Violence

Report: Pacific Sisters with Disabilities at the Intersection of Discrimination

Posted on 4 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Employment, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Policy & Legislation, Rehabilitation, Reports, Resources, signed languages, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , |

Both people with disabilities and also women experience discrimination in countries around the world, including within the Pacific region. Women with disabilities experience a double dose of discrimination. A newly released report, entitled Pacific Sisters with Disabilities: at the Intersection of Discrimination (PDF format, 981 Kb), reviews the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. It includes discussion on the challenges of discrimination against women with disabilities; laws among Pacific Island governments; and policies and programs within disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), women’s organizations, and mainstream international development partners. The report concludes with recommendations for improving the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. This April 2009 report, by authors Daniel Stubbs and Sainimili Tawake, covers the situation of 22 Pacific countries and territories. It was published by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Pacific Center.

The research leading to this report found that a few helpful laws, policies, and systems of practice do exist in some countries. However, disabled women do still tend to fare more poorly compared to disabled men or compared to non-disabled women. Specifically, they are often less educated, experience more unemployment, face more violence and abuse, encounter more poverty, are more isolated, have less access to health care, and have lower social status. Women with disabilities also have less access to information about education, health care, their reproductive rights, recreation, politics, or even the weather.

Unfortunately, very limited documentation on the situation of women with disabilities exist in any region, including the Pacific. This report relies partly on extrapolation from what is known about women with disabilities in other regions. This information is supplemented, where possible, with local data, statistics, anecdotes, and other information specific to disabled women in the Pacific.

The full 90-page report can be downloaded for free, in PDF format (981 Kb) at: http://www.undppc.org.fj/_resources/article/files/Final%20PSWD%20BOOKLET.pdf.



I learned about this report via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development email discussion list.

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NEWS: Violence Against Disabled Denounced by Albanian Disability Rights Foundation (English and në gjuhën shqipe)

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Blind, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

në gjuhën shqipe

Tirana, May 22nd, 2009
PRESS RELEASE

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation denounces the violence towards people with disability

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation (ADRF), through this declaration expresses the indignation on the violence exercised on May 21st, 2009 during the peaceful protest organized by blind people in front of the Government Building.

ADRF, expresses its concern for the violence of integrity and dignity of blind people, an action that was done in presence of staff of authorities responsible to guarantee the order and security of the Albanian citizens. Such acts, confirm once again the multiple discrimination and human rights violation faced by people with disability especially women with disability in Albania.

ADRF strongly denounces the act of violence and demand from the Albanian Government to take all measures to punish the person conducting this act and requires compensation to the person to whom violence was exercised.

ADRF makes an appeal to the Albanian Government to undertake in the future concrete measures that aim to eliminate discriminatory situations, to guarantee observance of human rights to all categories of people with disability on equal bases to all Albanian citizens.

ADRF
www.adrf.org.al
Tel: (04) 2269426
Rr: “Bogdani” (ish-A.Z.Çajupi) Pall. 15 Kt i 3, Tirane, Albania

Tiranë më 22.05.2009
DEKLARATE PËR SHTYP

FSHDPAK dënon dhunën e ushtruar ndaj Personave me aftësi të kufizuara në shikim

Fondacioni Shqiptar për të Drejtat e Personave me Aftësi të Kufizuara (FSHDPAK), me anë të kësaj deklarate shpreh indinjatën e thellë për dhunën e ushtruar në datë 21.05.2009, gjatë protestës së organizuar nga personat me aftësi të kufizuar në shikim, përpara selisë së Këshillit të Ministrave.

FSHDPAK, shpreh shqetësimin për cënimin e integritetit dhe dinjitetit të kategorisë të personave me aftësi të kufizuar në shikim, ndodhur për më tepër në prani të organeve të mbrojtjes së rendit dhe sigurisë të shtetasve Shqiptarë. Akte të tilla konfirmojnë edhe njëhërë diskriminimin e shumfishtë dhe shkeljen e të drejtave themelore të njeriut ndaj personave me aftësi të kufizuara dhe në mënyrë të veçantë ndaj grave me aftësi të kufizuara.

FSHDPAK, dënon me forcë aktin e dhunshëm dhe kërkon nga Qeveria Shqiptare marrjen e të gjitha masave për dënimin e dhunuesit dhe dëmshpërblimin e personit ndaj të cilit u ushtrua dhunë.

FSHDPAK, gjithashtu, kërkon të tërheqë vëmendjen e qeverisë Shqiptare për ndërrmarjen në të ardhmen të masave konkrete me synim eleminimin e situatave të tilla diskriminuese, garantimin dhe respektimin e të të drejtave themelore të njeriut për të gjitha kategoritë e personave me aftësi të kufizuar, si pjesë e rëndësishme në shoqërinë Shqiptare.

FSHDPAK
www.adrf.org.al
Tel: (04) 2269426
Rr: “Bogdani” (ish-A.Z.Çajupi) Pall. 15 Kt i 3, Tirane, Shqiperi



We Can Do received this press release via the Asia Pacific Disability email discussion group.

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[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Tirana, May 22nd, 2009

PRESS RELEASE

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation denounces the violence towards people with disability

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation (ADRF), through this declaration expresses the indignation on the violence exercised on May 21st, 2009 during the peaceful protest organized by blind people in front of the Government Building.

ADRF, expresses its concern for the violence of integrity and dignity of blind people, an action that was done in presence of staff of authorities responsible to guarantee the order and security of the Albanian citizens. Such acts, confirm once again the multiple discrimination and human rights violation faced by people with disability especially women with disability in Albania.

ADRF strongly denounces the act of violence and demand from the Albanian Government to take all measures to punish the person conducting this act and requires compensation to the person to whom violence was exercised.

ADRF makes an appeal to the Albanian Government to undertake in the future concrete measures that aim to eliminate discriminatory situations, to guarantee observance of human rights to all categories of people with disability on equal bases to all Albanian citizens.

ADRF

http://www.adrf.org.al
Tel: (04) 2269426
Rr: “Bogdani” (ish-A.Z.Çajupi) Pall. 15 Kt i 3, Tirane, Albania

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24, 2009

Posted on 9 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I am re-posting the following announcement, partly as a reminder for people who wish to register but also to correct and clarify the instructions for registration:

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24

Posted on 4 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, accessibility, Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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A Mine-Free World, Mission Possible! ناهج زا يراع ،نیامذپ ناکما تیرومام ریتسا !

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Disaster Planning & Mitigation, News, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , |

A Mine-Free World, Mission Possible!
ناهج زا يراع ،نیامذپ ناکما تیرومام ریتسا !

Press Release
23rd Feb – 2009, Kabul, Afghanistan – Ten years after the historic treaty banning antipersonnel mines became binding international law, campaigners in some 50 countries around the globe are taking action this week to once again draw the world’s attention to the horrific consequences of landmines and to call for renewed efforts toward a mine-free world.

“The Mine Ban Treaty has made a major difference on the ground in dozens of mine-affected countries, but despite the successes to date, too many people’s lives remain impacted by uncleared minefields, too many mine survivors are denied decent living conditions, and too many mines are still stockpiled,” said Sylvie Brigot, Executive Director of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL).

“We always knew that pursuing a mine-free world would be a long-term mission, but it can be done. States Parties need to recommit themselves to doing everything in their power to end the suffering caused by these weapons. This is ‘mission possible’.”

To date, 156 states have joined the treaty and, as reported by the ICBL’s Landmine Monitor the stigma attached to the use of antipersonnel mines means that only two governments – Burma (Myanmar) and Russia – and a handful of non-state armed groups employed these weapons in the past few years. Some 42 million antipersonnel mines have been destroyed from stockpiles since 1997; only 13 of the more than 50 countries that manufactured antipersonnel mines in the early ‘90s still have a production capacity; trade in antipersonnel mines has virtually stopped; and large tracts of land have been cleared and returned to productive use.

However, despite the goodwill and continued partnership between governments and civil society, the task of ensuring full compliance by Mine Ban Treaty members is an ongoing challenge. Belarus, Greece, and Turkey failed to meet their four year stockpile destruction deadline on 1 March 2008, although they have since indicated that they are committed to destroying their stockpiled antipersonnel mines as soon as possible. Some states have been unacceptably slow in fulfilling their mine clearance obligations, potentially putting thousands of civilian lives at risk. Fifteen States Parties, including Bosnia and Herzegovina, Mozambique, Nicaragua, the UK and Yemen, had to ask last year for an extension of their tenyear deadline for clearance of mine-affected areas. Programs to address the lifelong needs of mine survivors – estimated at almost half a million people worldwide – are still grossly inadequate in the vast majority of affected countries.

Thirty-nine countries – two of which originally signed the treaty but have not ratified it – have not yet formally joined the treaty and thus remain at odds with the widespread international rejection of the weapon.

“Over the past decade we have seen elements of the new diplomacy that created the Mine Ban Treaty applied to tackle other issues, particularly cluster munitions,” said Brigot. “We strongly support the new Convention on Cluster Munitions. However, as with the Mine Ban Treaty, the real value of this agreement will be the difference it makes in the lives of people affected on a daily basis by these weapons, and how it will avoid new victims.”

The ICBL – a worldwide network of some 1,000 civil society organizations, awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997 – is marking the 10th anniversary of the Mine Ban Treaty’s entry into force with events and activities in more than 50 countries (see list). This includes tree-planting in formerly mine-affected areas in Georgia, a creative campaign to mark dog waste in Spain with “danger: mines” warning signs, a march in the streets of the mine-affected Casamance region of Senegal, an art installations on the border between Greece and Turkey, the DVD launch of the landmines documentary film Disarm, and dozens of media events and roundtables with decision-makers.

In Afghanistan we as a representative of civil society organizations in Afghanistan are ready to support this process and to work cooperatively with you and other relevant ministries in order to ensure that we all – States Parties, survivors and disability stakeholders – are satisfied by our achievements by the 2 nd Review Conference. Afghanistan should focus in 2009 on the following priorities for those government ministries working on victim assistance in partnership with all mine action and disability stakeholders to:
* Create an up-to-date database on all disability services available in Afghanistan,
* Promote greater understanding of the socio-economic conditions of people with disabilities , including mine survivors,
* Create a directory of all emergency and continuing medical care services in mine/ERW-impacted rural areas,
* Improve physical accessibility in provinces/areas with disability, especially in public areas,
* Improve psychological support programs and social reintegration services for all mine/ERW affected areas in Afghanistan,
* Create a directory of all economic reintegration services in Afghanistan including microfinance provider, vocational training and employment centers,
* Appoint a focal point person within each relevant ministries (MoLSAMD, MOPH and MFA),
* Develop a new or extend the current victim assistance objectives and develop a clear plan of action for the post 2009 period to ensure that Afghanistan can present these objectives and plans at the 2nd Review Conference in November 2009,
* Ensure the full participation of survivors and relevant civil society actors in all VA programs including developing, implementing, and monitoring victim assistance objectives and plans,

Background & Figures
Adopted in 1997, the Treaty entered into force on 1 March 1999 – more quickly than any other treaty of its kind. This was the result of a unique partnership of visionary governments and civil society working together to save human lives and limbs. Landmines still affect 70 states, and 6 territories.

80% of the world’s states (156 countries) have adhered to the Mine Ban Treaty. Thirty-nine states remain outside the treaty, including major powers like China, Russia and the USA.

26 countries and the European Commission donated US$430 million for mine action in 2007. This is a US$45 million decrease in global mine action funding compared to 2006.

Mine Ban Treaty obligations include:
– A prohibition on the use, production, stockpiling or trade in antipersonnel mines, as well as the assistance to or encouraging of anyone involved in these activities;
– A requirement to destroy all stockpiled antipersonnel mines within four years of joining the treaty;
– A requirement to remove and destroy all antipersonnel mines from all mined areas under the state’s jurisdiction or control within 10 years of joining the treaty;
– The provision of assistance for the care and rehabilitation, and social and economic reintegration, of mine victims and for mine awareness programs. Campaigning and media events to celebrate 1 March will take place in: Afghanistan, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Cambodia, Canada, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Japan, Kenya, Kosovo, Lebanon, Mongolia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sudan, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, UK, USA, Uruguay, Western Sahara, Yemen, Zambia.

International Campaign to Ban Landmines: www.icbl.org
Landmine Monitor: www.icbl.org/lm
ALSO website: www.Afghanlandminesurvivors.org

Address: St # 12, H # 11, Between MTN Antenna and Assadullah Ghaleb Mosque Lane, Qala-e-Fathullah, Kabul Afghanistan.
Phone call: 0093 (0) 799 31 62 53 / 799 35 36 69
Website: www.afghanlandminesurvivors.org /
Email: afghan.lso@gmail.com
English


ناهج زا يراع ،نیامذپ ناکما تیرومام ریتسا !
یتاعوبطم رشن
5 توح 1387ناتسناغفا لباک ،: ،تسا هدرک ادیپ ار یللملا نیب نوناق تیثیح ینیمز نیام عنم یخیرات هدھاعم ،لاس هد زا دعب و نیا لقادح رد اھ رنیپماک رگید رابکی ھتفھ50 روشک رسارس ردایناھج ھجوت بلج تھج ناھج ھب نبلط و ینیمز نیام راوگان جیاتن ایند یارب ددجم یاھ ششوکییدننکیم مادقا نیام زا یراع . نیام دض یللملا نیب نیپماک رتفد یوییارجا سییر توگیرب یولسینیمز ) ICBL ( ،دیوگیم” تارییغت نیام عنم هدھاعم ار هدمع لامعً دروآ دوجو ھب نیام زا رثأتم روشک اھ هد رده اب اما ، ،اھ تیقفوم دوجومدرم زا یریثک دادعت یگدنز زونھ ارنیام مولعمان یاھ نادیم نکیم دیدھتندایز دادعت و دنرادن یسرتسد یگدنز ھتسیاش تیعضو ھب نیام ناینابرق زا یریثک دادعت ،دیدراد دوجو زونھ نیام ریاخذ “. ” نیام زا یراع ییایند ھب لین ھک مینادیم ام تدمزارد تیرومام کیتسا یندش ماجنا اما ،تسا . ورین مامت اب دیاب وضع یاھ روشک اھ تبیصم متخ یاربیدننک هرابود دھعت ددرگیم ببس حلاس نیا اب ھک .تسا نکمم تیرومام کی نیا “. ،لاح ھب ات156 روشک تسا هدرک ذخا ار هدھاعم نیا تیوضع ،ھک ار تشادداییام دض یللملا نیب نیپماک ینیمز نیام شرازگ ن ینیمز لنوسرپ دض نیام هدافتسا دروم ردھمیمض دوب هدرک – ھیسور و امرب روشک ود فرص – یتموکح ریغ حلسم پورگ دنچ و دنا هدرک هدافتسا ھتشذگ لاس دنچ رد اھ حلاس عون نیا زا . لاس زا1997 دادعت ھب وسنیدب 42هریخذ لنوسرپ دض نیام نویلیم هدش ،تسا هدیددرگ بیرخت رتشیب زا زا50روشک ناھج ھھد لیاوا رد ار لنوسرپ دض یاھ نیام ھک 90درکیم دیلوت دن طقف ،13 روشک نیام زا ولمم یاھ نیمز عیسو تمسق و تسا هدش هداد فقوت لامع لنوسرپ دض یاھ نیام تراجت ،دراد ار دیلوت تیفرظ زونھً ددرگیم هدافتسا دیلوت یارب و یزاسکاپ . و تین نسح دوجو ابکیرشت یعاسم هدھاعم یاضعا طسوت لماک قیبطت نیمأت ھفیظو ،یندم ھعماج و اھ تلود نیب موادتمعنم نیام ددرگیم بوسحم یراج شلاچ کی . ھلاس راھچ دوعوم رد دنتسناوتن ھیکرت و نانوی ،سورلابناش رد ،1 چرام 2008 شیوخ ریاخذ ، ت ھب دھعتم ھک دنا ھتشاد راعشا اھنآ ،دنچرگ ،دننک بیرخت ار مامت بیرخدنشابیم نکمم نامز تدم رد لنوسرپ دض نیام ریاخذ . یضعب لامع ار یکلم ناسنا نارازھ یگدنز و دننکیم تکرح یطب یکاپ نیام یاھ تیلووسم ماجنا رد شریذپ لباق ریغ لکش ھب اھ روشک زاً دنھدیم رارق رطخ ضرعم رد .کین ،وکیبمازوم ،انیوگزرھ و اینیسوب لومش ھب روشک هدزناپ دیاب ھتشذگ لاس ،نمیی و ایناتیرب ،اوگارا دیدمتدعوم ارناش ھلاس هد نیام اب هدولآ قطانم یزاسکاپ یاربتساوخرددندرکیم . ناینابرق تدمزارد یاھ زاین ھب ھک یاھ ھمانرب نکیم ھجوتن د–نیمخت اً ناسنا نویلیم مین ینابرق ناھج رسارس رد– ناھج رثأتم یاھ روشک رثکا رد زونھ ات رایسبدشابیم یفاکان . 39 روشک – تسا هدرکن بیوصت یلو اضما ار هدھاعم نآ روشک ود – زونھ ات دنا ھتفرگن ار هدھاعم تیوضع امسرً عیسو حیبقت اب انب ،ً دنا هدنام یقاب یلامتحا تلاح رد حلاس یللملا نیب . “یدوب دیدج یسامولپید زا رصانع داجیا دھاش ام ھتشذگ ھھد نایرج رد صوصخ ھب اھ ھلضعم ریاس یارب ار نیام عنم هدھاعم ھک م دنا ھتخاس یلمع ییا ھشوخ تامھم”تفگ توگیرب ، ” . نویسناونک امعنممینکیم تیامح ایوق ار ییا ھشوخ تامھم ً . ،دنچرگ شزرا نیام عنم هدھاعم دننام نویسناونک نیا یعقاویقرف دوب دھاوخ مدرم یگدنز ردور ھک حلاس نیا اب هرمز اھ یچ و ،دندرگیم رثأتم دنک بانتجا دیدج ناینابرق زا روط”.
ینیمز نیام دض یللملا نیب نیپماک- ابیرقت زا لکشتم یناھج ھکبش کی ً1000 لاس رد لبون حلص هزیاج هدنرب و یندم نامزاس 1997 – زا رتشیب رد اھ تیلاعف و لفاحم اب ار نیام عنم هدھاعم قیبطت زورلاس نیمھد 50روشک )تسا ھمیمض تسیل ( لیلجت ناھج دنکیم . اھ تیلاعف نیا اب ایناپسھ رد کس عایض رطاخ ھب یرنھ نیپماک کی ،ناتسجرگ رد نیام اب هدولآ یلبق قطانم رد لاھن سرغ “رطخ :نیام ” ھقطنم یاھ نابایخ رد هرھاظم کی ،رطخ ملاعا هدولآ نایم یزرم دحرس رد یرنھ راثآ کی بصن ،لاگینس سنماسک کرت ینیمز یاھ نیام دنتسم ید یو ید رشن ،نانوی و ھی”حلاس علخ ملیف ” میمصت اب رودم یاھزیم و یتاعوبطم لفاحم اھ هد و اھ هدنریگار ، لماشدوشیم . ھناخ ترازو ریاس و امش اب میھاوخیم و میتسھ ھسورپ نیا زا تیامح هدامآ ناغفا یندم یاھ نامزاس هدنیامن ثیحنم ام ناتسناغفا رد ھ ام ھمھ تیاضر نیمأت رطاخ ھب ھطوبرم یا– نیلولعم تاسسوم و ناینابرق ،وضع یاھ روشک – رد اھ درواتسد و جیاتن زا مینک یراکمھ یناث رورم سنارفنک .
لاس رد ناتسناغفا2009م یاھ داھن مامت تکراشم اب ناینابرق ھب کمک یارب ھک یاھ ھناخ ترازو رد یتآ یاھ تیولوا یور دیاب نیا دنک زکرمت ،دننکیم راک تیلولعم و یکاپ:  ؛ناتسناغفا رد نیلولعم یارب هدامآ تامدخ عاونا مامت یتاعلاطا کناب کی داجیا  ؛نیام ناینابرق لومش ھب تیلولعم یاراد دارفا یعامتجا و یداصتقا تیعضو میھفت دشر  زا رثأتم تسدرود قطانم رد موادم یحص تامدخ و یرارطضا یامنھر داجیا؛گنج نارود هرجفنم داوم و نیام  تایلاو رد یکیزف یسرتسد فاشکنا/؛ھماع یاھاج رد اصوصخم تیلولعم یاراد دارفا قطانمً  و یلکسم ھیبرت زکارم ،کچوک ھضرق یاھ کناب لومش ھب تیلولعم یاراد دارفا ددجم رارقتسا تامدخ یامنھر داجیا ؛یبایراک تامدخ  و رھ رد هدننک گنھآمھ کی مادختسا ترازو ،نیلولعم و ادھش ،یعامتجا روما و راک ترازو ،دننام ھطوبرم ھناخ تراز ؛ھجراخ ترازو و ھماع تحص  لاس زا دعب یارب صخشم لمع نلاپ کی فاشکنا و ناینابرق ھب کمک یلعف دصاقم دیدمت ای و دیدج دصاقم فاشکنا2009 سنارفنک رد ار دصاقم نیمھ ناتسناغفا ھکنیا زا ندش نییمطم و ربماون رد یناث رورم2009؛دنکیم میدقت  نیمأتمھس لماک یبایزرا و ،قیبطت ،فاشکنا لومش ھب ناینابرق ھب کمک یاھ ھمانرب رد ھطوبرم یندم یاھداھن و ناینابرق ؛ناینابرق ھب کمک یارب اھ نلاپ و دصاقم دیریگب سامت ھبحاصم و دیزم تامولعم یارب:
ینیما نامیلس ینیمز نیام دض یللملا نیب نیپماک رتفد)ICBL( 0093 799 31 62 53 +41 76 267 84 90 میال: afghan.lso@gmail.com firoz@icbl.org
ماقرا و ھنیمز سپ نیام عنم هدھاعم لاس رد1997 لاس رد و ذاختا 1999– مسق مھ هدھاعم ھب رظن –یاھ تموکح یعاسم کیرشت رثا زا و نیب کین دندرکیم کرتشم راک ناسنا یاضعا و ناج ظفح یارب ھک یندم ھعماجدمآرد ارجا ھب رت دوز . زونھ ینیمز یاھ نیام70 و روشک 6 دنکیم دیدھت ار ورملق .80 % ناھج یاھ روشک)156روشک (دنا هدرک ذخا ار ینیمز نیام عنم هدھاعم تیوضع . ھب روشک ون و یس دنمتردق یاھروشک لومشدنا ھتفرگن تیوضع زونھ ات اکیرما هدحتم تلاایا و ھیسور ،نیچ دننام ناھج .26 نویسیمک و روشک غلبم ییاپورا430یکاپ نیام ھمانرب ھب ار رلاد نویلیم لاس 2007تسا هدرک ادھا . لاس ماقرا ھب رظن نیا2006 ،45 رلاد نویلیم رد ناھج یکاپ نیام ھمانربتسا ھتشاد شھاک . تیفلکملماش نیام عنم هدھاعم یاھ :  نانچمھ و ،ینیمز یاھ نیام تراجت و هریخذ ،دیلوت ،هدافتسا میرحتاب یراکمھ اھ تیلاعف نیا رد ھک نیریاس قیوشت ای و ؛دنا فورصم  دض یاھ نیام ریاخذ مامت بیرخت ھب مازلالنوسرپ؛تیوضع ذخا دعب لاس راھچ فرظ رد  هدولآ قطانم مامت یزاسکاپ ھب مازلا لنوسرپ دض یاھ نیام اب تموکح هرادا تحت فرظ رد نآ بیرخت و10 زا دعب لاس ؛تیوضع ذخا  یھاگآ یاھ ھمانرب یارب و نیام ناینابرق یداصتقا و یعامتجا ددجم رارقتسا و ،ددجم ییایحا و رامیت یارب تامدخ ھیھت ؛نیام زا یھد رد یتاعوبطم لفاحم و نیپماک 1 چرام 2009یذ یاھ روشک رد ددرگیم رازگرب ل: تیروھمج ،ایبمولوک ،اداناک ،ایدوبماک ،لیزارب ،انیوگزرھ و اینسوب ،میجلب ،سورلاب ،ناجیابرذآ ،ایلرتسآ ،انیتنجرا ،لاوگنا ،ناتسناغفا ،ووساک ،اینک ،ناپاج ،قارع ،ایزیودنا ،ناتسودنھ ،لاامیتوگ ،نانوی ،ناملآ ،ناتسجرگ ،ھسنارف ،ایپوتیا ،وگناک کیتارکومد ،نانبل ،سیوس ،نادوس ،ایناپسھ ،اقیرفآ بونج ،ایلاموس ،ینول هریس ،لاگینس ،دنلوپ ،نیپیلف ،ناتسکاپ ،ایرجیان ،اوگاراکین ،لاپین ،ایلوگنم ایبمز ،نمیی ،یبرغ اراھس ،اوگوروا ،اکیرما هدحتم تلاایا ،ایناتیرب ،ادنگا ،ھیکرت ،دنلیات ،ناتسکجات ،ھیروس.

org.icbl.www دض یللملا نیب نیپماکنیام :
ینیمز نیام شرازگ :
lm/org.icbl.www
نیام زا رثأتم یاھ ناغفا ھسسوم :org.afghanlandminesurvivors.www

سردآ: هرامش کرس12 ربمن ھناخ ،11ناتسناغفا لباک الله حتف ھعلق ،بلاغ الله دسا دجسم ھپوک و ابیرا نترآ نیب ،. سامت هرامش :53 62 31 799 0093 لمیا :afghan.lso@gmail.com



Thank you to the Afghan Landmine Survivors’ Organization for disseminating this announcement. Any flaws in the Darsi version of this release can likely be blamed on my clumsy attempt to copy/paste it from PDF into this blog.

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FUNDS For Humanitarian Programs Helping People Affected by Slavery

Posted on 23 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Funding, Health, Human Rights, Opportunities, Slavery & Trafficking, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Subject: Call for application: Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery; Appel à candidature: Fonds de contributions volontaires sur les formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

English; French

[Note to We Can Do readers: Organizations serving people with disabilities who have been affected by human trafficking, sexual slavery, child labor, forced marriage, or other forms of contemporary slavery may wish to consider this opportunity to devise an appropriate project targeted at, or incorporating, their needs. This fund is not specifically devised for people with disabilities, but grant seekers could argue for their need.]

Dear colleagues,

The United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery allocates project grants (for a maximum of 15 000 USD), for programmes of humanitarian, legal and financial assistance to individuals whose human rights have been severely violated as a result of contemporary forms of slavery.

Contemporary forms of slavery include trafficking, sexual slavery, child labour and child servitude, debt bondage, serfdom and forced labour, forced marriage and sale of wives ect.

Projects undertaken with previous Trust Fund grants include medical and psychological aid, food, shelter, and vocational training to victims of trafficking for sexual and economic exploitation; support to rehabilitation centres for sexually and physically abused street children and a project to identify and release bonded labourers in the carpet industry and stone quarries. Other projects have provided victims with the means to generate sustainable sources of income, such as sewing machines, hairdressing equipment, or farming tools.

Please consult the official web site to download the application form in English, French, or Spanish. Application forms should be duly completed and submitted by 31 March 2009.

If you need more information on the Fund, you can consult the website of the OHCHR: http://www2.ohchr.org/English/about/funds/slavery/index.htm.
You can also contact the OHCHR at MClerc@ohchr.org.

You are more than welcome to disseminate this message to oganisations working with victims of comtemporary forms of slavery.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French

*********************************************************************************************

Chers collègues,

Le Fond de contributions volontaires des Nations Unies pour la lutte contre les formes contemporaines d’esclavage octroi des subventions (pour un maximum de 15 000 dollars des Etats-Unis) aux projets fournissant une aide humanitaire, juridique et financière aux personnes dont les droits de l’homme ont été gravement violés par des formes contemporaines d’esclavage. Les formes contemporaines d’esclavage sont le trafic d’êtres humains, l’esclavage sexuel, le travail des enfants et la servitude des enfants, la servitude pour dettes, le servage, le travail forcé, les marriages forcés et la vente d’épouses ect.

Veuillez trouver ci-dessous le formulaire de demande de subvention en anglais, francais et espagnol. Les formulaires de demande doivent être complétés et soumis avant le 31 Mars 2009. Les projets financés par le passé grâce aux subventions du Fonds, ont pas exemple, permis aux victimes de la traite des êtres humains à des fins sexuelles et commerciales, d’obtenir de l’aide relative aux soins médicaux et psychologiques, à la nourriture, au logement et à la formation professionnelle. Ils ont permis aux enfants des rues abusés sexuellement et physiquement de bénéficier de soutien dans des centres de réhabilitation. Ils ont également permis d’apporter de l’aide à l’identification et à la libération des travailleurs en servitude pour dettes employés à la fabrication des tapis et dans les carrières de pierre. D’autres projets ont permis aux victimes d’obtenir les moyens de générer des sources de revenus durables comme l’achat de machines à coudre, équipements de coiffure et des outils agricoles.

Si vous avez besoin de plus d’information sur le Fond, vous pouvez consulter le site internet du HCDH: http://www2.ohchr.org/french/about/funds/slavery/index.htm Vous pouvez aussi nous contacter en répondant à MClerc@ohchr.org.

N’hésitez pas à diffuser ce message aux organisations travaillants avec les victimes des formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserver.

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JOB POST: CBR Officer, Dadaab Refugee Camp, Garissa, Kenya

Posted on 19 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Assistive Devices, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

*_VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT_*

*_Position_** : CBR Officer ( Prosthesis & Orthotic) _Responsible to _: CBR Coordinator*

*_Location_** : Dadaab Refugee Camp (Garissa) _Family Status_ : Non Family duty Station*

*_Closing Date_** : Open *

*_THE ORGANIZATION_*

HI began its operations in 1992 as an emergency support programme in Garissa (North Eastern Province). Currently, HI is operating a medical referral project for refugees in this region in partnership with the UNHCR. HIV and AIDS activities are also being provided for the local community.

In 1994, HI launched another emergency support programme for internal displaced persons (IDPs) following inter-ethnic clashes, in Trans Nzoia District (Kitale town). Today, we are running in Kitale the most comprehensive HI Programme on HIV and AIDS in Kenya.

In 2002, in Nairobi we began disability activities with local partners (community-based organisations) focusing on support to networking, inclusive education and access to resources.

In April 2005, we have started a Mine Risk Education (MRE) project for the refugees living in the Kakuma Refugee Camp (near the Sudan border).

*_Rehabilitation project in Dadaab refugee camp:_*

Dadaab Refugee Camps, located in Garissa district, are the main settlement for Somali refugees, with a total population of 170,000 refugees, with a recent new influx^^[1] ^ due to the latest political events and severe drought in the southern parts of Somalia. To date some basic services have been developed to meet the refugees with disability needs. UNHCR, CARE International and other implementing partners working in Dadaab refugee camps raised a concern about the critical situation of the refugees with disability and scarce services provided to them. Therefore, UNHCR solicited Handicap International to support and contribute to develop initiatives towards disabled refugees in Dadaab camps.

An assessment carried out by HI from in February 2007 defined HI intervention with focus in two main areas:

(i) */To develop access to adequate rehabilitation services for persons with disability/*, with particular attention to be paid to technical aids and prosthetic production and rehabilitation and counselling services for children with intellectual disability and/or cerebral palsy; and

(ii) */To facilitate access to humanitarian aid and community development for persons with disability/*, through information sharing, counselling and sensitization of staff and agencies in charge of food distribution, sheltering, health, watsan and construction works, education, community development services and livelihood, etc.

The Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) Project Team will consist of 1 x Project Manager, 1 x CBR Coordinator , 1 x Mainstreaming Officer, 3 x CBR Officers (with technical expertise in differing but complimentary areas), 6 x rehabilitation workers, 6 x technical aids workers (leather work/shoe making and carpentry), and 30 x CBR workers.

* *

*THE POSITION*

Under the responsibility of CBR Coordinator, the CBR Officer (Prosthesis & Orthotic) will offer technical support to the CBR team in ensuring quality production and fitting of prosthetics, esthetics, & other orthopedic devices to persons with disability among refugees and host communities. She/he will also build capacity of the local technicians and rehabilitation staff and take lead in the referrals and follow ups of patients.

*S\he will be responsible for :-*

*1) Supervision and management of mobility aids workshops*

· Supervise operations in all mobility aids workshops present in all the three camps including Dadaab workshop.

· Closely monitor and arrange procurement of equipment and materials as required for workshop – production.

· Provide advice on installation of equipment in the workshops including workshop planning and utilization of workshop consumables

· Ensure P&O workshops’ set up are all up to standards and accepted specifications

· Ensure mobility aids workshops are barrier-free for the easy access to persons with disabilities.

· Ensure all safety measures are observed within the workshops to reduce hazards in the operation of various machinery and equipment.

· Develop proper workshop management systems to ensure effective and efficient P&O workshop management.

· Carry out regular monitoring of workshop activities, technicians’ performance and manufacture of devices.

*2) Capacity Building*

· Identify and provide on-the-job training to local technicians in Prosthetics and Orthotics.

· Develop training curriculum for on-the-job training of local technicians.

· Conduct regular evaluation of the on-job training.

· Provide basic orientation to community CBR workers on the maintenance and repair of devices in the field.

· Train P&O Assistants in Workshop Management and information systems.

*3) Supervision of P&O Assistants*

· Develop job descriptions for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Together with the team, develop weekly work plan for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Carry out induction and appraisal for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Monitor P&O Assistants/Technicians performance and production.

* *

*4) Referrals and Physical rehabilitation*

· Ensure persons with disabilities receive good quality and appropriate prosthetic and orthotic devices and services from the workshops as well as in the field and from Garissa/Kangemi.

· Develop a good and effective patient’s follow up mechanism for patients who are fitted with P&O devices from Garissa general hospital and Kangemi.

· Maintain individual file for each person with disability receiving P&O devices and carry out regular follow up as per the requirement of the particular person.

· Maintain all records pertaining to service delivery.

· Ensure required gait training is provided to the clients after prosthetic and orthotic fitments.

· Ensure that the clients receive rehabilitation therapy as required, e.g. release of contracture and healing of stump edema before fitting devices.

*5) Coordination and networking *

· Maintain necessary coordination with Rehabilitation Therapists.

· Work closely with the Physiotherapist and Occupational therapist for patient treatment, follow-up and evaluation.

· Liaise with Technical Advisors for various technical matters and training programs as necessary.

· Represent the organization at forums, workshops and conferences in the areas of Prosthetics and Orthotics as may be required.

*6) Reporting*

· Produce updated reports at regular intervals as required by the project in terms of donor and organizational requirements.

*7) Others*

· Advice Management on various costs related to P&O materials, equipment, maintenance, training and service delivery.

· Capitalize on new areas of learning in P&O or any specific case histories for internal learning and for external dissemination when required.

*/ /*

*Qualifications and experience required:-*

· Diploma in Orthopaedics with 2 years of experience

· Knowledge of CBR implementation and management

· Ability to work in and lead a team

· Good report writing, presentation, communication and interpersonal skills

· Demonstrated ability to transfer knowledge through informal and formal trainings

· Computer literate with Knowledge of Word, Excel and Internet

· Experience with an International NGO is an added advantage

*Conditions*

Living conditions in Dadaab camp may be challenging (remote area, climate very hot), although facilities are offering minimum of comfort.

R&R leave of 7 days will be provided every 8 weeks of continuous accommodation within Dadaab.

If you feel you are the right candidate for this position, kindly send your application along with an up-to-date CV(including 3 referees) by email to the Human Resources Officer : hrofficer@handicap-international.or.ke

*NB: Applications will be processed as they are received and interviews conducted until the appropriate candidate is selected.*

*The email subject line should be marked: “Application for CBR Officer – Dadaab position”*

* *

*Please do not send your academic certificates and other testimonials they will be requested at a later stage.*

Only short listed candidates will be contacted.

*Handicap International is an Equal Opportunity Employer – Females and Persons with Disability are encouraged to apply ***



This job post was recently distributed on the Intl-Dev mailing list. As with all job posts and other opportunities announced at We Can Do, any applications or inquiries should please be directed to the sponsors, NOT to We Can Do.

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NEWS: BPKS Bangladesh Congratulates Obama, Thanks for Including Disabled

Posted on 10 November 2008. Filed under: News, South Asian Region, Violence | Tags: , , , , |

Congratulation letter to US President-elect Obama from Bangladesh Protibandhi Kallyan Somity (BPKS) Bangladesh Dear all in Disability movement, We disabled peoples from Bangladesh send the congratulation letter to Obama as the Elect president of the USA and mentioned thanks for his acknowledgment of the need for unity between all citizens, including the “disabled and not disabled”. Please see the letter that attached herewith. Sattar from Bangladesh

November 4, 2008
Mr. Barack Obama
President Elect
C/o The Embassy of the United States – Dhaka
Madani Avenue
Baridhara, Dhaka, 1212
Bangladesh

Dear Mr. Obama,

As the Executive Director of Bangladesh Protibandhi Kallyan Somity (BPKSP and President of the National Alliance of Disabled People’s Organisations (NADPO) and on behalf of the membership of Disabled People’s Organizations of Bangladesh, I would like to offer my heartfelt congratulations for your historic success today. You demonstrated enormous determination and integrity throughout the election campaign and I truly wish you every success.

I would also like to thank you for your acknowledgment of the need for unity among all citizens, including the “disabled and not disabled”. This is an important step in the right direction. However, at this crucial juncture, I would also like to take this opportunity to request that you give your very serious consideration to the catastrophic impact of war and conflict on all people, particularly those that are vulnerable, including people with disabilities. I also enjoin you to consider the tragic way in which war creates more people with disabilities, people who will struggle with poverty and face enormous challenges, long after the bombs stop falling.

Finally, I urge you to use your new position as a world leader, for the good of people with disabilities, not just in your great country, the United States of America, but also in those oft “forgotten corners” of the world you referred to in your speech, like Bangladesh, and others, where wars continue to be waged.

With our warmest regards and best wishes from Bangladesh,

Md Abdus Sattar Dulal
Executive Director, BPKS


  • Thank you to Md Abdus Sattar Dulal for agreeing to allow this letter to be posted at We Can Do. This letter is one more contribution in a campaign among people with disabilities and allies around the world to send emails to Obama. These emails are an opportunity to thank him for mentioning people with disabilities in his election night speech and also an opportunity to remind him of the campaign promises he made to people with disabilities. These include a promise to sign the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Read more about the Call To Action, and how you can participate, at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/11/07/disabilities-email-obama/

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    FUNDING: Request for Applications for Wheelchair Programs

    Posted on 10 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Funding, Opportunities, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

    Special Program to Aid the Needs of Survivors (SPANS)
    Grants Solicitation and Management

    http://worldlearning.org/spans.htm

    REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS (RFA) FOR WHEELCHAIR PROGRAMS
    DEADLINE: November 17, 2008, at 1 pm EST

    October 17, 2008 – World Learning announces a solicitation under the USAID funded Grants Solicitation and Management activity. Using funding provided by USAID Bureau of Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance, World Learning anticipates awarding five to seven SPANS/GSM grants under this RFA and that each sub-grant will be for up to $2,000,000 for a three year period(February 2009 – January 2012.) *Applications must be received by November 17, 2008 at 1 PM EST.*

    *Download application here* (PDF format):http://worldlearning.org/WLID_documents/USAID-SPANS_RFA01_Wheelchairs_WL_10-17-08.pdf

    *Download RFA Questions and Answers here* (PDF format): http://worldlearning.org/WLID_documents/faq_spans_wheelchair_rfa20081028.pdf

    The Special Programs to Aid the Needs of Survivors (SPANS) Grants Solicitation and Management (GSM) is an umbrella grant making mechanism which supports service delivery, training and related activities aimed at assisting vulnerable populations. Through a five-year Cooperative Agreement from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), World Learning supports USAID’s goal of improving the health and well being of specific vulnerable populations, including displaced children and orphans, war victims, people with disabilities, and victims of torture.

    On behalf of USAID’s Bureau for Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance, World Learning will award sub-grants in a number of thematic areas such as Displaced Children and Orphan’s Fund (DCOF), Leahy War Victims Fund, People With Disabilities and Wheelchairs Fund, and the Victims of Torture Fund (VWF). World Learning administers the SPANS/GSM grant making process from identifying potential grantees, to soliciting applications, to monitoring project implementation, to close-out.

    Over the course of FY 09, World Learning anticipates issuing three Request for Applications (RFA) on behalf of the Wheelchair Fund, DCOF, and LWVF. All RFAs are determined by USAID.

    For more information on the Grants Solicitation and Management Program, please contact Bill Saur, Program Director, at bill.saur@worldlearning.org



    This notice was recently circulated on the Intl-Dev email mailing list, which can be subscribed to for free.

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    World Vision International Peace Prize NOMINATIONS Sought

    Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Opportunities, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    World Vision International Peace Prize

    [It is my hope that We Can Do readers will consider whether they might know an individual with disabilities, or a disability-oriented organization, that might qualify for the World Vision International Peace Prize. The winning organization will receive $5,000; the winning individual will receive $1,000. The deadline to submit nominations is February 15, 2009. The following text is copy/pasted from the World Vision guidelines for the awards, which can also be downloaded in PDF format. The guidelines are also available in French and in Spanish.]

    Guidelines

    Purpose
    The purpose of the World Vision International Peace Prize is to annually recognize and honor one individual who is a catalyst for peacemaking and one organisation which champions the integration of peacebuilding into relief, development and advocacy programmes.

    Two award recipients shall be named annually under this World Vision International Peace Prize:
    1. Peacebuilding Award – given to an agency or organisation that excels at integrating peacebuilding into relief, development or advocacy activities, and mobilising communities to build a durable peace
    2. Peacemaking Award – given to an individual who has taken risks and excelled in being a catalyst in either bringing conflicted parties together to resolve a conflict or in enabling a peace process that engages peacemakers, mediators and people of moral authority who bring hope that a significant destructive conflict can be resolved.

    The first award focuses on World Vision’s area of greatest expertise in peacebuilding, namely integrating peacebuilding in relief, development and advocacy. Key programmatic themes of World Vision include the role of children, youth and women in building peace.

    The second award focuses on World Vision’s secondary area of focus, making a significant contribution to community-based peacemaking, serving as a catalyst and building bridges so that other organisations and individuals can assist in resolving destructive conflicts that put all development at risk.

    Description of award
    The World Vision International Peace Prize is given annually in honor and memory of Steve Williams (1951-2007), World Vision UK Senior Policy Advisor on Peace and Conflict. Steve brought vast experience in peacebuilding, conflict analysis and policy analysis to World Vision UK, and served as the Co-convener of PaxNet, the World Vision global peacebuilding network.

    He distinguished himself not only within World Vision but within the peace community around the world as one who integrated his conflict analysis and policy work, was committed in his personal, family and work life to work for peace and reconciliation, strongly supported programmes of Children as Peacebuilders, and was a great advocate for peace with justice.

    It is in this spirit that the World Vision International Peace Prize was established to honor his life, his work and his memory. The awardees each year may be little known to the public but each will serve as profound examples of peacemaking and peacebuilding in a world of conflict.

    Nomination and selection process principles

    Eligibility

    Organisations and individuals that are external or internal to World Vision International may be nominated with equal consideration. Local community-based organisations as well as global humanitarian and development organisations are eligible for nomination.

    Qualifications
    The Awards Committee will give particular attention and consideration to nominees who mobilise children, youth and women in peacebuilding. A nomination will be strongest when the organisations or individuals demonstrate that their work and programme is built on careful context and conflict analysis, and produces credible policy and advocacy influence that contributes toward peace.

    Monetary Prize and Trophy
    Each organisation and individual who is awarded the World Vision International Peace Prize will receive both a monetary award ($5,000 for an organisation and $1,000 for an individual) and a physical trophy with the award designation.

    Use of the award
    The monetary award is to be used at the sole discretion of the awardees to further the work of the individual or the organisation in their continued role in peacemaking and peacebuilding.

    Procedures for nomination
    Nominees may come either from within or from outside World Vision. Self-nominations are accepted. The World Vision International Peace Prize Nomination Form can be found online at www.wvi.org/peaceprize. It should be completed in full and sent by email to: wvi_peaceprize@wvi.org by the final day for submission: February 15, 2009.

    Selection process
    The World Vision International Director of Peacebuilding and the Peacebuilding Unit will initially review all applications to determine which ones meet the criteria and are the strongest candidates. A vetting process will assess the nominations and develop a preliminary list of finalists. The entries from those finalists will be posted online for one month, allowing the global peacebuilding community to view, vet and rank the nominees. A short list of nominees for each prize will then be submitted to an International Peace Prize Awards Committee which will review the nominations and select the winner in each category. Decisions of the Committee will be final.

    Peace Prize deadlines
    September 21, 2008 International Day of Peace: Announcement and Solicitation of Nominations
    February 15, 2009 Final Day for Submission of Nominations
    June 30, 2009 Awardees informed privately of their selection
    September 21, 2009 Announcement of Prize recipients, presentations and call for nominees for 2010 competition

    Award presentation
    Awards will be presented by the World Vision International President or designee on the International Day of Peace, September 21, 2009.

    To find out more about World Vision’s Peacebuilding work and team, go to www.wvi.org/peaceprize.

    [We Can Do readers should please note that the official web site for the World Vision International Peace Prize is at

    http://www.wvi.org/wvi/wviweb.nsf/maindocs/AC6E33C8CE519993882574C50060CD3E?opendocument

    People interested in learning more about the World Vision Peace Prize should please follow the link to their web site. Nomination forms can be downloaded at their web site in English, Spanish, or French. Any questions about the prize that are not adequately addressed by the World Vision Peace Prize website should please be directed to wvi_peaceprize@wvi.org, NOT to We Can Do.]



    I learned about this prize via the Disabled Peoples’ International email newsletter.

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    NEWS: Tanzanians with Albinism Regularly Murdered

    Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Blind, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , |

    In some countries, it is believed that people with albinism have magical powers. This can sometimes lead to the murder of people with albinism so that their body parts can be sold to witch doctors for use in their potions.

    Albinism is a condition that causes lack of pigmentation (coloration) in the hair, skin, and eyes; most people with albinism have some degree of vision impairment, and many are legally blind.

    Read more about a series of murders committed against people with albinism in Tanzania–and what is being done to stop them–at http://www.underthesamesun.com/home.php

    People may sign a petition protesting these murders at http://tinyurl.com/4wk5za



    I learned about this story, and the petition, via the Disabled Peoples’ International email newsletter.

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    RESOURCE: Refugees with Disabilities: Facts and Solutions

    Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Inclusion, Resources, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    What population in the world is the most excluded, marginalized, or simply forgotten? Many readers of this blog probably would immediately say, “people with disabilities.” But if you were to talk with someone who is a refugee from war, or someone who works with them, they might immediately say, “refugees.” So who is right? I suspect probably both. So what then of refugees with disabilities–forgotten both by people in the wider disability community and by people who work with refugees? Even this blog, in more than 300 posts, has only barely mentioned them before.

    The Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children in June 2008 released two publications highly relevant to this community. The first is a report, Disabilities Among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations (PDF format, 1.81 Mb, 76 pages), that provides an overview of the situation facing disabled refugees. The second publication is meant to give workers some guidance in how they can ensure that refugees with disabilities are fully included in their programs: Disabilities Among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations: Resource Kit for Fieldworkers (PDF format, 328 Kb, 32 pages).

    The report estimates that there are about 2.5 to 3.5 million refugees with disabilities around the world–enough, I would point out, to fill a small country. Not surprisingly, the report finds enormous challenges: shelters, food and water distribution centers, latrines, schools, health centers, and other vital services are often inaccessible. Refugees with disabilities are sometimes actively excluded from vocational training programs. Or, if they’re not intentially denied the right to participate, then they are often inherently excluded by the lack of appropriate accommodations.

    Refugees dispersed in urban centers, away from refugee camps, often are even worse off. In concentrated refugee populations, at least it becomes easier to identify people with disabilities and thus to tailor services for them. But refugees living in the community, because they may be undocumented, are reluctant to identify themselves to receive services, whether or not they have disabilities. Furthermore, refugees with disabilities in urban settings are often ignored both by services for refugees generally and also by local Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs): in short, they often are being served by no one.

    The good news is, some services do exist, including efforts to provide education to children with disabilities at least in refugee settlements. In some locations, refugees with disabilities and their families have organized their own self-help groups.

    The accompanying resource kit is targeted at United Nations, nongovernmental organization (NGOs), and Disabled persons’ organization field staff who work with refugees, asylum seekers, and internationally displaced people with disabilities. Readers can consult this kit for ideas on improving services and protection for people with disabilities so they can participate more fully in their communities. If you’re looking for concrete, prescriptive guidelines and checklists, you won’t find that here. What you will find are questions that planners and decision makers should know the answers to, or find the solutions for. These offer broad guidelines as to the kinds of problem areas they should be on the look out for, with suggestions for how to address them.

    At first glance, it seems an excellent start–with plenty of room for improvement. The Women’s Commission seems to be highly conscious of this: the introduction indicates they hope to build upon this publication in the future with input from, among others, DPOs and displaced people with disabilities themselves.

    Download the report (PDF format, 1.81 Mb) at:

    http://www.womenscommission.org/pdf/disab_fulll_report.pdf

    Download the resource kit for fieldworkers (PDF format, 328 Kb), at:

    http://www.womenscommission.org/pdf/disab_res_kit.pdf



    We Can Do found this resource via the Disabled People International electronic newsletter and also during the course of assembling resources to go up on the Resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website. (The latter is still being constructed, but check back in late August or early September.)

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    We Can Do Copyright
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    Disabled Girls in the Classroom: Finding What We Don’t Know

    Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Reports, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

    A report entitled Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) discusses what we don’t know about girls with disabilities in relation to education, and what ought to be done about it.

    Readers familiar with gender issues within education know that, in many countries, girls are still more likely to drop out of school–if they ever attend at all. They may be needed at home to fetch the water; they may be afraid of being sexually assaulted on the way to school; or they may be embarrassed about managing their menustration at schools where there is no separate bathroom for girls–or perhaps no bathrooms at all.

    Regular We Can Do readers and others familiar with the education field may also recall that about 77 million primary school-aged children today are not enrolled in school–and about one-third of them have disabilities. Schools are reluctant to enroll disabled students; parents may fear subjecting children with disabilities to bullying from the community and thus keep them at home; or decision makers may simply assume that disabled students either cannot learn or would be unable to use their educational degree later on because “no one wants to hire disabled workers.”

    But what of girls with disabilities? Being a double minority does tend to come with a triple whammy. Disabled girls are excluded because they have disabilities; they are excluded because they are girls; and then they are excluded yet again when programs might target girls without including disabled girls, or when programs might target children with disabilities without considering the impact of gender.

    This would seem to imply that girls with disabilities may face a unique set of barriers when pursuing an education–barriers that neither non-disabled girls nor disabled boys need to consider. If a unique set of barriers, then surely a unique set of solutions would also be needed to ensure that the push to put the last 77 million children into school does not leave behind girls with disabilities. But, how can we tackle these barriers if we don’t have a clear picture of what they are?

    The 35-page paper, Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb), is an attempt to pull together what is known about girls in education with what is known about disability in education, coupled with anecdotcal information about how girls with disabilities are affected differently. It provides recommendations for areas researchers should be focusing on and gives a few ideas for things that can help.

    This paper was published in 2003. But, unfortunately, I doubt it is significantly dated. I don’t pretend to be intensively familiar with the literature on education among students with disabilities internationally. But a quick skim through a more recent report on disability in education, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), suggests that advancements since 2003 have been far from dramatic.

    Perhaps one of the most important purposes of Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) is to help remind gender specialists that girls with disabilities are first and foremost, girls–but will be inherently excluded if not consciously targeted. For We Can Do readers already working on disability issues in education, another purpose is to remind that barriers excluding women and girls from full participation in society impact disabled girls and women just as much–if not more so.

    If issues impacting girls with disabilities interests you, then you might also be interested in some of the following We Can Do posts:

    Equalizing Educational Opportunity for the Nigerian-Ghanaian Blind Girl Child
    Violence Against Blind/VI Girls in Malawi
    Report on Violence Against Disabled Children (which I include in this list because violence against girls is often cited as a reason why some girls quit school)
    Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children
    Report on Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities (the referenced report includes brief references throughout to girls, including in the context of education)
    Online discussion of inclusive education in Eastern Africa

    Advocates working to promote more educational opportunities for girls with disabilities also may wish to consult, and cite, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), with particular attention to Article 6 (Women with Disabilities); Article 7 (Children with Disabilities); and Article 24 (Education).



    I found this report by browsing the AskSource.info database.

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    This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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    CALL FOR PAPERS: Child Injuries, Violence, Disability

    Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Cross-Disability, Health, Opportunities, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , |

    Dear colleagues,

    The World Health Organization Bulletin will publish a special issue on
    Child Injuries, Violence and Disability in May 2009.

    A call has gone out for related articles, see
    http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/media/news/whobulletin/en/index.html

    Authors are encouraged to submit papers by 1 September 2008.

    Please forward this call to groups or individuals that you think may be interested.

    Thanks
    Alana

    Alana OFFICER
    Coordinator
    Disability and Rehabilitation (DAR)
    Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability
    World Health Organization

    Interested authors should please follow the link to the official webpage on the call the papers in order to obtain all details, including guidelines for authors and instructions on how to submit your papers. We Can Do is unable to answer your inquiries. Thank you.



    This announcement was circulated by Alana Officer at the World Health Organization. I found this announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group.

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    CALL FOR PAPERS: Situation of Persons with Disabilities in Post-War and Post-Conflict Situations

    Posted on 23 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Opportunities, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    ZEITSCHRIFT BEHINDERUNG UND DRITTE WELT
    GERMAN JOURNAL FOR DISABILITY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    [Note:As of September 2008, I have been notified that the deadline for this specific call for papers has already passed. Interested authors, however, may wish to monitor http://www.zbdw.dethe German Journal for Disability and International Development website to learn about their publication and in anticipation of future calls for papers on other topics.]

    Topic:
    Situation of Persons with Disabilities in Post-War and Post-Conflict Situations

    This issue of the journal deals with living conditions and situations of people with disabilities after periods of war and/or conflict. As already stated by UN Special Rapporteur Leandro Despouy in 1993 wars and armed conflicts are causing long-term disabilities in large groups of the population and – at the same time – are situations of high vulnerability for PWD. Since strategies of war as well as weapons have changed over the last decades and differ from conflict to conflict, the situation of PWD afterwards might be disparate but disastrous in any way. The challenges that arise are manifold for PWD as well as aid organisations and governments. In most situations of conflict victims have no legal basis to claim their rights. At the same time they have to cope with insufficient rehabilitation services. With this issue, the German Journal for Disability and International Development wants to raise a topic that is not often heard but reality for many people. It will ask about:

    • traumatisation of large parts of population
    • legal rights of victims of wars/conflicts and compensation
    • availability of and access to rehabilitation services
    • specific challenges for PWD and war veterans concerning resettlement and generating income
    • the problem of unfair distribution of aids between war veterans and disabled civilians
    • changes in perceptions of disability through conflict and war

    Suggestions for contributions:

    • Introductory article
    • Articles reflecting and analysing the situation in specific countries
    • Impact studies/Surveys/Case Studies/Reviews
    • Reports from best practice projects
    • Autobiographical reports
    • And others

    Contact:
    Gabriele Weigt – gabi.weigt@t-online.de
    Doris Graeber – doris.graeber@arcor.de

    About us:
    The Journal for Disability and International Development is published by the Forum Disability and International Development. Since 1990 it is published three times a year. The target groups of the journal are scientists, professionals and interested people from all over the world.

    It aims to be a forum for an international exchange about the topic. Beside this it creates professional discussions on educational, social, developmental and intercultural issues in the context of disability and development. Each issue of the journal has a leading topic consisting of diverse articles.

    The editors and the advisory board try to win experts from all continents to contribute to the journal. The journal is published in German and English and available in a printed and online version http://www.zbdw.de

    Information for authors can be downloaded in RTF format (26 Kb) at: http://zbdw.de/projekt01/media/zbdw_author_info_engl.rtf



    We Can Do first learned about this call for papers when it was circulated on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv. People interested in submitting articles or in making inquiries should contact the German Journal for Disability and Development directly, not We Can Do. Please follow the relevant links or email contacts in the announcement above.

    Subscribe to We Can Do
    Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

    Other Resources at We Can Do
    Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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    REPORT: Violence Against Disabled Children

    Posted on 8 March 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Reports, Resources, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    UNICEF has released a summary report entitled, “Violence Against Disabled Children” (PDF format 245 Kb), with the subtitle “UN Secretary Generals Report on Violence against Children, Thematic Group on Violence against Disabled Children, Findings and Recommendations.”

    The first half of this report, released in July 2005, summarizes what is known about violence toward children with disabilities at home, in schools, in institutions, in the criminal justice system, within the broader community, and at work (in child labor situations). Children with disabilities are known to be at higher risk for abuse, partly because they may be perceived as “easy victims.” Also, abuse toward disabled children is less likely to be investigated or persecuted, which means abusers know it is easier to escape consequences even if the abuse is discovered.

    Many children, with or without disabilities, may face adults who fail to listen or to believe them when they try to report abuse. But children with disabilities face additional barriers. As one example, some adults may mistakenly assume that a child with intellectual disabilities or psycho-social disabilities must surely be “confused,” or unable to tell right from wrong, or unable to make their own decisions about what is done to their bodies.

    Disabled children may also be targeted for child murder, either because parents perceive them as bringing shame to the family or because adults may be convinced they will be “better off” dead than disabled. In countries where many men share the belief that sex with a virgin will “cleanse” them of HIV/AIDS, girls, boys, and adults with disabilities may be targeted for rape on the assumption that they do not have sex. Children with disabilities also may be forcibly sterilized, sometimes as early as the age of 8 or 9.

    The report makes a series of 13 recommendations for families, communities, policy makers, governments, advocates, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) or Civil Society Organizations, United Nations agencies, and other stakeholders with an interest in preventing violence toward disabled children. These recommendations include, as a few examples: increasing public awareness; reforming legislation so that the laws can better protect children with disabilities; advocating change to improve inclusion of disabled people throughout society; improving reporting mechanisms so that people who become aware of abuse have a way to report it; closing down institutions and integrating disabled children into the community; but also improving government oversight of institutions for as long as they continue to exist.

    The 33-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (245 Kb) at:

    http://www.unicef.org/videoaudio/PDFs/UNICEF_Violence_Against_Disabled_Children_Report_Distributed_Version.pdf

    People interested in the topic of violence against children may also wish to read an article on violence and disabled children in the 2003 issue of the joint Rehabilitation International and UNICEF newsletter, One in Ten:

    http://riglobal.org/publications2/10_24.htm

    Also of possible interest:

    A recent report, Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities could give ideas to advocates and families for how they can use international human rights laws to protect the rights of children with disabilities.

    Learn about a report on human rights abuses of disabled children and adults in Serbia, including the use of violence.

    Read a paper on Violence Against Blind and Visually Impaired Girls in Malawi

    Those interested in abuse and human rights violations in institutional settings may also wish to read the following first-hand accounts written by the same author, Amanda Baggs. These are well worth reading. Some talk about the more obvious kinds of violence that most people are used to thinking of as “abuse.” Some talk about forms of psychological manipulation that are so subtle that outside observers might miss them. But Amanda Baggs makes powerful arguments for why “outposts in our head,” or the uses of power nevertheless can be at least as important for anyone who cares about the well-being of children (and adults) with disabilities. Click on any title below to see Amanda Bagg’s post:

    Why It’s So Hard to Write Directly About My Life
    Outposts in Our Heads: The Intangible Horrors of Institutions that Must Not Be Forgotten
    The Meaning of Power
    Extreme Measures, and Then Some



    We Can Do learned about the UNICEF report on violence against disabled children from the AskSource.info database. Asksource.info provides a library of information, resources, and toolkits related to people with disabilities and to health issues, particularly in developing countries.



    Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



    Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



    This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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    PUBLICATION: Human Rights Africa Newsletter

    Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Media & Journalism, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Readers interested in human rights issues affecting Africans with disabilities can catch up with past issues of the newsletter Human Rights Africa. Issues are available in both English and French, and in both Word format and PDF format. This publication from the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities was published four times in 2006 and two times in 2007.

    All past issues may be worth browsing for people with a special interest in disabled Africans. But readers may particularly want to note the following (this is NOT a comprehensive list of articles):

    The first issue of 2006 has an article that lists five challenges and seven opportunities for the Secretariat of the African Decade on Persons with Disabilities.

    The second issue of 2006 focuses on HIV/AIDS among people with disabilties. This includes a story about how genocide helped spread HIV in Rwanda, and a story about efforts to prevent HIV/AIDS among women in Ethiopia. There is also a story about a new African Network of Women with Disabilities that is meant to help regional and national organizations share experiences in improving the lives of disabled women. Also see the article on how you can help influence development projects in your area so they will better include poor people with disabilities.

    The third issue of 2006 has an article that lists practical tips for how you can approach journalists and persuade them to cover issues that matter to the disability community in your country. Another article discusses how sports can be used to help meet the Millennium Development Goals.

    The fourth issue of 2006 has many articles about war and conflict in Africa with a focus on disability issues. Also see the article on how you can become involved in helping your country develop a Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) that is inclusive of people with disabilties.

    The first issue of 2007 provides more information about the campaign against HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities in Africa and an article about violence against women.

    The second issue of 2007 contains articles on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; a new African Federation of the Deafblind; and
    lessons learned from lobbying in Uganda.

    You can download copies of Human Rights Africa for free at:

    http://www.africandecade.org/humanrightsafrica



    We Can Do first learned about this newsletter after reading the Disabled People International (DPI) newsletter and exploring the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities.

    A modified version of this article has now been posted at RatifyNow with permission of author.



    Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



    Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

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    CALL FOR PAPERS: Human Security, Social Cohesion and Disability

    Posted on 29 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Human Rights, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, technology, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Call for Papers – Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal (www.rds.hawaii.edu)

    Human Security, Social Cohesion and Disability

    Guest Editors: Gregor Wolbring, Program in Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, Dept of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary;

    Anita Ghai, Department of Psychology Jesus and Mary College, New Delhi;

    Kirk Allison, Program in Human Rights and Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota;

    Human security and social cohesion are two central requisites for the medical and social well being of disabled people. Science and technology (S&T) advances often seen as essential for disabled people also impact on human security and on social cohesion. Human security according to the Commission on Human Security is concerned with safeguarding and expanding people’s vital freedoms. It requires both shielding people from acute threats and empowering people to take charge of their own lives. The Commission identified economic security, food security, health security, environmental security, personal security, community security, political security, freedom from fear, and freedom from want as primary concerns.

    Social cohesion in very general terms means: All that which brings people together (European New Towns Platform). In Canada the following description is in use: “Social cohesion is the ongoing process of developing a community of shared values, shared challenges and equal opportunity within Canada, based on a sense of trust, hope and reciprocity among all Canadians.” (Jeannotte and Sharon, 2001). This has also been articulated complementarily in terms of social capital which has been defined among others as “features of social organization such as networks, norms, and social trust that facilitate coordination and cooperation for mutual benefit” (Putnam 1995).

    More about the concepts can be found in the below references:

  • Gregor Wolbring (2006). Human Security and NBICS http://www.innovationwatch.com/choiceisyours/choiceisyours.2006.12.30.htm
  • Gregor Wolbring (2007). NBICS and Social Cohesion http://www.innovationwatch.com/choiceisyours/choiceisyours-2007-01-15.htm
  • Caroline Beauvais and Jane Jenson.(2002) Social Cohesion: Updating the State of Research. Canadian Policy, Research Networks, Canadian Heritage, Ottawa. http://www.cprn.com/doc.cfm?doc=167&l=en
  • European New Towns Platform. (2005). “The Top 8 Specific Challenges for Social Cohesion in New Towns.” http://www.newtowns.net/themes
  • Definitions of Social Capital http://www.analytictech.com/networks/definitions_of_social_capital.htm
  • Social Captial Initiative, Working Paper 1, 1998, http://go.worldbank.org/W8FMEK6FR0
  • We are honored that the theme for an issue of The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal will be human security, social cohesion and disability. This topic is chosen because the discourse around human security and social cohesion is of central importance for disability studies and for the well-being of persons with disabilities. At the same time discourses in disability studies can crucially clarify and test the discourses of human security and social cohesion.

    Thus, we urge potential contributors, regardless of their fields of training, to articulate their ideas about human security, social cohesion and disability. We especially encourage contributors to envision:

    • Future threats to human security and social cohesion including threats linked to new and emerging sciences and technologies processes and products and their impact on disabled people.
    • How disability studies discourses have generated tools and will continue to generate tools which can be used to minimize future threats to social cohesion and human security.
    • Other possible prevention strategies and fixes to possible future threat to human security and social cohesion.

    We encourage the submission of empirical case studies and theoretical models and we especially encourage contributions which cover the topic from a low income country background.

    Potential contributors to this Special Issue might consider:

    1. What is the “disability,” the discrimination angle of human security and social cohesion?
    2. What is the body image angle of human security and social cohesion?
    3. What is the importance of the disability studies angle on human security and social cohesion for other marginalized groups, for the marginalized majority of the world?
    4. What are potential future threats to human security and social cohesion and what would the impact be on disabled people?
    5. What are the cultural angles of human security and social cohesion?
    6. What is the role and potential of law?
    7. What empirical evidence and theoretical models illuminate the processes and effects?
    8. What is the impact of emerging social concepts such as transhumanism, which is?
    9. What is the impact of new and emerging sciences and technologies?
    10. What role does or could disability studies be playing in the interaction between new and emerging sciences and technologies and human security and social cohesion?
    11. How do or do not the human security and social cohesion discourses serve the needs of disabled people?
    12. What are the connections between human security and violent conflict?
    13. What are the relationships between development and poverty reduction, human security, and the prevention of violent conflict?
    14. What is the impact of natural disasters on those with disabilities in terms of security and cohesion
    15. How can social capital be discussed in context of disabled people, human security and social cohesion?

    Send via email 250-word abstracts, by March 31st, 2008 to Guest Editors Gregor Wolbring gwolbrin@ucalgary.ca ; Anita Ghai anita.satyapal@gmail.com and Kirk Allison alli0001@umn.edu. Please be sure to send abstracts to all editors. For those abstracts that are selected, we will request completed articles of approximately 3000-5000 words two months after the note of invitation to submit a full article was sent. Note that an invitation to submit an article based on an abstract does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

    For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



    We Can Do received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) email distribution list, which can be joined for free.

    The Review of Disability Studies journal has been featured before at We Can Do: see an earlier, more generic call for papers at RDS, or see a listing of previous RDS articles relevant to people with disabilities in developing countries, with abstracts.

    Check for other calls for papers.



    Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

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    We Can Do Retrospective: The First 100 Posts (and Then Some)

    Posted on 22 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Arts, autism, Blind, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Commonwealth Nations, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Deaf, Democratic Participation, Disability Studies, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, East Asia and Central Asia, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Events and Conferences, Families, Fellowships & Scholarships, Funding, Guest Blogger, Health, HIV/AIDS, Housing, Human Rights, Immigration, Inclusion, Interpreting, Introduction to "We Can Do", Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation, Remittances, Reports, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Violence, Volunteer Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Skip introduction, go straight to the Table of Contents

    If you’re new to We Can Do, what interesting information, news, or resources might you have overlooked from the past few months? Although some older items may no longer be interesting, others may still be relevant and helpful a year or three from now. This post can help guide you through the first 100-plus posts at this blog. You can click from the table of contents below to any section of this page that interests you–and then another click on “table of contents” can take you back to the contents, or “top of this page” takes you back to this introduction.

    Top of this page


    Table of Contents

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    About We Can Do

    To learn more about the purpose of We Can Do, see About We Can Do. For more on its guiding philosophy, go to Why We Can Do.

    Thinking about submitting your own written materials, job posts, conference announcements, or resources to We Can Do? Check the Wish list for written materials and resources.

    Want to receive an alert in email when a new post goes up at We Can Do? You can Subscribe to We Can Do for free.

    I changed the organization and appearance of We Can Do in early October to its present format.

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    The Five Most Popular We Can Do posts

    The five listed here are the ones that have attracted the most “page views” since We Can Do began in late July. You may notice that not all of these are featured in the 10 “most popular posts” listed in the right-hand navigation bar. That’s because the navigation bar only lists posts that have received a lot of traffic very recently (I think within the past few days; its done automatically by wordpress so I’m not sure how it works). But here I’m listing the five that have the highest TOTAL page views.

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    The Five Most Under-Rated We Can Do posts

    Are these posts really under-rated? You’ll have to read them and decide for yourself. But in choosing these five, I used two criteria: 1. These are posts that have received fewer than 100 visitors–sometimes far fewer. 2. These are posts that I think could be helpful or interesting to readers and maybe deserve more attention than they have gotten. These are in no particular order:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Finding Practical Resources and Case Studies or Helpful Organizations

    Finding organizations; Resources for inclusive development; Human rights resources; Case studies; Other helpful resources

    Finding organizations
    Mainstream international development agencies sometimes say that they don’t know how to find people with disabilities, or their representative organizations, in the developing countries where they work. Reviewing the July post entitled Finding Local Disability Organizations may help point you in the right direction. Also see Disability Organizations in Afghanistan, Asia, Kenya, Uganda.

    Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) sometimes aren’t sure where to find mainstream development organizations and resources that might be willing to collaborate with them.

    There is an international network of organizations for families of people with Rubinstein Taybi Syndrome.

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Resources for Inclusive Development
    Both disability advocates and mainstream development organizations want to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind when countries and organizations fight poverty or improve public health, education, water, and other services. But it can be a challenge to figure out how to make projects and government policies more inclusive. The following resources can help:

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Resources on the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
    By now, you may be aware that a global movement is taking place to ratify the international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Many relevant resources are now being produced in relation to the CRPD, some of which have been posted or featured here at We Can Do:

  • Read the CRPD “translated” into plain English.
  • UNICEF has developed a child-friendly version of the CRPD to help children understand disability rights
  • Disabled People International offers two toolkits on ratifying and implementing the CRPD for disability advocates who want to help ensure that all disabled people have their human rights recognized.
  • A handbook on disability rights targeted at parliamentarians can help parliamentarians, people who work in close contact with government agencies, and disability advocates in general, better understand the CRPD.
  • The United Nations’ new web site, UN Enable, is one of the best, and most official, places to find information on the CRPD.
  • Handicap International has produced its own Teaching Kit on the CRPD.
  • The International Disability Equality Agency (IDEA) has issued Equalize It! A Manifesto for Disability Equality in Development Cooperation that expresses their position on how to ensure disability equality in the international development field.
  • Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Case Studies
    Reviewing case studies of projects implemented elsewhere can be a valuable source of ideas that could help you figure out how to run or implement your own projects. I would love to post many more best-practice and failed-practice case studies than I have available right now. If you think you have something worth sharing, please check my Wish List of Written Materials and Resource and contact me at ashettle [at] patriot.net.

    But for now, here are two case studies:

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Other Helpful Resources

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Finding Useful Sources of Information and Research

    Finding academic research, papers, resources, or statistics
    Looking for academic research and academic papers; resources that can be used by people working in the field; or sources of statistics? Some of the following posts may be helpful:

    Information on people with disabilities
    Interested in learning about the living conditions of people with disabilities in specific nations, or in specific thematic areas? Some of the following may be of interest:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Funding Sources

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Academic Papers

    We Can Do has published, or re-published, academic papers, or linked to same, on a range of subjects, including:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    News

    September 2007; October 2007; November 2007; Early December 2007

    September 2007
    At one point in September, the international disability community prematurely thought we might be On the Verge of Making History by ratifying the disability rights community.

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    October 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    November 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Early December 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Opinion Pieces

    So far, the opinion pieces here are all by me. But I would like for We Can Do to be host to an active exchange of ideas and differing perspectives. If you have a strong opinion about something, please consider submitting it. Yes, that includes opinions that disagree with mine! Consult the Wish list for written materials and resources for ideas of the kinds of topics I’m trying to cover at We Can Do.

    Meanwhile, here are a few of my own opinion pieces:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Call for Papers (for Conferences, Journals, Other)

    You might be just now starting your academic career as an undergraduate or graduate student. Or perhaps you have been doing quantitative or qualitative research, or writing policy analysis, or case studies, or social analysis, for years. Either way, if you’re looking for opportunities to present, publish, or otherwise disseminate your papers or run a workshop, then check out these upcoming or ongoing opportunities:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    International Conferences and Events

    Looking for a conference to attend? Here are a few upcoming events:
    January 2008; February 2008; March 2008; April 2008; May 2008; August 2008; September 2008; November 2008

    January 2008
    The South Asian Conference on Autism is being held in New Delhi, India in January 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    February 2008

  • The Disabilities Initiatives in Development Seminar, also in Bangladesh also in February 2008.
  • One for all: Persons with Disabilities Initiative in Development, again in Bangladesh in February 2008.
  • The International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies at the University of Central Lancashire in Preston, UK is holding a conference on sign language research in the UK in February 2008.
  • A conference on the deaf community, sign languages, social issues, civil rights, and creativity will be held on the campus of Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, USA.
  • The Techshare India 2008 Conference on accessibility will be held in New Delhi, India, in February 2008.
  • Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    March 2008
    The 8th annual meeting of the Gulf Disability Society will meet in United Arab Emirates in March 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    April 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    May 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    August 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    September 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    November 2008
    The Association on Women’s Rights in Development (AWID)’s International Forum on Women’s Rights and Development will be held in Cape Town, South Africa in November 2008. A call for proposals is open until January 28, 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Jobs, Internships, Volunteer Opportunities

    We Can Do will probably never be a comprehensive job-board. Serious job, internship, or volunteer placement hunters will want to explore other means of finding opportunities. For example, jobs, internships, and volunteer opportunities in the international field generally, or in the disability field generally, can sometimes be found at www.idealist.org. But I do occasionally happen to come across a job announcement. Here are a few that may still be open to applications:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Education and Training Opportunities

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Opportunities

    Missed call for papers; Missed training opportunities; Missed job, internship, and volunteer opportunities; Missed events and conferences

    Some of the material I post at We Can Do is time-sensitive material. That means the conferences announced here have come and gone; job posts have been filled; and deadlines are over. So, if it’s too late for you to do anything about any of the following announcements, then why bother listing them? First, some conference organizers issue compilations of papers and presentations or other interesting materials after their event is over. If a topic interests you, it may be worth communicating with event organizers to see if any follow-up publications are available. Second, organizations that offer one conference, job opportunity, call for papers, etc., may offer something similar in the future. Many conferences, for example, meet every one, two, three, or four years. Monitoring, joining, or communicating with organizations of interest to you could help ensure that you learn about the next opportunity in time to plan for it.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Call for Papers
    The German Journal for Disability and Development called for papers on art and disabilities to be submitted by the end of November 2007.

    Also browse through the listing of upcoming conferences and missed conferences.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Training Opportunities

    In October 2007, the International Labour Organisation had a training course for professionals from developing countries.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Jobs, Internships, and Volunteer Opportunities
    Remember that it is too late to apply for these specific opportunities. These are listed here in case you want to check out the sponsoring organizations for future opportunities like these:

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Event and Conference Opportunities

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    What’s Next for We Can Do?

    I am not yet satisfied with We Can Do. I still see many gaps that I want to repair. I want to find, and post, more materials of a pragmatic nature. By which I mean, material that people in the field can put to immediate use in improving the lives of disabled people in developing countries. If you think you can help me locate helpful materials, please review my Wish list for written materials and resources and contact me.

    I also want to reach more development professionals at mainstream development organizations and more employees and volunteers at international disability organizations. And I want to reach more small DPOs and individual advocates in more developing countries. The knowledge shared at We Can Do cannot help until it is brought to people with disabilities living in poverty in developing countries. That “final mile” can only be bridged by readers like YOU.

    If you want to help, I hope you will consider telling your colleagues and contacts about We Can Do. If you run a web site or a blog, please consider linking to We Can Do at https://wecando.wordpress.com. If you have the skills, the time, and the commitment to launch a We Can Do mirror site translation into some other language, please talk to me (leave a comment or email me at ashettle [at] patriot.net). And please do feel free to print out the more helpful We Can Do posts to share with people you know in developing countries who do not have easy access to the Internet.

    For those of you who like numbers: We Can Do had 285 page views in July; 851 in August; 1305 in September; 2936 in October; 4862 in November; and more than 5100 in the first three weeks of December. And who is responsible for making these numbers happen? Why—you, of course! So, thank you for visiting We Can Do.

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

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    THREE JOB POSTS, Luanda, Angola

    Posted on 15 December 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Jobs & Internships, Rehabilitation, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Read carefully. This post contain THREE separate job announcements, all in Luanda, Angola. The first is for a Technical Expert who is experienced in social and health projects. The second is for a Project Coordinator who is a technical expert in severe disability rehabilitaiton. The third is for an expert in the identification of sanitation and hospital services, services of continous support to target group. All job posts are meant to begin in February 2008 and continue for 12 months. The deadline for all three job posts is December 31, 2007.


    Technical Expert – Experienced in social and health projects

    Country of assignment and location
    Angola, Luanda

    GTZ International Services in consortium with MundiServiços has been shortlisted for this World Bank-financed project.

    The project
    In the sequence of the Lwena Memorandum of Understanding complementary to Lusaka Protocol, the Angola Government has prepared the Angolan Program for Demobilization and Reintegration which is being implemented at National level by The Institute of Socio-Professional Reintegration for Ex-combatants (IRSEM). In the scope of this program assistance is been delivered to facilitate economic and social reintegration of 138.000 Ex-combatants. 105.000 are from Ex-FMU (Unita Forces) and 33.000 from FAA (Angolan Armed Forces).
    Among the program beneficiaries can be distinguished special groups as follows:
    Female Ex-combatants, Widows of Ex-combatants eligible for PGDR (Minors whose parents are Ex-combatants or their guardian, Ex-combatants with disabilities, designated as a “Vulnerable Group” to whom PGDR has designed a specific strategy to assist them.

    Estimated are that 1750-2000 of the 28000 disabled who will be demobilised are severely disabled: para-, hemi-, tetraplegic, multiple limb amputees, deaf, blind, mentally disabled,… They are the specific target group of this project.

    The objective of the project is to deliver technical assistance to IRSEM to create conditions for social reintegration and physical rehabilitation in order to prevent or minimise the dependency for specialised services for ex-combatants with severe disabilities.

    Your tasks
    Provide TA, organise and identify specialists for the following activities which will be defined by the results of the needs assessments of each Person with a Disability and of the service provision sector:

    1. PREPARATION PHASE

    • Identification of failure in terms of social services, psychological support and human support.
    • Formulating an action plan to improve Angolan service delivery to target group

    2. IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION PLAN, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION

    • Contracting out social reintegration of the disabled person taking in the account the actual and future living environment
    • Contracting out vocational trainings for disabled to perform professional activities. Special stock for small lending, creation of adapted micro enterprises and / or work opportunities.
    • Organizing training of Angolan institutions for psychological support to families and availability of resources in order beneficiaries can develop income generation activities taking advantage of existing economic opportunities.
    • Organizing training in occupational activities adapted to the disabled and to avail them of affordable opportunities
    • Orientation of contracted social services to refer family members to the existing projects for the development of economic activities.
    • Assuring access to distribution of tools for those having a viable idea of self employment

    • Providing technical support to create micro and small companies
    • Organizing training of Angolan institutions for economic capacity building to provide income generation/salaries for the People with Disability and/or family / relatives caring for the severe disabled

    Your qualification
    University degree in Public Health or Social Science or relevant field

    • Minimum of 5 years professional experience, of which 3 years in international projects
    • At least 3 years of experience in the provision of social services for vulnerable groups of population
    • Work experience in technical assistance projects funded by WB or other development agencies advantageous
    • Relevant work experience in the region
    • Excellent communication skills
    • Excellent command of Portuguese and English
    • Excellent degree of stress tolerance and flexibility

    Commencement
    Expected date of commencement is February 2008. The period of execution will be 12 months.

    Contact
    For further information please contact
    Mrs. Annette Mueller-Roth
    Phone: +49 61 96 79-1483
    e-mail: Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de

    Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de


    Project Coordinator – Technical expert in severe disability rehabilitation

    Country of assignment and location
    Angola, Luanda

    GTZ International Services in consortium with MundiServiços has been shortlisted for this World Bank-financed project.

    The project
    In the sequence of the Lwena Memorandum of Understanding complementary to Lusaka Protocol, the Angola Government has prepared the Angolan Program for Demobilization and Reintegration which is being implemented at National level by The Institute of Socio-Professional Reintegration for Ex-combatants (IRSEM). In the scope of this program assistance is been delivered to facilitate economic and social reintegration of 138.000 Ex-combatants. 105.000 are from Ex-FMU (Unita Forces) and 33.000 from FAA (Angolan Armed Forces).
    Among the program beneficiaries can be distinguished special groups as follows:
    Female Ex-combatants, Widows of Ex-combatants eligible for PGDR, Minors whose parents are Ex-combatants or their guardian, Ex-combatants with disabilities, designated as a “Vulnerable Group” to whom PGDR has designed a specific strategy to assist them.

    Estimated are that 1750-2000 of the 28000 disabled who will be demobilised are severely disabled: para-, hemi-, tetraplegic, multiple limb amputees, deaf, blind, mentally disabled,… They are the specific target group of this project.

    The objective of the project is to deliver technical assistance to IRSEM to create conditions for social reintegration and physical rehabilitation of this severely disabled subgroup in order to prevent or minimise the dependency for specialised services for ex-combatants with severe disabilities

    Your tasks

    Provide TA in order to:

    1. PREPARATORY PHASE:

    • organize a needs assessments (from each individual and from the capacity of the service delivery sector),
    • elaborate an individualized action plan and a disability sector plan

    2. IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION PLAN, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION

    • the implementation of training to the local service delivery sector
    • assisting IRSEM in contracting out the local service delivery
    • supervision

    The following activities have to be organized for the target group

  • Advise to IRSEM on the supply of auxiliary means for physical rehabilitation
  • Elaboration of recommendations for the modalities of collaboration between IRSEM and National and Local agencies involved in long term programs, assisting the reintegration process of severely People with a 100 % Disability
  • Identify and train appropriate partners for the delivery of special services and assistance, necessary to physical rehabilitation and social-economic reintegration of the target group:
  • Medical (surgery, ophtalmology, ENT,…), disability nursing, physiotherapy, prosthetic – orthotic devices and mobility aids,
  • psychosocial support
  • Professional support and economic capacity building (Agriculture activities and creation of micro and small business, Micro finance assistance) to provide income generation
  • Support to communities where disabled live to implement several social initiatives (schools, community centre, irrigation channels, healthcare post etc.) that facilitate the reintegration in shelter communities
  • Your qualification

  • University degree in Social Science or Public Health, with experience in disability
  • Minimum of 10 years professional experience, of which 7 years in international projects
  • At least five years of experience in the provision of social services for vulnerable groups of population
  • Work experience in technical assistance projects funded by WB or other development agencies very advantageous
  • Relevant international work experience in the region highly desirable, intercultural competence required
  • At least five years of experience in monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of projects in the social sector
  • Excellent managerial and communication skills
  • Excellent command of Portuguese (written and spoken) and English
  • Excellent degree of stress tolerance and flexibility
  • Commencement

    Expected date of commencement is February 2008. The period of execution will be 12 months.

    Contact
    For further information please contact
    Mrs. Annette Mueller-Roth
    Phone: +49 61 96 79-1483
    e-mail: Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de

    Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de


    Expert in Identification of sanitation and hospital services, services of continuous support to target group

    Country of assignment and location
    Angola, Luanda

    GTZ International Services in consortium with MundiServiços has been shortlisted for this World Bank-financed project.

    The project
    In the sequence of the Lwena Memorandum of Understanding complementary to Lusaka Protocol, the Angola Government has prepared the Angolan Program for Demobilization and Reintegration which is being implemented at National level by The Institute of Socio-Professional Reintegration for Ex-combatants (IRSEM). In the scope of this program assistance is been delivered to facilitate economic and social reintegration of 138.000 Ex-combatants. 105.000 are from Ex-FMU (Unita Forces) and 33.000 from FAA (Angolan Armed Forces).
    Among the program beneficiaries can be distinguished special groups as follows:
    Female Ex-combatants, Widows of Ex-combatants eligible for PGDR, Minors whose parents are Ex-combatants or their guardian, Ex-combatants with disabilities, designated as a “Vulnerable Group” to whom PGDR has designed a specific strategy to assist them.

    Estimated are that 1750-2000 of the 28000 disabled who will be demobilised are severely disabled: para-, hemi-, tetraplegic, multiple limb amputees, deaf, blind, mentally disabled,… They are the specific target group of this project.

    The objective of the project is to deliver technical assistance to IRSEM to create conditions for social reintegration and physical rehabilitation in order to prevent or minimise the dependency for specialised services for ex-combatants with severe disabilities

    Your tasks
    Provide TA, organise and identify specialists for the following activities which will be reviewed by the results of the needs assessments:

    PREPARATION PHASE

    • Organizing contracted out medical, psychological and social (environmental) assessment of beneficiaries in order to come to an individual screening plan
    • Training of the assessment teams
    • Identification of failure in terms of specialised medical and rehabilitation care, specialised training, psychological support and supply of technical and human support.
    • Formulating an action plan to improve Angolan service delivery to target group

    IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION PLAN, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION

    • Contracting partners to supply of auxiliary means for physical rehabilitation, including prosthesis, crutch/walking-stick, wheelchairs, tricycles, hearing devices, visual aids or others which may be considered necessary
    • Contracting of special services (or to strengthen existing services) such as eye care services, consultants for psychology support, hearing device delivery and consultants, orthopedic and esthetic surgery and neurology services.
    • Development of occupational therapy activities and special tools
    • Contracting supplementary assistance for daily activities
    • Contracting long term medical care (home care and sanitary education of the disabled). Access to specialised consultations, supply of medical and pharmaceutical assistance and/or daily technical support
    • Organizing specialised nursing training (to the disabled person, his/her family or others) by professional Health personnel in: transfers at home, urine and stool evacuation, physiotherapeutic exercises, warning signals, circulation problems, epilepsy crises orientation, orientation for psychological and psychiatrist disorder.
    • Contracting of specific training for persons with lacking sensorial sensitivity, such as sign language for the deaf, improvement of tactile habits and blind orientation and other communication techniques.

    Your qualification

    • University degree in physical or neurological rehab or relevant field
    • Minimum of 7 years professional experience, of which 3 years in international projects
    • At least 3 years of experience in the provision of social services for People with disability
    • Work experience in technical assistance projects funded by WB or other development agencies advantageous
    • Relevant work experience in the region
    • Excellent communication skills
    • Excellent command of Portuguese and English
    • Excellent degree of stress tolerance and flexibility

    Commencement
    Expected date of commencement is February 2008. The period of execution will be 12 months.

    Contact
    For further information please contact
    Mrs. Annette Mueller-Roth
    Phone: +49 61 96 79-1483
    e-mail: Annette.Mueller-Roth@gtz.de



    We Can Do learned about these three job opportunities through the email distribution list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD), which can be subscribed to for free.


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    PAPER: Violence Against Women with Disabilities in South Africa

    Posted on 18 November 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Some studies suggest that nearly one in three women are the targets of violence from their intimate partners. Women with disabilities are no exception. In fact, some studies suggest that violence against disabled women may happen even more frequently than does violence against non-disabled women. Yet, violence against women with disabilities is rarely studied at all even in rich countries–and studied even less often in developing countries.

    One exception is a small-scale exploratory research project on gender-based violence and disabled women conducted by the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) in South Africa entitled “On the Margins: Violence Against Women with Disabilities,” (PDF format, 341 Kb) written by Ereshnee Naidu, Sadiyya Haffejee, Lisa Vetten, and Samantha Hargreaves.

    Although this research project was small, it helps highlight what has often been an ignored problem perpetuated against an ignored population:

    “This exploratory research study on violence against women with disabilities strongly indicates that women with disabilities are extremely vulnerable to gender-based violence, that the violence and abuse they confront is shaped by the nature and form of their particular disability, and that they are especially disadvantaged in their access to the criminal justice system and gender-based violence support services, as compared to women without disabilities.”

    Yet, when the researchers asked what services are available to women with disabilities who are the target of violence, the result, although not surprising, was nevertheless worrying:

    “While many of the informants from service organisations reached through this survey were aware of and concerned about violence against women with disabilities, their organisations were, in the main, failing to address the needs of this specific, and very neglected, constituency.”

    Interested We Can Do visitors can follow the link to download “On the Margins” (PDF format, 341 Kb) for themselves. The paper offers a more detailed discussion of how and why women with disabilities in South Africa are vulnerable to violence. It also describes the barriers they experience both in finding help to escape violence and in seeking justice in the legal system. Finally, the authors make recommendations for what action should be taken in South Africa to address the problem including advocacy and awareness; networking and collaboration; promoting accessible services; and policy, monitoring, and research.

    The paper is available in PDF format (341 Kb) at: http://www.csvr.org.za/docs/gender/onthemargins.pdf

    For more We Can Do articles related to violence, click on the word “violence” under “categories” in the right hand navigation bar.



    [Edit 17 June 2008: Edited to update the link to the paper, which had moved. Apologies for the inconvenience to people who had clicked on the old, incorrect link.]

    We Can Do learned of this paper through a bi-monthly newsletter from www.AskSource.info. AskSource offers an extensive, on-line library of materials and resources related to health or to disability in developing countries. Their bi-monthly newsletter alerts subscribers to the newest resources available at their web site.

    We Can Do readers who would like to subscribe to the AskSource newsletter for themselves can do so by filling out the form at http://www.AskSource.info. Or you can email source@ich.ucl.ac.uk and type SUBSCRIBE
    SOURCE in the subject line, and state your name, organisation and email address. Additional information, such as your subject interests or activities, will help AskSource tailor their communications to your needs.


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    JOB POST, WHO: Technical Officer: Injuries, Violence Prevention, Disabilities, Rehabilitation

    Posted on 13 November 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is recruiting candidates for a one-year fixed-term appointment as a Technical Officer. The person chosen to serve will work to develop normative guidelines and capacity building material to strengthen rehabilitation policies and services. Interested parties should apply following the standard channels at WHO. We Can Do is not associated with WHO and cannot assist job applicants. The job description can be accessed at:

    https://erecruit.who.int/public/hrd-cl-vac-view.asp?o_c=1000&jobinfo_uid_c=18191&vaclng=en

    The home website for WHO employment is http://www.who.int/employment

    Vacancy Notice No: HQ/07/VIP/FT1136
    Title: Technical Officer
    Grade: P4
    Contract type: Fixed-term appointment
    Duration of contract: 1 year (time-limited duration)

    Date: 30 October 2007
    Deadline for application : 27 November 2007
    Duty Station: GENEVA Switzerland
    Organization unit: Injuries and Violence Prevention and Disabilities (VIP) / Disability and Rehabilitation (DAR)

    OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAMME :
    The Department’s objective is to spearhead global action to address disability and to prevent violence and injury using advocacy, datacollection, training, monitoring evaluation and dissemination of best practices.

    The aims of the Disability and Rehabilitation Team (DAR) are to:
    (1) Promote strategies to improve living conditions and equalizations of opportunities for persons with disabilities;
    (2) Support policy development in disability and rehabilitation;
    (3) Strengthen rehabilitation services; and
    (4) Integrate rehabilitation into primary health care through CBR services.

    Description of duties:
    – Prepare normative guidelines on rehabilitation in collaboration with other UN organizations/ Specialized Agencies/ International Nongovernmental Organizations and Disabled People’s Organizations.
    – Develop capacity building materials for health and rehabilitation service providers.
    – Support Member States to develop, implement and monitor rehabilitation programmes.
    – Develop a network of implementers and promoters of rehabilitation and habilitation.
    – Assist in fundraising for the promotion of rehabilitation services.
    – Other duties as may be assigned.

    REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS
    Education:
    Masters degree in Occupational Therapy, Prosthetics and Orthotics, Physiotherapy, Community Based Rehabilitation, Public Health, other related allied health disciplines or an equivalent level of experience.

    Skills:
    – Excellent skills in design, management and evaluation of rehabilitation programmes.
    – Extensive knowledge and experience of rehabilitation (community based and institutional).
    – Good knowledge of science and technology in the field of rehabilitation including assistive/ mobility devices.
    – Experience in developing technical documents and capacity building materials.
    – Excellent writing skills.
    – Ability to work in multicultural and multidisciplinary settings and excellent inter-personal skills.

    Experience:
    Essential:
    Minimum 7 years of experience in the design and management of programmes focused on rehabilitation including at least 3 years at the international level. Practical experience in the development of such programmes in developing countries.

    Desirable:
    Experience of working with disabled peoples organizations and various professional bodies in the field of disability and rehabilitation.
    Experience of working with a UN organization.
    Persons with disabilities are particularly encouraged to apply.

    Languages:
    Excellent knowledge of English with working knowledge of French.
    Knowledge of other UN languages would be an asset.

    Additional Information:
    Other posts may be filled from this vacancy.

    Annual salary: (Net of tax)
    US$ 61834 at single rate
    US$ 66401 with primary dependants
    Post Adjustment: 72.5 % of the above figure(s). This percentage is to be considered as indicative since variations may occur each month either upwards or downwards due to currency exchange rate fluctuations or inflation.

    A written test and interviews may be used as a form of screening

    Online applications are strongly encouraged to enable WHO to store your profile in a permanent database.

    Please visit WHO’s e-Recruitment website at: www.who.int/employment. The system provides instructions for online application procedures. All applicants are encouraged to apply online as soon as possible after the vacancy has been posted and well before the deadline stated in the vacancy announcement.

    Applications from women and from nationals of non- and under-represented member states are particularly encouraged.

    Any appointment/extension of appointment is subject to WHO Staff Regulations, Staff Rules and Manual. Only candidates under serious consideration will be contacted.
    Currently accepting applications
    WHO has a smoke-free environment and does not recruit smokers or other tobacco users.


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    Please Submit YOUR Materials to We Can Do

    Posted on 7 November 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Arts, Blind, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disability Studies, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Families, Funding, Guest Blogger, HIV/AIDS, Housing, Human Rights, Immigration, Interpreting, Introduction to "We Can Do", Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation, Remittances, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Uncategorized, Violence, Volunteer Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Currently, We Can Do gathers news; announcements; academic papers; case studies; opinion pieces; information about resources; and other materials of interest to disabled advocates and international development professionals from a wide range of sources. In addition to these, from time to time, I write fresh content of my own.

    I also hope to be able to depend heavily on YOU–We Can Do readers–for some of the best, most interesting, and helpful materials. Examples of materials that would interest me include, but are not limited to: “best practice” case studies; “failed practice” case studies; checklists; fundraising advice or resources; other pragmatic resources; academic papers or reports; student projects; press releases; opinion pieces; announcements; and more. For more detail, please click on “Wish List for Written Materials and Resources” at the top navigation bar.

    If you can assist with my current top priority, or with any of the other items in my “wish list”, then PLEASE GET IN TOUCH. Email me at ashettle at patriot dot net or leave a short note in the comment area below and I’ll contact you.

    Current Top Priority for We Can Do

    Are you from Croatia, Cuba, Gabon, Hungary, India, Jamaica, or Panama? If so, were you involved with the movement to persuade your government to sign and ratify the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)? If so PLEASE CONTACT ME (ashettle at patriot dot net, or leave a comment below with your email address).

    I want to interview people involved with these movements (via email) so I can write a story describing what strategies you used; any barriers you faced along the way; how you overcame these barriers; any mistakes you made, how you corrected them, and how other countries can avoid them; what activities or techniques you think were the most critical to your success; and so forth. Sharing this type of information at We Can Do–and elsewhere–could be immensely helpful to disability movements in other countries that are working toward the same goals.

    My primary written language is English, pero puedo escribir y leer, mas o menos, en espanol tambien. (Lo siento para la mala ortografia–no se como crear acentos en WordPress.) Once we are in contact, I will probably have many questions for you–and follow up questions after that!

    Thank you for helping make We Can Do become a strong, good-quality resource for people with disabilities in developing countries and the people who are working hard to meet their needs.

    Edited to Add: I do not post my full email address because any recognizable email address posted on the web then immediately becomes the target of “spam harvesters” and starts receiving tons of unwanted, unsolicited commercial emails. But I spelled it out above and spell it out again here. But this time I’m amplifying it because I realize that not all people have learned how to parse spelled out email addresses:

    My username is: ashettle

    Every email address has an @ at sign @ between the user name and the domain name, thus ashettle@

    My email domain is patriot.net

    Put it all together and you have my email address.

    Or if that is still too confusing–or if it’s just easier for you–then feel free to leave a note below (with your email address in the area provided for it) and I’ll get in touch.


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    CALL FOR INFORMATION: Implementing the CRPD

    Posted on 5 November 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Human Rights, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

    The following post is copy/pasted from an email from Mugiho Takeshita; any responses should be sent directly to her email address, NOT to We Can Do:

    From: Mugiho Takeshita [mugiho.takeshita@undp.org]

    I am working on disabilities issues for UNDP’s Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery. We have been developing a discussion paper for proposing sustainable and comprehensive crisis prevention and recovery approaches for persons with physical and mental disabilities caused by landmines, small arms and violence in conflict and in post-conflict situations, and by natural disasters.

    For developing this paper, I would like to know some examples of:

    • How countries that signed the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) have modified their regulations and laws (including existence of committees working on this); and
    • What they have been doing concretely for persons with disability, after the adoption of the CRPD.

    We will use the information to include into our discussion paper, mentioned above, which will be circulated inside of UNDP, and possibly to other UN agencies and organizations. We would also like to have your feedback, in case we decide to circulate externally our paper for reviewing.

    Thank you very sincerely for your support.

    Kind regards,
    Mugi

    ————————————————-
    Ms. Mugiho TAKESHITA
    Early Recovery & Cross-Cutting Issues Team
    Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery (BCPR)
    United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
    11-13 Chemin des Anémones
    Châtelaine, CH-1219 Geneva, Switzerland
    Tel.: +41 22 917 8113
    Email: mugiho.takeshita@undp.org



    This email from Mugiho Takeshita was circulated on the mailing list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD).


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    NEWS: Human Rights Violations of Argentines with Psychosocial, Mental Disabilities

    Posted on 25 October 2007. Filed under: Announcements, Cognitive Impairments, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opinion, Psychiatric Disabilities, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    SEGREGATED FROM SOCIETY IN ATROCIOUS CONDITIONS – ARGENTINA’S MENTAL
    HEALTH SYSTEM VIOLATES HUMAN RIGHTS

    WASHINGTON, DC—September 25, 2007— Argentina is among countries with the most psychiatrists per capita in the world—yet people detained in the country’s public psychiatric institutions are subject to serious human rights violations. Ruined Lives, an investigative report released today by Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI)and the Argentine human rights organization Center for Legal and Social Studies(CELS), finds that 25,000 people are locked away in Argentina’s institutions, segregated from society, many for a lifetime and with no possibility of ever getting out.

    Ruined Lives exposes widespread abuse and neglect in these institutions, including people burning to death in isolation cells, complete sensory deprivation in long-term isolation, forced sterilization and sexual and physical abuse. In one psychiatric penal ward in Buenos Aires, men were locked naked in tiny, barren isolation cells with no light or ventilation for months at a time. At another institution, four people died while locked in isolation cells. Toilets overflowed with excrement and floors were flooded with urine.

    Investigators found a 16 year-old boy in a crib, his arms and legs tied to his body with strips of cloth, completely immobilized. Staff said he had been tied up since being admitted to the institution more than a year before.

    “Argentina’s mental health system detains people on a massive scale without any legal protections,” said Eric Rosenthal, MDRI’s ExecutiveDirector. “The inhumane and degrading treatment we observed is banned by international human rights treaties and should not be tolerated in any society.”

    MDRI is an international human rights and advocacy organization dedicated to the full participation in society of people with mental disabilities world wide. For more information, visit www.mdri.org.

    CELS is an Argentine organization devoted to fostering and protecting human rights and strengthening the democratic system and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.cels.org.ar.

    The report and photographs can be downloaded from the MDRI web site in either English or Spanish.

    MENTAL DISABILITY RIGHTS INTERNATIONAL
    1156 15th St NW, Suite 1001, Washington, DC 20005
    Phone: (202) 296-0800, Fax: (202) 728-3053
    E-mail: mdri@mdri.org
    http://www.mdri.org

    This press release comes from Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI</a).


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    Violence Against Blind/VI Girls in Malawi

    Posted on 6 October 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Blind, Case Studies, Children, Guest Blogger, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    This paper was presented by its author Abigail Suka at the 12th International Council on Education for People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI) World Conference held in Malaysia from 16-21 July 2006.  Although she was with Sightsavers International at the time she presented this paper, Abigail Suka is now an independent consultant in development issues, team building, and planning.  She is also a part-time postgraduate student working toward a Masters of Public Health (MPH) at the University of Malawi.  Thank you to Abigail Suka for granting permission to publish her paper at We Can Do.

    Violence against Girls who are Blind and
    Visually Impaired in Schools in Malawi

    Abigail Suka
    Country Representative
    Sight Savers International
    Private Bag A 197
    Lilongwe
    Malawi
    Introduction
    In Malawi violence against girls (VAG) is rampant. Research work commissioned between recently by DFID, Action Aid and its partners shows that out of all the incidences of violence in schools 65% of these affect girls while 35% affect boys.(1) None of this research has looked at how violence in school affects girls with disabilities in general and visual impairment in particular.

    Sight Savers International (SSI) in Malawi is a member of the Civil Society Coalition for Quality Basic Education (CSQBE) which recently conducted a study on Violence Against Girls. SSI collaborated with Malawi Union of the Blind to also gather some information from this study and extrapolate it to attempt to establish how the girl who is blind is affected by such violence. This paper reports issues raised in discussions held by the writer with MUB Girl Guide members using the CSQBE study report as a guide, and some key informants, mainly blind young women who have defied the odds and passed through an unsafe school system. It also draws on literature available on the subject.

    What is Gender Based Violence (GBV)?
    The Fourth World Conference of Women, held in Beijing, China in 1995, reported the continued exploitation and abuse of girls in spite of the ratification of various UN conventions notably the Convention of the Rights of the Child of 1989. Specific issues raised included the violence directed at girls in the form of female genital mutilation, forced and early marriages, sexual exploitation, unequal access to education and health care. GBV recognizes that violence directed at girls and women is expressive of patriarchal power and authority.(2)

    What is School Related Gender Based Violence (SRGBV)?
    SRGBV comes in various forms such as sexual, physical, verbal, emotional and psychological and occurs in and out of school. Perpetrators of VAG are many but most of the VAG is committed by male pupils and male teachers thereby making schools unsafe for girls. This problem came into the limelight because in most schools enrolment for girls in upper primary school and secondary schools in much lower than boys. Moreover in most schools girls perform poorly during classroom exercises, tests and examinations. This problem is partly attributed to violence and is of concern because they cause high drop out and low education attainment for girls.

    The Global Statistics on Violence Against Girls with Disabilities
    The FREDA Research Centre on VAG, based in Canada, reports that (3)
    • 53% of women with disabilities from birth have been raped, abused, or assaulted (Lynn & O’Neill 1995:278)
    • The rate of sexual abuse for girls with disabilities is quadruple that of the national average (Razack 1994)
    Another study conducted through the New York City Board of Education who documented cases of adult to student sexual abuse found that whilst students receiving special education made up only 7% of the student body as a whole, they made up twice that percentage of targets of abuse.(4) A report by Waxman Fiduccia summarizing a few studies that offer a gender breakdown suggests that women and girls face higher rates of abuse than men and boys, often at the rate of more than twice the rate of non disabled girls. (5)

    Perceptions about Violence Against Girls
    Centre for Social Research in Malawi found the following perceptions about acts that constitute violence against girls at school(6):

    • Corporal punishments like digging pits, molding bricks during class time
    • Teasing, bullying and beating by boys and teachers
    • Forced to have relationships and sex with boys and teachers
    • Verbal abuse
    • Sexually harassment i.e. touching their breasts and other private parts.
    • Rape
    • Impregnation
    • Discrimination by teachers.
    • Suspending and expelling girls without warnings.
    • Not giving girls chance to voice out their views.

    A focus group discussion undertaken with Malawi Union of the Blind – Youth Wing girls when they were undergoing Girl Guide training, identified all the above as factors affecting them and added some more as:

    • Threats and actual sexual abuse from specialist teachers, class room (contact) teachers and blind boys
    • Promises to marry from blind adults in leadership positions in the organization of the Blind
    • Extensive teasing, such as leading them to a wrong classroom, hiding their white cane and their writing materials (Primary Education Pack)
    • Not escorting them to the toilet
    • Name Calling: For girls with albinism and low vision they face ridiculing name calling such as Zigoma: after the name of a singer with albinism or Mzungu or whitey
    • Verbal abuse : belittling them suggesting no one would be interested in an affair with a blind girl

    The Face of SRGBV: Low Enrolment of Visually Impaired Girls in School
    There are more women with visual impairment than men, however enrolment figures obtained from an integrated education programme that Sightsavers International supports consistently show a lower enrolment of girls in primary schools. Data from 8 project districts is tabulated below:

    MALAWI INTEGRATED EDUCATION PROGRAMME
    ENROLMENT 2004
    DISTRICT IT’s VIC BOYS VIC GIRLS VIC TOTAL
    Blantyre 10 129 81 210
    Lilongwe 11 140 104 244
    Rumphi 8 64 64 128
    Chikwawa 5 37 28 65
    Zomba 6 35 39 74
    Salima 5 41 30 71
    Balaka 6 45 58 103
    Machinga 8 65 80 145

    Total 59 556 484 1040
    53% 47%

    The Basic Education Statistics 2005, reported national enrollment of visually impaired children in schools in 2005 to be 15490 (7), of which 7412(47%) are girls and 8078 (53%) are boys, as in the project districts supported.

    Analysis of the Basic Education Statistics published for 2005 demonstrates that of the number of visually impaired girls who would have started off primary school in Standard 1, only 15% make it to the final class in primary school (Standard 8) indicating an unacceptably high level of drop outs. Although ‘lack of interest’ is indicated as the major reason contributing to high drop out, this consultation and other evidence suggests that violence against these visually impaired girls in school is a key factor in this high drop out rate. Or at least violence in schools is a major cause of the lack of interest, in other words, girls simply stop going to school because of the unsafe environment and this is interpreted as ‘ a lack of interest’ Compared to sighted girls, 25% reach the final primary school class. Compared to visually impaired boys, 31% would reach Standard 8, even beating the sighted pupils demonstrating that girls in general occupy a lower place in society. This also accentuates the fact that when a girl, is not only a girl but is also blind, the odds of her finishing her education are even more limited.

    Sadly continuation to secondary school is even more dismal. Of 607 girls with visual impairment who would have completed Standard 8 in 2005, only 217 (35%) would make it to secondary school and not all of these will complete secondary school.

    Factors affecting their propensity to Violence
    The first obvious factor has to be the limitation caused by the disability itself that may make it more difficult for a girl with visual impairment to detect or even discern the behavior of her perpetrator. Harilyn Rousso in her paper on ‘Sexual harassment in Schools’ intimates that ‘disability – related limitations make it difficult for girls with certain disabilities, to detect and fully understand the nature of the perpetrators behaviour, and some disabilities may limit her ability to defend herself or move away from perpetrators and to report incidents of violence.(8)

    The more underlying reasons however lie in the negative attitudes that girls with disability face in their day to day lives. The focus group discussion undertaken with MUB girl guides indicate that many suffer from low self-esteem and a lack of self-confidence which makes them portray a sense of helpless which in turn licenses perpetrators. For many girls such abuses start from their homes and extend to their trusted mentors such as a specialist teacher. There is no data to quantify the extent to which people in position of trust such as specialist teachers and classroom teacher, guides etc. This is mainly because the girls will lack the courage to report. Those who can talk about it are no longer in the school system.
    In her paper, The Girl Child: Having to ‘Fit’, Yasmin Jiwani, Ph.D. states that ‘girls with disabilities experience higher rates of sexual abuse (at 4 times the national average) because of their dependent status, isolation, and the negative stereotypes that prevail in the dominant society. Afraid to report the abuse because of the fear of not being believed, many of these girls continue to lead lives that are jeopardized by threats and actual incidents of violence’ They are often stereotyped, thereby undermining for actors to deal with unique and specific issue different to each girl. Harilyn Rousso reports of an extreme example of a stereotypical attitude in an incident of a young woman with disability who tried to report an attempted rape, her counselor said ‘Who would want to rape YOU?’ Furthermore, it is unbelievable that in some countries some courts will not entertain allegations of sexual violence brought by blind women or girls, because of supposed difficulties in identifying the perpetrator.

    Why should we address Violence against Visually Impaired girls NOW?

    1) MDGs and EFA
    One of the UN Millennium Development Goals adopted by the Heads of State and Government is to ensure that children everywhere, boys and girls alike, should be able to complete a full course of primary schooling by 2015. In order to achieve this goal, there is need for a 100% net enrolment and completion rates for school age children, including those with disabilities. There are far too few girls with disabilities completing school (15%). If this phenomenon is not addressed, it threatens to derail efforts by governments and other stakeholders to promote girls education and achieve 2015 Education for All (EFA) goals. Without visually impaired girls attaining an education, MDG and EFA will not be a reality for Malawi.

    Girls with Disabilities are bound together by double discrimination based on gender and disability. Statistics tell us that females with disabilities are achieving less in terms of employment and socialization into the mainstream of life than men with disabilities, with the vast majority of women living in dependent and comparatively impoverished circumstances.(9) In many developing countries, there are few educational opportunities for girls with disability. When there are opportunities for education, in special schools, boys usually receive them. Therefore it is necessary to ensure that where visually impaired girls are managing to go to school as is the case in Malawi where at least 400 girls with visual impairment were attending an integrated education in 2004, concerted effort should be made by stakeholders in their education to make sure that they stay in school.

    2) The time is right
    There is sufficient platform provided by Women’s Rights Activism, Women Disability Rights and the UN Charter on Disabilities. These international instruments will help to accelerate the effort to address and advocate for safe environment for girls who are blind and visually impaired to go to school.

    3) HIV/AIDS
    In Malawi, we are racing against the deadly HIV/AIDS pandemic. Not only is the rate of HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities threatening to scourge, on account of poverty related socio economic factors and attitudes, but sadly also due to prevalent cultural beliefs that having sex with a person with a disabilities will cure or ‘cleanse’ you of AIDS. Grace Massa, chairperson of Albinism Fellowship in Malawi intimates it is a common belief that girls with albinism are the best ‘cleansers’. (10)

    According to the World Bank funded Global Survey of HIV/AIDS among disabled populations(11), HIV/AIDS is a significant and almost wholly unrecognized problem among disabled populations worldwide. A growing body of literature and experience supports the notion that HIV/AIDS educational, testing and clinical programs around the world are largely inaccessible to individuals with disability.

    Continued low literacy rates among disabled individuals, particularly girls present real challenges to prevention efforts. It is therefore imperative that we address the issue of a safe environment for a girl who is blind to stay in school so that she can have higher literacy rates.

    What strategies can we employ?
    Concrete information: Obtaining information and data is the first step towards developing appropriate responses and services. It has been acknowledge that there is insufficient information in this important area. We need to undertake studies specifically addressing Violence against Girls with Disabilities and specifically with visual impairment because there are unique aspects to visual impairment.

    Challenging stereotypes: through community education, youth projects and media campaigns. In particular challenging “the almost universal belief that disabled people cannot be a reliable witness on their own behalf.” (12)

    Raising awareness: of the adverse effect SRGBV has on a girl who is blind to the various audiences that we have access to.

    Empowerment Programmes specifically designed to empower girls who are blind and visually impaired. Many state that they fail to report incidents of violence because they were shy. Therefore, programmes to improve the assertiveness of girls are necessary.

    However, shyness sometimes comes about because the reporting procedures themselves are not conducive. Therefore, advocating for the establishment of ‘safe pathways’ or procedures that encourages girls who are blind to report incidents of violence.

    Advocacy & Coalition Building – by remaining alert on SRGBV issues and participating in the wider advocacy arena, we can influence changes in legislation, school practice and curricula aimed at stopping violence against girls and we will have opportunity to add a voice regarding the girl who is blind. Joining established ‘voices’ or platforms such as the Civil Society Coalition will add credibility and muscle to our voice. Going it alone is unnecessary and expensive. However for us to participate in this advocacy effort we need to bring a body of evidence to the table, hence the need for professional research in this area.

    Motivation & Role Models – What would be the point of going to school if there no hope of you getting employment or engaging in meaningful pursuits? There is a role that role models can play. In this regards, the few girls who are blind and have completed their education and are participating meaningfully and interdependently in society need to be involved in programmes to reach the younger blind girls and talk to them about what career options they have. In this regard most of the key informants to this interview are in that category. They have demonstrated that they are not passive victims of harassment and violence. Theirs are stories that also need to be told.

    (1) CSCQBE report 2005
    (2) The Girl Child: Having to Fit by Yasmin Jiwani 19998.
    (3) The FREDA Centre for Research on Violence Against Girls and Women
    (4) Sexual Harassment in School, An invisible issue for Girls and Young Women with Disabilities, Harilyn Rouso
    (5) Disabled Women and violence Fact sheet, B.F. Waxman Fiduccia
    (6) Study Report: Violence Against Girls in School by University of Malawi, Centre for Social Research
    (7) Education Basic Statistics Malawi 2005, ME&HRD Statistics Unit, Page 33
    (8) Harilyn Rousso, Sexual Harassment in Schools: An invisible Issue for Girls and Young Women with Disabilities
    (9) Having a Daughter With a Disability: Is it Different For Girls? An extract from news Digest
    (10) Newspaper article, Grace Massa, Chairperson of Albino Association in Malawi
    (11) Groce N. Global Survey on HIV/AIDS and Disability. The World Bank/Yale University. April 2004. http://circa.med.yale.edu/globalsurvey
    (12) Nosek MA, Howland CA, Hughes RB. The investigation of abuse and women with disabilities: going beyond assumptions. Violence Against Women2001; 7:477-99.

    _________________________________

    We Can Do first received this paper via the Disability Information Dissemination Network, which is sponsored by Sightsavers International. If you wish to receive papers like this one directly, you can subscribe to the CSID mailing list by sending an email to csid@bdmail.net or csid@bdonline.com and putting the word “join” in the subject line.


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