Sub-Saharan Africa Region

NEWS: Deaf Empowerment Program in Ghana, Uganda Launches

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Deaf, Education, Employment, Interpreting, signed languages, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

First posted in November 2008 at http://www.uclan.ac.uk/ahss/research/islands/sign_language.php

£58,000 for deaf empowerment in Africa

The iSLanDS Centre has received a grant from the Education Partnership Africa programme for capacity building in sub-Saharan Africa.

The project “Training and employability for the deaf communities in Ghana and Uganda” is a joint initiative with the University of Ghana, Kyambogo University in Uganda, and deaf organisations in both countries, and aims at capacity building in the areas of applied sign language studies.

Course and curriculum development includes a sign language interpreter training course at the University of Ghana, a 2-year diploma course for deaf students in Applied Sign Language Studies in Uganda, and summer courses in academic skills development for deaf students. All of these are first-time initiatives, and are realised in close partnership with local deaf organisations.

We expect this project to impact positively on literacy, employability, and access to work for talented deaf participants in these programmes.

For further details, contact the project leader Ulrike Zeshan at uzeshan@uclan.ac.uk, or Sam Lutalo-Kiingi at slutalo-kiingi@uclan.ac.uk



I learned of this program via the Deaf Studies Africa mailing list. All inquiries should please go to either of the project leaders (see email addresses above), NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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Challenges Implementing Disability Rights Treaty?

Posted on 17 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Human Rights, Networking Opportunities, Opinion, Psychiatric Disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Abdul-Jeff Maalik Makana, the Executive Director of MindFreedom Kenya, wants to learn more about the challenges that other countries experience in implementing the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Below is his appeal for information. Please respond directly to him at kenya@mindfreedom.org.

Dear All,

Greetings from non sunny Nairobi day today!

We have a challenge here in Kenya advocating for the implementation of the UN CRPD. Are other states experiencing similar challenges? What are the challenges?

I recently on a media appearence to create awareness about the work of MindFreedom Kenya & advocating for the implementation of the UN CRPD… one caller to the show reinforced the general view that persons with psychosocial disabilities have no capacity at any time to make decision (Legal capacity) though the UN CRPD guarantees legal capacity(article 12) or even supported decision making.

To quote Daniel Hazen—Human Rights and Advocacy “cease the practice of exceptionalism when it comes to human rights” meaning we cannot downplay the CRPD which is a very important rallying point for our movement.

Mental Health (MH) policies cannot be written in a vacuum…. State parties and other stakeholders should get direction that adopting certain articles of the CRPD versus the CRPD in its entirety has far reaching consequences more so article 12 (right to legal capacity) a big part of the user/survivor movement advocacy.

Lastly, why was the term psychosocial disabled adopted in the UN CRPD versus the term mentally disabled or mentally ill? Here in Africa many don’t see mental illness as a disability? Can you please help me understand how to advocate better for psychosocial disabled term to be adopted and accepted locally.

What are your views:

I am doing a Survey on supporting signing/ratification and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities by state parties without reservations.

This obligation would require that the States both refrain from actions that undermine the principles and initiate efforts which would promote them. You can also e-mail your comments directly to kenya@mindfreedom.org
Question:

As a user, a survivor. mental health worker, or human rights activist in mental health do you support the position that the CRPD is non negotiable, and that the nature of this commitment obligates state parties to completely review MH policies and legislation which relied on flawed WHO MI Principles? *

http://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=cnR3dTlrTGFGRjFXY3g2YWhvTUJESUE6MA..

A few sampling of responses collected regarding the above question:

This obligation would require that the States both refrain from actions that undermine the principles and initiate efforts which would promote them.(MH Policy, legislation’s, new MH laws, civic education, more access to mental services at the community level, empowering of persons with psychosocial disabilities to participate equally in society without being discriminated based on disabilities).

Absolutely I support it!! Recently there have been reports that they are opening “behavioral” units in nursing homes in New York State–a way to lock us up again quietly so there won’t be too many complaints. Fortunately we noticed and… Read More now there’s a lawsuit. Good thing so many of us “suffer” from hypervigelance!! Anyway, so good to see that we’re coming together internationally. We can and will find our power no matter how hard the system tried to hold us down.

I am not sure that I can ask for the UN treaty to become nationalized, but I do agree with many of the tenets. I think that I can see where some conflicts of interest might be involved. So better person by person, not this group or that. That is what I think….

With kind regards,

Abdul-Jeff Maalik Makana

__________________________________
Abdul Maalik bin Ali formerly,
Jeff Makana

Executive Director,
MindFreedom Kenya(MF-K)
E-mail:kenya@mindfreedom.org
website: http://www.mindfreedomkenya.interconnection.org
Follow me on twitter@ www.twitter.com/Jeffmakana



Thank you to Abdul Maalik bin Ali for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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FUNDING: Small Grants for Deaf Children

Posted on 23 March 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Deaf, Funding, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

GLOBAL: Small grants programme for deaf children

Since 2002, Deaf Child Worldwide has supported organisations working to help deaf children overcome the barriers that contribute to their poverty and isolation.

Round 8 of Deaf Child Worldwide’s Small Grants Programme (SGP) opens on 19 March 2009 and ends 30 May 2009.

The SGP supports projects which show clear, measurable and sustainable improvements to the lives of deaf children and their families in developing countries.

Deaf Child Worldwide fund projects of up to three years and for a maximum amount of £30,000 (£10,000 per year). Visit the website for information on the SGP and the application process.

Successful projects must meet one or more of Deaf Child Worldwide’s strategic aims. Applicants must consider our cross-cutting themes in the development of their proposal.

Deaf Child Worldwide is focusing its activities in East Africa (Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania), South Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka) and Latin America (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru). You must be based in one of these countries to apply to SGP.

Applications are only accepted in ‘concept note’ format in English or Spanish. The deadline for submission of concept notes to Deaf Child Worldwide is 30 May 2009. Selected projects will start in January 2010.

The following documents can be downloaded from the Deaf Child Worldwide website:

* Background information leaflet containing details of the full eligibility criteria
* Guidance on applying
* Concept note format

Visit: www.deafchildworldwide.info

More details on the Small Grant Programme at http://www.deafchildworldwide.info/where_we_work/small_grants_programme/index.html

More details on how to apply at http://www.deafchildworldwide.info/where_we_work/small_grants_programme/how_to_apply/index.html

Missed the May 30, 2009, deadline? Deaf Child Worldwide offers similar grants on a periodic basis, though not always in the same countries. Consult their web site at www.deafchildworldwide.info to learn of future opportunities like this one.



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development mailing list. Please consult the Deaf Child Worldwide website directly, NOT We Can Do, for more detail on this funding opportunity, including more thorough instructions on how to apply.

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Disability in Non-Western Societies: A Bibliography of Bibliographies

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Middle East and North Africa, Poverty, Resources, signed languages, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Researchers who need to locate journal articles and other publications about people with disabilities throughout history in developing countries face significant barriers. People with disabilities outside of North America and Europe tend to be invisible in much of the published literature and throughout history.

Researchers can consult a list of annotated bibliographies at the Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange (CIRRIE) as a starting point in seeking out thousands of articles that may meet their needs.

These bibliographies do not directly link to the articles in question. In many cases, I suspect these articles may not exist on-line. But the bibliographies could be used to help researchers know what publications they should seek out through the inter-library loan program at their university library.

A few examples of annotated bibliographies include: Disability in the Middle East; Disability and Social Responses in Some Southern African Nations; Disability and Social Response in Afghanistan and Pakistan; Disability & Deafness in North East Africa; Disability and Deafness in East Asia: Social and Educational Responses, from Antiquity to Recent Times; Sign, Gesture, and Deafness in South Asia and South-West Asian Histories; Social Responses to Disability & Poverty in Economically Weaker Countries: Research, Trends, Critique, and Lessons Usually Not Learnt; and more.

Researchers may begin exploring the various bibliographies (by author M. Miles) at

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/bibliography/index.php



I found the page listing M. Miles’ various bibliographies by browsing the CIRRIE web site.

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PAPER: Deaf People in African Histories c. 960s – 1960s

Posted on 19 December 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Deaf, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Individuals interested in investigating the history of Deaf, deaf, or hard of hearing people in any African nation may wish to read the paper entitled, “Deaf People Living and Communicating in African Histories, c. 960s – 1960s” by M. Miles (2005).

The abstract for this paper is as follows:

“Glimpses of the lives and communication of deaf and hearing impaired people are seen in one thousand years of history across Africa. Textual evidence of 100 historical deaf adults and children, of hundreds more in groups, and of gestural communication and formal Sign Language, appears from 42 African nations, sourced in travellers’ accounts, legal and genealogical records, government reports, institutional and missionary archives, academic theses, linguistic studies, folklore, ethnography, novels, religious narrative, mime and dance. The data may assist in construction of valued identities and evidence-based cultural histories. Uses and interpretations remain for deaf people to discuss and choose according to their own varied interests and objectives.”

The article has 190 references, and notes some Africa-wide activities of deaf people, including in relation to deaf studies and sign language studies.

The author, M. Miles, has suggested that organizations of deaf people in each African nation should build their own archives and records of deaf people in order to help create an understanding of what it means to be deaf in Africa in the late 20th and early 21st century.

Read the full text of the article at:

http://www.independentliving.org/docs7/miles2005a.html



Thank you to the author, M. Miles, for announcing this article on the DeafStudies-Africa email-based discussion list.

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RESOURCE: MindFreedom Kenya Promotes Mental Health Rights

Posted on 18 December 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Psychiatric Disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

MindFreedom Kenya is an affiliate of MindFreedom International, formed in response to identified gaps in mental health rights, lack of adequate information about substance abuse and impact to society and those directly affected. Since its inception, MindFreedom Kenya has endeavored to develop efforts to transform and diversify the marginalized and the most vulnerable-persons with psychosocial disabilities.

It helps users and survivors to be involved in care planning and making informed decisions about their care and upholding of human rights, advocating inhumane treatment and creating awareness about substance abuse and psychosocial disabilities.

For users and survivors of psychiatry, one of the most important things about the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is that it says we have an equal right to legal capacity, which is the right to make our own decisions; and the right to free and informed consent in health care; and that we should not be deprived of liberty based on disability – which means that governments are violating this treaty if they lock us up in psychiatric institutions and do forced treatment. They also have positive obligations, to provide support and services needed to live in the community, and to provide access to support in exercising legal capacity if the person wants this support. Support in exercising legal capacity is the opposite of guardianship, because it means the person is in control of her/his own decisions and chooses the kind of help that she/he wants.

MindFreedom Kenya aim is to influence policy and planning, and to encourage improvements in the management and delivery of mental health services.

Ø Policy makers acknowledging the need and strongly pursuing mental health policies that positively impact their constituents and calling for revision of existing mental policies to match today’s complex and changing mental health care.
Ø Leaders in health profession, professional associations, mental health boards and health care companies to take a leading role in initiatives that increase access, quality and equity. On the same note, they must be able to establish a mental health advisory council independent from government that works collaboratively with policy makers. This mental health advisory council will create a mental health reform blueprints with support and input from both public and private health care sectors. The mental health advisory council along and/with sponsoring policy makers will ensure that such mental health policies are passed, implemented and delivered.
Ø Human Right organizations must recognize equity, access and quality of mental health care is a basic human right and they must take initiatives that will harness just distribution, fair and favorable policies and practically implementable mental health rights processes.
Ø Humanitarian Organizations involved in health care, WHO (World Health Org.) and UN (United Nations) to continue supporting mental health locally made policies and initiatives that are practical to the social realities of the people who need equal representation against abuses within the mental health system.

Regards,
Jeff Makana
kenya@mindfreedom.org
[Addendum, March 23, 2009: MindFreedom Kenya has a new website of its own at http://www.mindfreedomkenya.interconnection.org/

People also can learn about the organization at Jeff Makana’s blog at www.erucall.com.



Thank you to Jeff Makana for permission to post this information at We Can Do.

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Information Wanted: Africans with Disabilities, Policies, Programs, Organizations

Posted on 23 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

**The Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities needs your Help**
The Secretariat is currently collecting and updating information on the situation faced by persons with disabilities in the 54 African countries. It will enter this information into the country folders on its website. The information collected relates to policies, programmes, contact details for organisations engaged in disability work, best practice in the inclusion of disability in mainstream programmes, etc. If you have such information to share, please write to info@africandecade.co.za.

We Can Do readers will want to explore the excellent web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities. As implied in the above paragraph, their web site has a section with information on the 54 individual countries of Africa. Your assistance can help them expand the information provided in these folders. Providing information to the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities can also be an opportunity for you to help bring attention to policies, programs, organizations, and practices that have benefited people with disabilities in your country. Again, you can email relevant details to info@africandecade.co.za

It is also well worth exploring their collection of training materials for organizations of people with disabilities. Some of their training materials have been highlighted in past We Can Do posts, but not all of them. Training materials include a guidebook for journalists; material on lobbying and advocacy; resource mobilization and fund raising; evaluation; capacity building; and more.



The first paragraph of the above text is copy/pasted from a recent issue of the email newsletter for Disabled People’s International.

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Uganda Disability Activist to America: Thank you for Obama!

Posted on 11 November 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

International disability activist Ambrose Murangira sent the following email

This email was sent to my friends on 4th November 2hours after Obama’s acceptance Speech. Read it NOW. YES WE CAN make disability history!

Dear Friends (especially Americans with or without disabilities),

Today, i am tempted to write on Sen. Obama’s victory and its implication to Americans with Disabilities in particular and PWDs in general (world-wide). Many scholars and some politicians have been questioning why the international community was fondly behind Obama’s presidency. They argued that nothing different will happen outside America but when i tasked some of them to distinguish between Obama’s and McCain’s foreign policies they could not. Now, its a defining moment and the world is watching America. Early this morning at his victory celebration in Chicago, Obama was quoted as saying;

“If there is anyone out there who doubts that America is a place where anything is possible, who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time, who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer,”

“Young and old, rich and poor, Democrat and Republican, black, white, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, gay, straight, disabled and not disabled, Americans have sent a message to the world that we have never been just a collection of red states and blue states,” he said. “We have been and always will be the United States of America”.

Therefore, my attention has been paid to the second quotation – Its a hope for a reason and a reason for hope -Its about us – we, individuals with disabilities. When i read it, i cried tears of joy. It is not a secret, America is superpower… Its like a heart of the world. Meaning that a better America is a better world. A month ago, i was paid by Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington DC for their failure to fix TTY (phone for hearing impaired people) in my hotel room. This partly explains that a better America is a better place for everyone. Sen. Obama’s own foreign policies tells us all. You are also reminded that disability is one of the Obama’s top priorities – focusing on early intervention! You will also recall that Sen. Obama played a key role in the formulating and approval of various regulations relating to disability…

So what? Since Sen. (now President-Elect) Obama promised change which is already in America… Let AWDs tell him to change whatever disable them because they are Americans first – so that America can send a message to the World as he has stated it early today. Tell him that all his support nationally and internationally should be inclusive… Your voices counted in this historical elections so let us demand for change in our lives too. The most important thing is to watch closely to any changes and ensure that all the changes made are inclusive – No Person is to be Left Behind! The International community (beneficiaries of US government support) will also demand for change wherever its necessary and that change must not only be necessary but it must be sufficient to the needs of PWDs…

Just few points for today! Americans: THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU A BILLION TIMES, THANK YOU for choosing Obama.

My best regards,

Ambrose Murangira,
International Disability Activist,
Kampala,
UGANDA



Thank you to Ambrose Murangira for granting permission to post his letter at this blog. A global campaign is under way to urge people with disabilities, our loved ones, colleagues, and other allies to send emails to Obama. These emails are an opportunity in part to thank him for mentioning people with disabilities in his election-night speech. They also are an opportunity to increase the visibility of people with disabilities around the world within Obama’s administration. People are writing emails from across the United States and around the world. Learn more about the international Call To Action and how YOU can participate at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/11/07/disabilities-email-obama/

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NEWS: African Decade of Persons with Disabilities Extended to 2019

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ANNOUNCEMENT:

AFRICAN DECADE OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES EXTENDED TO DECEMBER 2019

A. CONGRATULATIONS AND GOOD NEWS!

We are ecstatic!

This is to announce that the AU Continental Decade of Persons with Disabilities has been extended to December 2019.

The Windhoek Declaration on Social Development adopted by Ministers in Charge of Social Development on 31 October 2008, adopted Resolution 6, which reads as follows:

‘6. ADOPT the extension of the Continental Decade of Persons with Disabilities for the period 2010-2019; CALL for the evaluation of the existing Decade and its Plan of Action (1999-2009) and the speedy conclusion of the evaluation and restructuring of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)’

In addition to the resolution extending the Decade, the Windhoek Declaration also adopted resolution 5(x) which reads as follows:

‘5. Further commit ourselves to implement the priority strategies under the key thematic social issues spelt out in the Social Policy Framework for Africa, through the following:

(x) Empowering and providing persons with disabilities with equal opportunities, safeguarding their rights and enlisting their participation and mainstreaming them in all development programmes’

The new Social Development Policy adopted by the Ministers in Windhoek Namibia has detailed coverage of disability work. We encourage organisations to get a copy of this policy and apply its contents in your programming processes.

We would like to thank all organisations (notably Pan African Federation Of the Disabled (PAFOD), African Union of the Blind (AFUB), and others), Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) Staff and leaders, Panel of Experts/Parliamentarians, Pan African Parliament, African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI), the African Union Social Affairs Commission, our Development Partners (Disabled Persons Organizations Denmark [DPOD], Sida, UK Department for International Development [DFID], and Southern Africa Trust), Christian Blind Mission (CBM) and those that supported our down-line networks and DPOs for their support during the first Decade and the campaign towards extension.

We look forward to hard work during the next ten years. We now have the benefit of learning from the mistakes that we made and the experience of managing an initiative of this nature.

B. MORE INFORMATION ON THE FIRST DECADE

The African Union declared the first decade of the new millennium (1999-2009) as the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities. In 2001 the African Union’s Labour and Social Affairs Commission along with its African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI) and the ILO held a meeting in Addis Ababa. In this meeting they designed a Continental Plan of Action (CPOA) to guide the member states of the African Union on how to implement the African Decade. The adoption of the African Decade of Disabled Persons (ADDP) placed responsibility on African States to implement Decade Programme activities.

With this declaration, the African Union adopted a Continental Plan of Action (CPOA) with twelve objectives that African States were to implement over the period.

The twelve objectives cover a wide range of themes that are of critical importance to improvement in the lives of persons with disabilities in Africa. These themes include ideas and strategies to:
1. Formulate and implement national policies, programmes and legislation to promote the full and equal participation of persons with disabilities.
2. Promote the participation of persons with disabilities in the process of economic and social development
3. Promote the self-representation of people with disabilities in all public decision-making structures.
4. To enhance support services for disabled persons.
5. Promote special measures for children, youth, women and elderly persons with disabilities.
6. Ensure and improve access to rehabilitation, education, training, employment, sports, the cultural and physical environment.
7. To promote and protect disability rights as human rights
8. To support the development of and strengthen Disabled Persons’ Organizations
9. Mobilize resources

These objectives where meant to be implemented by Africa States, with the cooperation of civil society organisations.
Prepared By:

Kudakwashe A.K. Dube, CEO
SADPD



This announcement is being circulated by The Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD). Their website is at http://www.africandecade.org.za and is worth exploring for anyone with an interest in human rights or social and economic development for people with disabilities in Africa. I modified this announcement to spell out most of the acronyms.

I received this announcement via the mailing list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development.

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NEWS: Tanzanians with Albinism Regularly Murdered

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Blind, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , |

In some countries, it is believed that people with albinism have magical powers. This can sometimes lead to the murder of people with albinism so that their body parts can be sold to witch doctors for use in their potions.

Albinism is a condition that causes lack of pigmentation (coloration) in the hair, skin, and eyes; most people with albinism have some degree of vision impairment, and many are legally blind.

Read more about a series of murders committed against people with albinism in Tanzania–and what is being done to stop them–at http://www.underthesamesun.com/home.php

People may sign a petition protesting these murders at http://tinyurl.com/4wk5za



I learned about this story, and the petition, via the Disabled Peoples’ International email newsletter.

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Videos about Deaf Life: Central Arican Republic, Philippines, Venezuela, Mexico, Austria

Posted on 3 October 2008. Filed under: Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Employment, Latin America & Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , |

Four on-line videos give an overview of deaf communities around the world; all can be viewed at:

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2008/09/24/deaf-awareness-week-striving-for-quality-education/

The first video on this page shares the story of a school for deaf children in the Central African Republic that has been struggling for funding. Several teachers have quit because they have not been paid consistently for the past four years; only two teachers remain struggling on. Unfortunately, this type of story is common in many schools in developing countries–not only in deaf schools. This video is in the signed language of the Central African Republic with English subtitles. As a deaf person, I can’t tell if this video has English voice over for blind people.

The second video was made by deaf students in the Philippines. This video, in Philippines sign language and English subtitles, portrays the difficulties many deaf people in their country confront when they look for jobs after graduation. Unemployment is another challenge that is common to deaf people and disabled people all around the world–not only in developing countries but also in industrialized countries. I don’t know if this video has voice over.

In Venezuela, teachers for the deaf explain the importance of a bilingual and bi-cultural education. Some Venezuelan Sign Language is seen on the screen in the background scenes, and there are some occasional Spanish words on the screen in between visual shots of children in the classroom, etc. Unfortunately there are no subtitles in any language to help deaf people understand what the teachers say in this video. But hearing people who understand Spanish could give this one a try.

The last video has a deaf woman from Mexico and a deaf man from Austria simultaneously demonstrate the Mexican and Austrian fingerspelled alphabets; the cardinal numbers in Mexican and Austrian signed languages; and the names of the months. I’m guessing there is probably no audio description.

Sighted people will note that the Mexican and Austrian signed languages are dramatically different from each other. I can tell you that they are both also very different from American Sign Language–and all three languages are different from the signed language used in the San Jose area of Costa Rica.

In addition to the four videos, the following web page also has links that give more information about the programs described in the videos:

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2008/09/24/deaf-awareness-week-striving-for-quality-education/



Thank you to Sylvia Cabus for alerting me to these on-line videos.

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RESOURCE: Deaf Peers’ Education Manual on Sexuality, HIV & AIDS

Posted on 30 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Research tells us that people with disabilities, and Deaf people, are at higher risk for HIV/AIDS than the general population. But many HIV/AIDS education programs exclude people with disabilities from opportunities to learn how to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS. Sometimes this exclusion is deliberate: some program managers mistakenly assume that Deaf and disabled people don’t need sexuality education because they don’t have sex. In other cases, programs exclude because they don’t offer sign language interpreters, nor do they offer print materials that are accessible to people who are intelligent but who have lacked access to opportunities for an education.

A training manual has been developed that can be used to help trainers learn how to facilitate workshops on sexual health and HIV/AIDS, entitled the The Deaf Peers’ Education Manual (PDF format, 6.44 Mb). This manual is targeted at members of the Kenyan Deaf community. The signs described in the manual, for example, assume knowledge of Kenyan Sign Language, rather than the many other hundreds of signed languages and dialects used around the world. However, most of the content can be easily adapted for use in Deaf communities in other countries.

The manual offers guidance to facilitators on how they can sensitively handle frank discussion of sexuality; the physical and emotional implications of human sexual development; the difference between friendship, infatuation, and real love; how the HIV virus is transmitted; the difference between HIV and AIDS; and how the HIV virus is NOT transmitted. It suggests a range of activities that can be used with Deaf participants to help them understand these complex and sensitive topics.

The manual was first released in 2007. But the organization that initiated the manual, Sahaya International, is interested in revising and updating the manual based on the feedback of other people who use it around the world. At this time, print copies of the manual are not available, but individuals may print their own copy from the PDF file. Koen Van Rampay with Sahaya International invites feedback on the manual, as well as discussion on printing and distributing the manual, at: kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu

More information about Sahaya International; their manual; and their project to teach Deaf people in Kenya about Sexuality and HIV/AIDS is available at:

http://www.sahaya.org/deaf.html

Please note that the manual has some separate, companion materials that trainers can use in educating Deaf participants. One set of printed materials can be used to teach participants basic facts on human sexual anatomy and reproduction. The other teaches participants about common myths related to HIV/AIDS. Both use cartoons and are designed to be used by readers who may have had limited opportunity to pursue an education or acquire literacy skills. The link to the main Deaf Peers’ Education Manual is available near the top of http://www.sahaya.org/deaf.html, but people will need to scroll down to the very bottom of the page to download the other materials.

The linked web page also shows some videos about the Sahaya International project in Kenya. These videos are in Kenya Sign Language with a voice interpreter (presumably in English). Unfortunately, these videos do not have subtitles. This creates a barrier for Deaf people outside of Kenya who might know other signed languages, but not Kenyan Sign Language. This is a shame because some of the people who are likely to have the strongest interest in the Sahaya International project are other Deaf people in other countries who want to emulate their efforts within their own local Deaf communities.

I hope that Sahaya International will find some low-cost (or no-cost) manner for putting subtitles on their videos. A suggestion: Many vloggers (video bloggers) who post to http://www.deafread.com face similar challenges where they wish to subtitle without high tech skills or financial resources. Perhaps a keyword search there would lead to web pages that offer tips, suggestions, and possible resources. Or, if someone reading this at We Can Do can offer the appropriate expertise or technical guidance, perhaps you could contact Sahaya International directly at kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu.



We Can Do learned about the Sahaya International project and manual when Ghulam Nabi Nizamani widely circulated an email originating with Koen Van Rampay.

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Statement on the Millennium Development Goals and Disability, from the Africa Regional Conference

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

THE STATEMENT OF THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE, HELD AT THE PANAFRIC HOTEL, NAIROBI, KENYA 15TH TO 17TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

We, the 200 delegates of the Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference from the, Central, Eastern, Northern, Western and Southern sub regions of Africa met in Nairobi, Kenya, at the Panafric Hotel on 15th to 17th September 2008, to examine the status of MDGs in respect to the inclusion and mainstreaming of disability;

And further to enhance the capacity of leaders from the disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in African countries;

Noting that MDGs have no specific reference to persons with disabilities and therefore their continued exclusion in the campaign processes, policies, planning, programmes and implementation;

Concerned also that disability has not been mentioned in the midway Millennium Development Goals Report;

Further acknowledging that the convention on the rights of PWDs has recently come into effect, to among other things strengthen the resolve for inclusion of people with disabilities;
We note with dismay the continued categorisation of people with disabilities as vulnerable which further marginalises us and consigns us to invisibility, we state that we wish to be recognised as actors in the development processes;

We Resolve As Delegates That We Shall;
• Communicate the outcome of this conference to our governments to review, prioritise and include issues of disability in their Country Statements during their high level meetings on MDGs in New York, in the September 2008 Summit
• Call on our Governments to move and support a motion during the UN General Assembly, calling for the establishment of a new UN Special Agency on Disability; to provide leadership, coordination, harmonisation and enhanced monitoring and reporting.
• Engage our Governments to ensure that People with Disabilities are protected from adverse effects from rising costs and related vulnerabilities and participate and benefit from existing social protection schemes
• Lobby Governments through the African Development Bank and related partners to establish an African Disability Equity Fund to support economic empowerment, entrepreneurship and business of people with disabilities
• Encourage the use of professional campaigners including goodwill ambassadors in promoting disability inclusion
• Recognise the efforts of parents, friends and guardians of people with disabilities and recognise them as part of the wider disability movement
• Uphold the principle of gender equity in disability
• Promote the use of positive language in reference to people with disabilities
We Urge The UN Through Member States;
• To establish a Specialist Agency on Disability in the league of UNICEF and UNIFEM to provide leadership and global accountability on matters related to the disabled people
• To prioritise include and partner with the disability movement in its entire millennium campaign initiatives and develop the strategies for doing so in the September summit
We Urge The AU And Related Bodies To;
• Set up a Disability Desk within all African regional bodies to monitor the implementation of both the convention and human rights violation of people with disabilities within the respective regions.
• Mainstream disability into their programmes and performance management systems
• Establish peer review mechanism and performance management system for disability in Africa
• Ensure political and social economic representation of people with disabilities in NEPAD and develop terms of reference for their participation.
• Work with DPOs to urgently review the structure and mandate of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)
• Extend the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities for another ten years by means of a proclamation by the meeting of the African Heads of State planned for January 2009
• Facilitate self- representation of PWDs in all commissions, Pan Africa Parliament and other structures

We Call On The Secretariat Of African Decade Of Persons With Disability to;
• Establish a programme to develop human resource capacity for policy analysis to act as a watch dog in monitoring disability inclusion
• Allocate responsibilities, roles and duties to the regional federations and other partners in order to ensure effective, well – monitored follow up and implementation strategies
We urge all Government to;
• Ratify, domesticate and implement the UN convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
• Work with DPOs in nominating the members of the panel of experts in convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
• Recognise DPOs as agents of change and therefore as partners in development planning and programmes
• Include people with disabilities and disability into their poverty reduction and development programmes
• Put into place affirmative action to enhance participation in political social and economic sectors
• Include disability data collection within the general national data collection systems recognising diversity in disability
• Use data to inform planning and service delivery and monitoring and evaluation
• Highlight and include disability in the existing MDG indicators in partnership with the disability movement.

We Call On Development Partners To;
• Prioritise disability as a tool for planning and analysis for development assistance and international cooperation in all their international cooperation and assistance (aid, debt relieve and trade)
• Include and consult people with disabilities and their respective organisations in planning, implementation, monitoring and reporting
• Include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes

We Resolve That As Disabled Peoples Organisations We Shall;
• Advocate to ensure that disability issues are mainstreamed in all government, UN agencies and development partners policies, plans and programmes particularly those related to MDGs
• Endeavour to understand the structures of various government, UN agencies and development partners with a view to engaging with them more effectively for full inclusion of people with disabilities
• Advocate development partners to include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes
• Engage and influence the social development process
• Participate in the Social Protection processes to ensure people with disabilities are included
• Advocate and lobby to be included in national poverty reduction strategies and other national development plans and initiatives
• Explore avenues of partnership with private sector in their economic empowerment programes
• Utilize our individual and collective capacity to cause the implementation of programmes related to the MDGs for the benefit of people with disabilities
• Build our own capacity to engage with our government on their commitments and agreement at national and international levels
• Ensure that whatever is agreed at regional or national workshops cascades downward to people with disabilities at the grassroots and rural areas
• Familiarise ourselves with the disability policies of different development agencies and ensure that they benefit us
• Strengthen our unity and common voice in planning, implementation and monitoring processes whilst at the same time recognising diversity in disability
• Restructure and reform our internal governance structures to adopt modern management and good governance systems and increase transparency and accountability to our members
• Nurture and mentor youth with disabilities into leadership succession plans and support them towards social economic empowerment
• Make a paradigm shift from the charity model to the human rights and social development model
• Strategically engage with media for both awareness and advocacy and built our capacity to engage with media
• Sensitise and capacitate the media to various disability needs and to urge them to be inclusive in their presentation and reporting
• Link with African Universities to promote evidence based disability research and to promote disability inclusive academic programmes
• Review through our Governments the Accra Development Plan of Action and cause its implementation for the benefit of PWDs in Africa

These resolutions are the outcomes of the conference, formulated and spoken by the delegates at this esteemed Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference.



This statement from the Africa Regional Conference was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

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RESOURCE: Young People Share Views on Inclusive Education

Posted on 24 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Reports, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

A new publication is available from the Enabling Education Network (EENET). It is called “Young Voices: Young people’s views of inclusive education” (PDF format, 905 Kb).
 
This easy-to-read A5 booklet contains photographs and drawings taken by disabled and non-disabled students in Uganda and Tanzania, along with quotes from them about what they think makes a school inclusive. The booklet also summarizes some of the important ideas raised by the students. For example, it points out that many children say that the attitudes of teachers and the encouragement of parents are important to helping them feel included.
 
The booklet was published/funded by the Atlas Allliance (Norway), with the participatory work and book production being handled by EENET.
 
A Kiswahili version and a Braille version will be available before the end of 2008. There is also a short DVD (approx 15 minutes) which accompanies the booklet. Copies will be available from EENET in mid-September.
 
EENET hopes that this booklet/DVD will be useful for advocacy and awareness raising around both inclusive education and the importance of listening to children’s opinions. Please in future send EENET any feedback you have about the booklet/DVD, or how you have used it.
 
The booklet can be downloaded from the EENET website in PDF format (905 Kb):

http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Young%20Voices.pdf

People who need a print copy or the accompanying DVD mailed to them can contact EENET directly and give them their mailing address. People who will want the Braille version or the Kiswahili version when they become available also should contact EENET directly. People may either email info@eenet.org.uk or ingridlewis@eenet.org.uk



This announcement is modified from the text of an email circulated by Ingrid Lewis at EENET on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. EENET Eastern Africa discussions focuses on issues related to inclusive education in the Eastern Africa region and can be joined for free.

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Stories of People with Disabilities in Developing Countries from Around the World

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Democratic Participation, Education, Human Rights, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, Mobility Impariments, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Too often, the voices of people with disabilities are simply not heard–within their country, within their community, or sometimes even within families. The voices of disabled people in developing countries are even more suppressed.

One special issue of the New Internationalist, released in 2005, brings us the voices of people with disabilities from India … Zimbabwe … Sri Lanka … Colombia … Bangladesh … and elsewhere.

The stories and interviews published in their magazine, available for free on-line, share the experiences of people with disabilities in developing countries in their struggle for sexual expression … the harrowing experience of rape … the push to achieve recognition for their human rights … the battle against severe poverty and starvation … success at becoming a blind teacher … getting involved with politics … and overcoming discrimination in the work force.

Browse the stories at the New Internationalist website at:

http://www.newint.org/issue384/index.htm

Each story can be read on-line in html format; they do not need to be downloaded.



I learned of this magazine issue when several of its stories were recently circulated via email on the Disability Information Dissemination Network, which is managed by the Centre for Services and Information on Disability (CSID), Bangladesh, and currently sponsored by Handicap International. People may subscribe directly to the CSID mailing list by sending an email to csid@bdmail.net, csid@bdonline.com, or info@csididnet.org, with the word “join” in the subject line.

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Disability Awareness Action newsletter, Our Rights, Issue 2, August 2008

Posted on 3 September 2008. Filed under: Children, Cognitive Impairments, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Our Rights – issue 2, August 2008

DAA’s newsletter for Disability Lib.

In the interest of solidarity, this newsletter is sent around by email to disabled people and their organisations across the world, and we invite you to forward it freely. We have provided links to internet sites, web pages and video clips, but understand that not all links are technically accessible to all users. From October Our Rights will be available in electronic format and on our website. For our contact details follow this link http://www.daa.org.uk/

Contents
Welcome Hello from DAA
Disability LIB partners
• Central Office
ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth
Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Mind Politics
Stigma
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
Being an Un-Person
Sceptical about The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
60 years of UN Convention on Human Rights
Inclusion means … being given a £50 token?
International News
Canada says ‘go home’ to disabled child
Sex in the City, and world wide
From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
Sit-in at Nursing Home
And Finally …

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******************
Welcome Hello from DAA
Thank you to all of you who took the time to respond to our first issue. We are delighted to be back! We have had replies from around the world.

“I am very happy indeed to get the DAA Newsletter – this is one newsletter that I eagerly look forward to. The articles provided me with new insights and sharpen my understanding.”
“Great newsletter!”
“I access DAA website regularly and will disseminate DAA newsletter to all my contacts.”
“Have just read your first bulletin and I am impressed with its coverage.”
“thanks a lot for your nice news letter. Hope it can help my people in bangladesh.”

Thank you for all your comments. We have improved our technical set-up, so fewer newsletters should land in Junk or Spam email boxes. From October you can access the newsletter on our website. You can request picture supported and word versions. We continue to strive to make our articles interesting, relevant and accessible. Please let us know how we are doing. This edition has two main themes: the body politics of bio-ethics and inclusion. We will also tell you again who we are and what we hope to achieve. Enjoy!
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

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Disability LIB partners
The project has its own website and central office. www.disabilitylib.org.uk
Disability LIB
6 Market Road
London
N7 9PW
England UK
Telephone: 0844 800 4331
Email: contact@disabilitylib.org.uk

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ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
The Social Inclusion Campaign Award from the Sheila McKechnie Foundation was given to the director of ALLFIE, Tara Flood. Tara is also chair of DAA. Tara and the Alliance run a campaign ‘We know inclusion works’. This is in response to the negative reporting in the media. You are invited to send your stories about how inclusion works to info@allfie.org.uk

“Inclusion for me is about society, which respects the humanity of its people.” says a disabled young person in Nottinghamshire. “Inclusion happens when everyone feels appreciated and welcome to participate.”
Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education.

Inclusion is going to school with your friends. “I kept asking myself what words a mother would use to explain to her daughter why they did not want her at her school. Except that she was disabled. If my daughter had only been black, and not disabled too, would the school have been able to do the same?”
Preethi Manuel mother of Zahrah.

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Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth

The media reported that a nine-year-old girl called Lin was moving her lips, but did not actually sing at the opening of the Olympic Games in China. The beautiful voice we all heard was from a different girl, the seven year-old Yang Peiyi. Apparently Yang was not shown on stage nor on television, because she has crooked teeth. Her face and her smile were regarded as not photogenic enough, so she was hidden to avoid damaging China’s international image.

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Often we find disabled people are hidden, out-of-sight and at the margins of society. Society’s underlying cultural preferences in terms of the body and mind is for a particular image of beauty and health: a superficial one.

Our impairment difference is treated like a ‘stigma’, a characteristic that is deeply discredited within one’s society and for which we are rejected. Our difference, it seems, is challenging.

“I experienced a nervous breakdown 20 years ago. Despite recovering from that, then going on to achieve academically and build a good marriage, my family remain wary of me. My sister is bringing up her child to refer to me as “crazy”. She even considers it funny to do so. I have tried to express how hurtful I find this, but my feelings have been overlooked.”
7th August 2008, Guardian ‘Stigmatised by my own family’

In a unique research called ‘Shout’ almost 4,000 mental health service users were involved. The charity Rethink found that 87% of people said they had direct personal experience of stigma and discrimination and reported the negative impact of stigma on their lives.

The damage caused was wide-ranging; the areas affected include employment, family, friendships, neighbours, accessing education, reporting crime, relationships with health professionals, and feeling confident enough to visit the shops, go to the pub or take part in activities in the community, it says.
The Stigma Shout report can be found at http://www.rethink.org/how_we_can_help/campaigning_for_change/moving_people/stigma_shout.html

But this problem goes deeper. If a girl can be excluded for crooked teeth, where does it end? Our society allows science and law to de-select disabled lives.
For impairment reasons they tamper with genetics in an attempt to screen out difference. We have laws that allow late abortion because of so called ‘defects’.We allow bio-ethics to de-select impairment.

In 2004, UKCPD (formerly the British Council of Disabled People) asked “Can human rights apply if we select children or value people’s quality of life on the basis of their genetic make-up or impairment?” http://www.bcodp.org.uk/library/genetics/3disabhr.pdf
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/06/mentalhealth
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/07/mentalhealth.familyandrelationships

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Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
on last month’s theme: Forced Interventions
Being an Un-Person… (8’47’’)
“This is from a handout I gave while speaking at training for staff who work with people who have developmental disabilities. It is about what it means to be dehumanized and it applies to a far greater group of people than the original audience. It is, to make it clear, something that is done to us by other people, not something intrinsic to who we are.

Being an Un-person means that people talk in front of you as if you aren’t there… It means that your existence seems to fill people with disgust and fear. … If you communicate with behaviour, you will be punished, restrained, drugged or put in a behaviour program.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c5_3wqZ3Lk

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Sceptical
A sceptical view was expressed about the usefulness of the Convention. How does it protect the rights of people with mental health issues?

“My organization are skeptical on the UN Convention re Legal Intervention for people with mental health issues and the sense of disabled people being able to join the armed forces.”

For a discussion of how different Articles in the Convention can work together, go to page 47 in this 2007 publication: http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_WORDversion.doc
The text of Article 12 can be accessed at http://www.mindfreedom.org/kb/mental-health-global/united-nations/article-12-un

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The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
This year (2008) we celebrate 60 years of the United Nations Convention on Human Rights, the first international commitment on human rights.

A web campaign http://www.everyhumanhasrights.org/ urges us to embrace the values and goals of the Declaration. To protect the rights of our fellow global villagers and to encourage others to do the same in our communities, workplaces and schools. We are asked to affirm these principles:

“Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, lanaguage, relition, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.” Every Human has Rights

However, our rights as disabled people are not spelled out specifically. It makes no specific mention of the meaning of rights as disabled people. Our experience is that we are often invisible, excluded or forgotten. We are not always included into the general phrase of ‘human’ inhuman rights.

That is why we needed a specific convention and why we are campaigning for our countries to ratify the Convention of the Rights of Disabled Persons.

UN Convention text resources:
Details of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People can be found at
http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=12&pid=150
http://www.un.org/disabilities/convention/conventionfull.shtml
Easy Read version of the Convention
http://www.officefordisability.gov.uk/docs/international-agreement-rights-disabled-people.pdf
For Easy Read versions of the Convention’s extra agreements (Optional Protocols) go to
http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/convention/nz.htm
A child-friendly text of the Convention can be accessed at
http://www.unicef.org/Child_friendly_CRPD.pdf

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Inclusion means … being given a £50 gift token?
A grammar school in Lincolnshire, England, did not listen to a boy with Autism when planning and arranging the 11-plus entrance exam. Under the Disability Discrimination Act any barriers to learning have to be removed, for example by making alternative arrangements or providing reasonable adjustments.

His mother said: “We knew he would struggle with the change in surroundings. Our primary school head teacher suggested we ask if he could sit the test there, or at least in a room on his own. But when I went to the school I was told, ‘No, we don’t make any allowances’.”

As the barriers of unfamiliar surroundings, a crowded room full with unfamiliar people were not removed, the boy was extremely distressed and failed the exam.

The ombudsman Anne Seex said the school had not considered its duties under the Disability Discrimination Act.

The boy was admitted to another grammar school on the basis of his exam results at the end of primary school (called SATs) and his junior school’s recommendation.

The school has apologised, has given the boy a £50 gift token and agreed to handle future cases differently.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/lincolnshire/7542948.stm
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/article4460621.ece

International News

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Canada
Paul and Barbara-Anne Chapman had sold their home in Britain and bought a farmhouse in Nova Scotia, Canada. The local authorities supported and welcomed them.

However, when the family arrived at the airport a border guard refused them entry. Several questions were raised about their work permit, clearance for their black Labrador and about their daughter Lucy, who has Angelman syndrome.

The family claim they were told by a border guard that because Lucy is disabled she would never be allowed into the country, and that she had a lifetime ban.

Mrs Chapman said: “My dog was allowed to stay. My dog has a higher status than my daughter in Canada, just because she is disabled.”

Canada’s immigration rules in section 38 do have a clause that states that you are not eligible for immigration if you would make an excessive demand on health and social services. Presently, “excessive demand” is usually defined as exceeding $15,000 of publicly funded health care costs over the next 5 years. However, in certain family applications, children are exempt from this rule of no entry due to health care costs.

The Convention on the Rights of Disabled People places obligations on countries to protect disabled people’s rights and freedoms. This includes the right to free movement and residency.

Entry to one’s own country is specifically mentioned in Article 18 of the Convention: “Are not deprived, arbitrarily or on the basis of disability, of the right to enter their own country.”

Entry into another country is protected in Article 18, where it says that disabled people should “not be deprived, on the basis of disability, of their ability to obtain, possess and utilize … relevant processes such as immigration proceedings, that may be needed to facilitate exercise of the right to liberty of movement.”

Mr and Mrs Chapman hired a Canadian lawyer to fight the decision.

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=278
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/canada/2519496/Canada-refuses-entry-to-disabled-girl.html

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Sex in the City… and world-wide.
Research has shown that disabled people are being denied the choice to full sexual relationships.

“I want to meet a girl I can become friends with, take to the pub and the cinema and then after a couple of months see where it goes,” Joseph Greene, 23.

The national charity Family Planning Association FPA has organised an information and poster campaign about the right to have sex and relationships. FPA gives people information and advice about sexual health. This is particularly important in view of the continuing rise and impact of HIV (see reports below).

Easy Read, posters and campaign info at
http://www.fpa.org.uk/news/campaigns/current%5Fcampaigns/detail.cfm?contentid=1021
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7540103.stm
http://www.fpa.org.uk/products/learning_disabilities_publications/detail.cfm?contentid=1037

‘Let’s talk About Sex’ was launched in June 2008 for young people with life-limiting health conditions, in a bid to open up a taboo subject and to better support these young people to have the opportunity to experience relationships and explore their sexuality, in a safe, supportive and empathetic environment.
http://www.act.org.uk/content/view/153/1/

Our rights and dignity in connection with these personal areas are protected in the Convention. Article 23 of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People specifically refers to forming relationships and accessing age-appropriate information, reproductive and family planning education.

As part of their obligations, countries who have ratified the Convention, have a duty to develop and change customs or practices. This includes working towards a change in attitude towards disabled people and sex.

Article 4 of the Convention asks governments to develop or change customs and practices which contradict the rights. Community norms, customs and practices of what people believe or how professionals deal with disabled people may go against the ideals laid down in the Convention.

“What is acceptable in the community is for a disabled person to marry another disabled person so that together they share their curse”, says a disabled local councillor in Uganda.
http://www.disabilitykar.net/docs/stories_women.doc

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
On August 6th a very important international panel discussion took place. ‘Beyond Barriers: Disability and HIV/AIDS’ gave information about studies from across the world – Brazil, South Africa, Cameroon, and Canada.

Disabled people were found to be consistently more vulnerable to infection. People with learning difficulties and disabled women are often exposed to riskier situations; women in particular experience more unprotected sex than the general population, often as a result of sexual violence.

A researcher in Kwa Zulu-Natal, where there is no disability-specific sex education, encountered a “let sleeping dogs lie” attitude in schools. As a result, she found that disabled children had little access to education or legal protection and were more vulnerable to abuse and infection.

n Cameroon, a study focused on a young deaf population, found that sexual debut was on the whole earlier and riskier than in the general population.
http://eliminateaids.blogspot.com/2008/08/beyond-barriers-disability-and-hivaids.html

The Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV/AIDS is an advocacy tool for all Campaign partners and supporters. We invite you to download this printer-ready version in English, French and Portuguese to disseminate at your various meetings and conferences!
http://www.africacampaign.info/a-nos-lecteurs-francais/index.html
http://www.africacampaign.info/recent-publication/index.html
http://www.dcdd.nl/data/1208782834413_Kampala%20Declaration%20on%20Disability%20and%20HIVAIDS.pdf

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
This article argues that despite national laws and certain improvements towards disability rights, El Salvador has only made nominal progress in implementing disability legislation and awareness.

In the context of El Salvador’s twelve-year armed conflict, 70,000 individuals were killed and another 300,000 people were disabled as a result of war.

However, this estimate conflicts with official statistics released by the Ministry of Economy in August 2008. Jesus Martinez, Director of the Landmine Survivors Network-El Salvador is extremely uncomfortable with the results of this 2008 Census.

“It should include accurate and trustworthy statistics about all of the disabled individuals living in this country.” he says.

Disabled people need to be counted in order to be visible in policy action, planning and prioritisation. Article 31 asks countries to find out about disabled people. State parties need collect appropriate information, including statistical and research data, to enable them to formulate and implement policies, which make a reality of the rights in the Convention.

If the Convention marks “a paradigm shift” in attitudes and approaches, then disabled people are not objects that are being counted, but subjects, who have rights and freedoms. As a result of this shift in thinking, ratification of the Convention should also mark a shift in creating a more inclusive society in El Salvador.
http://upsidedownworld.org/main/content/view/1384/74/

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Sit-in at Nursing Home
Demonstrators organised a sit-in and called for closure of a nursing home in Philadelphia. “There is no justice for someone in a nursing home,” read a sign held by one of the demonstrators.

The group’s goal was to persuade Mayor Nutter to help find homes for 50 or so disabled residents over the next six months, then get out of the nursing-home business. They were successful! Details at:
http://www.adapt.org/ http://www.philly.com/philly/hp/news_update/20080818_Protesters_seek_to_close_Phila__nursing_home.html

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

And Finally …
Discrimination is a putrid shade of yellow
It tastes like stale vomit
It smells like rancid fish
Discrimination reminds me of corruption, anger and despair
And sounds like a hooded coward running scared
Discrimination feels like nobody cares …
Extract from Bipolar works blog, 2007

Thank you for your time.
We are pleased to hear from you.
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

Supported by the National Lottery through the Big Lottery Fund.



Thank you to Disability Awareness Action for giving open permission to disseminate and re-publish their newsletter.

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Disabled, Poor–and Ignored: Results of Research in Zimbabwe and South Africa

Posted on 6 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Research conducted in Zimbabwe and South Africa has confirmed what grassroots advocates have known all along: people with disabilities aren’t just at higher risk of poverty. People with disabilities are also more likely to be ignored by many donors who support programs to end poverty.

The 77-page study is entitled, “Are Disabled Peoples’ Voices from both South and North Being heard in the Development process? A Comparative analysis between the situation in South Africa, Zimbabwe, United Kingdom and Northern Europe.” Conducted in 2005, this research explores the extent to which Disabled Peoples’ Organizations (DPOs) in Zimbabwe and South Africa have access to funding, and the extent to which DPOs were able to explain to donors what kind of funding would help them best.

People with disabilities who were interviewed for this study said they wanted to be involved with disability programs, from the planning stage through implementation. However, they felt they were often excluded, both by the government and also by DPOs themselves. The study concludes that many DPOs lack the capacity to reach large numbers of people with disabilities at the grassroots level. As a result, many people with disabilities in South Africa and Zimbabwe are not part of any network. They also usually lacked awareness of policies and programs that were meant to benefit them, such as the African Decade on Persons with Disabilities or the Millennium Development Goals.

DPOs, too, said they lacked opportunity to contribute to dialogue about what kinds of projects would be most beneficial for them. DPOs in South Africa and Zimbabwe said that donors from developed countries often impose their own tailor-made programs on them without asking for their input. They wanted to be more involved with designing the programs that they implement. DPOs usually were more aware than grassroots individuals of programs such as the African Decade or the Millennium Development Goals, but even some DPOs were not aware of them.

Even in the UK and Northern Europe, DPOs felt that they were struggling for donations. DPOs also complained that non-disability oriented international non-governmental organizations used information about people with disabilities to obtain donations for themselves instead of for DPOs.

The study makes recommendations based on its findings, including the need for more capacity building for DPOs in developing countries; stronger partnerships among DPOs in developing and developed countries and donors; and closer involvement of people with disabilities and DPOs in planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating programs.

Learn more about the study; download the 6-page executive summary (Word format); or the full 770-page report (Word format) at:

http://www.disabilitykar.net/research/thematic_voices.html



We Can Do found this study on the DisabilityKar.net site after exploring links from the Heathlink Worldwide site.

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RESOURCE: Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Children, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Less than a decade ago, more than 100 million primary-school aged children still had never entered a classroom. Today, that number has dropped below 80 million, even though the world’s population has grown in that time. Clearly progress has been made. But children with disabilities are being left behind: one-third of the world’s children out of school are disabled. Many of the rest are excluded for other reasons that pose their own set of challenges: some are left behind because they are girls; or because they don’t speak the dominant language of their country; or because they experience discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity.

How can Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and other Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) help schools in their country be more inclusive of students who have commonly been excluded? Save the Children UK has released a new report that offers guidance: “Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience” (PDF format, 4.14 Mb). This report describes successful projects, and the lessons learned, from countries as diverse as Vietnam, Kyrgyzstan, Peru, Bangladesh, China, Somalia, Brazil, Western Balkans, Mongolia, Nepal, Tajikistan, Serbia, India, and Morocco. Children with disabilities are targeted for many of these projects.

The report begins by describing both the conditions that prevent inclusive education and the conditions that can help make it possible. It also analyzes projects that have made it possible for linguistic minority students–and Deaf students–to obtain a bilingual education. Teacher training programs have helped encourage teachers to create more inclusive classrooms for children with disabilities and other students who have historically been excluded. Several countries have used Community-based Education Management Information Systems (C-EMIS) to draw upon the knowledge and motivation of local community members in making education more inclusive. Each chapter ends by discussing what lessons other communities in other countries may find helpful in implementing their own projects.

Advocates who tire of hearing governments complain there isn’t enough money will especially wish to read the 6th chapter on “Addressing financial barriers to inclusive education.” Funding issues are also discussed briefly throughout earlier chapters of Making Schools Inclusive (PDF format, 4.14 Mb).

The 8th chapter points readers to further materials and resources that may be helpful to them in advocating for more inclusive education in their countries.

The full 64-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (4.14 Mb) at http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Making%20schools%20inclusive%20SCUK.pdf.



We Can Do learned of this report through an announcement posted on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. The discussion group is devoted to issues relating to inclusive education in Eastern Africa.

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NEWS: Namibian Government Criticized for Failing Disabled People

Posted on 26 June 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , |

The Chairperson of the National Federation of People with Disabilities in Namibia, Martin Tjivera, has criticized the government of Namibia for failing to meet the needs of people with disabilities, AllAfrica.com has reported. Tjivera said that the government has made “empty promises” to Namibians with disabilities. Policies and programs meant to improve the lives of people with disabilities have not been implemented, he said.

Read more about Tjivera’s remarks in the AllAfrica.com story entitled “Namibia: Government Under Attack” at http://allafrica.com/stories/200806110736.html



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for bringing attention to this news item.

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LISTSERVE: On-line Discussion of Inclusive Education in Eastern Africa

Posted on 24 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear Colleagues,
 
To support the growing interest in the area of Inclusive Education throughout Eastern Africa, an Eastern Africa Discussion Group was set up to help facilitate discussions, networking and information sharing on this topic.  This discussion group is associated with EENET – The Enabling Education Network, which is a UK based information sharing network which promotes the inclusion of marginalized groups in education world wide.
 
The initial discussion group that was established was inundated with SPAM.  To overcome this problem the discussion group is now utilizing a Yahoo Group for discussion, which is free of SPAM.
 
If you would like to join the Eastern Africa Discussion Group, please send an email to eenet_eastern_africa-owner@yahoogroups.co.uk stating your interest to join the discussion group.   Or you may also join via the web at http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/eenet_eastern_africa/

If you join and decide later you do not want to be a part of the group any longer, you can unsubscribe at any time.
 
If you know any one else who you think might be interested in joining this group, please pass this message to them so as they have the information necessary to join.
 
Kind Regards,
 
Dimity Taylor
Coordinator
EENET Eastern Africa



Thank you to Dimity Taylor for submitting this announcement to We Can Do.

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Disability Rights Fund Opens Grantmaking to DPOs in 7 Countries

Posted on 16 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

En español

PRESS RELEASE
Disability Rights Fund Opens Grantmaking to DPOs in 7 Countries

JUNE 16, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced its first grants competition.

The broad objective of the Fund — which was launched by the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the United Kingdom Department for International Development, and an anonymous donor on the first anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) — is to empower disabled persons organizations in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to effectively implement and monitor the CPRD.

In 2008, the Fund plans to give out a total of USD $700,000 in one-year grants ranging from USD $5000 – $50,000 and aimed at awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

To be eligible for this year’s grants program, applicant organizations must be based in and conduct the majority of their activities in the following seven countries: in Africa, Ghana, Namibia and Uganda; in Latin America, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru; in Asia, Bangladesh. In these countries, the Fund will support Disabled Persons’ Organizations activities that advance the human rights of persons with disabilities at country-level.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, www.disabilityrightsfund.org. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by July 15. The deadline for applications is August 15.

Disability Rights Fund Steering Committee Co-Chair, William Rowland, President of the World Blind Union, stated “The Disability Rights Fund heralds an innovative partnership between donors and persons with disabilities. The flow of new resources to support our struggle for rights is a development of major significance.”

####

COMUNICADO DE PRENSA
El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad abre su período de subvenciones a OPDs en 7 Países

16 de junio de 2008

PARA SU INMEDIATA PUBLICACIÓN

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad, una iniciativa colaborativa que apoya los derechos humanos de las personas con discapacidad – anunció hoy su primera competición por subvenciones.

El objetivo amplio del Fondo – que fue lanzado por el Open Society Institute, el Sigrid Rausing Trust, el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional del gobierno británico, y un donante anónimo, en el primer aniversario de la Convención Sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD) de las Naciones Unidas – es el de empoderar a organizaciones de personas con discapacidad en el mundo en desarrollo y la Europa del Este/antigua Unión Soviética, para la implementación y monitoreo efectivos de la CDPD.

En el 2008, el Fondo tiene planificado otorgar un total de USD $700,000 (dólares estadounidenses) en subvenciones de un año de duración que varían desde los USD $5,000 hasta $50,000, dirigidos al aumento de la concientización, el fortalecimiento de alianzas y redes, y la defensa de derechos.

Para poder optar al programa de subvenciones de este año, las organizaciones aplicantes deben tener su sede y realizar la mayoría de sus actividades en alguno de los siguientes siete países: en África, Ghana, Namibia y Uganda; en América Latina, Ecuador, Nicaragua y Perú; en Asia, Bangladesh. En estos países, el Fondo apoyará actividades de las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad que contribuyan al avance de la CDPD a nivel de los países.

Se alienta a que las organizaciones interesadas revisen los criterios de eligibilidad y los detalles para aplicar que se encuentran en el sitio de Internet del Fondo: www.disabilityrightsfund.org. Cualquier pregunta acerca del proceso para realizar propuestas deberán dirigirse a: info@disabilityrightsfund.org a más tardar el 15 de julio de 2008. La última fecha para enviar aplicaciones es el 15 de agosto de 2008.

William Rowland, Co-Presidente del Comité Coordinador del Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad, quien también funge como Presidente de la Unión Mundial de Ciegos, declaró “El Fondo Sobre Derechos de Personas con Discapacidad ha constituído una asociación innovadora entre donantes y personas con discapacidad. La canalización de nuevos recursos hacia la lucha por reivindicar nuestros derechos, es un desarrollo de importancia significativa.”



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this press release for publication at We Can Do.

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Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV/AIDS Seeks Health Care Stories

Posted on 16 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This email was recently circulated by Gouwah Samuels.

version française dessous

Dear friends, colleagues and supporters

The time has come! As promised during our last meeting in Kampala the Communications Working Group is working on compiling the inaugural newsletter for the Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV/AIDS. We are hoping to get all submissions this month in order to distribute it via email in July.

The first issues will focus on access to health care. We invite each of you to read through the following questions and send back answers to Myroslava Tataryn: myroslavat@gmail.com by Friday, 27th June at the latest.

Questions for this edition are as follows:

1. How have you involved health care workers in your disability and AIDS initiatives?

2. Have you and/or your organizations engaged in any activities or initiatives promoting Disability and AIDS at local health care centres or hospitals? Please explain.

3. Do you have an statistics regarding people with disabilities accessing HIV/AIDS and/or reproductive health care services? If you do, please share them with us.

Please share your stories and pictures with us! Even though we may not be able to use all of the stories/pictures collected for this first edition of the newsletter. We will be keeping them on our Africa Campaign Databank! Also, please make sure you have secured necessary permission of people in the photos you are sharing.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact one of us:
Gouwah Samuels: gouwah@africandecade.co.za
Grace Musoke: gracejusta@yahoo.co.uk
Myroslava Tataryn: myroslavat@gmail.com

Looking forward to hearing from you soon!

With warm regards,
Myroslava Tataryn: and Gouwah Samuels
For the Africa Campaign Communications Working Group

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Cheres amis, collegues et patrons,

Finalement, comme etait promis a la derniere reunion a Kampala, la group de travail de communication est en train d’assembler le premier bulletin pour la Campagne Africaine du VIH/SIDA et les handicaps. Nous esperons d’obtenir tous vous contributions ce mois-ci enfin de nous permetre de distribuer le bulletin final par email au mois de juillet.

La premier numero de notre bulletin est consacre aux questions concernant l’access aux soins medicaux. Nous vous invitons de lire les questions qui suivent et de repondre a Myroslava Tataryn (myroslavat@gmail.com) avec vos reponses par vendredi, le 27 juin, au plus tard.

Questions pour ce numero:

1. Comment est ce que vous avez implique les travailleurs medicaux dans vous activites du SIDA et l’incapacite?

2. Est ce que vous ou vos organismes sont engages dans des activites ou initiatives qui font la promotion des questions du SIDA et l’incapacites dans des hopitaux ou des centres medicaux dans vos localites? Expliquez s’il vous plait.

3. st ce que vous avez des statistiques selons les persons avec incapacites qui accessent les services de VIH/SIDA ou la sante reproductif? Si oui, s’il vous plait, partagez-les avec nous.

S’il vous plait, partagez vos histoires et vos photos avec nous! Meme si nous ne serons pas capable de publier chacun dans cet premier numro du bulletin nous allons les garder dans la base de donnees de la campagne. Aussi, s’il vous plait, assurez-vous que vous avez les propres authorizations des personnes dans les photos que vous nous envoyez.

Si vous avez n’emporte quelles questions, n’hesitez pas a nous contacter:

Gouwah Samuels: gouwah@africandecade.co.za
Grace Musoke: gracejusta@yahoo.co.uk
Myroslava Tataryn: myroslavat@gmail.com

Nous esperons vous reponses bientot!

Avec sinceres salutations,
Myroslava Tataryn: and Gouwah Samuels
Pour la groupe de travialle de la communication pour la Campagne Africaine



Thank you to Gouwah Samuels for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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NEWS: Kampala, Uganda, Declaration on Disability and HIV & AIDS

Posted on 25 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

From: AfricaCampaign@webmail.co.za
Subject: Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV&AIDS update

******* version française dessous *************

It has been just over three-weeks since we converged for the 2nd General Meeting of the Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV & AIDS was held March 11 – 13, in beautiful Kampala, Uganda.

We would like to once again take this opportunity to express our gratitude to the National Union for Disabled People in Uganda (NUDIPU) and the Government of Uganda, through the Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development for gracefully hosting our gathering. Our gratitude is also extended to The Secretariat of the African Decade, Handicap International and once again NUDIPU for supporting the event and last but not least to each and every member of the National Organizing Committee for their exceptional contribution prior to and during the meeting. It would not have been possible without your sterling efforts, long and hard hours and sleepless nights!!!

We were more that 170 delegates representing more that 20 African countries and 10 countries outside of Africa. We came from a wide variety of backgrounds, including civil society, government, academic and research institutions, international NGOs, funding agencies, international stakeholders in HIV/AIDS work and the media.

In addition to networking and rich exchange among groups and countries, the constitution of five working groups with plans of action to further Campaign objectives, a renewed steering committee, we also gave birth together to the Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV&AIDS. (full text is enclosed in English. Portuguese and French will be forwarded ASAP)

The declaration calls on governments, HIV/AIDS service providers, the African Union, UN agencies, funding agencies, research and academic institutions and disabled people’s organizations to action toward

  • Equal access to HIV/AIDS prevention and services and
  • Full participation by persons with disabilities in the response to HIV/AIDS in every country and at every level.

We hereby encourage you to disseminate this declaration widely within your country, to persons with disabilities, governments, HIV/AIDS service providers, UN agencies, funding agencies, researchers and academic institutions. Please also use opportunities you have with media to highlight this important message. Feel free to add it onto your organisation’s website.

We would like to take this opportunity also to introduce our steering committee and at the same time extend our warmest welcome to the newer members of the committee. They are:

  • Mr. Tambo Camara (Pan African Federation of the Disabled (PAFOD) – Mauritania;
  • Ms. Farida Gulamo (Association of Disabled Mozambicans (ADEMO) – Mozambique;
  • Mr Martin Babu Mwesigwa (National Union of Disabled Persons of Uganda (NUDIPU) – Uganda;
  • Dr. Elly Macha (African Union of the Blind (AFUB) – Kenya;
  • Mrs. Rachel Kachaje (Southern African Federation of the Disabled (SAFOD) – Malawi
  • Mr. Obuya George Onyango (African Deaf Union (ADU) – Kenya;
  • Mr. Paul Tezanou (Chair of the Secretariat of the African Decade) – Cameroon;
  • Hon. Hendrietta Bogopane-Zulu (Member of SA parliament, Disability respresentative of SA National AIDS council executive structure) – South Africa;
  • Ms. Fri Beatrice Bime (Global Fund) – Geneva NEW
  • Mr. Oumar Diop (Handicap FormEduC, Resource Centre for the promotion of the rights of persons with disabilities) – Senegal NEW
  • Mr. David O. Anyaele (Centre for citizens with disabilities) – Nigeria NEW

We would also like to bring your attention to changes in the campaign management. At the end our gathering we said goodbye to Dr. Susan Girois. She will no longer be actively involved in the work on the Campaign Management Team (CMT), although her expertise, experience, guidance and spontaneity will be sought more often than she expects. Her active participation will surely be missed however knowing she’s on call sets the rest of us at ease. In the same breath we would like to welcome two new additions to the CMT: Kevin Henderson who is the HIV&AIDS technical advisor at Handicap International’s Kenya program and Aïda Sarr, a programme manager for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities’ West, North and Central Africa regional programme.

We would like to encourage you to please keep us updated on the developments in your respective countries, regions and districts and we promise to share your experiences with the rest of the world.

Gouwah Samuels, Kevin Henderson, Aïda Sarr
Campaign Management Team

Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV & AIDS

PREAMBLE:

We, the participants of the Second Meeting of the Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV&AIDS representing Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs), Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working with and for persons with disabilities, Funding and Development Agencies from 21 African countries and representatives from other parts of the world, a meeting hosted by the National Union of Disabled Persons of Uganda (NUDIPU) in conjunction with the Government of Uganda, with support from Handicap International and the African Decade Secretariat, in Kampala, Uganda, March 11-13, 2008;

NOTING the fact that the incidence of HIV is disproportionately high among groups that are excluded socially, culturally and economically, including persons with disabilities, and that these groups are disregarded in a majority of national and international HIV/AIDS programming initiatives in Africa. Further noting the importance of mainstreaming disability issues in relevant strategies to achieve sustainable development;

RECOGNIZING that national, regional, continental and international instruments on human rights, such as the United Nations Human Rights Bill and the International Covenants on Human Rights, have proclaimed and agreed that everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in these instruments, without distinction of any kind. Further recognizing the principles and objectives of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 2006, the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS – adopted at the UN General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS in 2001 and the Millennium Development Goals (MDG);

CONSIDERING that despite these various instruments and undertakings to which many United Nations member states are signatories, persons with disabilities continue to face barriers in their participation as equal members of society and violations of their human rights in all parts of the world, including Africa. Persons with disabilities should have the opportunity to be actively involved in decision-making processes about policies and programmes, including those directly concerning them; and the importance of accessibility to the physical, social, economic and cultural environment, to health and education and to information and communication in enabling persons with disabilities to fully enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms. Further considering the fact that children and women with disabilities are often at greater risk, both within and outside the home, of violence, injury or abuse, neglect, maltreatment or exploitation;

We call on all African Governments to include disability in its diversity as a crosscutting issue in ALL poverty reduction strategies.

Mindful of the above preamble, the signatories to the Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV & AIDS make the following call that:

African Governments shall ensure that:

National AIDS strategic plans recognize persons with disabilities as vulnerable to the impact of HIV and AIDS as well as valuable contributors in the response to HIV/AIDS.

National HIV/AIDS monitoring and evaluation systems and the existing population surveillance systems include disability specific and disaggregated indicators to be used for planning and programming purposes;

The National HIV/AIDS Commissions/Councils include active representation of persons with disabilities;

Information Education Communication (IEC) strategies at all levels ensure provision for IEC which is accessible to persons with intellectual, mental, physical and sensory disabilities;

HIV/AIDS is recognized as a cause of disability.

HIV/AIDS prevention specialists and service providers shall:

Develop targeted prevention messages and methods that are disability-specific, gender-specific, age-specific and adapted to local language and cultural variations;

Equip all HIV/AIDS care and support service centres to provide comprehensive information and confidential counselling to persons with intellectual, mental, physical and sensory disabilities;

Provide equal opportunity to persons with disabilities to train for and engage in counselling and care provision (i.e. Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT), Preventing Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) and adherence counsellors, and home based care providers;

Associations of people living with HIV and AIDS recognise the rights of persons with disabilities living with HIV and AIDS to ‘access for all’ and provide greater involvement of persons with disabilities in the issues that affect them.

African Union AIDS portfolio and Africa AIDS Watch shall:

Ensure that their strategies, programmes and monitoring systems include disability in its diversity as a cross-cutting issue.

UNAIDS and its composite UN agencies—UNHCR, UNICEF, WFP, UNDP, UNFPA, UNODC, ILO, UNESCO, WHO and the World Bank—shall:

Recognise disability in its diversity as a cross-cutting issue in all HIV/AIDS policies, guidelines and programmes;

Ensure that their monitoring mechanisms track the involvement of persons with disabilities as planners, implementers as well as beneficiaries of HIV/AIDS programmes.

Funding Agencies shall:

Ensure that their funding requirements include both disability and HIV/AIDS as cross cutting issues;

Provide all key documents related to funding opportunities in formats that are accessible to persons with different types of disabilities;

Ensure that their monitoring mechanisms track the involvement of persons with disabilities in planning and implementation as well as beneficiaries of recipient programmes;

Independent research agencies and academic institutions shall:

Include disability and HIV/AIDS as a priority area for research;

Include disability issues in protocols for designing research programmes;

Ensure that research methods capture data that is disability-specific, gender-specific, age-specific and adapted to local language and cultural variations;

Ensure that persons with disabilities are included as researchers, not only respondents or subjects.

Disabled People’s Organisations shall:

Seek accreditation for civil society representation at the UNGASS through UNAIDS;

Provide/give input into HIV/AIDS country reports through governments;

Solicit the Civil Society Task Force for the High Level HIV/AIDS Meetings for membership and active participation;

Implement measures for the protection and promotion of the rights, needs, confidentiality and dignity of persons with disabilities living with HIV and AIDS;

Raise awareness among persons with disabilities and build HIV/AIDS into their regular programmes;
Avail human resources/disability experts to support the HIV/AIDS response for disabled and non-disabled people at all level

****************************************************************************
***********************

Chers membres du Comité de Pilotage, Sympathisants et Amis de la Campagne Africaine,

Cela fait tout juste 3 semaines depuis que nous nous sommes retrouvés pour la seconde Assemblée Générale de la Campagne Africaine sur le Handicap et le VIH&SIDA. C’était dans la jolie ville de Kampala, Ouganda du 11 au 13 Avril 2008.

Nous aimerions encore une fois saisir cette opportunité pour exprimer notre gratitude à l’Union Nationale des Personnes Handicapées d’Ouganda, au Gouvernement Ougandais, par le biais du Ministère de Genre, du Travail et du Développement Social pour avoir généreusement abrité cette rencontre. Nos remerciements vont également au Secrétariat de la Décennie, Handicap International et encore une fois au NUDIPU pour son soutien sans
faille lors de cet événement. Et enfin, à tous les membres du Comité National d’Organisation pour leur contribution exceptionnelle et efforts considérables déployés avant et durant la réunion. Cela n’aurait pas été possible sans votre dure labeur et nuit sans sommeil !!!

Nous étions plus de 170 délégués venant de plus de 20 pays Africains et 10 hors du continent. Des représentants de la société civile, du gouvernement, d’Institutions académiques, d’ONG internationales, d’Agences de Financement, des partenaires internationaux travaillant dans le domaine du VIH/SIDA et des médias étaient également présents lors de ce grand
rendez-vous.

L’aboutissement de tous nos efforts comme vous le savez, est la Déclaration de Kampala sur le Handicap et le VIH&SIDA. A cela s’ajoute, les discussions fructueuses notées au sein des groupes, la mise en place de 5 groupes de travail avec des plans d’action sur les objectifs de la Campagne et l’entrée au sein du comité de pilotage de nouveaux membres. (ci-joint le texte intégral de la déclaration en Anglais, Portugais et Français, sera transféré ASAP
La Déclaration appelle les gouvernements, les prestataires de services, l’Union Africaine, les Agences des NU, les Agences de financement, les Institutions Académiques et les Organisations de Personnes Handicapées à entreprendre les actions suivantes :

  • L’accès égal à la prévention et aux services du VIH/SIDA et
  • La pleine participation des personnes handicapées à la réponse au VIH/SIDA dans chaque pays et à tous les niveaux.

Nous vous encourageons ainsi, à faire de cette Déclaration une large diffusion dans votre pays, auprès des personnes handicapées, des gouvernements, des prestataires de services, des Agences des NU, des Agences de Financement, des Institutions Académiques. Saisissez les opportunités que vous avez avec les médias pour relayer cet important message auprès du grand public et le publier sur le site web de votre organisation.

Permettez nous également, de vous présenter le comité de pilotage qui s’est élargit et d’accueillir chaleureusement les 3 nouveaux venus :

  • M. Tambo Camara (Panafricaine des Personnes Handicapées (PAFOD) – Mauritanie;
  • Mme. Farida Gulamo (Association des Mozambicains Handicapés (ADEMO) – Mozambique;
  • M. Martin Babu Mwesigwa (Union Nationale des Personnes Handicapées d’Ouganda (NUDIPU) – Ouganda;
  • Dr. Elly Macha (Union Africaine des Aveugles (AFUB) – Kenya;
  • Mme. Rachel Kachaje (Fédération des Personnes Handicapées d’Afrique Australe (SAFOD) – Malawi;
  • M. Obuya George Onyango (Union Africaine des Sourds (ADU) – Kenya;
  • M. Paul Tezanou (Membre du Conseil D’Administration du Secrétariat de la Décennie) – Cameroun ;
  • L’Honorable Député, Hendrietta Bogopane-Zulu (Parlementaire Sud Africaine; Représentante de la structure exécutive du Conseil National de Lutte contre le Sida) Afrique du Sud) – Afrique du Sud;
  • Mme. Fri Beatrice Bime (Global Fund) – Genève NEW
  • M. Oumar Diop (Handicap FormEduC, Centre de Ressources pour la Promotion des Droits des Personnes Handicapées) – Sénégal NEW
  • M. David O. Anyaele (Centre des Citoyens Handicapés) – Nigéria NEW

Autre changement, le départ du Dr Susan Girois de l’Equipe de Gestion de la Campagne à qui nous disons aurevoir. Elle ne sera plus activement impliquée dans le travail de l’Equipe de Gestion de la Campagne (EGC), cependant son expertise sera toujours mise à contribution. Son expérience, ses conseils and sa spontanéité seront plus souvent sollicités qu’elle ne le pense. Sa participation active nous manquera mais la sachant sur répondeur nous rassure. Dans le même temps, nous aimerions souhaiter la bienvenue au sein de l’ECG à Kevin Henderson, Conseiller Technique en VIH&SIDA à Handicap International et Aïda Sarr Assistante du Programme Régional pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest, Central et du Nord, du Secrétariat de la Décennie Africaine des Personnes Handicapées.

Un rapport détaillé y compris la liste des participants vous sera transmis par email end -Avril. Si vous avez besoin d’une copie sur CD, envoyez nous un email à cette adresse : khenderson@handicap-international.or.ke.

Nous souhaitons que vous nous teniez informer des derniers développements dans vos pays respectifs, régions et districts et nous promettons de les partager avec le reste du monde.

Gouwah Samuels, Kevin Henderson, Aïda Sarr
Equipe de Gestion de la Campagne



We Can Do received the Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV&AIDS via the Intl-Dev listserv on international development.

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TRAINING: New Ethiopian Sign Language & Deaf Culture University Degree

Posted on 25 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, News, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , |

Press Release – Ethiopian Sign Language degree
No. 1/08

The Department of Linguistics, Addis Ababa University, organized and conducted a one day consultative workshop on a Draft syllabus of a BA program in Ethiopian Sign Language (ESL) and Deaf Culture on March 14, 2008 in Addis Ababa. The purpose of the workshop is to evaluate the draft syllabus with the presence of stakeholders who are working in the area of sign language and Deaf Education. The participants are mainly teachers of Deaf schools, Deaf Students, representatives from Deaf Association, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs, NGOs, various relevant government offices and the university officials.

Ethiopia’s first BA program in ESL and Deaf Culture has the following main objectives:

  • Train Deaf teachers and Deaf sign linguists,
  • Promoting the growth and enrichment of the ESL and,
  • Promote collaborative research on ESL.

It was told by the participants that such initiatives taken by the university is encouraging to minimize the shortage of teachers of deaf students all over the country. This three years BA program is hopefully to be launched in October 2008. Besides, the department has a future plan to set up a Regional Sign Language Center. Therefore, the department invites professionals to support our effort in the improvement of Ethiopian Deaf Education and for the development of Ethiopian Sign Language.

Currently, the department gives a non-credit, free of charge, awareness raising course on ESL and Deaf Culture for the University community. There are about 250 students attending this course in six (6) classes and will be certified on June 2008.

Inquiry about the Sign Language Program in Addis Ababa University can be made to the following addresses:

Dr. Hirut WoldeMariam, Chairperson, Dep’t of Linguistics, AAU
Email- hirutwoldemariam@yahoo.com

Dr. Moges Yigezu, ESL and Deaf Culture Project Leader,
Email- mogesyigezu@yahoo.com.au

Eyasu Hailu, ESL and Deaf Culture Project Coordinator
Email- tusaye11@gmail.com

Department of Linguistics
Addis Ababa University

April 2008



We Can Do obtained this press release via the DeafStudies-Africa listserv. Please note that inquiries related to the Ethiopian Sign Language program should be directed to one of the three email addresses given above, not to We Can Do.

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4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress Report Available Online

Posted on 14 May 2008. Filed under: Assistive Devices, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Reports, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

In low-income countries, the overwhelming majority people who need wheelchairs don’t have one. This has a profound impact on their ability to lead independent lives–or even leave their own homes. Participants in a recent conference in Africa exchanged ideas and knowledge on how to address this challenge.

The 4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress Report (PDF format, 446 Kb) can now be downloaded for free on-line. The report summarizes a series of remarks, panel discussions, and other conference sessions on how to promote appropriate wheelchair services across the African continent. The report also presents a list of resolutions made on the last day of the Congress. The 4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress was held in September 2007 in Tanzania.

The Pan Africa Wheelchair Builders Association (PAWBA) and the Tanzanian Training Centre for Orthopaedic Technologists (TATCOT) facilitated the congress. Co-funders included the World Health Organisation, ABILIS, Motivation Africa, Christoffel Blindenmission (CBM), and SINTEF. The 116 participating members came from Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Angola, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Namibia, South Africa, UK, Norway and USA.

The previous three All Africa Wheelchair Congresses were held in Zambia (2003); Kenya (1998); and Zimbabwe (1995). Each congress was a landmark in developing appropriate and affordable wheelchair products and services in Africa in allowing participants to exchange knowledge across the continent. PAWBA was formed at the 2003 Congress.

You can download the full, 47-page 4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress report in PDF format (446 Kb) at:

http://www.independentliving.org/docs7/pawba-tatcot200709.pdf



We Can Do learned about this report by browsing the AskSource.info database on health, disability, and development. I gathered further detail by skimming the report itself.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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Listserv on Deaf Studies, Sign Linguistics in Africa

Posted on 13 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Middle East and North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Dr Victoria Nyst at Leiden University and Shane Gilchrist ÓhEorpa at the University of Amsterdam have set up a new yahoogroups (listserv) for scholars and researchers in Deaf Studies, Sign Linguistics, and related studies in Africa.

The group is open to people who have some expertise/knowledge about the Deaf Community in Africa.

In order to join the group, you need to send a blank email to:

deafstudies-africa-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

and you will be automatically added.

This group is meant to be a small, informal, perhaps chatty group for scholars in Deaf Studies, Sign Linguistics, and related topics in Africa.

You can read past messages posted in the DeafStudies-Africa listserv via the web at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DeafStudies-Africa/. However, to post messages of your own, you need to be subscribed. Follow the link for more details.



Thank you to Shane Gilchrist ÓhEorpa for circulating this notice on the deafintl listserv.

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NEWS: Disability Advocate, Gladys Charowa, Dies

Posted on 21 April 2008. Filed under: Children, Education, Human Rights, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following email was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC listserv, an email discussion group devoted to disability rights and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), as a tribute to fellow listserv member and disability rights advocate, Gladys Charowa.

Hi folks,

The vast majority of you will have seen many posts here from Gladys Charowa from the DWSO. She was a great supporter of the Convention and worked hard to ensure that her group were not going to be excluded from the Convention nor from the process.

It is with great sadness to that I have to inform you of Gladys Charowa who was the Executive Director of Disabled Women Support Organisation (Zimbabwe). Gladys suffered a stroke on the 6th of March and her health subsequently deteriorated leading to her death on the 7th of March, 2008 in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Gladys Charowa was involved in the disability movement since February 2002 during her rehabilitation in Harare after breaking her back in a car crash in December 2001. She was released from hospital in April 2002 after experiencing the conditions tolerated by the women who were also being rehabilitated. She decided to set up the Disabled Women Support Organisation (DWSO) after helping some of the service users at the centre; for example, she successfully petitioned an education examination board to allow a student with disabilities additional time to sit her examinations. Gladys wanted to challenge the traditional view that there is nothing that can be done to support women and girls who are spinally injured.

DWSO works alongside hospitals, often in rural areas, to provide support for individuals and their families to become both physically and financially independent; this includes training to sensitise the community, peer group education and micro-finance projects. DWSO is one of the first disability organisations to have projects in each of the 10 provinces of Zimbabwe.

DWSO also works with schools, setting up Disability Clubs and projects to help children and parents to increase their understanding of the needs of disabled people. Since 2002, she worked tirelessly as a disability activist fighting for poverty reduction, particularly among disabled women. Gladys was an active disability activist at both national and international level, and contributed immensely to disability related literature. Gladys will be greatly missed in disability activism and may her soul rest in peace after working so hard for a good cause.

Some of Gladys Charowa’s publications

(i) Reply to a statememt for discussion: investing in education for children with disabilities is economically not interesting

March 1, 2006 – Published by: Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development (DCDD), Available at http://www.dcdd.nl/default.asp?2905

(ii) Body blows: in the thick of Zimbabwe’s current turmoil, women with disabilities face hellish prejudice, hunger and rape. Gladys Charowa bears witness.(POVERTY & GENDER)(Column) – Published in New Internationalist, November 1, 2005

Best wishes,

Frank

Frank Mulcahy



Thank you to Frank Mulcahy of Ireland for sharing this sad news with the AdHoc_IDC listserv.

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NEWS: Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum Founded

Posted on 8 April 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Ghulam Nabi Nizamani has asked that people circulate the following press release.

COMMONWEALTH DISABLED PEOPLES’ FORUM

Press Release

A New Voice Shouts to the Commonwealth –
Nothing About us Without Us.

Disabled youth and adult people from 16 Commonwealth countries came together from 15-17 March, 2008 in London to launch a unique Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum (1), the purposes of which will be to provide a link between disabled people’s organisations in all Commonwealth countries and all the political structures of the Commonwealth.

At the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in October 2007 the civil society challenge to CHOGM was to mainstream disability in sustainable development, to ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (CRPD) and to adopt disability inclusive policies. This cannot be achieved without a strong, democratic forum of disabled youth and adults to ensure implementation.

We had a vibrant and dynamic series of meetings to consolidate the vision, constitution and activities of the Forum (2). The youth met separately to devise their own creative methods of self representation and organisation. We came together in a final agreement of how to go forward together. It is essential that the voice of young disabled people is heard clearly in the work of the CDPF. They are the future leaders and builders of our shared vision of a Commonwealth built on equality, human rights and respect for diversity.

The major focus of our work in the next two years, including a major conference before CHOGM in 2009, will be to ensure that Commonwealth countries sign, ratify and implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. As Rachel Kachaje said at the Launch of the CDPF, hosted by the Commonwealth Foundation at Marlborough House,
‘Disabled people see that hope springs out of the convention – hope for a new, inclusive world where disabled people can be seen as fully human’

We, All Sanghar Handicaps’ Association Pakistan are very proud to have part of this exciting new beginning and look forward to working with our disabled colleagues to ensure our full inclusion in all the nations of our shared Commonwealth.

For further information contact:
Ghulam Nabi Nizamani
South Asia /South East Asia Regional Representative
Bakhoro Road Sanghar-68100, Pakistan. (3)
Ph # +92-333-2916281
Email: ghulamnabi.nizamani@gmail.com (4)

(1) This meeting was funded by the Commonwealth Foundation, DFID, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and ADD.
(2) Officers elected were: Chair: James Mwanda (Uganda), Vice Chair: George Daniel (Tinidad & Tobago), Secretary: Javed Abidi (India), Treasurer: Richard Rieser (UK), Women’s Representative: Rachel Kachaje, (Malawi) Youth Representatives: Laura Kanusu (Uganda)
George Kasara (Kenya), Regional Representatives: Ghulam Nabi Nizaamani (Pakistan), Lesley Emmanuel (Antigua), Setareki Macanawai (Fiji), Steve Estey (Canada) Thomas Ongolo (South Africa).
(3) The registered office of the CDPF will be in India and there will be a liaison office in the UK to work directly with the Commonwealth Secretariat and Foundation.
(4) This email address can be changed after website of CDPF.



In addition to the above press release, Ghulam Nabi Nizamani also made the following note in mid March:

The following countries from South Asia and South East Asia are member countries of Commonwealth. These Countries are invited to submit application for Commonwealth Disabled Peoples’ Forum (CDPF) Country Focal Point.
Bangladesh
Brunei Darussalam
India
Malaysia
Maldives
Pakistan
Singapore
Sri Lanka

The Organization must be National Level Organization in respective country if in any country there will be no National Organization we will support to encourage to estabilish National organization in that country. Please also send establishment date of Organization, Network in the Country, Some credible work done in past. Please send information by mail or email before the first week of April 2008.

Cheers!
Ghulam Nabi Nizamani
Regional Representative CDPF
South and South East Asia

Note: We have no contact from Brunei Darussalam please help us for finding National organization there.



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for sharing the above press release. Any inquiries should please be emailed to him directly at ghulamnabi.nizamani@gmail.com.

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RESOURCE: Disabled Women’s Organizations in Pacific-Asia

Posted on 7 April 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following list of Disabled Women’s Organizations, Groups, and Committees in the Asia/Pacific Region (plus a few in Africa) was developed at the International Labour Organisation in Bangkok in December 2007. We Can Do readers should note that contact information can change quickly. If you try contacting an organization and cannot seem to reach them with the contact information given here, try googling the name of the contact person, or the name of the organization, or both. You can also consult other resources that can help you find more disability-oriented organizations around the world.

List of Disabled Women’ Organizations/Groups/Committee
Date: 19-12-2007

Annie Parkinson
President of Women with Disabilities Australia (WWDA)
Post Office Box 605 Rosny Park, Tasmania 7018 Australia
Tel: + 61 3 62448288
Fax: + 61 3 62448255
E-mail: wwda@wwda.org.au
Web: http://www.wwda.org.au

Sabina Hossain Kochi
Chair Person of
Women with Disabilities Development Foundation BPKS complex, Dhakkhinkhan, Uttara, Dhaka 1230. Bangladesh
Tel: + 880-8923915,8960077
E-mail: bpks@citechco.net

Ashrafun Nahar Misti
Deputy coordinator of Women with Disabilities Development Network
BPKS complex, Dhakkhinkhan, Uttara, Dhaka 1230, Bangladesh
Tel: +880-8923915,8960077
E-mail: cotoed@bpksbd.org
Champa Dash
Chairperson of
Disabled Women’ Development Committee
PSID center Narail
Moheshkhola Narail PSID Center
Post: Narail, Upzilla & dist: Narail, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Mob: +880-8901713196017

Shucithra Rani Shaha
Chairperson of Disabled Women ‘s Development Committee,
Nagarpur Disabled Peoples Organizations Tangail Bangladesh
Vill & Post : Mamud Nagar
Upazilla: Nagarpur, District: Tangail
Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01711`512295, 01712078249

Mah,uda Khatun
Chairperson of Disabled Women Committee Narshindi
Narshindi Disabled People Organization to Development
Vill: Ashrafpur (Near Sub registry Office )
Upazilla: Shibpur, District : Narshingdi
Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01712078247, 01713196024

Hafsa Akter
Chairperson of
Disabled Women Development Committee
Chandpur
Chandpur Disabled People Organizations to Development
Vill: Charbashanto, Upazilla: Faridgonj
District Chandpur, Bangladesh
Mob: +8801712o78245

Soyada Shahina
Disabled Women’s Development Committee
NDDS Protibandhi Kallayan Society (PKS)
24, R K Mission Road, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Mob:+880-01712069686
e-mail: pks-bd@agnionline.com

Naznin Nahar
Coordinator of
Disabled Women’s Development Committee, Meherpur
SPD Complex, Post: Mujibnagar
Dist: Meherpur-7100
Bangladesh
Tel:+880-2-07923-74011
Fax: +880-2-8332924
e-mail:spd@bdonline.com

Nasima khatun
Chairperson of Disabled Women’s Development Committee, Disabled People Organizations to Development Moulovibazar, Bangladesh
Vill: natissar, Post: Giash Nagar ,
Upazilla & Dist: Moulovibazar , Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01712078248

Lovely akter Shapla
Chairperson of Disabled Women’s Development Committee, Monmanshingh Disabled Peoples Organizations to Development
Vill: Voradoba Klab bazaar, Upazilla: Valuka
Dist: Moimanshingh, Bangladesh
Mob: +880-01713196029

Women with Disabilities Project Centre for Services and Information on Disability (CSID)
House # 715, Road # 10,
Baitul Aman Housing Society
Adabor
Dhaka- 1207 Bangladesh
Tel: 9129727, 8143882
Fax: 8125669
E-mail: csid@bdonline.com, csid@bdmail.net
Web: www.csidnetwork.org

Disabled Women’s Committee
Fiji Disabled People Association 355 Waimanu Road, Suva G.P.O. Box 15178, Suva, Fiji
Phone: +679- 331-1203
Fax: +679- 330-1161.

Association of Women with Disabilities Hong Kong
Room 11-12, G/F, Wang Cho House
Wang Tau Hom Estate Kowloon,
Hong Kong, China
Fax: +852-2337-1549
Email: women@awdhk_conf.org
For all disabilities.

Miss Berhane Daba
President of Ethiopian Women with Disabilities National Association (EWDNA)
P.o. Box 43128
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Tel: + 252-1-0911-451717
Email address berhanedaba@yahoo.com

Regina
Secretary of Sadhana Women with Disabilities Association Tamil Nadu
ADD India
Kallukadai Steet, Sathyamoorthy Nagar
Keeranur Pudukottai District
Tamil Nadu, India
Email: addindiatn@rediffmail.com
All disabilities

Kuhu Das,
Director of Association of Women with Disabilities 6/J, Surah 2nd Lane, Phoolbagan, Kolkata-700010, India
Tel: +91-64535802
Fax: +91-23639115
Mobile: +91-9830226718
E-mail: sawwd@vsnl.net

Shampa Sengupta
Representative of Women with Disability, Sruti Disability Rights Centre
Sruti disAbility Rights centre
5A R.K. Ghosal Road
Kolkata 700 042, India
Tel: +91- 9433174978

Sobhagya Goyal
Vice President of National Forum for Visually Impaired Women
All India Confederation of the Blind Ghasety Bazar Ajmer
Rajasthan, India
Tel. : +91- 0145-2621185
Mob. : +91 – 9414708018

Ms. Lidya Miranita
Indonesian Association of Women with Disabilities (HWPCI)
Jl. Cempaka Putih raya No. 1, Jakarta – Pusat
Jakarta – 10510 – Indonesia
Tel/Fax : +62-21-42879844
E-mail : ariani_0704@yahoo.com
website : www.hwpci.org

Indonesian Blind Women Union (PERTUNI)
Gedung Inkoppol, Gd II, lt. 2
Jl. Tambak No. 2, Jakarta – Pusat
Jakarta – 10320, Indonesia
Tel/fax : +62-21-31931704
email : pertuni_dpp@yahoo.co.id

Ms. Kimie Nagumo
President of DPI Women with Disabilities Network Japan
Japan
nagumo-kimie@mwe.biglobe.ne.jp

Kim, Mi Joo
Representative of Women with Disabilities Arts and Culture and Network
Seoul Women’s Plaza 3F NGO Center 345-1
Daebang-dong Dongjak-gu Seoul 156-808 Korea
Tel: +82-02-823-8360
Cell: 011-746-2196
Email: kim_mijoo@yahoo.com
Web: http://www.kkipan.com

Koo Gwi Hoi
Coordinator of Organizing Committee for the Global Summit of Women with Disabilities
Swon Bdg, IF, 877-13, Shinjeong5-dong, Yangcheon-gu,
Seoul, Korea
Tel: +82-2-2692-2293
Mobile: +82-19-285-5447
Email: koohj19@hanmail.net

Lee Ye-ja
Korean Differently Abled Women United Organization
Rm 811, Chritian Building
136-46 Yonci-dong, Chongno-Ku, Seoul
Korea (110-736)
Tel: +82-2-3675-9935
Email: kdawu@hanmail.com
leeyeja@shinburo.com
Web: http://www.kdawu.org

Catherine Mwayoga
Women’s Committee
United Disabled Persons of Kenya (UDPK) Waiyaki Way; P.O. box 13488; Nairobi, Kenya
Tel.: +254-2-443915
Fax: +254-2-446065,
E-mail: disability@wananchi.com

Ms. Daloonny Souvannavong
Director of Lao Disabled Women Development Center
Ban Dongphosy, Hatsayfong District Vientiane
PO Box 6751, Thadeua Rd, Hatsayfong District
Vientiane Capital, Lao
Tel : +21 812282
Fax : +21 812282
Email : ldwdc@laotel.com

Shusila Poudel
President of Nepal Disabled Women Society (NDWS)
Pulchowk, Lalitpur:3; PO Box 5445, Nepal
Tel: +997-1- 535770, 531324
Fax: +997-1- 535770, 535142
E-Mail: sushila@coho.wlink.np
ndws@coho.wlink.com.np

Indira Chapagain
President of Nepal Disabled Women Association (NDWA)
NPC 8973,00560
Kathmandu, Putalisadak, Nepal
Tel: +977-1-6635926
Email: ndwa_ndwa@hotmail.com
Nara Kumari Karki
President of National Association for Disabled Women-Nepal (NADW-Nepal)
P.O. Box 7268 Koteshwor
Kathmandu Nepal
Tel: +977-14496664
E-mail: nadw@hotmail.com

Shrijana Singh
President of Deaf Women Development Committee (DWDC)
P.O. Box 4601 Putalisadak Kathmandu
Tel: +977-1-415-568
Fax: +977-1-416-200 Deaf and hard of hearing

Ola Abu Alghaib
Stars Of Hope Center ‘Empowerment of women with Disabilities’ Palestine
Palestine-Mamalloh-Al Elsal-Bazar Commercial Center-4th Floor
Tel: +972-2-2972345
Mobile: +972-599-026260
Email: starofhope2007@gmail.com

Miss N.G. Kamalawathie,
President of Association of Women with Disabilities (AKASA)
Pahalagama Road , Kongollewa,
Talawa, Sri Lanka
Tel: +94 25 5670329
Fax : +94 25 2275022
Mobile :+94 773121062
E-mail : akasa7@sltnet.lk

Savina Nongebatu
Member of Disabled Women’s Committee Solomon
Disabled People Organization Solomon DPASI(DPO) Solomon
Tel: +677- 24863, 677- 36062
savina_nongebatu@yahoo.com.au
cbr@moh.gov.sb

Association of Blind Women Thailand 94/4 Moo 13 Sihaburanukit Road
Minburi, Bangkok, 10510, Thailand
Tel: +66-2-233-6079
Email: abwt@tab.or.th

Ms. Supattraporn Tanatikom
Disabled Peoples’ International Asia Pacific Regional Office
92 Phaholyothin 5 Road, Samsennai, Phayathai Bangkok 10400 THAILAND
Telephone numbers: (662) 271 2123
Fax : (662) 2712124
E-mail: sarahmaithai@gmail.com,
supattraporn@dpiap.org
Website: www.dpiap.org

Ms. Hellen Asamo
African Women with Disabilities
P.O. Box 8567, Kampala, Uganda
Tel.: +256-41-540179
Fax: +256-41-540178
E-Mail: nudipu@starcom.co.ug

Ms. Duong Thi Van
Women’s Committee of Bright Future Group for People with Disabilities
124 A Dai La Street, Hanoi, Vietnam
Tel: +844 628-0527
E-mail: van@netnam.com

Ms. Nguyen Hong Oanh
Director of Hanoi Women with Disabilities Club 112B5, 46B Pham Ngoc Thach alley, Hanoi (the front gate), Vietnam
Tel: +84-4-8522 778
Email: phunuthudo@nguoikhuyettat.org
lananhdf@gmail.com



Thank you to Bishnu Maya Dhungana for passing along this list.

Do YOU have a list of disability-oriented organizations in developing nations or regions? Please share with We Can Do readers by submitting it to me at ashettle [at] patriot.net.

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NEWS: International Coalition Launches Groundbreaking Disability Rights Fund

Posted on 2 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

PRESS RELEASE

International Coalition Launches Groundbreaking Disability Rights Fund
MARCH 31, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Diana Samarasan, Director
Telephone: 617-261-4593
Email: dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org

BOSTON, MA – The Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the United Kingdom Department for International Development, and an anonymous donor today announced a groundbreaking collaborative to support the human rights for people with disabilities.

Launched on the first anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD), the Disability Rights Fund will provide financial support for human rights advocacy in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union. The broad objective of the Fund will be to empower disabled persons organizations around the world to effectively implement and monitor the CPRD. The Fund is a project of Tides.

“The Fund is a unique partnership among donors and the worldwide disability community,” said Emily Martinez, Director of Special Initiatives at the Open Society Institute. “It will directly support the human rights work of disabled persons organizations in the developing world.”

The CRPD recognizes that self-representation is essential to the enjoyment of human rights. It underscores the importance of including people with disabilities in the development of disability law, policies and programs. Through its unique governance structure, the Disability Rights Fund incorporates this principle.

A global advisory panel, made up of 12 individuals, most of whom are persons with disabilities, will provide recommendations on grantmaking strategies for the Fund; four of the Panel members will also serve on the Fund’s grantmaking decision body. The members of the panel come from five continents and reflect a broad cross-section of the disability community. The majority were nominated by international and regional disabled persons organizations.

The structure of the Fund not only reflects the international disability community’s slogan, “Nothing About Us Without Us,” it also reflects a growing trend within the grantmaking community to better listen to the communities they seek to serve and to redefine the relationship between grantmaker and grantee in the interest of more effective grantmaking.

Grants disbursed by the Disability Rights Fund will be centered on three major areas: increasing the participation of persons with disabilities in their communities through trainings and networking opportunities; developing awareness of the CPRD among stakeholders; and supporting advocacy projects that promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights by persons with disabilities. The Fund expects to make its first grants in late spring/early summer 2008.

“The broad, international support for the Disability Rights Fund is a remarkable characteristic of this grantmaking enterprise. It is our hope that this diversity in funding sources will expand as the Fund develops,” said Diana Samarasan, Director of the Fund.

####



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for sending this press release to We Can Do.

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RESOURCE: African Union of the Blind Web Site

Posted on 22 March 2008. Filed under: Blind, Democratic Participation, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Individuals who share an interest in the self-empowerment of blind people in Africa can turn to the African Union of the Blind (AFUB) web site for a range of information, publications, and helpful resources. The materials at this site will be particularly for people with an interest in HIV/AIDS; women; and youth.

The AFUB website is meant to mobilize, empower, and disseminate information for individuals and organizations supporting people with visual impairments across Africa. AFUB is a pan-African umbrella non-government organization (NGO).

On the page for AFUB publications, readers may download past issues of AFUB news in English or French. Issues of the news letter, Women’s Voices, contain a range of news, advice for independent living, and advocacy tips related to blind African women. Or readers may download manuals on training HIV/AIDS trainers; including blind people in HIV/AIDS education programs; training blind people to advocate and lobby for their rights at the local and national level; and empowering visually impaired youth. Some of these manuals could probably be usefully adapted for use outside of Africa as well.

On the projects page, people may learn about AFUB’s HIV and AIDS Awareness and Training Project; its Gender And Youth Development; and its National Civic Education Program.

The Reports and Policy page offers copies of AFUB’s annual reports and many reports from AFUB’s various training activities and other projects, particularly in the areas of HIV/AIDS awareness and in gender and youth development.

Or, download reports from
past conferences
on HIV/AIDS and on Democracy and Development training.

Begin exploring AFUB’s web site from their home page at:

http://www.afub-uafa.org



We Can Do first found the AFUB web site through the AskSource.info database. Further
details about its contents were found by exploring the AFUB web site
itself. I especially encourage the AFUB
publications
page for anyone seeking pragmatic materials they can use
in the field.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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FUNDING: Small Grants for Projects for Deaf Children

Posted on 20 March 2008. Filed under: Children, Deaf, Funding, Health, HIV/AIDS, Latin America & Caribbean, Poverty, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[En español más abajo.]

The following email is being circulated by the UK-based international organization Deaf Child Worldwide (formerly known as International Deaf Child Society):

Dear colleagues,

If are in touch with local organisations that want to start new work with deaf children, then please forward the information below about the latest round of the Deaf Child Worldwide Small Grants Programme.

Thank you so much for your help with this.

English
Round 7 of Deaf Child Worldwide’s Small Grants Programme is now open. The deadline for completed concept notes is 30 May 2008.

The Small Grants Programme (SGP), aims to have an impact on the lives of deaf children, their families, service providers and policy makers by establishing quality partnerships with local organisations based in our priority countries within East Africa, South Asia or Latin America. We fund one to three year projects of up to £10,000 per year.

Go to www.deafchildworldwide.info/sgp for more information about how to apply.

If you applied to SGP in the past, then please note that in 2007, we carried out a strategic review and an evaluation of SGP. We have made some significant changes to the programme. These include:

  • Smaller geographic focus. Now only organisations based in East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda), South Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka), and Andean region of Latin America (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru) can apply.
  • New strategic focus areas. We are only looking for projects which work towards these key areas.
  • Cross-cutting themes. All projects must consider poverty, gender, the social model of disability and sexual health and HIV/AIDS.
  • Longer projects. You can now apply for projects that are from one to three years long.

Please e-mail info@deafchildworldwide.org if you have any questions or would like to discuss your project idea.

Español
Se ha abierto la Ronda 7 del Programa de Pequeñas Subvenciones de Deaf Child Worldwide. El plazo final para la presentación de las notas conceptuales es el 30 de mayo del 2008.

El Programa de Pequeñas Subvenciones (PPS) busca tener un impacto en la vida de niños sordos, sus familias, proveedores de servicios y formuladores de política estableciendo para ello asociaciones de calidad con organizaciones locales con sede en nuestros países prioritarios en África Oriental, Asia del Sur o América Latina. Financiamos proyectos de uno a tres años de hasta £10,000 anuales.

Visiten www.deafchildworldwide.info/pps para mayor información sobre cómo postular.

Si ustedes postularon al PPS en el pasado, entonces tomen en cuenta que en el 2007 llevamos a cabo una revisión estratégica y una evaluación del PPS. Hemos hecho algunos cambios significativos al programa. Éstos son:

  • Foco geográfico más pequeño. Ahora sólo organizaciones con sede en África Oriental (Kenya, Tanzania y Uganda), Asia del Sur (Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistán y Sri Lanka) y la región andina de América Latina (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador y Perú) pueden postular.
  • Nuevos ejes estratégicos. Estamos examinando sólo proyectos que trabajen en pro de estos ejes clave.
  • Temas transversales. Todos los proyectos deben considerar pobreza, género, el modelo social de la discapacidad y salud sexual y VIH/sida.
  • Proyectos más largos. Ahora ustedes pueden postular con proyectos que tengan de uno a tres años de duración.

Si tienen alguna pregunta escríbannos a info@deafchildworldwide.org. Trataremos de responder lo más pronto posible, aunque recién podremos responder a indagaciones en español después del 7 de abril del 2008.

Sírvanse reenviar este email a organizaciones o colegas que ustedes consideren estarían interesados en esta oportunidad.

Best wishes,

Kirsty

KIRSTY WILSON
Programmes Manager
Deaf Child Worldwide
www.deafchildworldwide.org

Deaf Child Worldwide is the only UK based international development agency dedicated to enabling deaf children to overcome poverty and isolation. We are the international development agency of The National Deaf Children’s Society in the UK. Registered Charity No 1016532.

Join our network – receive regular updates and share your experiences about work with deaf children and their families. Contact info@deafchildworldwide.org or add your details at www.deafchildworldwide.info/joinournetwork



We Can Do thanks Kirsty Wilson at Deaf Child Worldwide for passing along this announcement.

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RESOURCE: Disability Kenya Web Site

Posted on 7 March 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People with disabilities in Kenya and other interested individuals can turn to an on-line web site, Disability Kenya, to learn more about life for disabled people in Kenya.

At Disability Kenya, you can find news, opinion pieces and feature articles, and sometimes information about resources. Here are just a few examples:

If you are currently working on a funding proposal and aren’t sure how to write one, you can consult a model at

http://www.disabilitykenya.org/codeke%20projects.htm

The proposal at the above link successfully obtained grants to support a project using computers to help deaf students overcome barriers in education and communication. That project helped lead to the Disability Kenya web site.

The health page at Disability Kenya has links to information about HIV/AIDS in Kenya, projects targeted at the Deaf community there, and other health-related information (e.g., rape, violence toward disabled children, accessibility issues at a local hospital, etc.).

The Inclusion page at Disability Kenya, and particularly the Projects page, both share information about projects targeted at people with disabilities in Kenya.

Learn about disability-related laws in Kenya, and other policy issues and news, at the Disability Kenya Policy Page.

Or learn about issues related to the education of disabled Kenyan children at the Education page.

Start exploring Disability Kenya at:

http://www.disabilitykenya.org/

Disability Kenya is updated regularly, so people with a strong interest may wish to check their site periodically for new materials.



We Can Do was first alerted to Disability Kenya some months ago when someone involved with their web site tried to contact me. My apologies for taking so long to put up a post related to it. I was also reminded about this web site more recently when I saw a link to it from the AskSource.info web site, which has a very large and rapidly growing data base of resources and links related to people with disabilities in developing countries, as well as resources related to health issues in general.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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PUBLICATION: Feb Issue UN Enable Newsletter

Posted on 28 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The second monthly issue of United Nation’s Enable Newsletter has now been released. The initial launch of this newsletter was announced at We Can Do last month.

A sampling of headlines for the February issue is listed below, except that I have modified them to spell out most acronyms. To read the full stories (usually one or two paragraphs each), consult the February issue of the Enable Newsletter at http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=312

  • UN Commission Renews Mandate for Special Rapporteur and Agrees on Mainstreaming Disability in Development.
  • United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator Makes New Commitment to Disability
  • World Bank and Organizaiton for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Conduct Joint Effort for the Achievement of Millennium Development Goals 2 & 3. [We Can Do note, for those new to international development: the Millennium Development Goals are a set of targets agreed upon by country governments and development agencies for reducing global poverty and improving global health; more information at http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/
  • World Bank Psycho-Social Listserv is Open for Sign-Up at http://go.worldbank.org/SIP5GYWK00
  • International Labour Organization (ILO) to Produce Advocacy Kit on Decent Work for Persons with Disabilities
  • Ratification Talk in Serbia
  • Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Raises Awareness in the Maldives
  • Sharing Experiences on Best Practices in Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Services for Persons with Disabilities
  • Identifying Concrete Actions in Mozambique Towards Implementation of the Convention
  • Atlas: Global Resources for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities (Atlas-ID) (We Can Do note: The launch of this Atlas also was announced at We Can Do).
  • United Nations Information Center (UNIC) Moscow Hosts Discussion on Persons with Disabilities

The February issue of the Enable Newsletter also lists several publications and upcoming events. You can read the January or February issue for free. Or you can sign up for a free subscription to receive each month’s newsletter via email, for free. All available at:

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=312



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere else, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people.

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TRAINING: Short Human Rights Courses

Posted on 15 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People interested in taking courses on human rights may wish to consult a
recently updated page that lists more than 60 short courses and summer schools from 2008 to 2009. Some are very general introductions. Others are very specialized courses on indigenous peoples, discrimination, women’s rights, and more. Courses are available in locations around the world, including Africa, Europe, the Americas, Asia, and the Middle East. All these can be found at the humanrightstool.org web site.

Idowu Ajibade, from Nigeria, who did the hard work of updating this page. She has just joined Human Rights Tool’s small team of dedicated volunteers.

Some very interesting courses that Human Rights Tools would like to highlight:

1. CLOSING SOON: Monitoring economic, social and cultural rights. The Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies in Geneva (IHEID), in cooperation with HURIDOCS, is organizing a new course on monitoring and documenting economic, social and cultural rights. It will take place in Geneva, 5 – 9 May 2008. This exciting and much-needed course will be timed to match the second week of the ESC Committee, so you should be able to attend both with the same plane ticket! There are still a few slots for paying participants, but you must apply before 3 March 2008. http://www.huridocs.org/training/escr.

2. CLOSING SOON: Video advocacy course. The Video Advocacy Institute, the first of its kind, is an innovative program that trains human rights defenders to successfully integrate video advocacy into their social change campaigns. When: July 19 – August 2 2008, in Montreal, Canada. Application deadline is 2 March 2008. http://www.witness.org/vai

3. CLOSING SOON: Transitional justice francophone Rabat fellowship program. Transitional justice refers to a range of approaches that societies undertake to reckon with legacies of widespread or systematic human rights abuse as they move from a period of violent conflict or oppression towards peace and democracy. The International Center for Transitional Justice’s francophone Rabat fellowship program will be running from May 2nd to the 25th. It runs for 10 weeks and ICTJ takes in charge the full cost of participation of each participant (including the visa and airfare). Application deadline is 25 February 2008. http://www.ictj.org/en/workshops/fellowships/ottawa/index.html

4. Justice sector reform, Human rights fieldwork IHRN is organizing two courses. The first is entitled “Justice Sector Reform: Applying Human Rights Based Approaches” and will take place at the National University of Ireland, in Maynooth. The dates are from 16 to 20 June 2008, and the application deadline is 2 May 2008. http://www.ihrnetwork.org/new-justice-sector-reform.htm

The second IHRN course is entitled “Human Rights Fieldwork – Principles, Strategies and Skills” will be held in the same location, from 26 October to 2 November 2008. http://www.ihrnetwork.org/hr-fieldwork.htm

See the full listing of short courses and summer courses at:

http://www.humanrightstools.org/shortcourses.htm



We Can Do first found this listing on the Adhoc_IDC email list. People can join this email-based discussion group for the International Disability Caucus on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities for free.

This article is cross-posted at the RatifyNow web site with permission of We Can Do editor. RatifyNow is an organization working to maximize the number of countries that sign, ratify, and implement the international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (https://wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere OTHER THAN We Can Do, BlogAfrica, or RatifyNow, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people without their permission.

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RESOURCE: Training Manual on HIV/AIDS Awareness and Disability Rights

Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Young people with disabilities in Africa can now use a free training manual to learn how to become leaders in preventing HIV/AIDS in their country.

The manual, entitled “HIV/AIDS Awareness and Disability Rights Training Manual” (Word format, 800 Kb), is targeted at: people in the disability community; government officials involved in disability and HIV; community leaders; and people working for HIV organizations. The manual is written in simple language to meet the needs of people who have little or no basic literacy skills.

The first chapter clarifies the definition of disability; explains some of the barriers people with disabilities experience in gaining access to information that could save their life; and offers guidance on meeting the communication needs of disabled people.

The second chapter explains what “HIV” and “AIDS” are and clarifies some common, incorrect beliefs about HIV/AIDS. It explains the common ways in which HIV/AIDS is transmitted (how people are infected) and why disabled people are at high risk for getting or spreading HIV. The chapter also provides information about the importance of being tested for HIV/AIDS; suggests how to deal with being HIV-positive; and how to prevent HIV/AIDS.

The third chapter discusses the stigma and discrimination that people with disabilities experience and the causes and effects of stigma. It suggests possible strategies and solutions for addressing stigma and discrimination against persons with disabilities living with HIV/AIDS.

The fourth chapter provides an overview of important international disability rights laws, including the new international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). It advises new leaders on how they can take steps to advocate for the rights of people with disabilities living with HIV/AIDS.

The fifth chapter discusses how emerging leaders can continue to strengthen their leadership skills and learn the principles of good governance.

The manual, “HIV/AIDS Awareness and Disability Rights Training Manual” (Word format, 800 Kb), was prepared by Rehabilitation International (RI), Disabled Organization for Legal Affairs and Social Economic Development (DOLASED), and Miracles in Mozambique, with support from the Swedish International Development Agency (Sida).

It is available in two versions: one version is targeted at trainers whoplan to use the manual for leading activities to train others. The other version is targeted at people who plan to participate in training activities.

The manual for training participants can be downloaded at:

http://riglobal.org/advocacy/projects/RI_HIV-AIDS_PARTICIPANTS-MANUAL_10Dec07_FINAL.doc (Word, 700 Kb)

The manual targeted at trainers can be downloaded at:

http://riglobal.org/advocacy/projects/RI_HIV-AIDS_TRAINING-MANUAL_10Dec07_FINAL.doc (Word, 800 Kb)



We Can Do learned about these manuals by browsing the Rehabilitation International web site.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).


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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (https://wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere OTHER THAN We Can Do, BlogAfrica, or RatifyNow, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people without their permission.

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PUBLICATION: Human Rights Africa Newsletter

Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Media & Journalism, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Readers interested in human rights issues affecting Africans with disabilities can catch up with past issues of the newsletter Human Rights Africa. Issues are available in both English and French, and in both Word format and PDF format. This publication from the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities was published four times in 2006 and two times in 2007.

All past issues may be worth browsing for people with a special interest in disabled Africans. But readers may particularly want to note the following (this is NOT a comprehensive list of articles):

The first issue of 2006 has an article that lists five challenges and seven opportunities for the Secretariat of the African Decade on Persons with Disabilities.

The second issue of 2006 focuses on HIV/AIDS among people with disabilties. This includes a story about how genocide helped spread HIV in Rwanda, and a story about efforts to prevent HIV/AIDS among women in Ethiopia. There is also a story about a new African Network of Women with Disabilities that is meant to help regional and national organizations share experiences in improving the lives of disabled women. Also see the article on how you can help influence development projects in your area so they will better include poor people with disabilities.

The third issue of 2006 has an article that lists practical tips for how you can approach journalists and persuade them to cover issues that matter to the disability community in your country. Another article discusses how sports can be used to help meet the Millennium Development Goals.

The fourth issue of 2006 has many articles about war and conflict in Africa with a focus on disability issues. Also see the article on how you can become involved in helping your country develop a Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) that is inclusive of people with disabilties.

The first issue of 2007 provides more information about the campaign against HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities in Africa and an article about violence against women.

The second issue of 2007 contains articles on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; a new African Federation of the Deafblind; and
lessons learned from lobbying in Uganda.

You can download copies of Human Rights Africa for free at:

http://www.africandecade.org/humanrightsafrica



We Can Do first learned about this newsletter after reading the Disabled People International (DPI) newsletter and exploring the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities.

A modified version of this article has now been posted at RatifyNow with permission of author.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

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NEWS: The Law Has Been Instrument of Our Oppression, Says Disability Advocate

Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Human Rights, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People with psychosocial disabilities have been quick to embrace the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). One of them is David Stolper, a South African advocate for the human rights of people with psychosocial disabilities.

Stolper, says, “The whole world looks at our constitution in South Africa and sees it as the most progressive one for the rights of all people, but we in mental health have been totally marginalized.” Stolper, who has been institutionalized in both the United Kingdom and also in South Africa, terms himself a “psychiatric survivor.”

Of the CRPD, he says, “I think it gives us a legal framework and something on paper that will be binding that is a dramatic shift from what we have had before. There has always seemed to be some kind of barbaric tool to control us. The law has been an instrument of our oppression. The convention says that it is time that the government and people around us drop this notion that we cannot think for ourselves.”

We Can Do readers can read a full-length interview with David Stolper about his perspectives on the CRPD at the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities:

http://www.africandecade.org/reads/articles/legalcapacityarticle/view

The interview also was published in the newsletter Human Rights Africa, 2007, Issue 2 (PDF format, 1.8 Mb). Human Rights Africa focuses on issues relevant to human rights for persons with disabilities in Africa.

Past issues of Human Rights Africa are available in both English and French in both PDF and Word format at:

http://www.africandecade.org/humanrightsafrica



We Can Do learned of this article through the Disabled People International (DPI) newsletter.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

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NEWS: Guinea Ratifies CRPD and Optional Protocol; Benin and UAE Sign

Posted on 11 February 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The disability communities in three countries have reason to celebrate: Guinea, Benin, and United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Guinea has now ratified both the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the accompanying Optional Protocol. This brings the total number of countries ratifying the CRPD to 16 and the total number of countries ratifying the Optional Protocol to 10. The CRPD needs to be ratified by 20 countries before it and the Optional Protocol can take full legal force.

In addition, Benin has signed both the CRPD and the Optional Protocol. United Arab Emirates also signed the CRPD, but not the Optional Protocol. Guinea, Benin, and UAE all ratified or signed these international treaties on February 8, 2008. These newest signatures brings the total number of signatories for the CRPD to 125 countries, and the total number of signatories for the Optional Protocol to 70 countries.

The CRPD is an international disability rights treaty. A few of the rights it is meant to protect include the right to education; health; work; respect for privacy; freedom from exploitation, violence, and abuse; and the right to an adequate standard of living. The Optional Protocol gives disabled people in ratifying countries another option for pursuing redress if they feel their rights under the CRPD have been violated. Specifically, it allows disabled people to bring their case to an international Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

The CRPD was first opened for countries to sign or ratify on March 30, 2007. A full list of the countries that have ratified the CRPD or the treaty is at the United Nations disabilities web site at http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=257.

Signing an international treaty, such as the CRPD and the Optional Protocol, is an intermediary step toward ratification. Merely signing a treaty does not legally obligate a country to follow the treaty. It does, however, indicate interest in ratifying the treaty in the future. It also commits the country to avoid doing anything that would directly violate the spirit of the treaty. For example, a country that signs the CRPD should not pass any further new laws that actively discriminate against people with disabilities.

More background information on the CRPD and the Optional Protocol, and the global movement to ratify and implement both, is available at www.RatifyNow.org.



This article is posted at both We Can Do and RatifyNow.org with permission of author.

We Can Do learned about these newest signatures and ratification at the United Nations “Enable” web site.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

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