of the barriers that Solidez has encountered in its work, for example in overcoming negative, religion-based attitudes toward gender or disabilities. Solidez also explains some of the strategies they used and their results: for example, they attribute part of their success to the use of home visits and meetings in women’s homes. The publication offers frank discussion of some of the challenges Solidez has confronted, such as finding ways to support groups in resolving sometimes very emotional inter-personal conflicts. It concludes with recommendations for how Solidez could further improve upon its efforts.

The publication is available from One World Action, an NGO based in the United Kingdom that works to create opportunities for the world’s poorest people.

You can download “Learning from experience: strengthening organisations of women with disabilities” in PDF format (1.3 Mb) at

http://www.oneworldaction.org/Resources/One%20World%20Action/Documents/Disability%20Rights/solidezreport6.pdf



We Can Do learned about this case study through contacts at Mobility International USA and from the Siyanda database of resources on gender and development.



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CASE STUDIES: Disabled Women Entrepreneurs in Ethiopia

Posted on 26 January 2008. Filed under: Blind, Case Studies, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Employment, Mobility Impariments, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Women with disabilities in Ethiopia and many other countries can face enormous obstacles in becoming economically independent. But some Ethiopian disabled women do become successful entrepreneurs.

A publication from the International Labour Organization (ILO), entitled Doing Business in Addis Ababa: Case Studies of Women Entrepreneurs with Disabilities in Ethiopia, presents 20 stories that describe how women with various disabilities have established their own small businesses in Addis Ababa and the Tigray region in Ethiopia. The women have a range of disabilities including visual impairments, hearing impairments, mobility impairments; and some have had leprosy. Two stories also describe how mothers of children with learning difficulties became entrepreneurs.

All the stories depict both the challenges faced by disabled women in Ethiopia and also the range of possibilities that can be open to them when they have access to the right skills, training, and opportunities. Many of the disabled women entrepreneurs in these case studies are able to use their income to support their families and children.

Read an abstract and download the publication in PDF format at:

http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/gladnetcollect/189/



We Can Do learned about this publication by browsing through Siyanda, an on-line database for publications and research related to gender and development.



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RESOURCE: How to Include Disabled Women in Your Organizations

Posted on 23 January 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/yv5ouo]

Certain resources can help women’s organizations and international development agencies better include disabled women in their program activities. Skip to the resource list.

Women with disabilities confront many of the same challenges that other women in developing countries face, such as gender-based discrimination. But they also face some additional challenges, such as discrimination based on their disability. Some women’s organizations would like to advocate for the needs of disabled women in the same way that they advocate for all women. And international development agencies also want to ensure that they meet the needs of disabled women in the same way that they strive to meet the needs of all the poor people in the countries where they work.

But sometimes mainstream organizations aren’t sure how to begin. What barriers might they unknowingly create that make it harder for disabled women to participate in their programs’ activities or to make their needs known to their organization? What further barriers exist in society that may need to be overcome before an organization can more effectively serve women with disabilities? How can women’s organizations and international development agencies remove these barriers?

Several resources, listed below, can help. Mainstream organizations may wish to use these as guides to make their programs more accessible. Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) may wish to use these when communicating with mainstream organizations to persuade them to make change.

MIUSA’s “Checklist for Inclusion”
Mobility International USA (MIUSA) has a free checklist available (PDF format, 10 Mb). This 19-page self-assessment guide is written for mainstream international development agencies. It provides a series of questions that women’s organizations and international development agencies can use to help them identify what they’re already doing right and what things could be improved upon. For example: when you choose a meeting location, do you make sure that it is wheelchair accessible (ground-floor location with doors wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs, etc.)? Does your organization make its print materials available in non-print (Braille; diskette) and also large-print versions? Does your organization make qualified sign language interpreters available for its training, conference, and other program activities?

MIUSA’s International Development and Disability (IDD) Program
MIUSA’s International Development and Disability (IDD) program strives to bridge the disability community and the international development community in promoting the inclusion of people with disabilities as leaders and participants in development. It provides technical assistance and advice to both disabled people’s organizations and development agencies on gender and disability inclusion. In addition to their Checklist for Inclusion, organizations may wish to learn more about MIUSA activities, publications, videos, and other resources at MIUSA’s IDD web site:

http://www.miusa.org/idd/index_html

In particular, note that the checklist on inclusion was originally written as part of a more comprehensive guidebook on disability inclusion entitled Building an Inclusive Development Community: A Manual on Including People with Disabilities in International Development Programs.

Can’t afford the book? Or want to supplement it with free resources? Consult MIUSA’s page of links to free resources:

http://www.miusa.org/idd/keyresources

Also, read some “best practice” stories (case studies) of other organizations that have successfully promoted disability inclusion in their activities:

http://www.miusa.org/publications/freeresources/mti

Another item that might be of interest is an article written by Sarah Rosenhek at the Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID) about her experience learning about gender and disability through participating in MIUSA’s August 2006 Gender Disability and Development Institute (GDDI). Her article, entitled “Strengthening Women’s Rights Organizations through Inclusion: Lessons Learned from the Gender, Disability and Development Institute,” includes pragmatic advice for other women’s organizations that Rosenhek learned at the institute.

VSO’s Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability
Volunteer Service Overseas has a publication available on-line for free entitled A Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability (PDF format, 2 Mb). This handbook guides mainstream international development organizations in finding ways to overcome the stigma that can be associated with disability; how to actively integrate more disabled workers in the workplace; how to integrate more disabled participants in program activities; and how to integrate disability into organizational policy. Each chapter has case studies that describe how other organizations have implemented the advice given in this handbook. Download the handbook itself at

http://www.asksource.info/pdf/33903_vsomainstreamingdisability_2006.pdf (PDF format, 2 Mb)

The VSO’s Handbook on Mainstreaming Disability was previously featured at We Can Do, with an overview of its contents.

Siyanda On-line Database of Gender and Development Materials
Siyanda is targeted at development specialists who want to integrate gender equality issues into their work,whether or not they specialize in gender issues. This database makes iteasy to search for, and locate, full-length materials, that can bedownloaded for free. Its library of documents includes items in multiple languages including English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, and others. Try a key word search for “disabilities.”



We Can Do learned about the MIUSA resources and the Siyanda on-line database through contacts at MIUSA.



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RESOURCE: Books for Healthier People, Happier Children

Posted on 16 January 2008. Filed under: Blind, Children, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Health, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/2b23c5]

If you’re sick, and you’re in an industrialized country with a health insurance system that meets your needs reasonably well, then you go to the doctor. Or if you are a parent who has just found out that your child is deaf or blind, you turn to professionals for advice and services.

But sometimes there is no doctor. And there are no professionals. If you’re poor; if you have no medical insurance; if you’re in a remote rural area; if the nearest doctor, clinic, or rehabilitation center is three days away on the back of a donkey, then you’re on your own.

Books cannot replace good-quality, affordable medical care from professionals. Nor can they replace blind adults who can teach your child Braille, or deaf adults who can teach your family sign language. But the right kind of books can still save lives. And books can guide parents and community members in helping integrate their disabled children into the family and community.

That’s where the Hesperian Foundation comes in. The Hesperian Foundation is a non-profit organization that publishes books and educational materials. People in developing countries around the world use publications from the Hesperian Foundation to help them understand how to take better care of their own
health and how to raise disabled children. These books are written in simple language with many pictures that can be understood by people with basic literacy skills. Some have been translated into Spanish. A few have also been translated into other languages, such as Chinese or Vietnamese.

Their most famous book is Where There is No Doctor, also available in its Spanish edition, Donde no hay doctor.

Many of their books can be downloaded for free, one chapter at a time, from Hesperian’s on-line library in PDF format. Other books can be purchased.

Don’t have enough money to buy the books you need to save lives or guide parents in your community? Not satisfied with downloading books for free onto your computer? Discounts may be available, under certain conditions, for people in developing countries. A limited number of print books may be available, for free, to some health workers and community leaders in developing countries, through the Gratis Books program.

Free books of particular interest to people with disabilities, their families, and the professionals who work with them, include: A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities; Helping Children Who are Deaf; Helping Children Who are Blind (in English); and the Spanish edition of the same book, Ayudar a los ninos ciegos. People can also purchase Disabled Village Children; or the Spanish edition of the same book, El nino campesino deshabilitado.

If you wish to download a free book or book chapter, you can proceed to the Hesperian on-line library at http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download.php#wwd.

If you wish to purchase a book or multiple publications, you can review the full list of products at http://www.hesperian.org/mm5/merchant.mvc?Store_Code=HB&Screen=PLST.

Have any questions about how to order a book, or how to get a discount for people in developing countries? You may find it helpful to consult the book order FAQ at http://www.hesperian.org/publications_faq.php.

Inquiries about ordering books or obtaining discount prices can be directed to the Hesperian Foundation store at bookorders@hesperian.org.



The information provided in this post was gathered by exploring the Hesperian Foundation web site. Any inquiries should be directed to the Hesperian Foundation.



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TRAINING: 4th Int’l Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability

Posted on 13 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Fellowships & Scholarships, Funding, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Mobility International USA’s (MIUSA)
4th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD)

August 12 – September 2, 2008
Eugene, Oregon, U.S.A.

APPLY NOW!
Application deadline: FRIDAY APRIL 4, 2008
Generous scholarships available.

American Sign Language interpretation*

MIUSA is currently accepting applications from emerging and established
women leaders with disabilities who are:

  • From Africa, Asia, Eurasia, Latin America, the Middle East, and
    Oceania/Pacific
  • First time visitors to the USA and have NOT participated in a MIUSA WILD
    program
  • From an organization led by and for people with disabilities, or by and for women, with particular attention to issues of women and girls with disabilities; or employed in a business or program committed to inclusion of women and girls with disabilities
  • **Women with disabilities who are from rural areas and/or indigenous backgrounds are especially encouraged to apply**
  • Generous scholarships are available for this program.

The WILD program will include workshops, site visits and practical activities on priority issues for women with disabilities, including:

  • Leadership for economic empowerment, including employment policy, legislation, private sector partnerships and coalition building
  • Educational rights and opportunities including specialized and inclusive schools, policy and legal rights, services and accommodations for accessibility
  • Career planning and higher education, including policies and support systems for women and girls with disabilities
  • Employment strategies for women with disabilities including training models, supported employment, microenterprise, private sector partnerships, career mentorship and skill-building
  • Health and family issues including parenting, health care and violence prevention
  • Accessible transportation and communities including policy and implementation, public advocacy, model transport systems, solutions for accessibility
  • Using the media and coalition building
  • Organizational development and sustainability, including funding resources and strategies, and fostering partnerships with community organizations and businesses
  • Cultural, team-building and community service experiences
  • Goals and action plans to strengthen collaborative relationships with other organizations and/or businesses and to implement plans for the employment of women with disabilities locally, regionally or internationally

The official languages of WILD are English and American Sign Language (ASL). However, some language translation may be provided during formal program workshops and activities only. Specific languages (e.g. Arabic, French, Russian, and/or Spanish) will be determined based on need and availability of resources.

Materials in alternative formats will be provided. Other disability-related accessibility arrangements will be negotiated to ensure full participation of all program participants.

APPLY EARLY! Limited space available!

Application deadline is April 4, 2008. Late applications will be accepted as space permits. Application materials are available in alternative formats upon request.

Applications can be downloaded at http://www.miusa.org/miusa-exchange-programs/WILD2008/index_html or requested via e-mail at: womenleaders@miusa.org

Application forms are currently available in English, Spanish, or Arabic. Translations into French and Russian are forthcoming.

Since 1981, MIUSA has been pioneering short-term international exchange programs for people with and without disabilities from over 90 countries. As a non-profit organization, MIUSA is dedicated to empowering people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

Contact information:
Mobility International USA
WILD 2008
E-mail: womenleaders@miusa.org
Website: www.miusa.org



We Can Do learned about this opportunity from MIUSA.

I was fortunate enough to have been able to participate in the 2nd International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability in 2003. I had a great time getting to know a group of 30 brilliant, ambitious, hard working women with different disabilities from nearly 30 developing countries around the world. It was a good reminder to me, as someone in a developed country, how much talent, energy, and creativity there is among disabled people in some of the poorest countries in the world.

To any Deaf (or deaf) people reading this: When I participated in 2003, there were six of us women who were Deaf/deaf. One besides me was fluent in ASL and used the ASL interpreter; another did not know ASL but could lipread in English and used an interpreter who signed in English word order while mouthing the words in English; another came with someone bilingual in Spanish and Panama Sign Language who listened to the Spanish interpreters and translated to Panama signs for her; another lipread one of the Spanish interpreters who was assigned to her for this purpose; another did not know any of the primary languages used in the workshop, so a deaf interpreter was assigned to her to translate from ASL to their own pidgeon mixture of international signs.

If you are deaf, then you will probably get the most of the workshops if you either know ASL or are able to lipread well in one of the primary languages used during the training program. But if you have other communication needs, then please do talk with the people with MIUSA and see what can be arranged. Contact MIUSA directly at the website or email addresses provided above. We Can Do is NOT responsible for WILD and cannot assist with your inquiries.



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CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: Successful Disabled Women Entrepreneurs

Posted on 8 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Employment, News, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Do you know of a successful disabled woman enterpreneur in a developing country? A World Bank annual publication, Doing Business would like to learn more about her, what has made her business successful, and what legal, regulatory, and practical barriers she has encountered along the way. Doing Business is published by the World Bank Group’s private sector arm, the International Finance Corporation.

The Doing Business project is currently doing research in 178 countries to identify what legal and regulatory barriers make it harder for businesswomen to become successful. As part of this two-year research project, the Doing Business team is collecting stories about women entrepreneurs that describe why they are successful and highlight what obstacles they have needed to overcome. Gathering these case studies will help the team understand what strategies are needed to remove these barriers for all businesswomen. This will help them make better recommendations to country governments that want to encourage more women to start and expand their own businesses. A few of the case studies may be featured in a future Doing Business publication. Nominations need to be submitted by January 22, 2008, in order to be considered.

Each year, Doing Business evaluates 178 countries in terms of how their laws and regulations help, or prevent, enterpreneurs from starting and expanding businesses. Many countries use the Doing Business guide to identify where their strengths and weaknesses are in promoting private sector growth. They make reforms based on its recommendations, which has helped more entrepreneurs start businesses, create jobs, and escape poverty.

Each candidate for nominations should be the founder or owner of a business; active in her community; and have an experience that can offer lessons that can inform reform efforts. When submitting nominations, please send the following information:

  • Full name of Nominee
  • Name and type of business
  • Business address, phone number, and e-mail
  • Month and year business was started
  • A brief biography of the nominated entrepreneur
  • A brief description of the business
  • A brief summary of the obstacles overcome, discoveries made, and outcomes

Read more about the desired criteria and how to nominate business women to be profiled at:

http://www.doingbusiness.org/features/womenentrepreneurs.aspx

Individuals may make inquiries or nominate women entrepreneurs they know in developing countries, with or without disabilities, by sending an email to:

doingbusiness@worldbank.org
snarsiah@worldbank.org

Read more information about this project at: http://blog.doingbusiness.org/2008/01/women-entrepren.html

The Doing Business project will select women from among the nominations, contact them, and prepare profiles on each woman. The chosen profiles will be published in Doing Business 2009.



We Can Do learned about this call for nominations through the World Bank Doing Business blog. Please note that We Can Do is not associated with the Doing Business project. Any inquiries, as requested above, should be directed to doingbusiness@worldbank.org or to snarsiah@worldbank.org.



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TRAINING for Program Coordinators in Bangalore

Posted on 3 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, HIV/AIDS, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Action on Disability and Development (ADD) India
Training for Project Coordinators

Action on Disability and Development (ADD) India is a development organization working with persons with disability in rural areas in South India.

ADD India is conducting a Training in Bangalore for Programme Coordinators. This is aimed at developing the skills of Coordinators working in the development sector to incorporate and manage teamwork and their role as leaders and to strengthen their field based functions.

Training CBR Workers and Project Coordinators has been an integral part of ADD India for almost two decades. ADD’s training focuses on increasing the knowledge, building skills and developing a positive attitude to working in the field. There is also an emphasis on practical exposure with information and knowledge. The main resource persons is Mr. Ramakrishna from Anweshana in Bhubaneshwar, who has 20 years experience in training in the development sector.

The main resource persons is Mr. Ramakrishna from Anweshana in Bhubaneshwar, who has 20 years experience in training in the development sector.

Training Components will Include

  • Facilitating the Community Worker to implement the project.
  • Clarifying the role and responsibilities of the Project Coordinator.
  • Setting goal and task accomplishment
  • Understanding Group Processes
  • Sanghas and their management
  • Federation Vision, Values and leadership Development
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Resource mobilization from the community
  • Exposure visit to a Sangha and / or Federation.

It is anticipated that candidates selected for this training would have some knowledge of disability work. Therefore, this training, while examining the fundamental principles behind work of this kind, aims primarily to develop skills in the areas of programme development, monitoring and capacity building of people.

Recommended Programme participants

  • Coordinators and managers of Community Based programmes in the development sector.
  • Professionals working with vulnerable groups like People with Disabilities, Women’s Development, Community Work and Education and Disabled peoples organizations, HIV/AIDS, Children’s programmes.
  • Individuals who wish to develop the skills to become involved in community development programmes.
  • Training Methodology
    This training is residential and would be conducted with simple facilities. The method of training will include lectures, discussions, group work, practical sessions and field visit.

    Language
    The language of training will be English. Participants must understand English but could express themselves in other languages ie. Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam, Bengali, Oriya, Hindi etc. All reading materials will be in English.

    Fee, Duration and Venue of training
    The fee is Rs.7000/- per person, which includes the training fee, meals, tea/coffee, accommodation for 6 days, training materials and exposure visit.

    Participants will have to make their own travel arrangements to reach Bangalore.

    Duration: March 3-7, 2008
    Venue: In Bangalore. Exact venue will be informed to the selected participants.

    Please send the completed application form to ADD India by 20th January 2008 either by email or by post.

    Action on Disability and Development India
    4005, 19th Cross, Banashankari 2nd Stage
    Bangalore – 560 070 India
    Phone: 080 – 2676 5881, 2676 2097
    Email: addindia@vsnl.net

    Selection will be confirmed by January 30th. The selected participants should pay the full fee by way of bank draft favouring ‘Action on Disability and Development India’, payable at Bangalore.

    For further details please contact Mrs. Nisha Printer at addindia@vsnl.net



    I learned about this opportunity via Ghulam Nabi Nazimani.



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    News at Your Fingertips

    Posted on 30 December 2007. Filed under: autism, Blind, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Commonwealth Nations, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Deaf, Democratic Participation, East Asia and Central Asia, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Employment, Families, Funding, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, Introduction to "We Can Do", Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation, Reports, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Women |

    I have now added a page to the top navigation bar, News, that consolidates all the news and press releases posted at We Can Do since this blog began.

    I mostly cribbed this new page from the work I did recently for the We Can Do Retrospective: The First 100 Posts (and Then Some). However, if you compare the two, you will see that there are more items listed under the “News” page in the top navigation bar than there are in the Retrospective post. That’s because, when I wrote the Retrospective post, I made a rule with myself that each We Can Do post would be listed only once, even if it arguably belonged in more than one category. Some of the “news” items reported new resources that might still be helpful for readers months or years from now. So I listed those items under “Resources” in the Retrospective post instead of news. But for the “News” page in the navigation bar, I made sure to include anything that was tagged as “news” when it was first posted.

    I will try to keep the “News” page up to date. You will notice that it already includes one news item that has gone up since the Retrospective post.



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    We Can Do Retrospective: The First 100 Posts (and Then Some)

    Posted on 22 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Arts, autism, Blind, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Commonwealth Nations, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Deaf, Democratic Participation, Disability Studies, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, East Asia and Central Asia, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Events and Conferences, Families, Fellowships & Scholarships, Funding, Guest Blogger, Health, HIV/AIDS, Housing, Human Rights, Immigration, Inclusion, Interpreting, Introduction to "We Can Do", Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation, Remittances, Reports, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Violence, Volunteer Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Skip introduction, go straight to the Table of Contents

    If you’re new to We Can Do, what interesting information, news, or resources might you have overlooked from the past few months? Although some older items may no longer be interesting, others may still be relevant and helpful a year or three from now. This post can help guide you through the first 100-plus posts at this blog. You can click from the table of contents below to any section of this page that interests you–and then another click on “table of contents” can take you back to the contents, or “top of this page” takes you back to this introduction.

    Top of this page


    Table of Contents

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    About We Can Do

    To learn more about the purpose of We Can Do, see About We Can Do. For more on its guiding philosophy, go to Why We Can Do.

    Thinking about submitting your own written materials, job posts, conference announcements, or resources to We Can Do? Check the Wish list for written materials and resources.

    Want to receive an alert in email when a new post goes up at We Can Do? You can Subscribe to We Can Do for free.

    I changed the organization and appearance of We Can Do in early October to its present format.

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    The Five Most Popular We Can Do posts

    The five listed here are the ones that have attracted the most “page views” since We Can Do began in late July. You may notice that not all of these are featured in the 10 “most popular posts” listed in the right-hand navigation bar. That’s because the navigation bar only lists posts that have received a lot of traffic very recently (I think within the past few days; its done automatically by wordpress so I’m not sure how it works). But here I’m listing the five that have the highest TOTAL page views.

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    The Five Most Under-Rated We Can Do posts

    Are these posts really under-rated? You’ll have to read them and decide for yourself. But in choosing these five, I used two criteria: 1. These are posts that have received fewer than 100 visitors–sometimes far fewer. 2. These are posts that I think could be helpful or interesting to readers and maybe deserve more attention than they have gotten. These are in no particular order:

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    Finding Practical Resources and Case Studies or Helpful Organizations

    Finding organizations; Resources for inclusive development; Human rights resources; Case studies; Other helpful resources

    Finding organizations
    Mainstream international development agencies sometimes say that they don’t know how to find people with disabilities, or their representative organizations, in the developing countries where they work. Reviewing the July post entitled Finding Local Disability Organizations may help point you in the right direction. Also see Disability Organizations in Afghanistan, Asia, Kenya, Uganda.

    Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) sometimes aren’t sure where to find mainstream development organizations and resources that might be willing to collaborate with them.

    There is an international network of organizations for families of people with Rubinstein Taybi Syndrome.

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    Resources for Inclusive Development
    Both disability advocates and mainstream development organizations want to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind when countries and organizations fight poverty or improve public health, education, water, and other services. But it can be a challenge to figure out how to make projects and government policies more inclusive. The following resources can help:

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    Resources on the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
    By now, you may be aware that a global movement is taking place to ratify the international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Many relevant resources are now being produced in relation to the CRPD, some of which have been posted or featured here at We Can Do:

  • Read the CRPD “translated” into plain English.
  • UNICEF has developed a child-friendly version of the CRPD to help children understand disability rights
  • Disabled People International offers two toolkits on ratifying and implementing the CRPD for disability advocates who want to help ensure that all disabled people have their human rights recognized.
  • A handbook on disability rights targeted at parliamentarians can help parliamentarians, people who work in close contact with government agencies, and disability advocates in general, better understand the CRPD.
  • The United Nations’ new web site, UN Enable, is one of the best, and most official, places to find information on the CRPD.
  • Handicap International has produced its own Teaching Kit on the CRPD.
  • The International Disability Equality Agency (IDEA) has issued Equalize It! A Manifesto for Disability Equality in Development Cooperation that expresses their position on how to ensure disability equality in the international development field.
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    Case Studies
    Reviewing case studies of projects implemented elsewhere can be a valuable source of ideas that could help you figure out how to run or implement your own projects. I would love to post many more best-practice and failed-practice case studies than I have available right now. If you think you have something worth sharing, please check my Wish List of Written Materials and Resource and contact me at ashettle [at] patriot.net.

    But for now, here are two case studies:

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    Other Helpful Resources

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    Finding Useful Sources of Information and Research

    Finding academic research, papers, resources, or statistics
    Looking for academic research and academic papers; resources that can be used by people working in the field; or sources of statistics? Some of the following posts may be helpful:

    Information on people with disabilities
    Interested in learning about the living conditions of people with disabilities in specific nations, or in specific thematic areas? Some of the following may be of interest:

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    Funding Sources

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    Academic Papers

    We Can Do has published, or re-published, academic papers, or linked to same, on a range of subjects, including:

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    News

    September 2007; October 2007; November 2007; Early December 2007

    September 2007
    At one point in September, the international disability community prematurely thought we might be On the Verge of Making History by ratifying the disability rights community.

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    October 2007

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    November 2007

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    Early December 2007

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    Opinion Pieces

    So far, the opinion pieces here are all by me. But I would like for We Can Do to be host to an active exchange of ideas and differing perspectives. If you have a strong opinion about something, please consider submitting it. Yes, that includes opinions that disagree with mine! Consult the Wish list for written materials and resources for ideas of the kinds of topics I’m trying to cover at We Can Do.

    Meanwhile, here are a few of my own opinion pieces:

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    Call for Papers (for Conferences, Journals, Other)

    You might be just now starting your academic career as an undergraduate or graduate student. Or perhaps you have been doing quantitative or qualitative research, or writing policy analysis, or case studies, or social analysis, for years. Either way, if you’re looking for opportunities to present, publish, or otherwise disseminate your papers or run a workshop, then check out these upcoming or ongoing opportunities:

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    International Conferences and Events

    Looking for a conference to attend? Here are a few upcoming events:
    January 2008; February 2008; March 2008; April 2008; May 2008; August 2008; September 2008; November 2008

    January 2008
    The South Asian Conference on Autism is being held in New Delhi, India in January 2008.

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    February 2008

  • The Disabilities Initiatives in Development Seminar, also in Bangladesh also in February 2008.
  • One for all: Persons with Disabilities Initiative in Development, again in Bangladesh in February 2008.
  • The International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies at the University of Central Lancashire in Preston, UK is holding a conference on sign language research in the UK in February 2008.
  • A conference on the deaf community, sign languages, social issues, civil rights, and creativity will be held on the campus of Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, USA.
  • The Techshare India 2008 Conference on accessibility will be held in New Delhi, India, in February 2008.
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    March 2008
    The 8th annual meeting of the Gulf Disability Society will meet in United Arab Emirates in March 2008.

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    April 2008

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    May 2008

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    August 2008

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    September 2008

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    November 2008
    The Association on Women’s Rights in Development (AWID)’s International Forum on Women’s Rights and Development will be held in Cape Town, South Africa in November 2008. A call for proposals is open until January 28, 2008.

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    Jobs, Internships, Volunteer Opportunities

    We Can Do will probably never be a comprehensive job-board. Serious job, internship, or volunteer placement hunters will want to explore other means of finding opportunities. For example, jobs, internships, and volunteer opportunities in the international field generally, or in the disability field generally, can sometimes be found at www.idealist.org. But I do occasionally happen to come across a job announcement. Here are a few that may still be open to applications:

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    Education and Training Opportunities

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    Missed Opportunities

    Missed call for papers; Missed training opportunities; Missed job, internship, and volunteer opportunities; Missed events and conferences

    Some of the material I post at We Can Do is time-sensitive material. That means the conferences announced here have come and gone; job posts have been filled; and deadlines are over. So, if it’s too late for you to do anything about any of the following announcements, then why bother listing them? First, some conference organizers issue compilations of papers and presentations or other interesting materials after their event is over. If a topic interests you, it may be worth communicating with event organizers to see if any follow-up publications are available. Second, organizations that offer one conference, job opportunity, call for papers, etc., may offer something similar in the future. Many conferences, for example, meet every one, two, three, or four years. Monitoring, joining, or communicating with organizations of interest to you could help ensure that you learn about the next opportunity in time to plan for it.

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    Missed Call for Papers
    The German Journal for Disability and Development called for papers on art and disabilities to be submitted by the end of November 2007.

    Also browse through the listing of upcoming conferences and missed conferences.

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    Missed Training Opportunities

    In October 2007, the International Labour Organisation had a training course for professionals from developing countries.

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    Missed Jobs, Internships, and Volunteer Opportunities
    Remember that it is too late to apply for these specific opportunities. These are listed here in case you want to check out the sponsoring organizations for future opportunities like these:

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    Missed Event and Conference Opportunities

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    What’s Next for We Can Do?

    I am not yet satisfied with We Can Do. I still see many gaps that I want to repair. I want to find, and post, more materials of a pragmatic nature. By which I mean, material that people in the field can put to immediate use in improving the lives of disabled people in developing countries. If you think you can help me locate helpful materials, please review my Wish list for written materials and resources and contact me.

    I also want to reach more development professionals at mainstream development organizations and more employees and volunteers at international disability organizations. And I want to reach more small DPOs and individual advocates in more developing countries. The knowledge shared at We Can Do cannot help until it is brought to people with disabilities living in poverty in developing countries. That “final mile” can only be bridged by readers like YOU.

    If you want to help, I hope you will consider telling your colleagues and contacts about We Can Do. If you run a web site or a blog, please consider linking to We Can Do at https://wecando.wordpress.com. If you have the skills, the time, and the commitment to launch a We Can Do mirror site translation into some other language, please talk to me (leave a comment or email me at ashettle [at] patriot.net). And please do feel free to print out the more helpful We Can Do posts to share with people you know in developing countries who do not have easy access to the Internet.

    For those of you who like numbers: We Can Do had 285 page views in July; 851 in August; 1305 in September; 2936 in October; 4862 in November; and more than 5100 in the first three weeks of December. And who is responsible for making these numbers happen? Why—you, of course! So, thank you for visiting We Can Do.

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