Human Rights

Join the Thunder for the “Disability Treaty” (CRPD)!

Posted on 6 June 2014. Filed under: Announcements, CRPD, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[This was first posted two days ago at my other blog, Rambling Justice.]

Help bring attention to the “Disability Treaty” (Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, CRPD)!  We need the U.S. to ratify this important international human rights treaty protecting the civil rights of 1 billion people with disabilities worldwide. Sign up your Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr account NOW to join the next “Thunder Clap It” for the CRPD at http://thndr.it/1ky8p97 !

What’s A “Thunder Clap It”?

A “Thunder Clap It” is when 100 or more people sign on their Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr account to all send out the same message at the same time to all their followers.  To participate, you need to sign up in advance.  The next CRPD “Thunder Clap It” will be at 2pm EST on June 10, 2014 (1pm Central Time, 11am Pacific Time).  Sign up BEFORE this time or you will miss the Thunder Clap.

How Do I Sign Up?

  • Go to this link: http://thndr.it/1ky8p97
  • A message will ask you to share a message to support the #CRPD.
  • You will find three buttons—one each for Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr.  You need to have an account in at least one of these three in order to participate.
  • Click on whichever button is appropriate.  You will have an opportunity to personalize your message to your followers.
  • Hit the “Add My Support” button.
  • If you have successfully signed up, then you should appear at the top of the list of “Recent Supporters” in the right hand side bar.  Refresh the page if needed.

What Else?

Learn more about the CRPD and other ways to help at http://disabilitytreaty.org.  Sign up for the CRPD “action alert” mailing list at the link!  Ask your friends to do the same!

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Disability and Development Online Consultations March 8-28, 2013

Posted on 13 March 2013. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, indigenous people, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, universal design, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

These online consultations (from March 8 to 28th, ie RIGHT NOW) are an opportunity to influence important decisions about how people with disabilities will be included in efforts to reduce poverty around the world.

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have been profoundly influential in making decisions on how to prioritize foreign assistance and government funds in more than 100 developing countries. The global community is now working to identify what goals should replace them after 2015. This means that the next few months will be critical for ensuring that people with disabilities are not again forgotten.  It is important for the global disability community, our constituency organizations, and professionals in the fields of international development and human rights be engaged.

Read below and follow the links for more detail on how individuals can participate in this on-line dialogue.

Online Consultations
As part of the preparatory process for the United Nations General Assembly High-level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD), the HLMDD Online Consultations (HOC) will be conducted from 8 to 28 March 2013. The consultations are co-organised by DESA and UNICEF under the existing platform of the World We Want 2015 (http://www.worldwewant2015.org/enable) in multiple languages.

Please register at: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/register.  If you have difficulty registering, then please email enable@worldwewant2015.org for assistance.

Simultaneous consultations will take place in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. The site is compatible with screen readers, however, if you are unable to access the site, please email your response to: enable@worldwewant2015.org. Please note that the forum is moderated, therefore your post will not appear immediately but will be posted within twenty-four hours.
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CRPD Final Vote In US Senate Tuesday. Take Action Early And OFTEN.

Posted on 1 December 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , |

CRPD FINAL VOTE  U.S. Senate, TUESDAY at 12 o’clock EST

EMAIL, FAX, and DROP OFF the new CRPD handout in MASSES.  Get it to the PRESS in your town and state.

Link to CRPD Handout:
http://usicd.org//doc/SupportheCRPD%20AD.pdf

Find your Senator’s contact here!
http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

Senate switchboard at (202) 224-3121

Please act quickly and do your part to make this a WIN for the disability community around the world.  Let’s not look back and think of what we should have done but what we DID do!

Time is running out.  This Tuesday, December 4th at 12PM the CRPD with be voted on.

CRPD_Sticker

We have all worked years to come to this point.  Over 300 disability and veterans organizations and thousands of disability advocates have weighed in and worked tirelessly to get a vote on the CRPD in the Senate.  But a small and LOUD opposition led by Rick Santorum and the Tea Party is using their misinformation to take the votes that we have all worked so hard to secure. The Senators opposed to our treaty have agreed to a vote without amendments – because they think the disability community will NOT win.

We are DOWN the votes we need but the disability community SHOULD NOT AND DOES NOT GIVE UP!

Can we count on you? Will your Senators be a “YES” vote? We need 67 VOTES to win and this will be a VERY close vote. WE NEED YOUR STATE!

At this point only an ACTION by you in your STATE will get us a positive REACTION in the Senate.  Make your support known in the press, in the media, in your Senator’s offices.  Call, Tweet with #CRPD, sit in, whatever works for you BUT doing nothing will not get us anything.

We need action all weekend and on Monday, the International Day of People with Disabilities.  Even if you’ve communicated with your senators before, they need to hear from you again as we enter the last 40 hours leading up to the final vote.

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All 50 US States Needed RIGHT NOW to Support International Disability Rights!

Posted on 28 July 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , |

Author’s Note: The following post is slightly adapted from a note I posted in Facebook.

One billion people with disabilities live on Earth–and 54 million of us live in the United States. But throughout history, people with disabilities have often met profound challenges including the high risk of poverty, exclusion from opportunities to access an education or employment, violence, forced confinement in institutions, and more.

Thursday last week, July 26, 2012, was a historic date for those of us who are Americans with disabilities and for the people who are our friends, relatives, colleagues and other peers.  It was the 22nd anniversary that the world’s first disability civil rights legislation was passed–the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  But it also was the day that the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee agreed to pass the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) to the full Senate for a floor vote.  In other words, we are now in a new and exciting phase of the campaign for US ratification of the CRPD.  This means that all 100 US senators will be asked to vote on if the US should ratify the CRPD.  We need a two-thirds majority–67 votes.  It is time for every US citizen who cares about the human rights of people with disabilities all around the world, including fellow Americans, to tell your Senators to support the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)–even if you have already asked them.  Your calls, emails, and visits to your senators are absolutely vital.  Opponents of this important international treaty, which was inspired by our own ADA, have been spreading incorrect information to senators in an attempt to convince them to vote against the CRPD.  Your voices … our voices … are essential to telling senators that those of us who have disabilities, or who care about people who do, want them to support the CRPD.

The Capitol Switchboard number is (202) 224-3121.  Ask to be connected to your Senator’s office and call both Senators!

Or, you can find Senators’ contact information at this link: http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

Please remember to reach out to BOTH of the senators that represent your state.

Want to learn more about the CRPD and why the US should ratify? Visit a FAQ on the CRPD. Also learn the latest news about the campaign for US ratification of the CRPD, or look up which organizations support this treaty.

Sign on to a national letter for individuals and organizations in the US who support the CRPD–visit http://www.usicd.org (scroll a little down the screen to the blurb entitled “Tony Coelho Calls on You to Sign a Letter of Ratification”).  At usicd.org you will find a link to the full letter as well as links for individuals or for organizations to sign the letter.

After talking with your senators and signing the letter, please spread the word as widely as you can! Tell all your friends to do the same! We need as many people as we can talking to their senators!  Use Facebook, twitter, emails, phone calls … whatever works for you.

Thank you all for your help!

Author’s Note: To international friends outside the US: The fate of US ratification of the CRPD is going to be decided by US senators who ultimately represent the people who voted them into office, thus this call to action is meant to reach out to US citizens who care about the CRPD and who also have the power to influence the decisions of the senators who represent their interests in the US federal government.

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Why Fight Disablism? A Global Perspective: Blogging against Disablism Day (BADD) 2012

Posted on 1 May 2012. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Why fight disablism?

The short answer takes one paragraph:  Because disablism is more than just an attitude.  Because when people hold disablist attitudes toward people with disabilities, people with disabilities are excluded, isolated, left out, left behind, and pushed to the margins of society.  Disabled people are hurt in physical ways that can leave bruises, rope burns, broken bones, and even dead bodies.  And people with disabilities also are hurt in not so physical ways that, sometimes they say are even worse.

The long answer would have to involve listening to one billion people on the face of the Earth describing the one billion ways that disablism impacts their lives.  Because one billion is the number of people with disabilities living in the world today.  And, chances are, all of them would have a slightly different answer to what disablism means.  And it’s not just disabled people and their loved ones who think that various forms of prejudice that people with disabilities is an important issue.  Two major international organizations—the World Bank and the World Health Organization (WHO)—have this to say about the effects of the social inequities that people with disabilities experience daily:

“Across the world, people with disabilities have poorer health outcomes, lower education achievements, less economic participation and higher rates of poverty than people without disabilities. This is partly because people with disabilities experience barriers in accessing services that many of us have long taken for granted, including health, education, employment, and transport as well as information.”

They cite many inter-related causes for these effects.  And these include negative attitudes that others may sometimes hold toward people with disabilities:

“Beliefs and prejudices constitute barriers to education, employment, health care, and social participation. For example, the attitudes of teachers, school administrators, other children, and even family members affect the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream schools. Misconceptions by employers that people with disabilities are less productive than their non-disabled counterparts, and ignorance about available adjustments to work arrangements limits employment opportunities.”

If you want to read their evidence for yourself, check out the World Report on Disability that the World Bank and WHO released, with a big media splash, in September 2011:   http://www.who.int/disabilities/world_report/2011/report/en/index.html
This publication is available in any of the major United Nations languages, namely, English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Russian, Arabic, and Chinese

I’m fortunate that my passion for international disability rights coincides with my career path: I’m now at an organization based in Washington, DC, called the U.S. International Council on Disability (USICD). When people ask me what the U.S. International Council on Disabilities (USICD) does, there are a few basic answers I could give.  I can say that USICD works to mobilize the U.S. disability community to become more engaged with the international disability rights movement.  It works to promote U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which is the first legally binding international human rights treaty to specifically protect the human rights of people with disabilities.  It promotes disability inclusion in U.S. foreign assistance programs abroad.  And, via the Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL) project, which I manage, we are working to deliver disability rights knowledge to advocates and policy makers in developing countries who have limited Internet connectivity.  No, it’s not an “anti-disablism” organization per se.  But I suspect that its mission would align well with the values of many of the people participating in the 2012 edition of Blogging Against Disablism Day (BADD).

I’ll probably spend a good part of May browsing through the many excellent blog posts I anticipate will be presented as part of this year’s Blogging against Disablism Day (BADD) on May 1, 2012.  For the past several years, this event has been hosted by the disability blogger at “Diary of a Goldfish”, which means her blog is the go-to link for finding all the other BADD posts for 2012.  (And for archived BADD posts from past years also.)  Usually a hundred or more bloggers participate, all with something fresh to say about what disablism means to them.  Many are themselves people with disabilities.  Many other bloggers are friends, families, and allies of disabled people.  I hope you will explore the other BADD contributions, also!  In past years, most participating bloggers have been from developed countries.  But I hope that bloggers from developing countries will also consider making contributions to the event, either this year (it’s not too late!) or in future years.  Enjoy the day!

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International Day of Mourning and Remembrance: Institutionalized Lives of People with Disabilities–Forgotten Lives and the Ones Who Fight Back

Posted on 23 January 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opinion, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Blogger Dave Hingsburger is trying to make today, January 23, the first of what he wants to be an annual event in which we remember together people with disabilities who have lived in institutions and, in some cases, died in them.  Another blogger, Amanda Baggs, has also written extensively about her own experiences inside places that others label as “institutions”–and also some places that weren’t labeled “institutions” but were just as bad: I encourage readers to read today’s post at her blog, “What Makes Institutions Bad.”   Today, in Dave’s proposal, is meant to be a day to remember the people that we were meant to forget: people placed in institutions, not to help them, but to isolate them from so-called “normal” people.  And, it is meant to remember people who have been “put away” supposedly for “their own good,” people who others think “cannot live in the community” as if being human were not enough to qualify one to live among other humans.  It is meant to mourn the lives that people with disabilities could have led if they had been allowed to live in their own homes and allowed choice and self autonomy.  It is important to emphasize that the day is meant not only to consider people institutionalized years ago, in a time we think we can safely forget because we assume it belongs only in the past.   It is also meant to consider the millions of people worldwide, in both developing and also developed countries, who continue to be institutionalized today due to no crime other than being different, being someone who others has labeled as “disabled.”

Dave also means this day as a day to celebrate people with disabilities who have fought back against the mentality that strives to push them to the margins of society, making it easier to institutionalize them.  In this context, Dave Hingsburger mentions a woman named Sandra Jensen who fought literally for her life when she was initially denied a heart transplant simply because she had Down Syndrome.  Sandra, already a disability rights advocate, fought back and won her transplant in 1996–and also won change in organ transplant policies in Canada.  In addition to individuals Sandra Jensen, I can also think of certain organizations that work hard to promote de-institutionalization and other closely related causes:  Disability Rights International (DRI), ADAPT, MindFreedom International, World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (WNUSP), various chapters of People First worldwide, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and others.   I have probably missed many other organizations that are also devoted to ending institutionalization: feel free to mention them in the comments area below.

If these organizations don’t choose to carry forth Dave’s proposal, or if these international and national bodies like the concept but choose a different date or take the idea in a different direction, then Dave’s International Day might well still catch on at some local organizations scattered throughout Canada, US, the UK, and Australia.  Dave, after all, has been in the field of intellectual disability and disability rights for more than 30 years: he has delivered hundreds (possibly thousands) of lectures around the world, his blog reaches thousands more readers every month, and some of his many books are required reading in some training programs for future service providers who will be working with people with disabilities.  Dave is certainly not without some clout and influence all on his own.   But without the support of large and highly visible organizations, his concept could remain a relatively obscure event known only in certain circles in certain cities in, predominantly, English speaking developed countries.  It will spread only slowly, if at all, to non-English speaking countries or to developing countries.

Also critical to the success of this event in the future is the International Disability Alliance (IDA) and its member organizations.  IDA, as many of We Can Do’s more regular readers probably already know, is a major umbrella organization for various international disability organizations that include WNUSP (listed above), the Disabled Peoples’ International (an organization run by people with various disabilities, with national assembly members in more than 100 countries), Inclusion International (representing people with intellectual disabilities and their loved ones), World Federation of the Deaf, World Blind Union, and others.  Each of IDA’s member organizations themselves have many more member organizations in dozens of countries around the world, and many of these in turn have member organizations at the local level in their countries.  If some of these organizations adopt Dave’s idea, then many more organizations around the world would surely also pick it up as well–whether their local language is English, Spanish, French, or something else, whether in developed countries or in developing countries.

Is this day an event that should catch on more widely?  I hesitate to issue a firm position on this issue.  I do feel that it is worthwhile to have some kind of event that could prompt us, not only to mourn people who would otherwise be forgotten, and to celebrate people who have promoted the cause of freedom, but also to take some action that could help set free the many people who are still institutionalized against their will today.  For this reason I do like Dave’s general concept and feel it is worthwhile putting it in front of the readers of We Can Do for their consideration.  But I also feel that the issue of how to frame such an event, how to promote it, what activities should be done to acknowledge it, and what date it should be held on, should ultimately be determined by people who have themselves experienced institutionalization, or been threatened with the possibility.  People with intellectual disabilities who are confined because they learn more slowly than others.  People with psychosocial disabilities and people on the autistic spectrum who are confined because others view their behaviors as “bewildering” and would rather not have to see them at all than try to understand.  People with mobility impairments, and people who are acquiring a range of conditions related to old age, who are institutionalized because government legislation, budgeting policies, and the medical profession make it easier to place them in nursing homes than to get support to continue living at home.  People who are deaf, or blind, who may be mistaken for having other disabilities, or who others may assume are incapable of learning or being independent because they cannot hear or see.  Organizations such as People First, WNUSP, MindFreedom, ASAN, ADAPT, and other international and national organizations run by people who themselves are most commonly targeted for being institutionalized come to mind.  I think this is a choice that needs the involvement of many advocates and leaders around the world, not just one man–even a powerful leader like Dave Hingsburger.  And not just one woman either, including me as the author of this blog site.

For now, readers may want to read a few blog posts that Dave wrote about what today’s date means to him and why he feels it is important to have an International Day of Mourning and Remembrance:

January 23: International Day of Mourning and Memory in which Dave first sets forth his proposal.  Note that he seems open to revising the concept, or at least the name, for future years.

Cousin Mattie: The International Day of Mourning and Memory — Dave’s post from today, January 23, honoring the day itself.

She Never Knew: The Interviews — in which Dave presents an interview he conducted with a woman who performed a song that Dave feels fits in well with the spirit of the International Day.

I also encourage readers to consider taking a few moments–or a few hours, or days–to learn more about the reality of institutionalization today and what is being done to end it.  A few of the links from above are good resources.   Disability Rights International (DRI) has a huge collection of reports and videos documenting institutionalized abuses from around the world, from Ukraine to Mexico to the United States to Romania to Paraguay and elsewhere.  Many People First organizations fight against the institutionalization of people with intellectual disabilities.  The Global Disability Rights Library has content and links related to institutionalization of people with disabilities–particularly try the information portal of the same name (Global Disability Rights Library) and check under specific disabilities for psychosocial disabilities and intellectual disabilities.  Also in the same information portal, check the section on Independent Living for some of the solutions that allow people with mobility impairments and a range of other disabilities live freely in the community instead of in nursing homes (the link goes to GDRL’s primary page on independent living, but don’t miss the sub-sections under this page with more resources).  And check out some of the personal stories on MindFreedom’s website.

A blog post on institutionalization from me would be incomplete without also mentioning another blogger besides Dave Hingsburger who has taught me a great deal about what it really means to be institutionalized:  Amanda Baggs.  Amanda has herself been institutionalized: although most of her experience in places others would recognize as institutions was in the 1990s, she still knows people who have been institutionalized much more recently than that.  And she has had experiences in places that, although technically are not institutions, can be harmful in ways she feels is very similar.  Amanda’s entire blog is very well worth reading: I regularly encourage people interested in disability rights to read her blog front to back, or back to front, or inside out, or outside in, or sideways or upside down or right side up or any way at all as long as they read it, throughly and often.  Both Amanda and Dave are in developed countries (the United States and Canada, respectively) and I suspect most of their contacts and most of what they have learned about disability rights is also somewhat oriented to developed countries as well.  But many of the concepts that both of them wrestle with day in and day out on their blog sites and elsewhere, much of the philosophy they espouse, the values they uphold, and their insightful analysis of how even very lovely, good, kind people can still do terrible things are not bound to any one country.  I suspect that disability rights advocates from any country, whether developed or developing, will find ideas of value both in Dave’s blog and in Amanda’s blog.

Here are a few of Amanda’s blog posts that have helped teach me about what it is actually like to be inside an institution, or in an environment that is harmful in similar ways:

What Makes Institutions Bad (today’s post)

Outposts in Our Heads

Everything I Need to Know in Life I learned in Institutions

Identical Behavior, Constrasting Responses

What it Means to Be Real  (These events were at a day program, not technically at an institution. But apparently much of the way people in the program is treated is similar)

Being an Unperson (Not specifically about institutionalization, but the process of dehumanization described in this video does occur in many institutions)

And one more from Dave, from the perspective of a person who once worked in institutions early in his career:

Patty  — In this video (deaf and hard of hearing people can read the full transcript below the video) Dave describes an incident in which he reached out to Patty, a woman in the institution where he worked, and the reactions of his co-workers.

At least one more blogger has also blogged about this day: International Day of Mourning and Memory at Lounalune.  And one individual, Kristine Snider, sent Dave a video in honor of the day.

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Apply for 6th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD)

Posted on 20 January 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, indigenous people, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Mobility International USA (MIUSA)
Invites women with disabilities around the world to apply for the
6th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD)
August 6 – 27, 2012 (Tentative)

Eugene, Oregon, USA

ABOUT MIUSA:
Mobility International USA (MIUSA) is a U.S.-based, non-profit organization whose mission is to empower people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

ABOUT THE WILD PROGRAM:
MIUSA’s Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD) will bring together approximately 30 women leaders with disabilities from approximately 30 different countries, to strengthen leadership skills, create new visions and build international networks of support for inclusive international development programming.

During the three-week program, participants will take part in workshops, seminars and discussions, conduct on-site visits, and participate in team-building activities, to explore challenges and exchange strategies for increasing leadership opportunities and participation of women and girls with disabilities in international development programs.

WHO CAN APPLY: ELIGIBILITY
Women with disabilities who are from:

  • South Pacific
  • Middle East
  • Latin America
  • Caribbean
  • Eurasia
  • Asia
  • Africa

Women with disabilities who are:

  • Established leaders and/or professionals
  • Emerging young leaders, ages 21 and above

Women with disabilities who speak or use at least ONE of the following languages:

  • Conversational English (minimum)
  • Spanish
  • Arabic
  • Sign Language; preferably familiar with American Sign Language (ASL)

•    MIUSA uses ASL sign language interpreters who are experienced and skilled at providing interpretation for individuals who use different sign languages.
•    Spoken and sign language interpretation will be provided during formal program activities, workshops, discussions and site visits only.

WHO CAN APPLY: QUALIFICATIONS
Women leaders with disabilities who demonstrate:

  • Personal experience with disability, an understanding of issues, and a commitment to working for the rights of women and girls with disabilities
  • Membership in an organization led by and for people with disabilities, or by and for women, with particular attention to issues of women and girls with disabilities; or civil society organization committed to the inclusion of women and girls with disabilities
  • Commitment to and capacity for increasing leadership opportunities of women with disabilities in the community and/or country
  • Commitment to and capacity for increasing the participation of women and girls with disabilities in international development programs

MIUSA will strive for diversity of geographic region, age, ethnic background, and types of disability in final selection of qualified participants. MIUSA will give priority to qualified women with disabilities who:

  • Are from rural communities
  • Are members of indigenous groups
  • Have not participated in a MIUSA exchange program
  • Have not visited the United States

PROGRAM OVERVIEW:
The WILD program will include interactive workshops, site visits and practical activities on priority issues for women with disabilities, including:

•    National and International Policies and Legislation, including the UN Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Disability Policy
•    Educational rights and opportunities including specialized and inclusive schools, policy and legal rights, services and accommodations for accessibility
•    Leadership for economic empowerment, including higher education, training models, supported employment, microenterprise, private sector partnerships, career mentorship, skill-building, employment policy, and career development.
•    Health and family issues including parenting, health care, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health and violence prevention
•    Using the media
•    Coalition building
•    Organizational development and sustainability, including funding resources and strategies, and fostering partnerships with community organizations and businesses
•    Goals and action plans to promote collaborative relationships with other organizations for the inclusion of women and girls with disabilities in international development programs.
•    Inclusive international development, including exchanging strategies for inclusion with representatives from U.S-based international development organizations and/or human rights organizations
•    Cultural and team-building experiences
•    Mentorship and networking

LODGING AND TRANSPORTATION:

•    Simple but comfortable lodging with a local host family will be provided. During one-week of the program, shared lodging will be provided at a simple outdoor retreat center.
•    Breakfast, lunch and dinner will be provided each day. All supplemental meals, snacks, or personal incidentals (including laundry) will be at the expense of each delegate.
•    Accessible public transportation will be provided.
Note: Please do not expect “luxury” accommodations, meals, or transportation.

PROGRAM COST:
Accepted participants will be responsible for:
1.    $250 USD program fee.  Limited scholarships may be available based on applicant’s demonstrated financial need. Applications for a scholarship will be provided upon acceptance to the WILD program.
2.    Obtaining a current, valid passport and U.S. visa, including all related costs such as travel to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in the home country

MIUSA will provide:
1.    Roundtrip airplane tickets for participants to travel from home countries to Eugene, Oregon, USA
2.    Travel health insurance during the WILD program
3.    Food, lodging, program activities and accessible public transportation during the WILD program
4.    Disability-related accommodations, including sign language interpreters, funding for personal assistants, etc.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 1, 2012

APPLY EARLY!
We receive a large number of applications for a limited number of openings.
Send your application by e-mail (preferred), or fax:

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) / 2012 WILD
Email: womenleaders@miusa.org
Fax:  +1-541-343-6812 / Website: www.miusa.org

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Invitation to Join International Indigenous Network of People with Disabilities

Posted on 3 January 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, indigenous people, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Resources | Tags: , , , |

The International Indigenous Network of People with Disabilities (IINPWD) is an email-based network where participants advocate and mediate for the voice of indigenous/first peoples with disabilities to be heard at all levels of the development and implementation of law and policy in relation to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. IINPWD welcome all respectful communications and posts on indigenous/first peoples and disability issues especially those that directly impact on indigenous/first peoples with disabilities. We hope you become a part of a growing and dynamic movement.

Membership of the IINPWD is open to international, regional, national or local organizations, groups or networks of Indigenous people with disabilities, as well as to individual Indigenous people with disabilities. All who identify, as Indigenous people with a disability are welcome, irrespective of birthplace, disability, sexual identity, sexual orientation, gender identity or presentation, age, ethnicity, religious background, etc. The network also invites Indigenous people without disabilities and non Indigenous People to join in as allies to the IINPWD.

For information about joining the group, send an email to rossackley@bigpond.com.

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Disability Rights Fund Requests Funding Proposals from Bangladesh, Pacific Island Countries, Ghana, Uganda, Nicaragua, and Peru

Posted on 7 July 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund Releases Second 2011 Request for Proposals:
Addressing Bangladesh, Pacific Island Countries, Ghana, Uganda, Nicaragua and Peru

July 7, 2011
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF)—a grantmaking collaborative between donors and the global disability community which supports the human rights of persons with disabilities—today announced its second 2011 grants round, “Securing Our Rights.” Grantmaking in this round will be targeted to disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in Bangladesh, 14 Pacific Island countries, Ghana, Uganda, Nicaragua and Peru.

The broad objective of the Fund—which was officially launched in March 2008 and is a Project of Tides—is to empower DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).

In the second round of 2011 grantmaking, applicant organizations from 14 Pacific Island countries (Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu), Ghana, and Nicaragua may apply as single organizations or partnerships for 12-month Small Grants. Organizations from Bangladesh, Peru and Uganda may apply by invitation only. Grants will range from USD 5,000 to 20,000 and will support efforts to build CRPD skills and to develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grantmaking. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org. The deadline for applications is August 18, 2011.

In 2010, the Fund made 99 grants to organizations in 15 countries (India, Indonesia, Mexico, Ukraine; Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Uganda; Bangladesh; and Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu), totaling USD 2,222,123. Grants ranged from USD 5000 – 100,000 and supported CRPD skills-building, local rights advocacy, and national-level CRPD promotion, implementation and monitoring by DPO-led coalitions.

DRF’s donors include the American Jewish World Service, the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID), the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID).
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COMUNICADO DE PRENSA

Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad publica convocatoria a presentar propuestas de proyectos: S
egunda ronda de financiamiento de 2011 dirigida a Bangladés, Ghana, Nicaragua, países insulares del Pacífico, Perú y Uganda

7 de julio de 2011
PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (DRF)—una iniciativa de colaboración financiera entre donantes y la comunidad mundial de personas con discapacidad que apoya los derechos humanos de estas personas—anunció hoy su segunda ronda de financiamiento de 2011, “Asegurando nuestros derechos”. Los subsidios en esta ronda apoyarán a organizaciones de personas con discapacidad (OPD) en Bangladés, Ghana, Nicaragua, 14 países insulares del Pacífico, Perú y Uganda.

El DRF—que fue iniciado oficialmente en marzo de 2008 y es un proyecto de la Fundación Tides—tiene el objetivo amplio de fortalecer a las OPD del mundo en desarrollo y de Europa Oriental / antigua Unión Soviética a fin de que participen en la ratificación, aplicación y seguimiento de la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD).

En la segunda ronda de financiamiento de 2011, organizaciones de Ghana, Nicaragua y 14 países insulares del Pacífico (Estados Federados de Micronesia, Fiyi, Islas Cook, Islas Salomón, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palaos, Papúa Nueva Guinea, República de las Islas Marshall, Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu y Vanuatu) pueden solicitar pequeños subsidios para un periodo de 12 meses como OPD que trabajan independientemente o en alianza con otras organizaciones. OPD de Bangladés, Perú y Uganda podrán solicitar fondos únicamente por invitación. Los subsidios oscilarán entre USD 5,000 y 20,000. Apoyarán esfuerzos dirigidos a fortalecer las habilidades de las OPD para abordar la CDPD, así como a desarrollar promoción, defensa y seguimiento de los derechos enunciados en la CDPD.

Se recomienda a las organizaciones interesadas leer todos los criterios de elegibilidad y detalles para solicitud de fondos que se encuentran en esta página del DRF: http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/es/otorgamiento. Cualquier pregunta relacionada con el proceso de las propuestas debe dirigirse a info@disabilityrightsfund.org. La fecha límite para enviar propuestas es el 18 de agosto de 2011.

En 2010, el DRF otorgó 99 subsidios por un total de USD 2.222,123 a organizaciones en 15 países (Bangladés, Estados Federados de Micronesia, Fiyi, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Islas Salomón, México, Nicaragua, Papúa Nueva Guinea, Perú, Tuvalu, Ucrania, Uganda y Vanuatu). Los subsidios, que oscilaron entre USD 5,000 y 100,000, se destinaron al desarrollo de habilidades de las OPD para abordar la CDPD y defender los derechos de las personas con discapacidad a nivel local; también fueron otorgados a coaliciones lideradas por OPD para la promoción, aplicación y seguimiento de la CDPD a nivel nacional.

El DRF cuenta con el apoyo de la Agencia Australiana para el Desarrollo Internacional (AusAID), el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional (DFID) del Reino Unido, el Fondo Sigrid Rausing, Fundaciones para una Sociedad Abierta y el Servicio Mundial Judío Americano (AJWS), entre otros.

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Prototype Global Disability Rights Library Launches

Posted on 14 June 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News, technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Washington, DC – Disability rights advocates around the globe can now access a newly launched tool for finding the knowledge and toolkits they need: the Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL) at http://gdrl.org .  A prototype “test” version of this library is being made available both on-line and off-line so that users can share feedback with the GDRL team on improving the library.

The GDRL is a collaborative effort between the U.S. International Council on Disabilities (USICD) and the University of Iowa’s WiderNet Project with funding support from USAID.  It is working to bring the best materials on disability rights and the convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to developing countries, particularly to locations with limited internet access.

“We are excited to be able to begin sharing the prototype version of the Global Disability Rights Library with the public because we need everyone’s help in making it an outstanding resource,” says Andrea Shettle, GDRL program manager at USICD.  “Disability rights advocates, policy makers, and other stakeholders in developing countries deserve easier access to a rich body of digital knowledge.  These websites, videos, and electronic publications can support their work in improving the lives of people with disabilities in developing countries.  The GDRL is still very much a work in progress.  We need disabled people’s
organizations, service providers, government personnel, families, and people with disabilities around the world to start using it and telling us how they want us to improve the library.”

Under the current USAID funding grant, 60 organizations, universities, and agencies in developing countries with limited internet access will receive a free off-line version of the digital library in an eGranary.  An eGranary is a hard drive with an extensive collection of digital resources.  An eGranary also has an interface that emulates the appearance and function of the web without
requiring actual internet access. So far, a total of 27 deployment sites have been selected. This includes four locations in Ethiopia, Nigeria, Peru, and Zambia that will join on-line users in closely reviewing the prototype version of the library.  The GDRL team will use feedback from the first four deployment sites, along with feedback from on-line users, to improve the library before disseminating it via eGranaries to the other deployment sites.  Another 33 deployment sites will be selected after the final September 1, 2011 application deadline.  An on-line application form is at http://www.widernet.org/digitallibrary/GDRLSiteSelection/ .

People who do have internet access can now visit the on-line version of the prototype GDRL at

http://gdrl.org

All GDRL users are encouraged to share their feedback and suggestions for additional digital resources by sending an email to gdrl@usicd.org or to librarian@gdrl.org

Read more about the GDRL project at:

http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/global-disability-rights-library

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Call for Nominations: Good Policies and Practices Promoting Disability Rights

Posted on 11 May 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Human Rights, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Essl Foundation and the World Future Council plan to acknowledge future just policies and exceptional examples of good practice that actively promote and implement the rights of persons with disabilities – both now, and for the future. Together, they aim not only to raise global awareness of exemplary policies and practices, but also to speed up political action “to promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity”, as laid out in Article 1 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

With this announcement, they invite you to put forward your nominations.
The policies and practices can originate from different areas, from respect for inherent dignity, individual autonomy and independence, to full and effective participation and inclusion in society, to equality of opportunity, and accessibility. Nominated practices and, in particular, laws or policies, should be either of a regional or national nature. They should have been in existence long enough to prove their effective implementation and, most importantly, deliver identifiable improvements.

On 22-23 January 2012, there will be a Conference on “Future Just Policies: Persons with Disabilities” in Vienna, to present publicly and commend to, and discuss with, decision makers and parliamentarians, encouraging examples of political responsibility, in order to spread social innovation and development. In addition, we will be establishing a resource of exceptional examples of both good practice and good policy to be readily and easily accessible to all those interested, and who may benefit from it.
The Essl Foundation and the World Future Council would be very grateful if you could provide your nominations by May 31, 2011, to Mr Thomas Butcher, enable@worldfuturecouncil.org.

The present request has been sent to full (national council), associate and observer members of the EDF, members of the UNCRPD Committee, together with major international organizations and individuals working in the field of disability governance. In addition, we should like to encourage you to forward our request for nominations, particularly of good practices, to any other persons, or organizations, you may consider appropriate.

Thanking you in advance for your help,

Yours Sincerely

The Essl Foundation and the World Future Council

The Essl Foundation

The purpose of the Martin and Gerda Essl Social Prize Private Nonprofit Foundation is to support people in need and to promote public awareness about the necessity of support for those in need and to provide the individuals concerned with the appropriate training. Good practice is at the heart of the Essl Foundation’s mission and the foundation believes strongly that social innovation is heavily dependent on entrepreneurs to create change. The present project has grown out of the work the Essl Foundation continues to undertake around the situation of persons with disabilities.

For more information, please visit www.esslfoundation.org

The World Future Council

The World Future Council aims to be a global advocate for the concerns of future generations in international politics. The Council consists of 50 personalities from around the world who have already successfully promoted change in various and diverse fields. Their activities range from advocating human rights and sustaining the planet to promoting political, scientific, cultural and economic justice. The WFC’s mission is to inform decision makers about the challenges facing future generations and to provide them with practical policy solutions. The WFC identifies and promotes successful policies that can be implemented as laws, policy standards, and international agreements. To achieve this, the WFC draws on its networks of parliamentarians, institutions and organisations around the globe.

For more information, please visit our website www.worldfuturecouncil.org

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Disability Rights Fund Announces Letter of Interest Process for Bangladesh, Peru, and Uganda (English y Español)

Posted on 5 May 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

| English | Español|

Disability Rights Fund Announces Letter of Interest Process for Bangladesh, Peru, and Uganda

May 5, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                      

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF) is announcing a new letter on interest process for Disabled Persons’ Organizations (DPOs) in Bangladesh, Peru and Uganda. 

DRF is a grantmaking collaborative between donors and the global disability community which supports the human rights of persons with disabilities. Officially launched in March 2008, DRF empowers DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD). DPOs in Bangladesh, Peru and Uganda have received DRF support since 2008.

Now, instead of preparing full proposals as a first step, DPOs from Bangladesh, Peru and Uganda may submit a letter of interest as a first step to determine if their project fits DRF eligibility criteria. DPOs may apply as single organizations or partnerships to build skills and develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. The activities should take place during a 12-month period beginning in January 2012. Grant awards range from USD 5,000 to 20,000.

Interested organizations are urged to review the eligibility criteria and letter of interest details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant. The letter of interest process helps determine fit with DRF criteria and priorities before applicants expend time and resources to put together a full proposal. If eligible, applicants will be requested to submit a full proposal.  

Any questions on the letter of interest process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org. The deadline for receipt of Letters of Interest is June 15, 2011.

In expanding the LoI process, Director Diana Samarasan said, “DRF aims to make our application process as accessible as possible, to ensure that a diversity of organizations of persons with disabilities can and do apply.” To date, the Fund has given out $5 million to organizations in 17 countries (Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Ukraine, Ecuador, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Ghana, Namibia, Uganda, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu). Grants have ranged from USD 5,000 to 100,000 and support CRPD skills-building, local rights advocacy, and national-level CRPD promotion, implementation and monitoring by DPO-led coalitions.

DRF’s donors include the American Jewish World Service, the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID), the Leir Foundation, the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID).

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 Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad anuncia proceso de formulario pre-solicitud para Bangladés, Perú y Uganda

5 de mayo de 2011

PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (DRF) anuncia un nuevo proceso de formulario pre-solicitud para organizaciones de personas con discapacidad (OPD) en Bangladés, Perú y Uganda.

El DRF es una iniciativa de colaboración financiera entre donantes y la comunidad mundial de personas con discapacidad que apoya los derechos humanos de estas personas. Iniciado oficialmente en marzo de 2008, el DRF fortalece a las OPD del mundo en desarrollo y de Europa Oriental / antigua Unión Soviética a fin de que participen en la ratificación, aplicación y seguimiento de la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD). OPD en Bangladés, Perú y Uganda han recibido apoyo del DRF desde 2008.

Ahora, en lugar de preparar solicitudes completas al principio, OPD de Bangladés, Perú y Uganda pueden enviar un formulario pre-solicitud como primer paso para determinar si su proyecto es compatible con los criterios de elegibilidad del DRF. Las OPD pueden presentar una solicitud como organizaciones que trabajan independientemente o en alianza con otras para desarrollar habilidades, promoción, defensa y seguimiento en torno a la CDPD basándose en los derechos de las personas con discapacidad. Las actividades deberán llevarse a cabo durante un periodo de 12 meses a partir de enero de 2012. Los subsidios oscilan entre USD 5,000 y 20,000.

Se recomienda a las organizaciones interesadas leer los criterios de elegibilidad y detalles del formulario pre-solicitud que se encuentran en esta página del DRF: www.disabilityrightsfund.org/es/otorgamiento. El proceso de formulario pre-solicitud ayuda a determinar si un proyecto es compatible con los criterios y prioridades del DRF antes de que las organizaciones inviertan tiempo y recursos en preparar una solicitud completa. De ser elegibles, se pedirá a las organizaciones que presenten una propuesta completa.

Cualquier pregunta relacionada con el proceso de formulario pre-solicitud debe dirigirse a info@disabilityrightsfund.org. La fecha límite para enviar formularios pre-solicitud es el 15 de junio de 2011.

Al amplia el proceso de formulario pre-solicitud, dijo Diana Samarasan, directora del Fondo, “el DRF procura hacer nuestro proceso de solicitud lo más accesible que sea posible, para asegurar que diversas organizaciones de personas con discapacidad puedan solicitar fondos y lo hagan”.

Hasta la fecha, el DRF ha otorgado un total de USD 5 millones a organizaciones en 17 países (Bangladés, Ecuador, Estados Federados de Micronesia, Fiyi, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Islas Salomón, México, Namibia, Nicaragua, Papúa Nueva Guinea, Perú, Tuvalu, Ucrania, Uganda y Vanuatu). Los subsidios, entre USD 5,000 y 100,000, se han destinado al desarrollo de habilidades de las OPD para abordar la CDPD y defender los derechos de las personas con discapacidad a nivel local; también fueron otorgados a coaliciones lideradas por OPD para la promoción, aplicación y seguimiento de la CDPD a nivel nacional.

Entre los donantes del DRF están la Agencia Australiana para el Desarrollo Internacional (AusAID), el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional (DFID) del Reino Unido, el Fondo Sigrid Rausing, la Fundación Leir, el Instituto de la Sociedad Abierta y el Servicio Judío Americano Mundial (AJWS).

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Opportunity for International Cooperation to Advance Disability Rights

Posted on 21 April 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Call for Nominations or Applications, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News, Opportunities, Poverty, Resources, Volunteer Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

English | العربية (Arabic) | Español (Spanish) | Français (French) | Hausa | русский  (Russian)

Opportunity for International Cooperation to Advance Disability Rights

Human rights, poverty reduction, and humanitarian organizations are invited to join a global effort to collect and disseminate digital information to advance the global disability rights movement.  Organizations that do not specialize in disability are encouraged to respond to this opportunity, as are disability-focused groups and individual advocates. 

The Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL) project is strengthening its resource collection and identifying a total of 60 locations in developing countries with limited web access to receive a free, off-line copy of the digital library. The GDRL is a joint initiative of the United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD) and the WiderNet Project at University of Iowa with funding support from USAID. 

The GDRL project is meant to bring disability rights knowledge to grassroots advocates and policy makers beyond the reach of the internet.  The project uses an innovative, off-line digital storage technology called eGranary units to deliver the library to locations in developing countries with limited internet access.  It is like having a slice of the internet inside a box.  In addition to the off-line version of the library, an on-line version will also be available.

Briefly, here are three ways that organizations or individuals can contribute:

  1. Suggest or contribute digital content!  The GDRL needs all languages and digital formats, especially accessible formats.  This includes both disability-focused and mainstream content on human rights, poverty, and humanitarian issues, capacity building for grassroots organizations, and accessibility software.
  2. Help identify potential deployment sites in developing countries! Share information about the GDRL with contacts and assist them with the application process as needed.  The application deadline is September 1, 2011.
  3. Consider offering, coordinating, or hosting volunteer support in building the digital library!  A network of volunteers and interns around the world are helping to identify important content for the library daily.

For more information about this project, please visit the GDRL website at:

http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/global-disability-rights-library

Learn more about the kind of content we want, the application process, and more ways to help the GDRL project at our “Frequently Asked Questions” (FAQ) page: http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/gdrl-faq

The on-line application form is at http://www.widernet.org/digitallibrary/GDRLSiteSelection/

Contact the GDRL team via gdrl@usicd.org

Or contact them via postal mail at:                          

Global Disability Rights Library
  United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD)
 1012 14th Street, NW, Suite 105
  Washington DC 20005 USA


فرصة للتعاون الدولي من أجل النهوض بحقوق المعاقين

 

إلى المنظمات العاملة في المجالات الإنسانية بصفة عامة ، والمنظمات العاملة في مجالات حقوق الإنسان ومكافحة الفقر، أنتم مدعوون للإنضمام إلى الجهود الدولية الخاصة بتجميع ونشر المعلومات في صيغتها الرقمية  وذلك دعما وتطويرا للحركة العالمية لحقوق المعاقين. ونود أن نحيطكم علما بأنه يمكن حتى لتلك المنظمات  غير المتخصصة في مجالات الإعاقة إغتنام هذه الفرصة والإشتراك في تلك الجهود جنبا إلى جنب مع المنظمات التي يتركز نشاطها في الدفاع عن حقوق الجماعات والأفراد المعاقين.

يقوم مشروع المكتبة الدولية لحقوق المعاقين (GDRL) الآن بتعزيز جمع مصادره وتقويتها حيث تمكن حتى الآن من تحديد  60 موقعا في بعض البلدان النامية التي تعاني من محدودية الوصول إلى شبكة الإنترنت لتتلقى نسخا مجانية من المكتبة الرقمية ، تلك التي يمكن إستخدامها دون الحاجة للوصول لشبكة الإنترنت. و تعد المكتبة الدولية لحقوق المعاقين (GDRL) نتاج مبادرة مشتركة  بين المجلس الأمريكي الدولي للمعوقين (USICD) ومشروع (WiderNet) بجامعة أيوا،  وبدعم مالي من الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية.          

 لقد إبتكر مشروع المكتبة الدولية لحقوق المعاقين (GDRL) تكنولوجيا لتخزين المعلومات في صورتها الرقمية داخل أقراص صلبة أسماها وحدات إي قراناري                                  

حتى يتمكن من إرسال نسخ من المكتبة الرقمية إلى مناطق من البلدان النامية التي تعوزها خدمات الإنترنت. الإي قراناري  تشبه إلى حد بعيد  فكرة خدمات الإنترنت مع فارق وحيد هو أن خدمة الإنترنت موجودة في الفضاء السايبري بينما الإي قراناري هو عبارة عن إنترنت داخل صندوق. ومن مميزات هذه المكتبة الرقمية أنها إضافة إلى توفرها للمشتركين خارج شبكة الإنترنت ، يمكن أن تتوفر لهم  أيضا عبر شبكة الإنترنت. 

وبإختصار نعرض هنا طريقتين يمكن للمنظمات والأفراد أن يقدموا من خلالهما مساهماتهم:

1- إقترح أو ساهم بمواد وموضوعات رقمية. تحتاج المكتبة الدولية لحقوق المعاقين (GDRL) إلى كل اللغات وكل الأشكال والصيغ الرقمية ،

)Digital Formatsخاصة تلك الأشكال والصيغ الرقمية التي يسهل التعامل بها (

وفي ذلك الباب مفتوح لكل المنظمات التي تركز في عملها على المعاقين أو تلك التي تعمل في الحقل الإنساني العريض والذي يتضمن حقوق الإنسان ، مكافحة الفقر، المساعدات الإنسانية ، المنظمات التي تعمل على بناء القدرات في المستويات القاعدية ويمكن الإستعانة بأي برامج سهلة التصفح.

2-  إمكانية توفير أعمال التنسيق الإداري أو إستضافة مساهمات المتطوعين الإلكترونية في صدد بناء المكتبة الرقمية. إن وجود شبكة من المتطوعين والمتدربين حول العالم يساعد وبشكل يومي في تحديد وإختيار مواد هامة وضرورية للمكتبة.                          

لمزيد من المعلومات حول هذا المشروع يرجى زيارة موقع المكتبة الدولية لحقوق المعاقين (GDRL) على العنوان التالي:

http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/global-disability-rights-library

 

يمكنكم معرفة المزيد عن المعلومات والمواد المطلوبة وعن سبل الإنخراط في معية العاملين بمشروع  المكتبة الدولية لحقوق المعاقين (GDRL) ، وذلك عن طريق صفحة الأسئلة والأجوبة على الرابط التالي:

  http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/gdrl-faq

 

الغالبية العظمى من محتويات موقعنا الإلكتروني ، في الوقت الراهن متوفرة  باللغة الإنجليزية ، وهناك ترجمات محدودة إلى لغات أخرى ستكون متاحة فور حصولنا عليها ، وسنمدكم بهذه الترجمات على الرابط :

http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/downloads

 

أو يمكنكم الإتصال بفريق عمل  مشروع  المكتبة الدولية لحقوق المعاقين (GDRL) على عنوان البريد الإلكتروني:

gdrl@usicd.org

 

أو الإتصال عبر البريد العادي على العتوان التالي:

 

 

Global Disability Rights Library
                     United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD)
                    1012 14th Street, NW, Suite 105
                     Washington DC 20005 USA

 


Oportunidad para la Cooperación Internacional para Promover de Derechos

de los Personas con Discapacidades

Los organizaciones de los derechos humanos, de la reducción de la pobreza, y las organizaciones humanitarias están invitados a unirse a un esfuerzo mundial para colectar y compartir información digital para promover los derechos de los personas con discapacidades.  Las organizaciones que no se especializan en la discapacidades se les anima a responder a esta oportunidad, junto con grupos enfocados con la discapacidades y defendores.

El proyecto, La Biblioteca Mundial de Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidades (GDRL iniciales en ingles), está esforzando su colección de recursos y está identificando 60 sitios en los países en desarrollo con acceso limitado a Internet a recibir una copia gratuita de la biblioteca digital sin la necesidad del internet. El GDRL es una iniciativa conjunta a el Consejo Internacional de las Personsas con Discapacidades de los Estados Unidos (USICD iniciales en ingles) y El Proyecto WiderNet en la Universidad de Iowa con el apoyo financiero de USAID.

El proyecto GDRL utiliza una tecnología innovadora de archivos digitales sin la necesidad del internet se llama eGranary para entregar la biblioteca a sitios en los países en desarrollo con acceso limitado al Internet. Es como tener un pedazo del Internet dentro de una caja. Además de la versión sin necesidad del internet de la biblioteca, hay una versión en el web que también estará disponible.
Aquí hay dos maneras que las organizaciones o las personas pueden contribuir:

  1. ¡Sugerir o contribuir contenidos digitales! El GDRL necesita de todos los idiomas y formatos fácilmente digitales, especialmente en formato accesible. Esto incluye el contenido centrado en los derechos humanas, la pobreza y humanitarias tanto acerca de las personas con discapacidades y acerca de las personas sin discapacidades. Este además incluye software de accesibilidad y contenido acerca de la creación de capacidad para las organizaciones.
  2. Considere la posibilidad de ofrecer, de coordinar, o que puedan hospedar a voluntarios en el desarrollo de la biblioteca digital. Cada día una red de voluntarios de todo el mundo están ayudando a identificar el contenido importante para la biblioteca.

Para obtener más información sobre este proyecto, por favor visite el sitio web GDRL en:
http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/global-disability-rights-library 

Obtenga más información sobre el tipo de contenido que queremos y más formas de involucrarse con el proyecto GDRL nuestra “Preguntas Frecuentes” (FAQ): http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/gdrl-faq

Actualmente, la mayoría de nuestro contenido en el web es en Inglés. La traducción limitada se prestará en otros idiomas cuando sea factible. Estas traducciones se proporcionan en http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/downloads

O contactar al equipo de GDRL: gdrl@usicd.org 

O contactar por correo posta:

Global Disability Rights Library
United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD) 
1012 14th Street, NW, Suite 105               
Washington DC 20005 USA


Opportunité Pour La Collaboration Internationale D’ améliorer les droits des personnes handicapées

Des droits de l’homme, la réduction de pauvreté, et les organisations humanitaires sont invitées pour joindre un effort global de collecter et diffuser des informations digital pour avancer le mouvement global de droites d’handicapées. Des organisations qui ne se spécialisent pas dans l’incapacité sont encouragés à répondre à cette opportunité, ainsi que les groupes incapacité focalises et les avocats d’individu.

Le projet global de la bibliothèque de droites d’incapacité (GDRL) renforce maintenant sa collection de ressource et en identifiant un total de 60 endroits dans les pays en voie de développement avec le Web limité accédez pour recevoir une copie libre et en différé de la bibliothèque digital. Le GDRL est une initiative commune du Conseil international des Etats-Unis sur les incapacités (USICD) et le projet de WiderNet à l’université de l’Iowa avec l’appui de placement de l’USAID.

Le projet  GDRL emploie une technologie innovatrice, en différé de mémoire digital appelée les unités eGranary pour offrir la bibliothèque aux endroits dans les pays en voie de développement avec l’accès d’Internet limité. Il est comme avoir une tranche de l’Internet à l’intérieur d’une boîte. En plus de la version hors ligne, une version en ligne sera également disponible.

Brièvement, voici deux manières que les organisations ou les individus peuvent contribuer

  1. Suggérez ou contribuez le contenu digital ! Le GDRL a besoin de tous les langues et formats digitaux, particulièrement formats accessibles. Ceci inclut contenu incapacité focalise et traditionnel sur des droits de l’homme, pauvreté, et des issues humanitaires, bâtiment de capacité pour des organismes de bases, et logiciel d’accessibilité. 
  2.  Considérer d’offrir, coordonner, ou accueillir l’appui volontaire en construisant la bibliothèque digitale. Un réseau des volontaires et les internes autour du monde aident à identifier le contenu important pour la bibliothèque quotidienne.

Pour plus d’informations sur ce projet, visitez le site de GDRL à:

http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/global-disability-rights-library

Apprenez plus sur le type de contenu que nous voulons et plus de façons de s’impliquer dans le projet GDRL à notre “Frequently Asked Questions” (FAQ) page: http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/gdrl-faq

En ce moment, la majeure partie de notre contenu  est en Anglais.  Traduction limitée sera disponible dans d’autres langues quand faisable. Ces traductions seront fournies à http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/downloads

Ou contactez l’équipe de GDRL par gdrl@usicd.org

Ou  contacter eux par courrier postal à  

Global Disability Rights Library
United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD)
1012 14th Street, NW, Suite 105
Washington DC 20005 USA


Dama sukuni na hadin kan kasarmu da na ketare domin cigaban rashin iya gaskiya

Ana gayyatar kungiyar yancikasa (human rights) da kun giyyar rage talauci ta kasa (poverty reduction) da kuma kungiyyar taimakon jamaa (humanitarian organisation) da su hadu gabadaya suyi kokarin su karbo kuma su yadar da nahurar sanarwa domin agabar da tafiye-tafiyen gabadayan rashin iya gaskiya. Kungiyyar da ba su saba a rashin iya gaskiya ba, ambada goyan bayan su amsa kira zuwa wanan damar tare da taron hangen rashin iya gaskiya da kuma waddanda suka goyi bayan jamaa kasa.

Maajin littafan na rasahin iya gaskiya na duniya gaba daya (the global disability rights library) (GDRL). yanzu yayi shirin karfafawa hanyar samun mashing da kuma warware wajen sittin (60) domin gyaran kasashe da dan mashiga sakar gijo a nahura mai kwakwalwa (access web) domin amshi abubuwar da ake yi batare da biya ba, mara layi (off-line) suna juyawa da nahura lamba na maajin littatafai (digital library). Kungiyyar (GDRL) wato maajin littatafai na rashin iya gaskiya na duniya gaba daya, sun hada baki da majalisar shawara kasrmu da na ketare ta amarika (United States International Council on Disability (USICD) ) da kuma raga mai fadi na shiri a jamia Iowa da gwoyan bayan kungiyyar ammarika mai ta ken (USICD) da wasu makuden kudi.

Kungiyyar (GDRL) sun yi shirin amfani da wata nahurar ajujar lamba mai sun (eGranary unit) domin isar da tsakon ma aji littatafai zuwa wurare domin gyaran kasashe da dan hange da nahura mai kwakwalwa. yana kamar samun yanki na nahura mai kwakwalwa a cikin akwati. Bugu da kari game da nahurar (off-line version) na maajin littatafai da kuma nahurar (on-line version) zasu zama samama masu amfani.
Takkaitacce, hanyoyi biyu ne anan da kungiyoyi ko kowa zai iya bada gudunmawarsa.

  1. Shawara kokuma bada nahurar lamba arubuce kungiyar (GDRL) ta son dukan harsuna da kuma nahurar lamba ta yanayin shigarwar wato (accessible format) wanan yana daga cikin dukan biyu rashin iya gaskiya da kuma zancen mafi bayani rubuce akan matsalolin kungiyar yancin kasa (human Rights) da na talauci (poverty) da kuma na taimakon jamaa (humanitarian) karfin ginawa. wakilan taron da kuma mashigar nahura mai kwakwalwa.
  2. Lura da kyauta, tsari,ko kuma a sa goyon bayan mataimakia gina nauran lamba tama’ajin littatafai ( digital Library). Naurar sannarwa na masu taimako da kuma yan makaranta da suka karanci magani na kewaye a duniya domin nuna muhimmancin rubutu na ma’jin littatafai na yau da kullum.

Dominnemankarin bayani da sanarwa game da wannan shirin,donAllah a ziyarci (GDRL website) tsakar jijiyoyi ta nahura mai kwakwalwa kamar haka: http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/global-disability-rights-library

Kara koyi irin rubutun da muke so da yanda zaka zama tare da kungiyar (GDRL) shiri a layin tambayan tambayoyi (FAQ) page: http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/gdrl.faq

A yanzu yawancin webda muke da shin a rubutu na turanci ne. Za a iya bayar da wasu fassara harshuna in a yiwu.Za a iya bayar da fassarar ta http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/downloads annan,ko kuma ka neme mu a (GDRL) jama’a tahanyar  gdrl@usicd.org 

Kokuma to wasika a takarda ta hanyar:

Global Disability Rights library

United States international Council on Disabilities (USICD)

1012 14th Street, NW, Suite 105

Washington DC



Возможность для международного сотрудничества в целях продвижения прав инвалидов

Организациям по правам человека, по борьбе с нищетой и гуманитарным организациям предлагается присоединиться к глобальным усилиям по сбору и распространению цифровой информации для продвижения глобального движения за права инвалидов. Организациям, которые не специализируются в вопросах инвалидов, предлагается также присоединиться, наряду с группами, специализирующие в вопросах инвалидов и другими адвокатами.

Проект- Глобальная библиотека по правам инвалидов (GDRL) в настоящее время укрепляет свой потенциал по сбору ресурсов и выявляет в общей сложности 60 мест в развивающихся странах с ограниченным доступом к сети интернета для получения бесплатной, автономной копии цифровой библиотеки. Проект GDRL является совместной инициативой Международного совета США по вопросам инвалидов (USICD) и проекта WiderNet Университета Айовы при финансовой поддержке Агентства США по международному развитию (USAID).

Проект GDRL использует инновационную, автономную цифровую технологию хранения материалов, называемой eGranary для предоставления библиотеки в местах с ограниченным доступом к сети Интернета развивающихся странах. Это как кусочек интернета внутри коробки. В дополнении к офф-лайн версии библиотеки, он-лайн версия также будет доступна.

Организации или отдельные лица могут способствовать следующим образом:

  1. Предложить или способствовать цифровыми материалами! GDRL нуждается материалами во всех языках в цифровом формате, особенно в доступных форматах. Это включает в себя как материалы по вопросам инвалидов так и основного содержания по правам человека, по вопросам нищеты, и гуманитарным вопросам, по укреплению потенциала менее активных организаций, и доступности программного обеспечения.
  2. Предложить, координировать, или принимать волонтёрскую помощь в создании цифровой библиотеки. Сеть волонтёров и стажёров по всему миру помогают определить важные материалы и ресурсы для библиотеки ежедневно.

Для получения дополнительной информации об этом проекте, пожалуйста, посетите веб-сайт проекта GDRL по адресу: http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/global-disability-rights-library

Узнайте о том, какого типа содержания материалов мы ожидаем, и как принять участие в проекте GDRL в “Часто задаваемых вопросах” (FAQ) страницы: http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/gdrl-faq

В настоящее время, большинство наших электронных материалов являются на английском языке. Ограниченный перевод материалов будет обеспечен на других языках очень скоро. Эти переводы материалов будут представлены в этой страничке:  http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/downloads

Также свяжитесь с членами команды проекта GDRL с помощью электронной почты:  gdrl@usicd.org

или свяжитесь с ними по обычной почте:                         

                                Global Disability Rights Library
                                United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD)
                                1012 14th Street, NW, Suite 105
                                Washington DC 20005 USA

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Master of Arts Degree in International Development with Persons with Disabilities

Posted on 9 February 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I graduated from the following program in 2009. I feel it can provide a good background in the field for people who want to work with people with disabilities in developing countries to support them in their struggle for human rights and to escape poverty. The most valuable course for me personally was a course in project design that helped me gain more confidence in my ability to evolve a clearly focused project idea and develop it into a cohesive plan of action.

Master of Arts Degree in International Development with Persons with Disabilities

Do you want to work with persons with disabilities in developing countries in ending the discrimination, stigmatization and exclusion they endure in violation of their guaranteed human rights? Imagine yourself becoming the expert to implement policies and practices inclusive of people with disabilities within federal agencies, international organizations and non-governmental organizations and in their overseas development assistance programs?

The Master of Arts degree in International Development at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC focuses on advocating for and with persons with disabilities. The program’s coursework is taught through a transformative lens where political, social and development issues become a means through which ID graduates study topics, such as, the latest global trends and issues concerning disability and development, gender, models of disability, the micropolitics of development, the design of sustainable and effective development projects and programs, and economic development. Your two years of coursework includes a practicum placement at one of several Washington, DC agencies, as well as an internship overseas using the skills you will learn through your coursework at Gallaudet and the international experiences you will be exposed to in our nation’s capitol.

For more information, please go to our website: http://edf.gallaudet.edu and/or write to amy.wilson@gallaudet.edu

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Call for Applications to Receive Global Disability Rights Library

Posted on 12 January 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opportunities, Resources, technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

MEDIA RELEASE

Call for Applications to Receive Global Disability Rights Library
January 7, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Andrea Shettle, Program Manager: Global Disability Rights Library
Telephone: (877) 535-0506
Email: gdrl@usicd.org

Washington, DC – The Global Disability Rights Library project announces a call for organizations to apply to receive a free digital Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL).  Applications are open to disabled people’s organizations, universities, government agencies, and other organizations in developing countries.   Sixty organizations will receive the digital library to empower them to disseminate valuable disability rights knowledge and toolkits to their communities.

The goal of the GDRL project is to improve the lives of persons with disabilities in developing countries.  The project uses an innovative off-line digital storage technology to deliver digital resources to people beyond the reach of the internet.  The electronic library will be stored in a hard drive, called an “eGranary unit” that also contains an interface emulating the look and functioning of the web but without requiring actual internet connectivity.  Users will include disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), decision makers, government agencies, individual advocates, and others who cannot easily download information from the web.  Read more about the GDRL project at:

http://www.usicd.org/index.cfm/global-disability-rights-library

The GDRL is a collaborative effort between the U.S. International Council on Disabilities and the University of Iowa’s WiderNet Project with support from USAID to bring the best materials on disability rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to developing countries.

Ideal deployment site candidates will have a demonstrated commitment to promoting and facilitating disability rights.  Successful applicants will have the organizational capacity to become a hub for disseminating disability rights information and will be inclusive of a diverse disability community. Interested organizations are urged to review the application and full eligibility criteria posted on WiderNet’s website at:

http://www.widernet.org/digitallibrary/GDRLSiteSelection

Individuals and organizations with internet access are encouraged to please assist in reaching out to organizations with poor internet connectivity to assist them with the application process.  There will be several selection rounds.  Applicants not accepted in an early selection round will be immediately rolled over into subsequent selection rounds.  Candidates are encouraged to apply early.  Please do not wait until the final deadline.

Apply by March 1, 2011, to be considered for deployment by June 30, 2011
Apply by September 1, 2011, to be considered for deployment by December 31, 2011
Apply by May 1, 2012, to be considered for deployment by August 31, 2012

Questions about the application process or eligibility criteria should be directed to gdrl@usicd.org.  Applicants who cannot use email also may reach us by post mail at

Andrea Shettle, MSW, MA
Program Manager, Global Disability Rights Library
United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD)
1012-14th Street, NW, Suite 105
Washington, DC 20005
United States of America

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Disabled women activists change the world through YouTube music video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)

Posted on 6 January 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, News, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mobility International USA
Website: www.miusa.org

Disabled women activists change the world through YouTube music video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)

January 6, 2011 – Signing and singing with passion in Arabic, Spanish and English, 54 disabled women activists from 43 countries celebrate the achievements, pride and solidarity of women with disabilities around the world. These leaders are revolutionizing the status of women and girls worldwide. Filmed during MIUSA’s 5th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD), the Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)  music video release marks the beginning of MIUSA’s 30th Anniversary year-long celebration.

Please share the YouTube link to Music Video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxxomUVsSik

Our goal is to reach 2,500 views and to raise funds through donations for the next WILD program empowering women and girls with disabilities. Every donation large or small brings us closer to that goal! To donate, visit http://www.miusa.org/donate/wild.

WILD delegates in the video come from Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Bangladesh, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria, Palestinian Territories, Peru, Philippines, South Africa, Sri Lanka, St. Lucia, Syria, Turkey, Uganda, United States of America, Vietnam, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The video is captioned. For the text video description in English click here.

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to empower people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development. For more information visit www.miusa.org.

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Funding Opportunity: Disability Rights Fund Releases 2010 Round Two Request for Proposals

Posted on 8 July 2010. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region |

PRESS RELEASE

Disability Rights Fund Releases 2010 Round Two Request for Proposals

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF)—a grantmaking collaborative between donors and the global disability community which supports the human rights of persons with disabilities—today announced its second 2010 “Moving Rights Forward” grants round. Grantmaking in this round will be targeted to disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in four regions and twenty countries: in Africa: Ghana and Uganda; in Asia: Bangladesh; in Latin America: Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru; in the Pacific: Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

The broad objective of the Fund—which was officially launched in March 2008 and is a Project of Tides—is to empower DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).

In the second round of 2010 grantmaking, applicant organizations from eligible countries may apply as: a) single organizations or partnerships for 12-month Small Grants and/or b) national DPO-led coalitions for 24-month National Coalition Grants. Grants to single organizations will range from USD 5,000 to 20,000 and will support efforts to build CRPD skills and to develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. Grants to national DPO-led coalitions will range from USD 30,000 to 50,000 per year (60,000 – 100,000 over 24 months) and will support advocacy toward ratification of the CRPD, passage of specific legislation to accord with the CRPD, or the production of alternative/parallel reports to UN monitoring mechanisms.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org. The deadline for applications is August 19, 2010.

In 2009, the Fund made 82 one-year grants to organizations in 14 countries (India, Mexico, Ukraine; Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; Bangladesh; and Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands), totaling USD 1,933,050. Grants ranged from USD 5000 – 70,000 and supported CRPD skills-building, local rights advocacy, and national-level CRPD promotion, implementation and monitoring by DPO-led coalitions.
DRF’s donors include Aepoch Fund, the American Jewish World Service, an anonymous founding donor, the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID), the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID).

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Job Post: Research Assistant for Global Disability Rights Library at US International Council on Disabilities in Washington, DC area

Posted on 17 May 2010. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Job Post: Research Assistant

Job Summary:

The United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD) is looking for a Research Assistant in the Washington, DC area. As a member of a small team, the Research Assistant will be responsible for providing support to the management team in implementing the daily activities of the Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL) project, a joint initiative of USICD and the University of Iowa WiderNet Project.

Responsibilities may include identifying, adding, and cataloguing material on disability rights for the eGranary digital library; managing information resources in a range of formats; communicating with authors and publishers to request copyright permission for inclusion of their content in the digital library; communicating with volunteers assisting the project; scheduling meetings to be held remotely among a global group of participants; maintaining a database of partners and potential partners and collaborators for the GDRL Project; and providing other research and administrative support to the management staff as needed. More information about the GDRL project is available here: http://usicd.org/template/page.cfm?id=163.

USICD’s mission is to catalyze and help focus the energy, expertise and resources of the U.S. disability community and the U.S. government to optimize their impact on improving the lives and circumstances of people with disabilities worldwide, and to be an active member of the global disability rights movement. This position offers a unique opportunity to join a groundbreaking organization supporting the rights of people with disabilities in the U.S. and abroad. Learn more about USICD at its website at www.usicd.org.

Qualifications Summary:

USICD seeks a dynamic, energetic researcher with prior training or experience in library and information science or management; excellent communication skills; experience with performing office coordination functions and with electronic communication; ability to work collaboratively and to take direction; and proficiency in computer software application.

A commitment to the advancement of people with disabilities and knowledge of disability cultures in the United States and internationally are desirable. Also helpful is a wide-ranging curiosity in all knowledge relevant to people with disabilities in developing countries and a commitment to disseminating this knowledge to support the efforts of disability rights advocates worldwide. First-hand experience with disability preferred.

Applicants:

This employment opportunity is currently a part-time position under grant funding; however, additional funding support is being sought, and applicants seeking full and part-time employment are encouraged to apply. Applicants should provide a cover letter, resume, and the contact information for three references. Electronic submissions by email are preferred.

Deadline: The position will remain open for applications until the position is filled.

Contact: Please send responses or inquiries to David Morrissey, Executive Director, at dmorrissey@usicd.org

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Fellowship Opportunity: at disability advocacy organization in Washington, DC, USA

Posted on 12 May 2010. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Fellowships & Scholarships, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear Colleagues,

The United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD), in partnership with Atlas Corps, has made available one fellowship position to work with USICD in Washington, DC for one year, beginning in September 2010. This is an exciting opportunity for a mid-career professional from another country, working in the nongovernmental sector, to spend a year working in Washington working and learning with our organization in areas such as advocacy, program development and nonprofit administration. Their experience will be further enriched by the professional development activities that occur throughout their placement, provided by Atlas Corps.

I have attached the candidate qualifications description we have developed with Atlas Corps. Please share this with any international networks with whom you participate. I am particularly enthused to have individuals with first-hand experience in disability in the applicant pool. Applications are now coming in; time is short, so please do not delay to encourage those people you know who may be interested to review the materials and consider applying. You can learn more about Atlas Corps here: http://www.atlascorps.org/ and in the information below; Atlas Corps manages the application process and is the point of contact for all applicants. Further information about USICD is available here: www.usicd.org.

Thank you,
David Morrissey

________________________________________
About Atlas Corps Fellowship

Atlas Corps coordinates the rigorous selection process as well as logistics including living stipend, visa, flight, health insurance, taxes, and end of service award. The Host organization pays a cost share that covers a percent of the expenses.

This is a unique opportunity to receive a talented, mid-career, citizen sector (nonprofit/NGO) leader from overseas who is recruited specifically for your organization. Host applications are accepted year round. The fellowship program runs a fall class from September to August and a spring class from March to February.

Host Benefits:
• The Host organization receives a full-time, yearlong, international Fellow who is a leader in the nonprofit/NGO sector with 3-10 years of relevant experience. The average Atlas Corps Fellow is 28 years old, is fluent in English, and has a bachelor’s or master’s degree. (Volunteers going to Bogota are also fluent in Spanish.)
• Atlas Corps recruits at least two strong candidates for the Host organization based on a job description provided by the Host. The Host interviews candidates and selects their top choice from Atlas’ pool of vetted candidates.
• Atlas Corps provides Fellows with assistance in obtaining a visa, ten days advance orientation and training, health insurance, round trip international travel to host assignment, living stipend, and ongoing monthly training.
• The Host joins an international network of nonprofit organizations and rising nonprofit leaders who work together and share best practices.
Host Responsibilities:
• Host agrees to pay Atlas Corps a cost share for the Fellow over the course of the year, beginning 30-45 days prior to fellow’s start date.. Payments are made quarterly. Host is not responsible for taxes, health insurance, visa, or additional compensation.
• Host interviews candidates and selects their top choice. The Fall Fellows start at Host organization in early September and Spring Fellows start in March.
• Host agrees to provide a workstation (desk, phone, computer).
• Host agrees to provide meaningful work opportunities for the Fellow and will develop a Fellow work plan during the recruitment process.
• Host agrees to embrace the two-way notion of the Atlas Corps program that values the contributions of rising nonprofit leaders from the global south.

Open Position: Atlas Corps Fellow
Job Summary: The United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD) is looking for an Atlas Corps Fellow to serve in the Washington, DC area.
USICD’s mission is to catalyze and help focus the energy, expertise and resources of the US disability community and the US government to optimize their impact on improving the lives and circumstances of people with disabilities worldwide, and to be an active member of the global disability rights movement. The selected fellow will join a groundbreaking organization supporting the rights of people with disabilities in the US and abroad.

As a member of a small team and working under the direction of the Executive Director, the Atlas Corps Fellow will have a working and learning experience with USICD. The Fellow will provide integral support to the administrative and programmatic functions of the organization, to include:

• Assisting the Executive Director with various administrative tasks related to operating a U.S.-based nonprofit organization
• Assisting the program management staff in implementing various USICD initiatives in the areas of CRPD education and global disability rights information dissemination
• Supporting the Board of Directors’ activities through communications and logistic planning
• Respond to the inquiries of USICD members and constituents for information and disseminating announcements via electronic and print mailings
• Uploading content to the USICD website
• And developing their own portfolio of projects, presentations, and global network building unique to their role as an Atlas Corps Fellow with USICD, under the guidance and advice of the Executive Director.

Qualifications Summary:

USICD seeks a dynamic, energetic individual who:
• Understands disability as a human rights issue, beyond the more traditional charity or medical models
• Has at least basic awareness of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities treaty -OR- the universal human rights framework in general
• Has some first-hand experience in the disability community, as a family member, advocate, or self-identified person with a disability
• Has developed skills speaking, presenting/teaching, and writing in English
• Has strong computer and internet use skills; experience with web publishing or content management a plus
• Some experience in nonprofit or civil society/NGO administration
A commitment to the advancement of people with disabilities and knowledge of disability cultures in the United States and internationally are desirable. First-hand experience with disability preferred.



Interested applicants will please note that this blog site, We Can Do, is NOT the appropriate conduit for applying for this fellowship opportunity. Instead, people who wish to apply are requested to contact Atlas Corps directly, as instructed in the announcement above. You may apply via the Atlas Corps website at http://www.atlascorps.org/. At the Atlas Corps website, click on the button that says “Apply here.” Then on the next screen, click “Apply to United States.” Follow the instructions provided on that page. Thank you and good luck in your endeavors.

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JOB POST: Spanish-speaking Grants Consultant, Disability Rights Fund, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Posted on 23 January 2010. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund seeks Spanish-Speaking Grants Consultant

Application Deadline: February 15, 2010

About the consultancy

This consultancy position offers a unique opportunity to collaborate with a groundbreaking grantmaking initiative supporting the rights of persons with disabilities. For an interim period (mid-April – mid-September 2010), on a part-time basis, the Grants Consultant will help the Fund manage relationships with its grantees in Latin America. The main objectives of the position are to support DRF staff with grantee communications and oversight and to review and evaluate Spanish-language grant applications. The Fund is looking for a candidate who is able to work in a fast-paced environment, is flexible, takes initiative, and is independent, but team-oriented.

Astrong>About the Disability Rights Fund
Launched in January of 2008 as a project of the Tides Center, the Disability Rights Fund is a grantmaking collaborative aimed at building community capacity to achieve the rights of all persons with disabilities. The Fund makes modest grants (USD $5000-70,000) to Disabled Persons’ Organizations in the Global South and in Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union for advancing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) at country-level.

About the DRF Grants Process
In 2010, the Fund will launch its second year of grantmaking to organizations in Mexico and its third year of grantmaking to organizations in Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru (as well as in 20 other countries around the world; in Africa, Ghana, Namibia and Uganda; in Asia, Bangladesh and India; and 14 Pacific Island Countries). A request for proposals for Mexico will be posted February 15; the deadline for applications is in April. A request for proposals for Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru will be posted July 8; the deadline for applications is in late August. Grant applications are evaluated in a staged process, with the consultant and DRF staff completing a first and second review and preparing dockets for a third review by the DRF Steering Committee.

Current grantees from Ecuador, Nicaragua, and Peru (who began projects January 1 2010) will be submitting grant mid-term reports in end June 2010. The consultant will aid DRF staff in review of these reports and communications with grantees about their project implementation. The consultant will also aid in communication with current grantees from Mexico (who began projects September 1, 2009).

Consultant Responsibilities

· Interface with DRF staff and current LAC grantees to ensure that projects are progressing smoothly.
· Support DRF staff in LAC grantee mid-term report review and communications with grantees about reports.
· Conduct grants review, evaluation and tracking process for LAC applicants, in conjunction with DRF staff.
· Serve as liaison between DRF and Spanish-speaking prospective grantees to help translate emails, answer questions, complete application paperwork, and build relationships.

Skills and qualifications

The ideal candidate should demonstrate:
· Grantmaking or grantseeking experience preferred
· Professional written and verbal translation skills Spanish to English and English to Spanish
· Strong administrative and organizational skills; the ability to manage time efficiently
· Computer proficiency (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint)
· Demonstrated ability to work well with diverse populations from around the world
· Familiarity with the Latin American community of DPOs and the CRPD preferred
· Bachelors degree, or equivalent with minimum 5 years of relevant experience; advanced degree desired

Compensation
Commensurate with experience.

Time Commitment
Mid-April – Mid-September 2010, 5-40 hours per week (average 15)

How to apply
Disability Rights Fund, a Project of the Tides Center, is an equal opportunity employer. We strongly encourage and seek applications from women, and people of color, including bilingual and bicultural individuals, as well as members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender communities. People with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Please email or mail a cover letter, resume, three references (with contact information and relationship), writing sample (five page maximum) to:

Disability Rights Fund
Diana Samarasan, Director
Third Sector New England’s NonProfit Center
89 South Street, Suite 203
Boston, MA 02111-2670
dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org (please no phone calls)
Fax: (617) 261-1977

Deadline: Applications must be received by February 15, 2010.

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITY for Human Rights Projects by Disabled People Organizations (DPOs)

Posted on 15 July 2009. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund Releases Second 2009 Request for Proposals, Extending Another Year of Grantmaking to Existing Target Countries and Opening Grantmaking to the Pacific
July 15, 2009
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF)—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced the second round of its 2009 grantmaking, “Raising Our Voice.” The application deadline is September 15, 2009. This round opens another year of possible funding to disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in: Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; and Bangladesh and adds an additional region to the Fund’s reach – the Pacific. In the Pacific, 14 island countries are targeted: Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

The broad objective of the Fund[1]—which was officially launched in March 2008—is to empower DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).

In 2008, the Fund made one-year grants to 33 organizations in 7 countries (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; Bangladesh), totaling USD 800,000. Grants ranged from USD 5000 – 50,000 and supported CRPD awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

In the second round of 2009 grantmaking, applicant organizations may apply within one of two categories: a) single organizations or partnerships and b) national DPO coalitions. Grants to single organizations will range from USD 5,000 to 30,000 and support efforts to build voice and visibility and to develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. Grants to national DPO coalitions will range from USD 30,000 to 70,000 and will support advocacy toward ratification of the CRPD, passage of specific legislation to accord with the CRPD, or the production of shadow reports.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by August 15. The deadline for applications is September 15, 2009.
DRF’s donors include the Aepoch Fund, the American Jewish World Service, an anonymous founding donor, the Australian Government’s International Development Assistance Agency – AusAID, the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development.

####

[1] The Disability Rights Fund is a project of Tides.



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this announcement to We Can Do.

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITY for Research on Accessibility of US-Funded Overseas Programs

Posted on 12 June 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Funding, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

NCD Announces Funding (Research) Opportunity
On May 13, the National Council on Disability in the US announced a Notice of Funding Opportunity (NCD-09-02) for a cooperative agreement to study “The Accessibility of U.S.-funded Overseas Facilities and Programs.”

NCD is interested in examining and understanding the responsibilities of U.S.-funded overseas facilities and programs, both public and private. NCD is seeking applicants to research and develop an NCD report with the following three components: 1) An analysis/examination of international law, to determine how U.S.-funded international development organizations will be required to comply with Article 32 of the Convention in those countries which have ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and 2) an empirical follow-up to NCD’s 2003 report on how USAID is implementing its own disability policy overseas and its impact thus far, along with its compliance with Sections 501, 503, and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act in its overseas operations. The report should review whether these protections against discrimination are being implemented by government employees and contractors working abroad, and will examine whether U.S.-funded programs are being operated in a manner that is accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities; and 3) evaluate progress on NCD’s recommendations regarding the accessibility of U.S. embassies and missions, as well as Department of Defense (DoD)-funded programs and facilities.

The deadline for received full proposals is 5:00 p.m. EDT on July 1, 2009.

For additional information, please contact Joan Durocher at 202-272-2117 or jdurocher@ncd.gov.



This announcement received via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list.

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JOB POST: Program Officer, Disability Rights Fund

Posted on 5 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund seeks Program Officer

About the position
The Program Officer position offers a unique opportunity to join a groundbreaking grantmaking initiative supporting the rights of persons with disabilities. As a member of a small team, the Program Officer will help shape the Fund as it matures and incorporates the best strategies in funding disability rights in the Global South and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union. The main objective of the position is to work with other Fund staff in the creation of grants strategy and process and the oversight of grantees. To do this work, the Program Officer will build field contacts and partnerships and work with grantees in the field. Other program and administrative responsibilities related to both grantmaking and the general operations of the Fund are also foreseen. The Fund is looking for a candidate who is able to work in a fast-paced environment, is flexible, takes initiative, and is independent, but team-oriented. This position is not necessarily Boston-based.

About the Disability Rights Fund
Launched in March of 2008 as a project of the Tides Center, the Disability Rights Fund is a grantmaking collaborative aimed at building community capacity to achieve the rights of all persons with disabilities. The Fund makes modest grants (USD $5000-70,000) to Disabled Persons’ Organizations in the Global South and in Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union for advancing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) at country-level.

Program Officer responsibilities
· Help design a grants proposal process that is accessible to people with disabilities
· Serve as liaison to grantees and prospective grantees
· Working closely with Tides, administer and manage grants(e.g., grant award and declination letters, disbursements, report tracking, grant files)
· Together with the DRF team, evaluate grant proposals, conduct financial and critical analysis of applicant organizations
· Provide technical aid to grantees during grants application and implementation
· Prepare concise written analyses of grant proposals and funding recommendations for Steering Committee comprised of field advisors and donors
· Arrange and conduct site visits and meetings with grantees
· Provide organizational effectiveness assistance to grantees or recommend helpful resources as appropriate
· Evaluate and monitor the impact of grants; review and analyze grantee reports
· Develop professional relationships within the field of disability rights to inform the grantmaking of the Fund; keep abreast of trends within the field of disability rights
· Collaborate with DRF team, Global Advisory Panel and Steering Committee to develop and refine grantmaking strategies
· Assist with the day-to-day operations of the Fund as needed
Skills and qualifications

The ideal candidate should demonstrate:
· Passion and commitment to advancing the human rights of people with disabilities
· Familiarity with the community of DPOs and the CRPD (particularly in the Asia Pacific region)
· Grantmaking or grantseeking experience (or relevant nonprofit experience)
· Experience supporting capacity development within civil society
· Demonstrated ability to work well with diverse populations from around the world
· Excellent written and verbal communication skills in English. Other language proficiencies a plus
· Strong administrative and organizational skills; the ability to manage time efficiently
· Computer proficiency (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint); willingness to learn additional applications (and accessible technology) as necessary
· Bachelors degree, or equivalent with minimum 5 years of relevant experience; advanced degree desired
· Ability to travel independently in developing countries
· Ability to combine the roles of objective evaluator and empathetic observer

Compensation
Salary and benefits negotiable, based on experience.

How to apply
Disability Rights Fund, a Project of the Tides Center, is an equal opportunity employer. We strongly encourage and seek applications from women, and people of color, including bilingual and bicultural individuals, as well as members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender communities, and people of other (non-U.S.) nationalities. People with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Please email or mail a cover letter, resume, three references (with contact information and relationship), writing sample (five page maximum) to:

Disability Rights Fund
Diana Samarasan, Director
Third Sector New England’s NonProfit Center
89 South Street, Suite 203
Boston, MA 02111-2670
dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org (please no phone calls)
Fax: (215) 261-4593

Deadline: Applications must be received by August 1, 2009.



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for submitting this announcement for publication at the We Can Do blog.

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Report: Pacific Sisters with Disabilities at the Intersection of Discrimination

Posted on 4 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Employment, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Policy & Legislation, Rehabilitation, Reports, Resources, signed languages, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , |

Both people with disabilities and also women experience discrimination in countries around the world, including within the Pacific region. Women with disabilities experience a double dose of discrimination. A newly released report, entitled Pacific Sisters with Disabilities: at the Intersection of Discrimination (PDF format, 981 Kb), reviews the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. It includes discussion on the challenges of discrimination against women with disabilities; laws among Pacific Island governments; and policies and programs within disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), women’s organizations, and mainstream international development partners. The report concludes with recommendations for improving the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. This April 2009 report, by authors Daniel Stubbs and Sainimili Tawake, covers the situation of 22 Pacific countries and territories. It was published by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Pacific Center.

The research leading to this report found that a few helpful laws, policies, and systems of practice do exist in some countries. However, disabled women do still tend to fare more poorly compared to disabled men or compared to non-disabled women. Specifically, they are often less educated, experience more unemployment, face more violence and abuse, encounter more poverty, are more isolated, have less access to health care, and have lower social status. Women with disabilities also have less access to information about education, health care, their reproductive rights, recreation, politics, or even the weather.

Unfortunately, very limited documentation on the situation of women with disabilities exist in any region, including the Pacific. This report relies partly on extrapolation from what is known about women with disabilities in other regions. This information is supplemented, where possible, with local data, statistics, anecdotes, and other information specific to disabled women in the Pacific.

The full 90-page report can be downloaded for free, in PDF format (981 Kb) at: http://www.undppc.org.fj/_resources/article/files/Final%20PSWD%20BOOKLET.pdf.



I learned about this report via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development email discussion list.

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NEWS: Manila Declaration, Asia Pacific Conference on Disability Rights Treaty

Posted on 1 June 2009. Filed under: East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights, News, Opinion | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

IDA – Asia Pacific Regional Conference on the CRPD Implementation and Monitoring

MANILA DECLARATION

February 11-12th, 2009

We, the delegates from The Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Nepal, India, Samoa, Fiji, and Republic of Korea being members of Disabled Peoples’ International, Inclusion International, International Federation of Hard of Hearing People, Rehabilitation International, World Blind Union, World Federation of the Deaf, World Federation of the DeafBlind, World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry, and Asia Pacific Disability Forum, all of which are members of International Disability Alliance (IDA) and participated in Asia Pacific Regional Conference on the CRPD Implementation and Monitoring, held at Manila, The Philippines on February 11-12, 2009,

We acknowledge the support of the Government of The Philippines, Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA), and Katipunan ng Maykapansanan sa Pilipinas, Inc (KAMPI) for this Conference.

After due deliberation and having reached consensus on the implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD) we make the following Declaration which shall be hereby referred to as the Manila Declaration 2009

GOVERNMENT
• We urge National Governments in the Asia and Pacific Region, to set the machinery in motion to ensure the signing, ratification without reservation, implementation and monitoring of the UN CRPD and the Optional Protocol;
• We further demand that the governments enact new legislation or amend existing legislation for Persons with Disabilities and related statutes to be in conformity with UN CRPD;

• We urge Public Authorities to change from a charity-based to a rights–based approach and from medical model to social model on disability as required by the UN CRPD;

• We ask all governments to initiate disability sensitization programs and to mainstream disability issues in all national agendas for the empowerment of persons with disabilities ;

• We recognize the vulnerability of all persons with disabilities with HIV/AIDS and we therefore request National Governments to address this urgent issue;

• We urge the Governments to include Children, Women and Youth with disabilities in all education and training programmes;

• We demand that Persons with Disabilities be represented through their representative organizations in law and policy making at all levels as required by Article 4 of UN CRPD;

• We recognize the positive role of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the lives of Persons with Disabilities. We therefore urge the Governments to facilitate the acquisition of ICT equipments;

• We appeal for the enactment of Disability Anti Discrimination Acts in our respective Countries;

• We seek the full participation of Persons with Disabilities in the Asia-Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons (2003-2012) in order to promote the accession, implementation and monitoring of UN CRPD;

HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION
We urge National Human Rights Institutions to include CRPD in their Plans and Strategies and constitute a Committee or Focal point to address Disability issues.

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES
We urge International Development Funding Agencies to include Disability Dimension in all their policies and programs;

We urge International Development Funding Agencies to modify the requirements in the Agreements so as to enable DPOs to access the technical and financial support;

MASS MEDIA
We urge Mass Media to promote positive images of Rights and Concerns of Persons with Disabilities.

NOTHING ABOUT US WITHOUT US



We Can Do received this declaration via several different sources; among them was the mailing list for the Global Partnership on Disability and Development.

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NEWS: Violence Against Disabled Denounced by Albanian Disability Rights Foundation (English and në gjuhën shqipe)

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Blind, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

në gjuhën shqipe

Tirana, May 22nd, 2009
PRESS RELEASE

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation denounces the violence towards people with disability

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation (ADRF), through this declaration expresses the indignation on the violence exercised on May 21st, 2009 during the peaceful protest organized by blind people in front of the Government Building.

ADRF, expresses its concern for the violence of integrity and dignity of blind people, an action that was done in presence of staff of authorities responsible to guarantee the order and security of the Albanian citizens. Such acts, confirm once again the multiple discrimination and human rights violation faced by people with disability especially women with disability in Albania.

ADRF strongly denounces the act of violence and demand from the Albanian Government to take all measures to punish the person conducting this act and requires compensation to the person to whom violence was exercised.

ADRF makes an appeal to the Albanian Government to undertake in the future concrete measures that aim to eliminate discriminatory situations, to guarantee observance of human rights to all categories of people with disability on equal bases to all Albanian citizens.

ADRF
www.adrf.org.al
Tel: (04) 2269426
Rr: “Bogdani” (ish-A.Z.Çajupi) Pall. 15 Kt i 3, Tirane, Albania

Tiranë më 22.05.2009
DEKLARATE PËR SHTYP

FSHDPAK dënon dhunën e ushtruar ndaj Personave me aftësi të kufizuara në shikim

Fondacioni Shqiptar për të Drejtat e Personave me Aftësi të Kufizuara (FSHDPAK), me anë të kësaj deklarate shpreh indinjatën e thellë për dhunën e ushtruar në datë 21.05.2009, gjatë protestës së organizuar nga personat me aftësi të kufizuar në shikim, përpara selisë së Këshillit të Ministrave.

FSHDPAK, shpreh shqetësimin për cënimin e integritetit dhe dinjitetit të kategorisë të personave me aftësi të kufizuar në shikim, ndodhur për më tepër në prani të organeve të mbrojtjes së rendit dhe sigurisë të shtetasve Shqiptarë. Akte të tilla konfirmojnë edhe njëhërë diskriminimin e shumfishtë dhe shkeljen e të drejtave themelore të njeriut ndaj personave me aftësi të kufizuara dhe në mënyrë të veçantë ndaj grave me aftësi të kufizuara.

FSHDPAK, dënon me forcë aktin e dhunshëm dhe kërkon nga Qeveria Shqiptare marrjen e të gjitha masave për dënimin e dhunuesit dhe dëmshpërblimin e personit ndaj të cilit u ushtrua dhunë.

FSHDPAK, gjithashtu, kërkon të tërheqë vëmendjen e qeverisë Shqiptare për ndërrmarjen në të ardhmen të masave konkrete me synim eleminimin e situatave të tilla diskriminuese, garantimin dhe respektimin e të të drejtave themelore të njeriut për të gjitha kategoritë e personave me aftësi të kufizuar, si pjesë e rëndësishme në shoqërinë Shqiptare.

FSHDPAK
www.adrf.org.al
Tel: (04) 2269426
Rr: “Bogdani” (ish-A.Z.Çajupi) Pall. 15 Kt i 3, Tirane, Shqiperi



We Can Do received this press release via the Asia Pacific Disability email discussion group.

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Tirana, May 22nd, 2009

PRESS RELEASE

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation denounces the violence towards people with disability

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation (ADRF), through this declaration expresses the indignation on the violence exercised on May 21st, 2009 during the peaceful protest organized by blind people in front of the Government Building.

ADRF, expresses its concern for the violence of integrity and dignity of blind people, an action that was done in presence of staff of authorities responsible to guarantee the order and security of the Albanian citizens. Such acts, confirm once again the multiple discrimination and human rights violation faced by people with disability especially women with disability in Albania.

ADRF strongly denounces the act of violence and demand from the Albanian Government to take all measures to punish the person conducting this act and requires compensation to the person to whom violence was exercised.

ADRF makes an appeal to the Albanian Government to undertake in the future concrete measures that aim to eliminate discriminatory situations, to guarantee observance of human rights to all categories of people with disability on equal bases to all Albanian citizens.

ADRF

http://www.adrf.org.al
Tel: (04) 2269426
Rr: “Bogdani” (ish-A.Z.Çajupi) Pall. 15 Kt i 3, Tirane, Albania

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Call for Disabled Role Models in Asian Region for Brochure

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Comments or Information, Call for Nominations or Applications, East Asia Pacific Region, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

by Aiko Akiyama

Please note that the deadline to submit pictures and bios is May 31, 2009.

Dear colleagues,

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the
Pacific (ESCAP) is putting together a brochure entitled, “Agents of
Change,” to promote the social model of disability and explain the changes that will need to be made to meet the requirements of Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action, which is the regional policy guideline on disability. As a part of the brochure, we would like to have pictures and messages of mentors with disabilities from the region as they themselves are agents of change.

We would like to ask for your collaboration in this endeavor. We would likes to have active thematic photos of persons with different impairments in the region, who work in certain professions as well as a
caption or a statement about how you see “disability” and a message to
younger generations of persons with impairments in the region.

Thus far, we have a picture and a message of a deaf pharmacist from
Japan, are also waiting for a picture of a blind architect from the
Philippines and another picture from Kyrgyzstan. We are also planning on
shooting a picture of a pizza baker, inT hailand, who is physically
disabled. We would like to have pictures of a person with intellectual
disability, a picture of a person who is a survivor of psychiatry, a
picture of deaf blind person all of whom are working in certain professions which they are proud of. Moreover, we would like to particularly welcome pictures from South Asia and the Pacific.

Time is of the essence and we would appreciate your urgent attention
to this request. We would appreciate if you can e-mail us pictures (sharper images are appreciated) towards the end of this month 31 May 2009. The
brochure is in draft form at the moment and you contributions would help us finalize it. Before the brochure final draft goes out to the printer, a copy will be circulated for those who are interested for peer review. Let me know if you are interested in that process.

Please send us pictures and messages to Mr Osama Rajkhan (rajkhan.unescap@un.org) and Aiko Akiyama (akiyama@un.org).

I look forward to hear from you soon and best regards.

Aiko Akiyama
Social Affairs Officer
Social Development Division (SDD)
UNESCAP
THAILAND
Email: akiyama@un.org
http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/disability/index.asp



I received this announcement from Aiko Akiyama via the AsiaPacificDisability listserver. Please note that all inquiries, pictures, and bios should please be directed to Mr Osama Rajkhan (rajkhan.unescap@un.org) and Aiko Akiyama (akiyama@un.org), NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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Challenges Implementing Disability Rights Treaty?

Posted on 17 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Human Rights, Networking Opportunities, Opinion, Psychiatric Disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Abdul-Jeff Maalik Makana, the Executive Director of MindFreedom Kenya, wants to learn more about the challenges that other countries experience in implementing the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Below is his appeal for information. Please respond directly to him at kenya@mindfreedom.org.

Dear All,

Greetings from non sunny Nairobi day today!

We have a challenge here in Kenya advocating for the implementation of the UN CRPD. Are other states experiencing similar challenges? What are the challenges?

I recently on a media appearence to create awareness about the work of MindFreedom Kenya & advocating for the implementation of the UN CRPD… one caller to the show reinforced the general view that persons with psychosocial disabilities have no capacity at any time to make decision (Legal capacity) though the UN CRPD guarantees legal capacity(article 12) or even supported decision making.

To quote Daniel Hazen—Human Rights and Advocacy “cease the practice of exceptionalism when it comes to human rights” meaning we cannot downplay the CRPD which is a very important rallying point for our movement.

Mental Health (MH) policies cannot be written in a vacuum…. State parties and other stakeholders should get direction that adopting certain articles of the CRPD versus the CRPD in its entirety has far reaching consequences more so article 12 (right to legal capacity) a big part of the user/survivor movement advocacy.

Lastly, why was the term psychosocial disabled adopted in the UN CRPD versus the term mentally disabled or mentally ill? Here in Africa many don’t see mental illness as a disability? Can you please help me understand how to advocate better for psychosocial disabled term to be adopted and accepted locally.

What are your views:

I am doing a Survey on supporting signing/ratification and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities by state parties without reservations.

This obligation would require that the States both refrain from actions that undermine the principles and initiate efforts which would promote them. You can also e-mail your comments directly to kenya@mindfreedom.org
Question:

As a user, a survivor. mental health worker, or human rights activist in mental health do you support the position that the CRPD is non negotiable, and that the nature of this commitment obligates state parties to completely review MH policies and legislation which relied on flawed WHO MI Principles? *

http://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=cnR3dTlrTGFGRjFXY3g2YWhvTUJESUE6MA..

A few sampling of responses collected regarding the above question:

This obligation would require that the States both refrain from actions that undermine the principles and initiate efforts which would promote them.(MH Policy, legislation’s, new MH laws, civic education, more access to mental services at the community level, empowering of persons with psychosocial disabilities to participate equally in society without being discriminated based on disabilities).

Absolutely I support it!! Recently there have been reports that they are opening “behavioral” units in nursing homes in New York State–a way to lock us up again quietly so there won’t be too many complaints. Fortunately we noticed and… Read More now there’s a lawsuit. Good thing so many of us “suffer” from hypervigelance!! Anyway, so good to see that we’re coming together internationally. We can and will find our power no matter how hard the system tried to hold us down.

I am not sure that I can ask for the UN treaty to become nationalized, but I do agree with many of the tenets. I think that I can see where some conflicts of interest might be involved. So better person by person, not this group or that. That is what I think….

With kind regards,

Abdul-Jeff Maalik Makana

__________________________________
Abdul Maalik bin Ali formerly,
Jeff Makana

Executive Director,
MindFreedom Kenya(MF-K)
E-mail:kenya@mindfreedom.org
website: http://www.mindfreedomkenya.interconnection.org
Follow me on twitter@ www.twitter.com/Jeffmakana



Thank you to Abdul Maalik bin Ali for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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Training Opportunity: Disability and Development Module, November 23 to December 19, 2009, VU University, Netherlands

Posted on 23 April 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Education and Training Opportunities, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Opportunities, Poverty, Rehabilitation, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability and Development Module at the VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Athena Institute, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University (Amsterdam), together with Enablement (Alphen aan den Rijn) and the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT, Amsterdam) are pleased to announce a 4-week module on Disability and Development to be held from November 23th to December 19th 2009 at the VU University. This course, a 4-week elective module, which is part of an academic Master degree programme, is open to external participants also. Students will learn in a highly participatory environment built around a problem-based learning approach. Lecturers have extensive international experience in disability and related fields. An overview of the course content can be found on the VU website: http://studiegids.vu.nl/ (type ‘disability’ as search term). The course was offered for the first time in 2008 and was very positively evaluated by the first batch of students.

The following topics will be covered in Module I:
Disability models and stereotypes, culture and disability, ICF conceptual framework, experience of having a disability, frequencies and distribution of disability, determinants of disability, including stigma and discrimination, poverty, gender and HIV/AIDS, rights of persons with disabilities, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, measurement of disability, disability-relevant research methods, survey methods, examples of disability research and an introduction to community-based rehabilitation.

In 2010, a second elective module will be offered on the subject of Disability & Development. This module will have the same duration as Module I

Module II will cover the following additional topics:
Project planning and management, monitoring and evaluation of community-based rehabilitation (CBR) programmes, management information systems, CBR as a preferred strategy for rehabilitation, organisational and institutional development, Disabled People’s Organisations, educational and economic empowerment of disabled people, the role of specific rehabilitation services, and sports and disability.

Interested candidates should apply well in advance and contact Huib Cornielje as soon as possible.

TARGET GROUP: rehabilitation professionals and professionals with an interest in disability and development.

REQUIREMENTS: good comprehension of the English language; bachelor degree or equivalent (in terms of experience and thinking capacity)

COURSE FEES: Euro 1,000 (excluding board & lodging); students who wish to gain official study credits (ETCS) will have to register as external students at the VU University. This will cost an additional €1,200 for 4 weeks, approximately.

DATES: November 23 to December 18, 2009

FURTHER INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED FROM:

Huib Cornielje
Langenhorst 36
2402PX Alphen aan den Rijn
The Netherlands
Tel: 0031-172-436953
Fax: 0031-172-244976
E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl



Thank you to Huib Cornielje for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do. All inquiries about this training opportunity should please be directed to Huib Cornielje at h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT to We Can Do. Thanks.

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Grassroots Advocacy Leadership Training for International Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals, June 28-July 5, 2009, USA

Posted on 10 March 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

by Simon Guteng

Subject: Grassroots Advocacy Leadership Training for International Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals

It is with much pleasure and enthusiasm that I [Simon Guteng] announce our summer 2009 international leadership training program titled “Grassroots Advocacy Leadership Training for International Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals”, June 28-July 5, 2009.

Committed to improving the quality of personal and professional lives of deaf and hard of hearing individuals, the Gallaudet Leadership Institute and Professional Studies (GLIPS), a unit of the College of Professional Studies and Outreach at Gallaudet University, in collaboration with the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) ensures and assures the following program experiences and outcomes for participants:

1. Thorough understanding of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)

2. Preparation for working at national level leadership positions

3. Skills to organize grassroots level deaf people into dynamic and productive groups

4. Hands-on training in strategic planning and goal setting

5. Knowledge of leadership styles and identification of one’s own strengths

6. Improvement in human relations skills

7. Enhanced knowledge about emotional intelligence and its uses

8. Certificate of attendance and participation

Participation cost per participant is $910. This cost covers program/registration fee, room, and meal.
It DOES NOT include or cover your airfare, ground transportation within and outside of United States, emergency medical/travel insurance, and pocket money.

The World Federation of Deaf (WFD) will dispatch an announcement letter on the leadership training to all National Associations of the Deaf around the world through their Headquarters. You should anticipate this letter of announcement from WFD. Meanwhile, feel free to use this email letter as a valid and legitimate letter to source funds.

For registration, please visit www.regonline.com/grassroots_advocacy.

I look forward to the participation of many deaf leaders from around the world.

Sincerely,
Simon I. Guteng

Simon I. Guteng, Ph.D.
Director
Gallaudet Leadership Institute and Professional Studies
College of Professional Studies and Outreach
Gallaudet University
Hall Memorial Building Room E111A
800 Florida Avenue, NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 250-2130 Voice & Video Phone
1-866-381-8410 Toll Free: Voice & Video Phone
(202) 448-7191 Fax



Simon Guteng’s announcement was recently circulated on the Intl-Dev email news distribution service.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24

Posted on 4 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, accessibility, Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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NEWS: US Secretary of State Clinton on International Disability Rights

Posted on 25 February 2009. Filed under: Human Rights, News, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This was from a State Department town hall meeting on February 4, see: http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2009a/02/116022.htm)

QUESTION: Good afternoon, Madame Secretary. It’s an honor to be working under your leadership, and I look forward to the challenges that you present. My name is Stephanie Ortoleva. I work in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

I basically wanted to ask you a question about what do you think can be the role that we can play, which you’ve illuminated – you’ve given us a little bit of illumination on that – but also what role can our colleagues who work in women’s rights organizations and disability rights organizations, what role can those colleagues play in supporting you in your efforts to advance the rights of women and the rights of people with disabilities as part of an integral part of United States foreign policy?

SECRETARY CLINTON: That’s a wonderful question. I thank you for it. You know, I think it was 1997, I came to this auditorium, the Dean Acheson Auditorium, with Madeleine Albright, who was Secretary of State, and addressed a large crowd like this about the commitment that the Clinton Administration had to including women as an integral part of foreign policy, not as an afterthought, not as an adjunct, but in recognition of the fact that we know from a myriad of studies and research that the role of women is directly related to democracy and human rights. And I feel similarly about people with disabilities.
It’s important to recognize that expanding the circle of opportunity and increasing the democratic potential of our own society, as well as those across the world, is a continuing process of inclusion. And I look forward to working on behalf of the rights of women and people with disabilities, and others as well, as we pursue our foreign policy. Because I think it sends a clear message about who we are as a people, the evolution that we have undergone.

I remember as First Lady traveling to many countries that had no recognition of the rights of people with disabilities. They were literally warehoused, often in the most horrific conditions. There were no laws. There were no requirements for education or access. And it struck me then and – we’ve made some progress, but insufficient. It certainly is part of my feeling now that we have to always be hoping and working toward greater inclusion as a key part of what our values are and what we believe democracy represents. So I’m going to look to working with those of you in the Department and at USAID and with our allies and friends outside who have carried on this work over the years. And you can count on my commitment to you on that.



I first received this quote via Joan Durocher.

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FUNDS For Humanitarian Programs Helping People Affected by Slavery

Posted on 23 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Funding, Health, Human Rights, Opportunities, Slavery & Trafficking, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Subject: Call for application: Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery; Appel à candidature: Fonds de contributions volontaires sur les formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

English; French

[Note to We Can Do readers: Organizations serving people with disabilities who have been affected by human trafficking, sexual slavery, child labor, forced marriage, or other forms of contemporary slavery may wish to consider this opportunity to devise an appropriate project targeted at, or incorporating, their needs. This fund is not specifically devised for people with disabilities, but grant seekers could argue for their need.]

Dear colleagues,

The United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery allocates project grants (for a maximum of 15 000 USD), for programmes of humanitarian, legal and financial assistance to individuals whose human rights have been severely violated as a result of contemporary forms of slavery.

Contemporary forms of slavery include trafficking, sexual slavery, child labour and child servitude, debt bondage, serfdom and forced labour, forced marriage and sale of wives ect.

Projects undertaken with previous Trust Fund grants include medical and psychological aid, food, shelter, and vocational training to victims of trafficking for sexual and economic exploitation; support to rehabilitation centres for sexually and physically abused street children and a project to identify and release bonded labourers in the carpet industry and stone quarries. Other projects have provided victims with the means to generate sustainable sources of income, such as sewing machines, hairdressing equipment, or farming tools.

Please consult the official web site to download the application form in English, French, or Spanish. Application forms should be duly completed and submitted by 31 March 2009.

If you need more information on the Fund, you can consult the website of the OHCHR: http://www2.ohchr.org/English/about/funds/slavery/index.htm.
You can also contact the OHCHR at MClerc@ohchr.org.

You are more than welcome to disseminate this message to oganisations working with victims of comtemporary forms of slavery.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French

*********************************************************************************************

Chers collègues,

Le Fond de contributions volontaires des Nations Unies pour la lutte contre les formes contemporaines d’esclavage octroi des subventions (pour un maximum de 15 000 dollars des Etats-Unis) aux projets fournissant une aide humanitaire, juridique et financière aux personnes dont les droits de l’homme ont été gravement violés par des formes contemporaines d’esclavage. Les formes contemporaines d’esclavage sont le trafic d’êtres humains, l’esclavage sexuel, le travail des enfants et la servitude des enfants, la servitude pour dettes, le servage, le travail forcé, les marriages forcés et la vente d’épouses ect.

Veuillez trouver ci-dessous le formulaire de demande de subvention en anglais, francais et espagnol. Les formulaires de demande doivent être complétés et soumis avant le 31 Mars 2009. Les projets financés par le passé grâce aux subventions du Fonds, ont pas exemple, permis aux victimes de la traite des êtres humains à des fins sexuelles et commerciales, d’obtenir de l’aide relative aux soins médicaux et psychologiques, à la nourriture, au logement et à la formation professionnelle. Ils ont permis aux enfants des rues abusés sexuellement et physiquement de bénéficier de soutien dans des centres de réhabilitation. Ils ont également permis d’apporter de l’aide à l’identification et à la libération des travailleurs en servitude pour dettes employés à la fabrication des tapis et dans les carrières de pierre. D’autres projets ont permis aux victimes d’obtenir les moyens de générer des sources de revenus durables comme l’achat de machines à coudre, équipements de coiffure et des outils agricoles.

Si vous avez besoin de plus d’information sur le Fond, vous pouvez consulter le site internet du HCDH: http://www2.ohchr.org/french/about/funds/slavery/index.htm Vous pouvez aussi nous contacter en répondant à MClerc@ohchr.org.

N’hésitez pas à diffuser ce message aux organisations travaillants avec les victimes des formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserver.

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US-Costa Rica Summer Exchange Program, June 26-July 10, 2009, Scholarships

Posted on 23 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Now Accepting Applications
Deadline: March 20, 2009
for the Costa Rica Program this Summer!

Live with a host family
Learn Spanish through immersion
Learn about disability rights and leadership
Go Abroad with Mobility International USA
June 26 to July 10, 2009
Generous Scholarships Available!
Applications available online now
First time travelers with disabilities who are between 18-24 years old, from cultural minority and low-income backgrounds are encouraged to apply. ASL staff interpreters and materials in alternative formats will be provided. Funding for personal assistants may also be available.
For more information:
apply@miusa.org
or
541-343-1284 (tel/tty)

http://www.miusa.org

The 2009 US/Costa Rica: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Disability Rights Leadership Exchange Program is funded by the New York Community Trust DeWitt Wallace/Youth Travel Enrichment Fund and administered by Mobility International USA to provide an educational travel opportunity to youth with disabilities from diverse communities.

Forward this email to a friend.

Mobility International USA, a non-profit organization founded in 1981, empowers people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development.

The MIUSA mailing address is:
Mobility International USA 132 E. Broadway Suite 343 Eugene, Oregon 97401, USA

MIUSA’s telephone:
541-343-1284 tel/tty

Please consult the official website on the US/Costa Rica program for further details, and to apply. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to MIUSA, NOT We Can Do. The official web site is at:

http://www.miusa.org/exchange/costarica09/index_html



I received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email news distribution service.

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NEWS: Bulgarians with Mental Disabilities Suffer Inhumane Treatment

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Cognitive Impairments, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Geneva, 3 December 2008

On the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT), the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee (BHC) and the Mental Disability Advocacy Center (MDAC) come together to express their serious concern over the situation of persons with mental disabilities, one of the most marginalised and discriminated groups in Bulgarian society.

In a series of letters to members of the Bulgarian Parliament and Government, officials and elected representatives in the European Union, and the United Nations Special Procedures mandate holders, the three organisations underline that persons with mental disabilities in Bulgaria, “frequently face social exclusion and severe human rights violations, including violence and ill-treatment”, and express their concern that, “[i]nadequate legislation together with entrenched institutional policies and practices also compromise their socio-economic well-being, as well as that of their families”.

Regardless of the skills and capabilities which persons with mental disabilities in Bulgaria possess, they are often deemed incompetent, deprived of their legal capacity and placed under guardianship. Bulgaria’s outdated legislation on deprivation of legal capacity removes a person’s right to make their own decisions and denies the exercise of their basic human rights, including the rights to marry, vote, work, take legal action and seek judicial remedies. Deprivation of a person’s legal capacity also impedes their rights to a fair trial, to own property and to respect for their personal and family life. In most cases, persons with mental disabilities who are placed under guardianship in Bulgaria are forced to live in large and remote residential institutions and to remain there for the rest of their lives. Once institutionalised, they are at risk of ill-treatment from staff and subjected to prison-like regimes. Indeed, living conditions in some of these institutions have been deemed to amount to inhuman and degrading treatment.

Please read the rest of this news release from the World Organization Against Torture at their web site by clicking on the following URL: http://www.omct.org/index.php?id=&lang=eng&actualPageNumber=1&articleId=8204&itemAdmin=article

I received this press release via several sources including the IDA_CRPD_Forum listserver; the AdHoc_IDC listserver; the RatifyNow organization’s listserver; and others. Only the first two paragraphs is quoted here. Please follow the link provided above to read the full story.

Note that “mental disabilities” is often used to refer to both people with intellectual disabilities and also people with psychosocial disabilities. Although these are very different disabilities, both populations in many countries are frequently locked up in the same institutions and may experience similar types of human rights violations.

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Intl Leadership Forum for Young Leaders, 1-9 August 2009

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Opportunities, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

International Leadership Forum Announcement – Call for Applications

[Note to We Can Do readers: This opportunity is not targeted at disability advocates, but young leaders with an interest in disability-related advocacy may wish to read the criteria below and consider whether their interests may usefully intersect.]

The UNESCO Chair & Institute of Comparative Human Rights at the University of Connecticut invites applications for the fifth annual International Leadership Programme: A Global Intergenerational Forum, to be held August 1 – 9, 2009 in Storrs, Connecticut, USA. Applications must be received by February 27, 2009.

The Forum seeks to empower young leaders by involving them in finding solutions to emerging human rights problems, and nurturing individuals to be effective leaders in the field of human rights.

To this end, the Forum will:

• Introduce participants to the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
• Build a network of solidarity among human rights leaders
• Expand the knowledge relevant to human rights practice
• Provide tools and a platform for open debates
• Provide programmes, activities and processes necessary for human rights leadership
• Promote the sharing of experiences and understanding
• Showcase speakers on such topics as: health and human rights, education, the environment, the plight of child soldiers, the use of media, fundraising, conflict resolution and transformation; litigation and advocacy

The UNESCO Chair will provide all conference participants with dormitory housing, meals, ground transportation in Connecticut, resource materials and a certificate of participation.

Young people between the ages of 18-30, with community service experience, and with demonstrated ability to work on solutions to human rights problems, should apply. Relevant issues include, but are not limited to, human trafficking, the plight of children, refugees, hunger, HIV/AIDs, gender discrimination, racism, classism, the environment and peace education.

Conference will be held in English only. Fluency in English is required. Applicants will be selected based on the strength of their application essay, demonstrated commitment to human rights (practical/hands-on experience), potential impact on the individual and their potential contribution to the Forum, regional and gender representation.

Programme details and application materials can be accessed by linking to www.unescochair.uconn.edu or http://www.unescochair.uconn.edu/upspecialevents.htm

Nana Amos
Program Manager
University of Connecticut
UNESCO Chair & Institute of Comparative Human Rights
UConn-ANC Partnership
233 Glenbrook Road, Unit 4124
Storrs, CT 06269-4124
860.486.3054 Phone
860.486.2545 Fax
www.unescochair.uconn.edu
–~–~———~–~—-~————~——-~–~—-~
Scholarship and Job are posted at
http://Cambodiajobs.blogspot.com



I received this announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability listserver. If you have inquiries about this opportunity or wish to apply for it, then please follow the relevant web links provided above and follow the instructions at the official web site. We Can Do is NOT able to assist you with your questions about this event–please contact the people organizing the forum directly. Thank you.

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Advanced Course, International Protection of Human Rights, 17-28 August 2009, Finland

Posted on 17 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , |

The 2009 Advanced Course on the International Protection of Human
Rights will be organized between 17 and 28 August, in Turku/Åbo,
Finland. Application deadline: 20 April 2009.

The course aims at providing a profound insight into, and analysis of, the system of international human rights protection in the light of contemporary problems and relevant case law. Students should have a law degree (or equivalent) and a good basic knowledge of human rights law. About 30 applicants will be accepted. The course fee, which includes lodging at the University’s guesthouse (dormitory standard), course materials, and two receptions, is EUR 1,300. The fee is EUR 1,000 for those who make their own housing arrangements.

Fore more information and application forms visit
http://www.abo.fi/instut/imr/courses.htm
Or else communicate with Ms. Johanna Bondas via email at courses.imr@abo.fi

[Note from We Can Do editor: In looking at the official web site for this advanced human rights course, I did not see any mention of specific disability content (for example, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities). Students with a specific interest in disability rights in developing countries may wish to communicate directly with Ms. Johanna Bondas via email at courses.imr@abo.fi to discuss more carefully whether the course will suit their needs. Students with disabilities also will wish to inquire with Ms. Johanna Bondas about what provisions the university has in place to accommodate their needs.]



I learned of this program via Joan Durocher, who obtained this announcement from Ms. Johanna Bondas.

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Master’s Degree in International Human Rights Law, Abo Akademi University, Finland

Posted on 17 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , |

The Institute for Human Rights and the Department of Law at Abo
Akademi University offer a two-year Master’s Degree Programme in
International Human Rights Law
. The application deadline for the 2009-2011 program is: 27 February 2009 at 4 pm (CET+1). Both the application and all supporting documents must be submitted by this time. Applications arriving past the deadline will not be considered.

The 120-credit program is taught in English. The a official website for the master’s program does not clarify whether offers content specific to the human rights issues of disabled people in developing countries. However, their provided information on the structure of the program indicates that students must take 15 to 35 credits in optional courses in order to achieve the total 120 credits required for the program. Students interested in disability rights in developing countries may wish to communicate directly with the program at hrm-coordinator@abo.fi to explore options for incorporating an emphasis on disability rights into the standard program.

Admission to the program is very competitive: only 15 students will be accepted to the 2009-2011 program. This means that not all students who meet the eligibility requirements will be able to enter the program. Students must have a law degree or other bachelor’s degree with at least 45 credits in law or relevant subjects.

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FUNDING for Disability Rights Projects in India, Mexico, Ukraine (Text in English, Español, українською мовою, на русском языке)

Posted on 16 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Democratic Participation, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке

Disability Rights Fund Releases 2009 Request for Proposals: 3 New Countries Targeted in First Round
FEBRUARY16, 2009
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF)—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced its first 2009 grants round, “Raising Our Voice,” targeted at disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in three countries: India, Mexico and Ukraine.

The broad objective of the Fund[1]—which was officially launched in March 2008—is to empower DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).

In 2008, the Fund made one-year grants to 33 organizations in 7 countries (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; Bangladesh), totaling USD 800,000. Grants ranged from USD 5000 – 50,000 and supported CRPD awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

In the first round of 2009 grantmaking, applicant organizations may apply within one of two categories: a) single organizations or partnerships and b) national DPO coalitions. Grants to single organizations will range from USD 5,000 to 30,000 and support efforts to build voice and visibility and to develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. Grants to national DPO coalitions will range from USD 30,000 to 70,000 and will support advocacy toward ratification of the CRPD, passage of specific legislation to accord with the CRPD, or the production of shadow reports.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by March 16. The deadline for applications is April 16, 2009.

As a donor representative on the DRF Steering Committee stated, “The launch of DRF’s 2009 grantmaking process marks an exciting expansion of our grantmaking to DPOs in three new countries and an effort to support both more marginalized sectors of the disability community and national coalitions advancing the rights of persons with disabilities.”

DRF’s donors include the American Jewish World Service, an anonymous founding donor, the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
####


Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad
publica convocatoria a presentar propuestas de proyectos en 2009:
Primera ronda de financiamiento va dirigida a tres nuevos países

16 de febrero de 2009
PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (DRF)—una innovadora iniciativa de colaboración que apoya los derechos humanos de estas personas—anunció hoy su primera ronda de financiamiento de 2009, “Alzando nuestra voz”, dirigida a organizaciones de personas con discapacidad (OPD) en tres países: India, México y Ucrania.

El Fondo[2]—iniciado oficialmente en marzo de 2008—tiene el objetivo amplio de empoderar a las OPD del mundo en desarrollo y Europa Oriental/antigua Unión Soviética con el fin de que participen en la ratificación, aplicación y seguimiento de la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD).

En 2008, el Fondo brindó apoyo financiero durante un año a 33 organizaciones en siete países (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Perú, Ghana, Namibia, Uganda y Bangladés), por un total de USD 800,000. Los subsidios, de USD 5,000 a 50,000, apoyaron la toma de conciencia respecto a la CDPD, el fortalecimiento de coaliciones y redes, así como la promoción y defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad.

En la primera ronda de financiamiento de 2009, las organizaciones solicitantes pueden presentar propuestas en una de las siguientes categorías: a) como OPD que trabajan independientemente o en alianza con otras organizaciones, o b) en calidad de coaliciones nacionales de OPD. Las organizaciones de la primera categoría podrán solicitar subsidios desde USD 5,000 hasta 30,000, los cuales han de utilizarse para esfuerzos encaminados a generar voz y visibilidad, como también a desarrollar promoción, defensa y seguimiento de derechos con base en la CDPD. Los subsidios para las coaliciones nacionales de OPD, que oscilan entre USD 30,000 y 70,000, apoyarán acciones de promoción y defensa a favor de la ratificación de la CDPD, la aprobación de legislación específica armonizada con la CDPD o la elaboración de informes sombra.

Se invita a las organizaciones interesadas a leer todos los criterios de selección y los detalles para solicitud de fondos que se encuentran en http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant_spanish.html. Cualquier pregunta relacionada con el proceso de las propuestas debe dirigirse, a más tardar el 16 de marzo, a info@disabilityrightsfund.org. La fecha límite para presentar propuestas de proyectos es el 16 de abril de 2009.

Tal como aseveró una representante de donantes en el Comité Directivo del DRF, “El lanzamiento del proceso de financiamientos del DRF en 2009 constituye una expansión emocionante de nuestro apoyo financiero a las OPD en tres nuevos países; es también un esfuerzo por apoyar tanto a un mayor número de sectores marginados de la comunidad de personas con discapacidad como a coaliciones nacionales para la promoción de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad”.

Entre los donantes del DRF figuran el Servicio Mundial Judío Americano (AJWS), un donante fundador anónimo, el Instituto de la Sociedad Abierta, el Fondo Sigrid Rausing y el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional (DFID) del Reino Unido.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
####

Фонд прав інвалідів публікує запит на грантові заявки 2009 року: для першого етапу обрано три нові країни
16 лютого 2009 р.

БОСТОН (США) – Фонд прав інвалідів (ФПI) – новаторський спільний проект з надання грантів на підтримку прав людей з інвалідністю – оголосив сьогодні про початок першого етапу виділення грантів на 2009 рік, «Піднесімо свій голос», на допомогу організаціям інвалідів (ОІ) у трьох країнах: Індії, Мексиці й Україні.

Загальним завданням Фонду[3], офіційно відкритого в березні 2008 року, є надання ОІ у країнах, що розвиваються, та Східній Європі/колишньому Радянському Союзі можливостей для участі в ратифікації, реалізації та моніторингу дотримання Конвенції ООН про права інвалідів (КПІ).

У 2008 р. Фонд надав річні гранти 33 організаціям семи країн (Еквадор, Нікараґуа, Перу; Ґана, Намібія, Уганда; Банґладеш) на загальну суму $800 000. Гранти, розміром від $5000 до $50 000, були використані на підвищення обізнаності громадськості про КПІ, зміцнення коаліцій та інших об’єднань організацій інвалідів, захисту їх прав.

Протягом першого етапу надання грантів 2009 р. організації-кандидати можуть подати заявки в одній з двох категорій: a) окремі організації чи партнерства та б) національні коаліції ОІ. Гранти окремим організаціям, розміром від $5000 до $30 000, будуть спрямовані на посилення ролі й авторитету ОІ у суспільстві та розробку системи захисту прав інвалідів і моніторингу дотримання КПІ. Гранти національним коаліціям, розміром від $30 000 до $70 000, уможливлять роботу з прискорення ратифікації КПІ, прийняття конкретного законодавства згідно з КПІ або складання «тіньових» звітів.

Зацікавлені організації можуть вивчити критерії відповідності й відбору і всі подробиці процедури подання заявок на вебсайті Фонду, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Усі запитання з процедури подання заявок слід надсилати на адресу info@disabilityrightsfund.org до 16 березня. Граничний термін прийому заявок – 16 квітня 2009 р.

Як сказав один з представників організацій-донорів у Керівному комітеті ФПІ: «Початок процесу надання грантів 2009 року позначить поширення нашої діяльності на три нових країни і наших зусиль з підтримки як найбільш ізольованих груп інвалідів, так і національних коаліцій в галузі захисту прав усіх людей з інвалідністю».

Серед донорів ФПІ – Американська єврейська всесвітня служба, анонімний донор – засновник Фонду, Інститут «Відкрите Суспільство», Фонд Сіґрид Раусінґ та Британський департамент міжнародного розвитку.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке

ПРЕСС-РЕЛИЗ

Фонд прав инвалидов публикует запрос на грантовые заявки 2009 года: на первом этапе выбраны три новые страны
16 февраля 2009 г.

БОСТОН (США) – Фонд прав инвалидов (ФПИ) – новаторский совместный проект по предоставлению грантов в поддержку прав людей с инвалидностью – объявил сегодня о начале первого этапа выделения грантов на 2009 год, «Возвысим свой голос», направленного на помощь организациям инвалидов (ОИ) в трех странах: Индии, Мексике и Украине.

Общей задачей Фонда[4], официально открытого в марте 2008 года, является предоставление ОИ в развивающихся странах и Восточной Европе / бывшем Советском Союзе возможностей для участия в ратификации, реализации и мониторинге выполнения Конвенции ООН о правах инвалидов (КПИ).

В 2008 г. Фонд предоставил годичные гранты 33 организациям семи стран (Эквадор, Никарагуа, Перу; Гана, Намибия, Уганда; Бангладеш) на общую сумму $800 000. Гранты, в размере от $5000 до $50 000, были использованы для повышения осведомленности общественности о КПИ, укрепления коалиций и объединений организаций инвалидов, защиты их прав.
В ходе первого этапа предоставления грантов в 2009 г. организации-соискатели могут подать заявки в одной из двух категорий: a) отдельные организации или партнерства и б) национальные коалиции ОИ. Гранты отдельным организациям, в размере от $5000 до $30 000, будут нацелены на усиление роли и авторитета ОИ в обществе, выработку системы защиты прав инвалидов и мониторинга выполнения КПИ. Гранты национальным коалициям, в размере $30 000–$70 000, будут использованы на работу по ускорению ратификации КПИ, принятию конкретного законодательства в соответствии с КПИ или созданию «теневых» отчетов.

Заинтересованные организации могут изучить критерии соответствия и отбора и все подробности процедуры подачи заявок на вебсайте Фонда, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Все вопросы по процедуре подачи заявок следует направлять по адресу info@disabilityrightsfund.org до 16 марта. Конечной датой принятия заявок является 16 апреля 2009 г.

Как сказал один из представителей организаций-доноров в Руководящем комитете ФПИ: «Начало процесса предоставления грантов 2009 года знаменует расширение нашей деятельности в трех новых странах и наших усилий по поддержанию как наиболее изолированных групп инвалидов, так и национальных коалиций по защите прав всех людей с инвалидностью».

Среди доноров ФПИ – Американская еврейская всемирная служба, анонимный донор – основатель Фонда, Институт «Открытое Общество», Фонд Сигрид Раусинг и Британский департамент международного развития.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
####

[1] The Disability Rights Fund is a project of Tides. Back to English text
[2] El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad es un proyecto de Tides.Regresar a Español
[3] Фонд прав інвалідів є проектом Тайдз. українською мовою
[4] Фонд прав инвалидов является проектом Тайдз. на русском языке

English; Español; на русском языке; українською мовою



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for sending me this press release for publication at We Can Do.

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