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A Time Line of the Campaign for U.S. Ratification of Disability Treaty (CRPD)

Posted on 21 July 2014. Filed under: Uncategorized |

Rambling Justice

This time line was edited and updated on July 17, 2014.

Confused about what has been happening with the campaign for U.S. ratification of the “Disability Treaty” (called, Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, CRPD)?  This post starts with a brief background on what the CRPD (“Disability Treaty”) is.  Then it provides a rough timeline of events in the movement for U.S. ratification of the CRPD.

The CRPD is an international treaty—an agreement among nations that sign and ratify it.  Countries that ratify the CRPD agree to provide people with disabilities the same rights and opportunities that other people have.  The CRPD was partly inspired by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It promotes equality, non-discrimination, and the inclusion of people with disabilities in the mainstream of society.  As of July 2014, 147 countries have ratified the CRPD–but the U.S. has not yet joined them.

When a country

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Acting Assistant Secretary Zeya Delivers a Video Message on the Disabilities Treaty

Posted on 19 December 2013. Filed under: Uncategorized |

Rambling Justice

This captioned 6-minute video from the U.S. Department of State explains why they are working to support U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). For more information on the Disability Treaty, visit http://disabilitytreaty.org. The website at this link also has a great Action Center that makes it easy to call or email Senators to ask their support for the CRPD: it does everything except dial the phone for you! Youth under 30 and students of all ages can sign a CRPD support petition at http://bit.ly/Youth4CRPD.

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IN MY DREAMS I DANCE-AN INCREDIBLE STORY OF ANNE WAFULA STRIKE AGAINST ALL ODDS.

Posted on 6 December 2013. Filed under: Uncategorized |

THAT GIRL WANJA

Image

As a young disabled girl,an activist on human rights ,disability inclusion and most of all an avid reader of African and European literature,always looking for inspiration,I have always noticed that there is a missing link,in terms of autobiographies and literature written by a women with disabilities.There is a huge impact when disability intersects with gender.At that point most certainly,women with disabilities tend to be disenfranchised and dually-discriminated.

In my quest for literature written by women with disabilities then,I came across one Anne Wafula Strike.Born In rural Kenya,but now hailing in the U.K.I was immediately drawn to her,a figure that has campaigned and withstood huge challenges and faced extreme adversity to shine and be a role model to millions of girls with disabilities in the world.

She has documented her life in a 277 paged Autobiography called “In my dreams I Dance”. The book explores her life right from the time…

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KENYA’S DWARFS DAY OUT

Posted on 6 December 2013. Filed under: Uncategorized |

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JOB POST: Russian- and Ukrainian-Speaking Grants Consultant, Disability Rights Fund, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Posted on 15 January 2010. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund seeks Russian- and Ukrainian-Speaking Grants Consultant

Application Deadline: February 1, 2010

About the consultancy
This consultancy position offers a unique opportunity to collaborate with a groundbreaking grantmaking initiative supporting the rights of persons with disabilities. The Grants Consultant will help the Fund build relationships with its target grantee community in Ukraine. The main objectives of the position are to support DRF staff with grantee communications and oversight and to review and evaluate Russian- and Ukrainian-language grant applications. The Fund is looking for a candidate who is able to work in a fast-paced environment, is flexible, takes initiative, and is independent, but team-oriented.

About the Disability Rights Fund
Launched in January of 2008 as a project of the Tides Center, the Disability Rights Fund is a grantmaking collaborative aimed at building community capacity to achieve the rights of all persons with disabilities. The Fund makes modest grants (USD $5000-70,000) to Disabled Persons’ Organizations in the Global South and in Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union for advancing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) at country-level.

About the DRF Grants Process
In 2010, the Fund will launch its second year of grantmaking to organizations in Ukraine (as well as in 24 other countries around the world; in Africa, Ghana, Namibia and Uganda; in Latin America, Ecuador, Mexico, Nicaragua and Peru; in Asia, Bangladesh and India; and 14 Pacific Island Countries). A request for proposals will be posted February 15; the deadline for applications is in April. Grant applications will be evaluated in a staged process, with the consultant and DRF staff completing a first and second review in April-May and preparing dockets for a third review by the DRF Steering Committee in their meeting June 12-13.

Current Ukrainian grantees (who began projects September 1 2009) will be submitting grant mid-term reports in March 2010. The consultant will aid DRF staff in review of these reports and communications with grantees about their project implementation.

Consultant Responsibilities

  • Interface with DRF staff and current Ukrainian grantees to ensure that projects are progressing smoothly.
  • Support DRF staff in Ukrainian grantee mid-term report review and communications with grantees about reports.
  • Conduct grants review, evaluation and tracking process for Ukrainian applicants, in conjunction with DRF staff.
  • Serve as liaison between DRF and Russian and Ukrainian-speaking prospective grantees to help translate emails, answer questions, complete application paperwork, and build relationships.

Skills and qualifications
The ideal candidate should demonstrate:

  • Grantmaking or grantseeking experience preferred
  • Professional written and verbal translation skills Russian and Ukrainian to English and English to Russian and Ukrainian
  • Strong administrative and organizational skills; the ability to manage time efficiently
  • Computer proficiency (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint)
  • Demonstrated ability to work well with diverse populations from around the world
  • Familiarity with the Ukrainian community of DPOs and the CRPD preferred
  • Bachelors degree, or equivalent with minimum 5 years of relevant experience; advanced degree desired

Compensation
Commensurate with experience.

Time Commitment
February-December, 5-40 hours per week

How to apply
Disability Rights Fund, a Project of the Tides Center, is an equal opportunity employer. We strongly encourage and seek applications from women, and people of color, including bilingual and bicultural individuals, as well as members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender communities. People with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Please email or mail a cover letter, resume, three references (with contact information and relationship), writing sample (five page maximum) to:

Disability Rights Fund
Diana Samarasan, Director
Third Sector New England’s NonProfit Center
89 South Street, Suite 203
Boston, MA 02111-2670
dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org (please no phone calls)
Fax: (617) 261-1977

Deadline: Applications must be received by February 1, 2010.

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Email Forum Facilitates Unified Effort to Implement International Disability Rights

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Uncategorized |

The IDA CRPD Forum has been set-up by the International Disability Alliance (IDA) http://www.internationaldisabilityalliance.org/ to continue the work of the International Disability Caucus. The IDA CRPD Forum upholds the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) as the universal standard for the human rights of all persons with disabilities that takes precedence over previous instruments. It is a binding treaty that entered into force for States Parties on May 3, 2008, together with its Optional Protocol authorizing individual complaints, and it reflects the most recent consensus of the United Nations General Assembly on the subject matter of the human rights of persons with disabilities. As such, it is relevant as a guide to interpretation of other treaties and obligations under international law, all of which must be applied without discrimination based on disability.

The adoption of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is not the end of the process, but the beginning of a long and difficult process to put the CRPD into practice.

If the Convention is really going to have the impact we all wish it to have, the disability movement led by the International Disability Alliance needs to engage actively and in a coordinated way in all the stages of ratification, implementation and monitoring of the Convention. It will be vital to ensure that the DPOs at national, regional and international level, representatives of our diverse constituencies, and allied NGOs such as development and human rights organisations, act in a coordinated way. The aim of the IDA CRPD Forum is to develop a strong unified voice from civil society led by Disabled people’s organisations, DPOs, in matters concerning the CRPD.

The key to a strong Convention is the number of people we reach, so it is expected, that all participants of this Elist whether DPOs and/or Individuals will develop wide networks with whom they consult and whom they inform.

To subscribe click on this link and send email;
IDA_CRPD_Forum-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Also see information about the group at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/IDA_CRPD_Forum/

Regards,

Frank Hall-Bentick
Moderator

Resource Links
UN New York http://www.un.org/disabilities/
UN Human Rights Geneva http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crpd/crpds1.htm
Implementation documents http://www.disabilityrightsnow.org.au/node/4



I received this announcement from Frank Hall-Bentick. People should subscribe by emailing IDA_CRPD_Forum-subscribe@yahoogroups.com, NOT We Can Do, thank you.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/IDA_CRPD_Forum/

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News from Kyrgyzstan: Projects, Laws, Funding Opportunities

Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Families, Funding, Human Rights, News, Policy & Legislation, Uncategorized, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following newsletter was sent to We Can Do from Kyrgyzstan–thanks to Azat Israilov for passing this on. This contains news about projects for people with disabilities in Kyrgyzstan; a new law protecting the rights of people with disabilities; the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and announcements for a couple of funding opportunities. Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

We are for equal possibilities and better future!
INFORMATIONAL BULLETIN

The newsletter is published under the Health Prom project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund

July 2008
Content:
Letter from A.Israilov, national in-country project manager
Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Brief information about participants of the project
HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Young people: new horizons!
President signed the Decree “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The new law about social order accepted
Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for
people with disabilities

Projects on employment for disabled people
The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Grants

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Dear readers, colleagues and partners,

We welcome you on the pages of the first issue of the Informational bulletin which is published under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund. The important aims of the bulletin will be providing news that are related to children with special needs and their families, and also updating on the progress of the project. The bulletin will be published and distributed once a quarter. At the same time neither the project, nor the bulletin will be involved in political processes in the country. In the first issue you will find some information on the project, its participants and also learn about
some latest events in social sphere of Kyrgyzstan.

It is hoped that the bulletin as a specialist publication will continue its existence beyond the project, and will become a useful source of information for parents and concerned organizations and people. And to become so we will be delighted to publish your interesting news and helpful information which you would like to share with.
Sincerely,
A.Israilov, national in-country project manager

“Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”
Contacts: Bishkek, m/r Kok-Zhar, h. 1, p/p 4, Tel./fax (0312) 517634, aisrail@gmail.com

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Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Charitable organisation HealthProm, located in London, UK, together with the Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI) and Public Association “Shoola Kol” has started a project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in the Kyrgyz Republic” funded by the Big Lottery Fund. The project is for three years and will help to establish two rehabilitation and resource centres in two pilot localities – Bishkek and Issyk-Kul oblast with Bokonbaevo v. as a centre. The project aims to improve on improving health and well-being of young children with disabilities and their parents through rehabilitation services, informational support and consultations. The project will not be involved in politics.

Prior to the project beginning there were study visits and research done during which the distress of people with disabilities, especially children, was revealed, whose families belong to the group with the lowest incomes in the country. According to the Ministry of Labour and Social Development, there are about 117 thousand people with disabilities in the republic now, out of them more than nineteen thousand are younger than 18, and 66% out of general number live in rural areas. The number of the disabled makes up 2,1% of the whole population while in the developed countries this figure varies approximately from 10 up to 20% (for example, in
the UK it is about 15%, in Russia up to 10%).

The project will fill the gap in knowledge and information resources in the Republic about prevention of disability, alternative approaches to child disability. Various trainings based on current needs will improve knowledge and skills of people with disabilities as well as of medical and social professionals. There will be developed or translated and published a number of necessary materials, and a specialised web site on disability issues will be created. A specialised microbus for each centre will connect experts and volunteers with disabled children and their families in the remote areas.

“The project focuses on sustainable development of our partners and the centres, and also on cooperation with local communities, non-governmental organisations and relevant local government agencies.” – underlines Tatyana Buynovskaja, the project manager. – “It includes programs on early intervention and providing advisory and practical support to new families with disabled children.” Tamara Dyikanbaeva, ARDI chairwoman, adds: “The project was developed taking into account the needs and wishes of parents and disabled children, considering provision of complex and versatile support to children and their parents. The project activity is based on social model of disability which recognises, that disability is not an illness (and in the developed countries it was recognised and accepted), and disabled people do not need pity and constant
guardianship, but need possibilities to study, work and communicate to become useful members of society”.

As a result of project activities it is planned to reach out about one and a half thousand parents of disabled children, and these children can participate in joint social events together with other children. It is expected in the end of the project the rehabilitation and resource centres in cooperation with local communities and government agencies will become vital for work with disabled children and their parents, and that this experience can be replicated in other regions.

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Brief information about participants of the project
Partner organisations responsible for implementing the project:

HealthProm – a charitable non-commercial organisation, based in London, works since 1984 with local communities for improving health and social support for vulnerable women and children in the countries of the former Soviet Union (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Russia, Uzbekistan, Ukraine, Tajikistan and recently in Kyrgyzstan). The primary activities of the organisation are social and medical projects. Recently HealthProm has successfully finished similar (to Kyrgyzstan) a 3-year project in Altay region of Russia. Local authorities immediately supported the initiative and provided premises and financing for two centres.

The Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI), Bishkek, established in 1995, gives advisory support to parents of disabled children, and also aspires to realise capabilities of disabled children and youth by their development and integration into society.

Public Association Shoola Kol, Bokonbaevo v. in Issyk-Kul region, is the human rights organisation and engaged in educational activity and raise public awareness. Shoola Kol also advises and educates people with disabilities and helps them establish NGOs for advancement of interests and rights of disabled people.

People who are involved in the project:
* Tatyana Buynovskaya – HealthProm manager, as well as the project manager “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund.
* Jonathan Watkins – senior project expert, social worker, consultant.
* Mark Hunter – child disability consultant, paediatrician.
* Azat Israilov – in-country project manager in Kyrgyzstan.
* Tamara Dyikanbaeva – Association of Parents of Disabled Children chair, project officer in Bishkek.
* Antonina Lee – Shoola Kol chair, project coordinator in Issyk-Kul region, Bokonbaevo.

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HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Under the project funded by the Big Lottery Fund HealthProm delegation of three people (see list above) have visited Kyrgyzstan for meetings with the representatives of government agencies and international and local non-governmental organisations. Between 11 and 23d May, 33 meetings took place in Bishkek and Bokonbaevo, one of them was an interview to the newspaper “Vechernij Bishkek”. In addition HealthProm representatives visited homes of families with disabled children. The results of these meetings will help partners to define the area of specialization for new rehabilitation centres. These centres will work in close interaction with local authorities and government agencies. Currently through consultations with local authorities and additional meetings there is a search for premises for the future centres as one of overall
project objectives is sustainability of the centres.

Young people: new horizons!
The youth of the Association of Parents of Disabled Children is becoming more active in public life of the country, and has also achieved some successes in education. In June this year Seinep Dyikanbaeva, project and PR manager of ARDI, has been named one of the first New Heroes of Kyrgyzstan for the positive contribution to the development of our society, a nomination organised by NGO “Atool” (Karakol). More detailed information can be found at: http://www.atuul.kg/?pid=19&hid=3. In addition, recently Seinep, a first year student of the American University in the Central Asia, has passed through a rigid competitive selection for a year training in Japan, sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA).

Ukei Muratalieva, another active young volunteer of ARDI, a student of the Kyrgyz Technical University, has been chosen together with other two Kyrgyz citizens for another training program on leadership and building networks, also sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA). She leaves for a month for Tokyo to learn how to train and at the same time to learn how local disabled people live and the organisations of disabled people work. After returning home she will conduct a series of trainings and seminars.
Best wishes to them!

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President signed the Law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
President of the Kyrgyz Republic has signed the law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”.

This law aims to improve social protection of persons with disabilities, provide them with equal with other citizens of the Kyrgyz Republic possibilities to practice their rights and freedoms, avoid restrictions in their lives.
Source: 24.kg, 12 April 2008

UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The General Assembly of the United Nations in the beginning of June, 2008 approved the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. It became the first universal international legal document aiming to protect the rights of persons with various kinds of permanent physical, mental, intellectual or sensor limitations. The convention contains 50 articles that protect and encourage the rights of the disabled, decrease discrimination towards them, provide them with rights to work, health services, education and full participation in society life, and also access to justice, inviolability of person, freedom from exploitation and abuse, and freedom of movement.
Source: 24.kg, 16 June 2008

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The new law about social order accepted
The law accepted in the second reading on 5th June this year intends to involve non-commercial organisations in realisation of government social programs through placing on a competitive basis and implementation the government social orders. This will also allow the government to essentially increase the efficiency of implementation of social programs and to involve in social sphere additional human, material and financial resources from non-government sources and it will partially reduce dependence of the non-governmental organisations on foreign funding.

The Minister of labour and social development of the Kyrgyz Republic Uktomkhan Abdullaeva supporting the law, underlined that “now in Kyrgyzstan, some social establishments, children’s homes, boarding schools, houses for aged people opened by the donor funding and the international organisations are on the verge of closing because of the termination of their financing by the foreign organisations. So why can’t we support the efforts of non-governmental organisations and public associations which will render social services to the
population and care for certain number of the aged, homeless children or the disabled who cannot be accommodated in the formal establishments now since there are no places or shortage of funds?”.

Similar laws has been successfully working for a long time in the countries of Europe, in Kazakhstan and 6 federal areas of Russia. Source:
Source: “The third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for people with disabilities
“The Japanese agency for international cooperation (JICA) plans to open in Kyrgyzstan a centre for people with disabilities”, – informed today at a press conference Uktomkhan Abdullaeva, the Minister of labour and social development of KR. According to her, there is the Asian-Pacific centre on problems of the disabled located in Japan. It is going to expand its activities in Central Asia. “After a working visit by Kyrgyz delegation to Japan it decided to open a head office in Kyrgyzstan for the countries of CA. It will bring to the republic additional investments. After the discussion of details of opening of the centre in October 2008 an international conference will take place in which well-known people with disabilities will take part”, – says Uktomkhan Abdullaeva.

As Minister of labour and social development KP emphasizes, such decision was affected by the new law “About the rights and guarantees of people with disabilities” recently passed by the government. “We have excluded articles from it that this category of people cannot work. Their number in workforce should make not less than 5 percent”, – said Uktomhan Abdullaeva.
Source: 24.kg, 22.05.08

Projects on employment for disabled people
We have to break the stereotype that disabled people are defective, said Edward Vinter, the executive director of Eurasia Foundation in Central Asia (EFCA). According to his words, disabled people in Kyrgyzstan are especially vulnerable group of population as being full members of society they simply cannot get a job. Many businessmen, in his opinion, are just confident that the disabled cannot work properly. In this regard, there are now some projects in Kyrgyzstan aiming to render assistance to disabled people in work search. In particular, the Eurasia Foundation in CA together with the Republican independent association of disabled women has
started cooperation with businesses of Bishkek and their management in granting workplaces for disabled people. There will also be a vacancy fair in Bishkek for people with disabilities.

Besides that, today the World Bank and EFCA declared winners of the Program of small grants of 2008 in Kyrgyzstan. “It is intended for the local organisations of a civil society. For 1996-2007 we have given out 121 small grants for a total sum of $315 thousand”, – said the chief executive of Fund Eurasia in the Central Asia Edward Vinter. Thirteen organisations have become winners.
Source: 24.kg

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The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
The Minister of Education and Science Ishenkul Boldzhurova presented a law providing such a grant recently at a committee meeting on international affairs and inter-parliamentary communications of the parliament of KR. She said, that in 2005 the ministry of education and science requested the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to support children with disabilities. “This project is supported by the Japanese Fund on reduction of poverty which will allocate $1 million, $50 thousands are provided by our government”, – added Ishenkul Boldzhurova.

The minister informed, that in the republic there are now about 19 thousand disabled children of which 250 children study at comprehensive schools in KR, in addition three thousand children study at the special boarding schools.

Ishenkul Boldzhurova noted that grant money will go on preparation of methodical manuals for schools and future teachers for training children with disabilities. According to her, for implementing the future project 35 comprehensive schools all over the country have already been selected – 5 in each region of the country, and also four boarding schools (internats) and two kindergartens.
Source: 24.kg, 15.04.2008

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Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Thanks to allocated 50 holiday vouchers by the Kyrgyzstan Federation of Trade unions the Association of Parents of Disabled Children organised on 4 – 25 July holiday for members of the Association, including 50 children ith special needs. Children’s recreational centre “Ulan” located near Balykchy accommodated them, and under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund transportation expenses for all children have been covered.

The recreational centre can accommodate about 250 people. Besides swimming on lake, there were joint cultural events organised for children, which promoted integration of disabled children with other children, and also promoted tolerance among their peers.

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Grants
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) (Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan) on behalf of the Canadian Foundation announces call for applications for small grants program for Central Asia.

The main areas: poverty reduction, sustainable development, increase participation of women, protection the children’s rights, capacity building for organisations, environment.

The maximum size of a grant is $20,000. The general grant pool is $50,000.

Projects should be short-term ending and presenting a financial report until 1st March 2009. For additional information please write to Anna Zhugan on: Anna. Zhugan@international.gc.ca

Bradley Foundation contests
Bradley Foundation supports: conducting annual events, holding conferences and seminars, purchasing equipment, general support, training, investments related to a project, publications, researches, stipends, development of educational programs.

Applications accepted: 1 March, 1 July, 1 September, 1 December each year.

The size of a grant: from $100 up to $550,000.

Priority areas of support: development of civic sense – projects can be aimed at any sphere of public life (economy, politics, culture, civil society), but they should advance citizenship to the bottom idea of elections and vote. For example, these can be projects showing increased public participation, political or academic research, media projects and others. Building projects and individuals are not financed.

Application procedure can be found at the Fund’s site. Results of selection appear in February, May-June, September and November, depending on application submission. More information can be found at: http://www.bradleyfdn.org/
Source: “the Third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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This newsletter sent to We Can Do by Azat Israilov. People who wish to receive future issues of this newsletter, in PDF format, via email should inquire by email at aisrail@gmail.com (NOT with We Can Do)

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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We Can Do First Anniversary!

Posted on 24 July 2008. Filed under: Introduction to "We Can Do", News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , |

It has now been one year since the very first We Can Do post went up a little after 9 p.m. (EST) on July 24, 2007. What has happened with this blog in that time?

In that time, thousands of individual people have browsed the pages at this blog, for a grand total of 100,000 page views. More than 200 of you subscribe to We Can Do so you know when to check the blog for the newest blog posts.

The geographical representation among the readers have fluctuated somewhat over time, but currently a little more than a quarter of you are from the United States; a little more than 10% are from India, and a little more than a quarter from East and South Asia as a whole; about 19% are from Africa; and 14% are from Europe. In other words, you come from around the globe. China and Latin America, however, are very much under-represented. I’d love to have more readers from these regions–suggestions for how to reach them are welcome!

The Most Popular We Can Do Pages
A few of the most popular blog posts and individual pages at We Can Do include the following:

Under-Rated Blog Posts
Some blog posts, at least in my humble opinion, might have been under-rated.

  • Only a few dozen people have looked at the blog post describing a resource that disability advocates can use to help schools in their country be more inclusive of students with disabilities–a publication entitled Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen. Follow the link to learn how to download the publication.
  • The United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) has a new web resource that may be helpful for actively people involved in advocating for human rights for people with disabilities. The post entitled UN Human Rights Disability Section describes, and links to, this resource.
  • One of my personal favorites is a blog post that has been read by fewer than 100 people: an essay I wrote a couple of months ago entitled “The Farmer, the Spoon, and the Plow,” an allegorical tale about why the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is worth celebrating–and why the work of disability advocates around the world.
  • I also hope that some of you will consider using the page on Resources, Toolkits, and Funding to help you find useful materials (and a few funding sources) that you can use to improve the lives of people with disabilities in your country, or in the countries where you work. Or look for Research, reports, papers, and statistics. Some of the items that I posted months ago may still be relevant and helpful today.

What Do YOU Think?
I hope some of you will take a few minutes to add a few thoughts of your own in the comments area below this blog post. What blog posts or links at We Can Do have been the most helpful for you? What resources did you discover through this blog? How have you been using those resources to improve the lives of people with disabilities? What resources would you particularly recommend for other We Can Do readers? What kind of content do you hope I will share at this blog during its second year of existence? Do you have suggestions for how I could make We Can Do more useful for you and other disability advocates in developing countries, or for mainstream international development professionals learning how to make their programs more inclusive?

Please let me hear your thoughts!

THANK YOU
I owe a big thank you to all the people who have given me feedback on this blog in the past year, or who have subscribed to this blog, or who simply come back to this site again and again to see the latest materials. We Can Do is entirely a volunteer effort that I work on in my free time outside of work, schooling, and volunteer activities. Your feedback helps motivate me to keep going.

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JOB POST: Survey of People with Disabilities in Nigeria

Posted on 15 July 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized |

Invitation for Pre-Qualification as a Resource Person Under MDG Programme

The Federal Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development invites interested Resource Persons for Pre-qualification to tender to conduct a nationwide survey of Persons with disabilities (PWDs) in Nigeria and to assist the department prepare modalities for carrying out the National Baseline Survey on Persons with Disabilities in Nigeria.

Application deadline July 21, 2008
_
Questions should be directed to:
Aireomiye Melchy Olamide James
Prothese Disability Economic Empowerment Project Services
at: pdeepservices@gmail.com
(NOT to We Can Do)


Qualification and Experience

Interested candidates should have garnered 10 years of professional working experience in areas of demographic and Survey research at both national and International levels.

  • Expert knowledge of disability issues
  • Experience of working with government/CSOs/NGOs
  • Ability to organize and mobilize people
  • Demonstrated leadership qualities
  • Ability to maintain effective report with different levels/group of people.
  • Demonstrated ability to plan and execute agreed task on schedule and within specified budget.
  • complete fluency in English
  • Experience in empirical research including field surveys
  • knowledge of Human Rights including Rights of Persons with disabilities.
  • Good writing and communication skills

Eligibility
Both National, and International Disability survey experts are eligible to apply.

——————————————————
Questions should be directed to:
Aireomiye Melchy Olamide James
Prothese Disability Economic Empowerment Project Services
at: pdeepservices@gmail.com
——————————————————–

Application should be Forwarded to:

The Ministerial Tenders Board
Federal Ministry of Women Affairs and
Social Development
Federal Secretariat Complex,
Shehu Shagari Way
Maitama,
First Floor RM 152
Abuja

Application should be submitted not later than two weeks from the date of this publication i.e. Monday 7th July 2008. Only shortlisted candidates who are duly registered with the Ministry will be contacted.

The application should also include the following documents (incomplete applications will not be considered)

(a) a letter of intent ( a minimum of two pages, maximum of three pages)

– Brief description of your work and your position and responsibilities within your organization.
– Describe what experience, qualities and skills you will bring to bear on the job.

(b) Two passport photographs

(c) Curriculum Vitae (maximum of Five pages); listing your education (degrees, qualification etc; your work experience (organizations you worked for, projects you were involved in); and if applicable a list of publications.

The Resource person should be equipped with the analytical and conceptual skills needed to understand disability issues in the context of demographic, economic and social data on persons with disabilities in Nigeria and the skills required for effectively carrying out a nationwide survey.



We Can Do received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email distribution list, which circulates announcements related to international development. Please note that any inquiries should be directed to the email address provided in the blog post above, NOT to We Can Do. Similarly, applications should closely follow the instructions given above and should NOT be directed to We Can Do. Thank you.

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VIII International Human Rights Colloquium

Posted on 18 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, Uncategorized, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , |

 

VIII International Human Rights Colloquium
“60th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: Challenges for the Global South”

8 to 15 november 2008, sao paulo, brazil

What is the International Human Rights Colloquium?
The Colloquium is an annual capacity building and peer-learning event designed for young activists from the Global South (Africa, Asia and Latin America). The objective of the VIII International Human Rights Colloquium is to strengthen the impact of human rights activists work and to offer the opportunity to build new collaborative networks among activists, academics and the Organization of the United Nations (ONU). 

Structure
The Colloquium offers lectures, seminars and working groups. In the morning sessions, participants will attend lectures, while in the afternoon sessions, they will take part in workshops and working groups, as well as visit human rights organizations.

Organization
The VIII Colloquium is organized by Conectas Human Rights together with Sur – Human Rights University Network. The VIII Colloquium is supported by Open Society Institute, the Ford Foundation, the United Nations Democracy Fund (UNDEF), among others.

Who can apply?
Young human rights defenders from the Global South who demonstrate commitment to the human rights cause as well as at least two-years of professional experience in the area. Additionally, criteria such as race, gender, and regional/social origin will be taken into
consideration during the selection process. Candidates who have participated in previous colloquia are not eligible for participation in 2008.

Fees and Scholarships
In order to cover costs, each participant must pay a participation fee.  A limited number of scholarships will be granted to guarantee participation of individuals. Candidates should submit a written request along with the application to be considered for a scholarship.

Applications
Required documents:

  • Application form;
  • 1 Reference Letter (to be sent by mail or e-mail);
  • Letter of Support from your organization;
  • Resume/C.V. (1 page);
  • Writing sample (1 page)

 Applications for the VIII International Human Rights Colloquium will be accepted until June 30th, 2008.

Candidates can apply on-line at www.conectas.org/coloquio (NOT at We Can Do) or download the application form (Word format, 155 Kb). The off-line version of the Application Form should be submitted by e-mail to coloquio@conectas.org. Candidates will be notified on August 1st, 2008.

Please, share this information with your colleges and partners!

 For more information, please visit: http://www.conectas.org/coloquio or email
coloquio@conectas.org (NOT We Can Do!)

Information is available in English, Portuguese, and Spanish.

I am not familiar with what accommodations the Colloquium organizers are able to offer to participants with disabilities. Interested parties are urged to communicate directly with them (email
coloquio@conectas.org, NOT We Can Do) regarding their needs.

Anyone with prior experience with this colloquium is encouraged to leave comments in the comments area below.



We Can Do received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD) listserve. Readers may join the GPDD listserve for themselves by contacting Maria Reina at mvreina@law.syr.edu.

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Disability Rights Fund Opens Grantmaking to DPOs in 7 Countries

Posted on 16 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

En español

PRESS RELEASE
Disability Rights Fund Opens Grantmaking to DPOs in 7 Countries

JUNE 16, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced its first grants competition.

The broad objective of the Fund — which was launched by the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the United Kingdom Department for International Development, and an anonymous donor on the first anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) — is to empower disabled persons organizations in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to effectively implement and monitor the CPRD.

In 2008, the Fund plans to give out a total of USD $700,000 in one-year grants ranging from USD $5000 – $50,000 and aimed at awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

To be eligible for this year’s grants program, applicant organizations must be based in and conduct the majority of their activities in the following seven countries: in Africa, Ghana, Namibia and Uganda; in Latin America, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru; in Asia, Bangladesh. In these countries, the Fund will support Disabled Persons’ Organizations activities that advance the human rights of persons with disabilities at country-level.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, www.disabilityrightsfund.org. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by July 15. The deadline for applications is August 15.

Disability Rights Fund Steering Committee Co-Chair, William Rowland, President of the World Blind Union, stated “The Disability Rights Fund heralds an innovative partnership between donors and persons with disabilities. The flow of new resources to support our struggle for rights is a development of major significance.”

####

COMUNICADO DE PRENSA
El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad abre su período de subvenciones a OPDs en 7 Países

16 de junio de 2008

PARA SU INMEDIATA PUBLICACIÓN

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad, una iniciativa colaborativa que apoya los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad – anunció hoy su primera competición por subvenciones.

El objetivo amplio del Fondo – que fue lanzado por el Open Society Institute, el Sigrid Rausing Trust, el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional del gobierno británico, y un donante anónimo, en el primer aniversario de la Convención Sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD) de las Naciones Unidas – es el de empoderar a organizaciones de personas con discapacidad en el mundo en desarrollo y la Europa del Este/antigua Unión Soviética, para la implementación y monitoreo efectivos de la CDPD.

En el 2008, el Fondo tiene planificado otorgar un total de USD $700,000 (dólares estadounidenses) en subvenciones de un año de duración que varían desde los USD $5,000 hasta $50,000, dirigidos al aumento de la concientización, el fortalecimiento de alianzas y redes, y la defensa de derechos.

Para poder optar al programa de subvenciones de este año, las organizaciones aplicantes deben tener su sede y realizar la mayoría de sus actividades en alguno de los siguientes siete países: en África, Ghana, Namibia y Uganda; en América Latina, Ecuador, Nicaragua y Perú; en Asia, Bangladesh. En estos países, el Fondo apoyará actividades de las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad que contribuyan al avance de la CDPD a nivel de los países.

Se alienta a que las organizaciones interesadas revisen los criterios de eligibilidad y los detalles para aplicar que se encuentran en el sitio de Internet del Fondo: www.disabilityrightsfund.org. Cualquier pregunta acerca del proceso para realizar propuestas deberán dirigirse a: info@disabilityrightsfund.org a más tardar el 15 de julio de 2008. La última fecha para enviar aplicaciones es el 15 de agosto de 2008.

William Rowland, Co-Presidente del Comité Coordinador del Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad, quien también funge como Presidente de la Unión Mundial de Ciegos, declaró “El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad ha constituído una asociación innovadora entre donantes y personas con discapacidad. La canalización de nuevos recursos hacia la lucha por reivindicar nuestros derechos, es un desarrollo de importancia significativa.”



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this press release for publication at We Can Do.

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CONFERENCE: 2nd Intl Forum of the Deaf in Morocco on Mental Health

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Call for Nominations or Applications, Deaf, Events and Conferences, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Psychiatric Disabilities, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The 2nd international Forum of the Deaf

The 2nd International Forum of the Deaf in Morocco is an initiative that aims to promote: Mental Health awareness among the medical core and the deaf community of Morocco. The establishment of  a national policy to investigate the linguistic, social, mental health, and physical needs of the deaf; for the purpose of developing a cohesive network for the implantation of programs to benefit the unification of the deaf community in Morocco. Subsequently, it will promote contact, participation and cooperation among deaf associations.
 
This Forum is entitled “Mental health and deafness” which will be held in the city of Fez, in order to better educate the population on the issues facing the deaf community.  In accordance with the royal directives, and the initiative of human development, The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf Association, The Africa Contact Group For Mental Health and Deafness and the World Federation of the Deaf are organizing a Forum of the deaf of Morocco from October 9th to 11th 2008.  45 deaf associations with two delegates (1 deaf and 1 hearing) and 120 specialized educators representing all of Morocco national territories will be invited to attend the forum. The forum of the Deaf of Morocco will comprise of three major themes: Mental Health and deafness, Education and academic qualification, and Sign language.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf is engaged in a number of campaigns to raise the standard of living of the deaf in Morocco. There is a growing public interest in the use of sign language in the various social domains where the deaf are involved. These include courts of law, educational institutions, police stations, and other various places of work. An outstanding example of this association’s dedication for the empowerment of the deaf are a special education training for educators May 2008, a SL training for police officers March 2008 and two summer youth camps for the deaf that were held in Rabat August 2006 and Salé August 2007.  These camps gave the deaf youth of Morocco a chance to interact with one another and to build life long friendships.  As well as, the first steps in building cooperation and participation among deaf associations in Morocco.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS), is looking for organizations to help them organize the second international forum of the deaf in Fez.

The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) is a non-governmental organization that strives to address the needs of the entire community, including the deaf youth of Morocco. Its membership consists of over 20 professionals from the city and surrounding areas of the province who have come together to pool their resources and labor in order to help develop the deaf community. The association was incorporated in 2006 under the laws of Morocco with the goal of helping to develop the social and economic roles of the deaf in the larger society. They are led by elected officers, including: a president, treasurer, secretary and vice president, who are chosen each year at an annual meeting.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) is nonprofit and raises money for projects through donations from members, grants, and donations from local, national and international government, and non-government organizations. The group has received various awards and certificates of recognition from the government in advancing the status of the deaf.

The association established The First International Forum of the Deaf of Morocco in 2006 in collaboration with the Dutch Foundation Marokkofonds.  The forum was an instrumental opportunity to promote deaf issues in Morocco and International.  This association has also
been advocating the nationwide adoption of sign language as the medium of instruction in all deaf schools and training institutions.

Furthermore, they lobby the Moroccan government of the challenges facing the deaf community.  Finally, this association developed and implemented deaf youth summer camps in association with the Ministry of Sports and Youth.
 
The successful projects led by The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) have illustrated the need to develop deaf awareness, and networking skills to overcome the limited opportunities for the deaf community within the Moroccan society as a whole. The members of The Moroccan
Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) approaches international institutions with the idea of organizing a group of deaf associations and helping them develop these specific skills, with an end goal of enabling them to advance from their current social and economic situation.

Expected outcomes

  • Meadows of 200 thousand deaf persons together with the Moroccan medical core will be sensitized on the mental health and human right of the deaf issues.
  • Implementing awareness raising projects.
  • Deaf empowerment.
  • Training in special education and sign language
  • Establishing a wide range of contacts.

Methodology
 The statistics of 200 thousand deaf persons usually expose a big number of the deaf to the means of specific communication of the handicapped and the non-implication of the handicapped in the programs or fight projects against the sexually transmittable diseases.

 After the difficulties proven by this category of the handicapped the Moroccan Forum of the Deaf Association takes advantage of this occasion to initiate a campaign of sensitization on the deaf problems, with the assistance of the interpreters in signs. It will also target the medical core and the Moroccan administrations to explain through the different international experts the importance of mental health and deafness.
 
The proposed forum will focus on many of the aforementioned elements in a professional sitting.  A subcommittee of Moroccan facilitators, French facilitators, and other Volunteers will focus on planning programs, while other members of the Moroccan Forum of the Deaf will concentrate on administrative elements of the forum. In implementing both of these as well as cultural activities, the forum will meet the aforementioned objectives.
 
Economic and Social Exchange:

  • Presentations on management methods for the purposes of developing and implementing projects will be presented.
  • Presentation on education and vocational training.
  • Presentation on sign language in the media.
  • Presentations on the need for a unified signing language for the purpose of educational and social development of the deaf will be presented.
  • Exhibition of handcrafted products made by the deaf will be on display.
  • Associations of the deaf will perform musical concert and theatrical presentations daily.

Workshops

  • Mental health and Deafness
  • Education and vocational training
  • Sign language linguistics

If you have any questions related to the conference please feel free to contact :

Mr. Abdelaziz Arssi- Project Director 
Tel/SMS : 0021262102415
Fax:0021235601651
Mail: fmsourds@gmail.com 

Mr. Mohammed DDich -Program Manager
Tel/SMS:0021266511034
Mail:fmsourds@gmail.com

Mr.Rachid El Ouardi- Finance Manager
Tel/SMS: 0021262216863
Mail: fmsourds@gmail.com 

Thank you for your time and consideration on this important issue facing the deaf community of Morocco. 



We Can Do received this announcement via the AdHoc_IDC listserv. People interested in the conference should please contact one of the organizers directly, not We Can Do. (Note their phone numbers and email address given above.)

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CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: International Service Human Rights Awards

Posted on 28 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opportunities, Poverty, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

International Service, a development agency that works in Latin America, West Africa, and the Middle East, is seeking nominations for its annual International Service Human Rights Awards.

We Can Do readers should please note that one of their categories is for grass roots activists or organizations working in the area of disability rights. This would be an opportunity for readers to help bring attention and recognition to a leader in the disability rights advocacy field who you have long admired. Rosangela Berman-Bieler was recognized in 2007.

The submission deadline is July 3, 2008.

International Service Human Rights Awards

Introduction and Guidelines
The International Service Human Rights Awards recognise grassroots organisations, international development workers and activists who work for change at a local, national or international level.

The Awards aim to honour organisations and individuals that work at the very grassroots level in promoting human rights and effecting real change in the lives of people. They seek to celebrate the work of the ‘unsung heroes’ in the struggle for human rights. These Awards are meant to complement rather than compete with other awards honouring people who promote social, economic and political change around the world.

The Awards have four objectives:

1. To affirm the importance of the work which is aimed at changing the things that cause people in society to be excluded, impoverished or disempowered.
2. To promote the importance of doing this work in a way which demonstrates an attitude of fundamental respect for all people, but especially for those who suffer from poverty and injustice.
3. To raise the profile of the individual or organisational achievement via press coverage in the UK and in the country in which the organisation or individual is based.
4. To complement existing higher profile awards in recognising grassroots work.

Eligibility criteria
Nominees must be individuals or organisations (including local partner organisations and international NGOs) working in development in any county in the world. Nominees can be nominated by international development agencies and human rights organisations. The activities referred to in the nomination must be activities which are currently underway or have recently been completed.

Categories
The Award for the Defence of the Human Rights of Women
The prize will be given for activities that have worked to empower, protect or promote women’s rights.

The Award for the Defence of the Human Rights of Children
The prize will be given for activities that have worked to protect children’s rights through access to healthcare, education or positive recreation.

The Award for the Defence of the Human Rights of Disabled People
The prize will be given for activities that have worked to achieve equal opportunities for disabled people.

The Award for the Defence of the Human Rights of People Living with HIV/AIDS
The prize will be given for activities that have worked to stop the spread of HIV/Aids in any country or empowered those who have already contracted the disease.

The Global Human Rights Defender
The prize will be given in recognition of someone who uses their influence or celebrity to campaign for human rights for all. International Service believes that grassroots work can also be promoted by individuals or organisations that use their influence or celebrity to raise the profile of the struggle for universal human rights.

Submission deadline
Thursday 3rd July 2008

Our panel of judges will meet to assess the nominations and agree upon a winner in each category. The judges’ decisions will be advertised in the International Service Human Rights Awards website (www.is-humanrightsawards.org) within a period of two months after the submission deadline. Winners will be contacted to inform them about the results. International Service will not contact unsuccessful entries, but enquiries can be made.

Awards presentation
The International Service Human Rights Awards presentation will take place on 8th December 2008 at the Terrace Marquee at the House of Commons.

The judging panel
The composition of the jury panel aims to include individuals from a wide range of backgrounds with interest in human rights. The 2008 panel is composed of people from the corporate, academic and development sectors.
• Haleh Afshar
• Marika Freris
• Tim Hancock
• Bryan Sanderson
• Candy Whittome

The decision of the judges will be final.

How to fill in the entry form
Each entrant is required to submit a completed entry form. You can download the awards entry form in Word format (176 Kb) at http://www.is-humanrightsawards.co.uk/is_hr_nomination_%20form%202008.doc, or you can download the awards entry form in PDF format (57 Kb) at http://www.is-humanrightsawards.co.uk/is_hr_nomination_%20form%202008.pdf

Please send completed entry forms and any supporting materials to humanrights@internationalservice.org.uk or to Human Rights Awards, International Service, 57 Goodramgate, York, YO1 7FX, England.

Electronic supporting materials should be in pdf, rtf, Windows Office XP or previous versions, jpeg or gif formats.

For further detail on the International Service Human Rights Awards, please consult their web site at http://www.is-humanrightsawards.org/

If you have any queries do not hesitate to contact International Service on 01904 647799 or Valeria Guarneros at vguarneros@unais.org.uk



Thank you to Valeria Guarneros for submitting this announcement to We Can Do. Readers with inquiries about this announcement should please either consult the awards web site or contact Valeria Guarneros, not We Can Do.

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Report on RI=USCID Seminar on Implementation of Draft UN CRPD

Posted on 29 April 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Reports, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Today, the international disability rights treaty, more commonly known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is on the verge of entering into force this May 3, 2008. But a mere year ago, in March 2007, the CRPD had only just been opened for countries to sign and ratify. And in August 2006, negotiations for the CRPD had just come to a conclusion.

Before the ink had dried on the latest agreed-upon text, Rehabilitation International and the United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD) convened a Seminar on Implementation of the Draft UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. A 20-page report from the seminar (PDF format, 144 Kb) summarizes the views presented there by government officials and members of civil society and academia on how to develop programs and policies that incorporate the CRPD. It identifies key goals, discusses best practice, and discusses how to ratify and implement the CRPD. Participants called upon people with disabilities to hold, not only individual governments, but also international organizations such as the World Bank accountable for being more inclusive.

The report presents a series of recommendations for how the United Nations, country governments, civil society organizations (especially disabled people organizations), and others can raise awareness for the CRPD, advocate for its ratification and implementation, and otherwise ensure that people with disabilities are able to enjoy their human rights in their daily lives.

The CRPD, as the first international, legally binding human rights instrument to protect the rights of people with disabilities, will help protect a wide range of rights such as access to education and health services; the right of people with disabilities to live in the community (not institutions); equal access to justice; the right to vote; and more. Learn more about the CRPD and how it is meant to help people with disabilities around the world by taking a few minutes to read the RatifyNow FAQ.

Download the full report in PDF format (144 Kb) at:

http://www.riglobal.org/meetings/Report_ImplementationSeminar_TxtOnly.pdf



We Can Do learned about the RI-USCID Seminar report by browsing the AskSource.info database on health, disability, and development.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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NEWS: Disabled to Vote in Karnataka, India

Posted on 22 April 2008. Filed under: Blind, Democratic Participation, Human Rights, Mobility Impariments, News, South Asian Region, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

People with disabilities in Karnataka, India, have now won the right to accessible polling locations in the upcoming May 10, 2008, assembly elections, Action Aid India has reported.  All officials involved with the upcoming election have been alerted to the requirement to install ramps and Braille voting booths so that people with mobility and vision impairments will be able to vote.

Delegates, including people who use wheelchairs or have vision impairments, visited political party officies to raise demands for access to voting polls.  However, the offices themselves were not accessible to the delegates because they had no ramps. 

Read the full story on the successful fight to achieve voting rights for disabled people in Karnataka, India, at:

http://actionaidindia.org/People_with_disability_Karnataka%20fight_to_make_election_count.htm

Are you working to achieve voting rights for disabled people in your own country?  If so, you might wish to review a letter written to Chief Electoral Officers in India  (PDF format, 2.29 Mb) last fall as part of the campaign to advocate for more accessible voting locations; unfortunately, the second part of the PDF file seems to be an image, which may be inaccessible to people using screen readers:

http://actionaidindia.org/download/disabled_right_group.pdf

While you are at the Action Aid India web site, you may wish to also browse among some of the other resources linked there related to disability rights.



We Can Do first learned about this news from Ghulam Nabi Nizamani.

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TRAINING the Trainer in Community Based Rehabilitation

Posted on 2 April 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

TOT in Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR)
25th of August to the 5th of September 2008
The Netherlands

People interested in applying are urged to apply with Enablement well in advance.

Enabling CBR

General objective
You will acquire the theory, skills and tools to develop and implement effective training programmes.

Specific Objectives
At the end of the ToT you will:

  • be sensitive to issues encountered in the adult learning process;
  • be able to assess training needs and set learning objectives
  • be able to choose and use training methods and materials using the principles of adult learning;
  • have practiced using questions as a learning tool;
  • be able to design, plan and implement participatory training sessions;
  • have practiced training, using your own design;
  • have developed their personal action plan.
  • be able to design and convey important CBR messages to relevant publics
  • be able to integrate new insights about the state of the art of CBR in your training activities.
  • demonstrate an appreciation of diversity in communities, particularly in relation to people that are differently abled.
  • demonstrate effective communication skills.

Target group
The target group consist of CBR enthusiasts, who are motivated to broaden the implementation of CBR programmes in their respective communities. Therefore the course is targeted at the following people:

  • Trainers in CBR
  • Advocates of disability issues
  • Managers of CBR
  • Experienced persons in CBR and interested in becoming a trainer

These people will after the ToT CBR probably train:

  • CBR managers
  • CBR staff
  • Community key persons
  • Policy makers and planners
  • Politicians

Entrance criteria

  • 2 years experience in CBR
  • Attended CBR training (formal or non formal) or additional experience
  • Motivation letter to be send to the course coordinator of no longer than 2 pages A-4 size, double spacing
  • Training Needs Assessment questionnaire to be filled out in detail and returned to the course coordinator
  • Competence in both written and spoken English

Provisional Programme
Consult the Enablement web site at http://www.enablement.nl, or contact h.cornielje@enablement.nl by email, for a copy of the provisional programme.

Teaching staff
The course is conducted under leadership of Mr Huib Cornielje. A number of trainers with a vast amount of experience, both in disability service development as well as training and education, will be responsible for different subjects. The course has been developed by a team of experts who form also the teaching staff; i.e.

  • Henk van Apeldoorn
  • Huib Cornielje
  • Fiona Post
  • Hanneke Verhoeven
  • Roelie Wolting

Course fees and other expenses

  • Fees (including tea and coffee): Euro 1350,00
  • Accommodation (incl. all meals) approximately: Euro 1500,00
  • Pocket money: Euro 20,00 a day is advised: Euro 300,00
  • International travel: variable

Scholarships
At this moment in time no scholarships are available, however, we will do our utmost to ensure that a number of scholarship will be made available for those who are:

  • able to indicate an urgent need for training
  • unable to show that they are unable to pay full course expenses

We must stress however, that at this moment no such guarantees can be given. If scholarships are awarded these do not cover pocket money and travel costs as these costs need to be paid by the participant.

For more information contact:
Huib Cornielje
Enablement
h.cornielje@enablement.nl
www.enablement.nl



We Can Do received copies of this announcement from multiple sources including Ghulam Nabi Nazimani and also the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserv.

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Free Rice for the Hungry, Free Vocabulary Fun for You

Posted on 1 January 2008. Filed under: Poverty, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

URL for this page: http://tinyurl.com/255u9a
The Fun Part
You can give free rice to hungry people, play a free game, and improve your vocabulary, all in the same key stroke at a new web site called FreeRice.

234_60_banner2.jpg

If you’re one of my regular readers at We Can Do: my apologies. I know you usually come here to find new resources, information, news, or announcements related to poverty and human rights among disabled people in developing countries. Usually I do try to stay very tightly focused on issues of disability and international development at this blog. But this post IS still about poverty, even though it’s not specific to disabled people. And, more importantly, it IS still a holiday for most readers. So what the heck. I’ll indulge, this once. And I hope you’ll indulge with me.

(For those of you who have been paying attention to the last few posts at this blog: the holiday season in general is one reason why I have been posting fewer new resources and devoting more time in the past week to long-term improvements to this web site. For example, see the new pages on accessibility; announcements for conferences, events, call for papers, and training opportunities; navigating We Can Do to help new readers quickly find the resources they need at this blog site; and news. I WILL start posting more fresh content soon, so do stay tuned. And consider subscribing to We Can Do so you don’t miss anything.)

If you’ve been reading the right blogs lately, then the image near the top of this page might look familiar. For those of you who are not able to view this image, I’ll describe it: this is a horizontal “banner.” At the left-hand side is a brown wooden bowl with a few grains of white rice in it. (Hm. Wouldn’t brown rice be healthier?) At the right-hand side, the text says: “Free Rice” on the first line in large letters and “Play and Help!” on the second line in medium sized letters. The background on the left side is a medium/dark green; on the right side, it’s a lighter shade of green with what I think is supposed to be a blurry image of rice plants. FreeRice has a number of other similar-looking banners available. [Sorry–I’m describing the image here instead of using alt tags because I don’t have a clue how to use alt tags. If you do, please take a few moments to advise me in the comments area below and I’ll fix it.]

So how does FreeRice work? Simple. Go to www.freerice.com. You will see a vocabulary word at the top of the screen and four possible definitions or synonyms. Choose the one you think is the closest match. If you guess correctly, FreeRice will give 20 grains of rice to hungry people. Then, if you like, you can continue playing. If you’re sighted and able to view images with your computer equipment, then you’ll also see a picture of a bowl of rice filling up each time free rice is given.

This game is tailored to the vocabulary skill of each player who participates. If you answer three vocabulary questions in a row correctly then it gives you a more challenging word. If you continue to guess correctly, the words become harder and harder. If you miss one, it gives you an easier word. If you keep missing, the words become easier and easier. Until you start to answer correctly again. There are 50 vocabulary levels. So nearly all people should be able to find a level that is comfortable for them whether you’re learning English as a second language or whether you’re a vocabulary geek.

You might wonder: if this game is free, then where does the money come from to pay for all the rice that’s going to hungry people? It comes from advertisers. There is an advertisement banner at the bottom of the screen. The ad in this banner changes every time you guess a new word. The more you play, the more ads you see. And the advertisers are obviously hoping that more people playing FreeRice will translate into more sales for their products, or more donations to their charitable causes.

You can guess one word or guess a million. Play for just one day or play every day the rest of your life. Or anything in between. It’s all up to you. The more you play, the more rice you give–and, in theory, the more vocabulary you learn. I say “in theory” because I’ve read some criticism somewhere (sorry, don’t remember where) that says vocabulary games like this one may not be necessarily the best way to learn vocabulary. But I’m sure it can’t hurt. And if you’re serious about it, you could use the game to develop a vocabulary study list and find other ways to rehearse the words you see. (Hint: double check your understanding with a dictionary. And use it in a sentence.)

Accessibility for Blind People
I’m not able to evaluate whether the FreeRice site is accessible to people who use screen readers. If this is you, I would be curious to learn about your experience there. Since the game itself is text-based, I’m guessing there should not be any major problems with it. Though I’m also guessing that the ads won’t be very accessible, unless a given advertiser thinks to use the alt tag for their images. And you won’t see that rice bowl filling up.

The Serious Part
This blog post deviates from the usual We Can Do post in two ways. One, as noted above, it’s not about disability. (Though disabled people do certainly starve also. In fact, given that disabled people are more likely to experience poverty, it’s probably safe to assume that people with disabilities are also more likely to go hungry.) Two, my normal focus in this blog is on finding long-term solutions to long-standing problems. Thus, things like how to better include disabled people in large-scale, long-term poverty reduction strategies. Or how to ensure that disabled children in developing countries are not left behind when their governments try to bring more children into the classroom.

In this view: one criticism I do have for the FreeRice site is that it offers a temporary fix for something that is, for far too many people, a chronic problem. In the long run, it’s not enough to keep shipping free rice to hungry people. That feeds them today, but it doesn’t help them feed themselves tomorrow or next year. That means we also need to invest in more long-term strategies for fighting poverty. That means more schools so that the 77 million children out of school can enter the classroom for the first time. And we need more textbooks and better quality teachers–and possibly more computers–so that children already in the classroom will learn something while they’re there. Poor people who have entrepreneurial skills need small business loans so they can lift themselves out of poverty with their own hard work. And we need to give more aid dollars directly to organizations based in developing countries who are running great projects to fight HIV/AIDS, deliver clean drinking water, or abolish poverty.

But this is not a slam against FreeRice, per se. In fact, I sometimes play this game myself. Yes, more chronic forms of hunger do need a long-term fix. But hunger can also be a short-term emergency, such as during a time of war (though wars, unfortunately, can sometimes be long-term) or in the first few months after a natural disaster. And short-term emergencies, unfortunately, will always happen. Therefore, we will always, to some extent, actually need short-term fixes like FreeRice.

I just feel compelled to point out the need for long-term solutions because I worry that some people in industrialized countries are too quick to donate time (or money) to easy, “feel-good” causes that don’t actually solve problems. If you really want to help, then don’t just help. Instead, make it possible for people to help themselves.

But, there’s nothing wrong with also having a little fun at freerice.com.

In that spirit: Here’s wishing you a Happy New Year. May the year 2008 be delightful and fruitful for you. And for those of you who work to ensure that disabled people are not left out when governments and organizations fight poverty and speak out for human rights: I hope all your endeavors this year will be successful ones.



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CLARIFICATION of USAID Funding Post

Posted on 21 December 2007. Filed under: Uncategorized |

Some clarifications have been added to the post regarding a possible funding opportunity from USAID. You may consult this post at:

https://wecando.wordpress.com/2007/12/19/usaid-funding-for-disability-inclusion-available/

Apologies for the inconvenience, to those of you who had already looked at the original version of that post.

The best source of information and detail, however, would be the USAID Mission office that is most relevant to you and your country. The above post links to a Mission directory that you can consult to figure out which office to contact. Or, if you already have an on-going relationship with a USAID mission office, you should communicate with your regular contacts there. If you are new to USAID, then it may be helpful to try working with an NGO that has received USAID funding in the past for assistance, contacts, or a possible partnership.



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Please Submit YOUR Materials to We Can Do

Posted on 7 November 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Arts, Blind, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disability Studies, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Families, Funding, Guest Blogger, HIV/AIDS, Housing, Human Rights, Immigration, Interpreting, Introduction to "We Can Do", Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation, Remittances, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Uncategorized, Violence, Volunteer Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Currently, We Can Do gathers news; announcements; academic papers; case studies; opinion pieces; information about resources; and other materials of interest to disabled advocates and international development professionals from a wide range of sources. In addition to these, from time to time, I write fresh content of my own.

I also hope to be able to depend heavily on YOU–We Can Do readers–for some of the best, most interesting, and helpful materials. Examples of materials that would interest me include, but are not limited to: “best practice” case studies; “failed practice” case studies; checklists; fundraising advice or resources; other pragmatic resources; academic papers or reports; student projects; press releases; opinion pieces; announcements; and more. For more detail, please click on “Wish List for Written Materials and Resources” at the top navigation bar.

If you can assist with my current top priority, or with any of the other items in my “wish list”, then PLEASE GET IN TOUCH. Email me at ashettle at patriot dot net or leave a short note in the comment area below and I’ll contact you.

Current Top Priority for We Can Do

Are you from Croatia, Cuba, Gabon, Hungary, India, Jamaica, or Panama? If so, were you involved with the movement to persuade your government to sign and ratify the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)? If so PLEASE CONTACT ME (ashettle at patriot dot net, or leave a comment below with your email address).

I want to interview people involved with these movements (via email) so I can write a story describing what strategies you used; any barriers you faced along the way; how you overcame these barriers; any mistakes you made, how you corrected them, and how other countries can avoid them; what activities or techniques you think were the most critical to your success; and so forth. Sharing this type of information at We Can Do–and elsewhere–could be immensely helpful to disability movements in other countries that are working toward the same goals.

My primary written language is English, pero puedo escribir y leer, mas o menos, en espanol tambien. (Lo siento para la mala ortografia–no se como crear acentos en WordPress.) Once we are in contact, I will probably have many questions for you–and follow up questions after that!

Thank you for helping make We Can Do become a strong, good-quality resource for people with disabilities in developing countries and the people who are working hard to meet their needs.

Edited to Add: I do not post my full email address because any recognizable email address posted on the web then immediately becomes the target of “spam harvesters” and starts receiving tons of unwanted, unsolicited commercial emails. But I spelled it out above and spell it out again here. But this time I’m amplifying it because I realize that not all people have learned how to parse spelled out email addresses:

My username is: ashettle

Every email address has an @ at sign @ between the user name and the domain name, thus ashettle@

My email domain is patriot.net

Put it all together and you have my email address.

Or if that is still too confusing–or if it’s just easier for you–then feel free to leave a note below (with your email address in the area provided for it) and I’ll get in touch.


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Welcome to the “We Can Do” Blog!

Posted on 25 July 2007. Filed under: Introduction to "We Can Do", Uncategorized | Tags: , , |

What is this blog about?
This blog is for anyone who wants to end poverty and oppression for poor disabled people in developing countries.

I plan to cover a wide range of topics.

Often I may simply point to a resource or web site that might be of interest to you.

Other times, I might invite a “guest blogger” to write an essay about something related to disability and poverty in developing countries. (Or disability and education … or health … or microfinance … or water and sanitation … or civil and human rights … or … the list goes on, as long as it relates to people with disabilities in developing countries).

Or I might interview someone who has interesting information, knowledge, or experiences to share about disabilities and poverty or human rights in developing countries.

Or sometimes I might simply express an opinion of my own.

One of my hopes for this blog is that it might become a way to bring together people from around the world from a wide range of backgrounds and interests. In other words:

This blog is for: People with and without disabilities. People in developing countries and in industrialized countries. People who grew up poor (or who are poor now), and people who grew up with all the food, water, clothing, education, health care, and other basic services that they needed.

This includes culturally Deaf, signing people who may not identify as “disabled” at all. As well as deaf or hard of hearing people who do.

This blog is for: People who might know a great deal about international development, but who are still learning about disabilities. I hope this blog can become a resource to you in figuring out how to more actively include people with disabilities (and Deaf/deaf people, “disabled” or not) in your mainstream program activities.

This blog is ALSO for: People who know a great deal about disabilities and disability rights, but who maybe don’t know much about this strange field called “international development” and wonder why they should.

(For now, let me just say two quick things: 1. No, it is NOT just “something to do with economics”! It includes that, yes. But that’s only one dimension of the development field. 2. If you care about disability rights in developing countries, then understanding a little about “international development” and development organizations could still be helpful to your work even if you think you will never do “international development” yourself.)

This blog is for: People who know about disabilities, but who maybe are not yet familiar with the “social model” or the human rights perspective of disability.

I think this is an important concept that anyone working with, or on behalf of, disabled people should be familiar with. And, ideally, live by. I plan to talk a bit about this topic from time to time. But this philosophy will permeate the whole blog even when I don’t refer to it directly.

This blog is for: People who are still new both to disabilities and to development or to developing countries.

This blog is for: People who are already experts in disability and development but who want to learn about best practices being done at other organizations or in other countries. Or who hope to learn about the occasional unfamiliar resource.

This blog is for: Professionals who work in the field of development, particularly professionals in disability and development.

This blog is for: Advocates and activists who volunteer their free time in a non-government organization (NGO) run by (or on behalf of) people with disabilities in developing countries.

This blog is for: Volunteers working with disabled people in developing countries. For example: Peace Corps, VSO, etc.

This blog is for: People who are not yet actively involved in improving the lives of people with disabilities in developing countries, but who would like to be.

This blog is for: People who want to learn from the perspectives of people who come from a different professional or personal background from yours.

I look forward to learning from your own perspectives and ideas in the comments area of this blog site, or in the essays you submit as a guest blogger. I hope you will find this blog to be helpful to you in turn.


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  • The Mwanza Computer Literacy Project

    The Mwanza Computer Literacy Project

    The Tusaidiane Disabilities Resources and Charity Organization of Tanzania (TDRCT) would like to improve computer literacy and self-employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Mwanza, Tanzania, and promote their empowerment.

    This organization is run by people who themselves have disabilities. I have known the man who founded this organization for some years. If his organization can quickly raise $5000 from 40 donors within a few days, then GlobalGiving will feature their organization on its website. This will enable them to attract more prospective funders. I have made a donation to them, I hope others will consider doing the same.
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