Health

Disability and Development Online Consultations March 8-28, 2013

Posted on 13 March 2013. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, indigenous people, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, universal design, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

These online consultations (from March 8 to 28th, ie RIGHT NOW) are an opportunity to influence important decisions about how people with disabilities will be included in efforts to reduce poverty around the world.

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have been profoundly influential in making decisions on how to prioritize foreign assistance and government funds in more than 100 developing countries. The global community is now working to identify what goals should replace them after 2015. This means that the next few months will be critical for ensuring that people with disabilities are not again forgotten.  It is important for the global disability community, our constituency organizations, and professionals in the fields of international development and human rights be engaged.

Read below and follow the links for more detail on how individuals can participate in this on-line dialogue.

Online Consultations
As part of the preparatory process for the United Nations General Assembly High-level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD), the HLMDD Online Consultations (HOC) will be conducted from 8 to 28 March 2013. The consultations are co-organised by DESA and UNICEF under the existing platform of the World We Want 2015 (http://www.worldwewant2015.org/enable) in multiple languages.

Please register at: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/register.  If you have difficulty registering, then please email enable@worldwewant2015.org for assistance.

Simultaneous consultations will take place in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. The site is compatible with screen readers, however, if you are unable to access the site, please email your response to: enable@worldwewant2015.org. Please note that the forum is moderated, therefore your post will not appear immediately but will be posted within twenty-four hours.
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Report: Pacific Sisters with Disabilities at the Intersection of Discrimination

Posted on 4 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Employment, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Policy & Legislation, Rehabilitation, Reports, Resources, signed languages, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , |

Both people with disabilities and also women experience discrimination in countries around the world, including within the Pacific region. Women with disabilities experience a double dose of discrimination. A newly released report, entitled Pacific Sisters with Disabilities: at the Intersection of Discrimination (PDF format, 981 Kb), reviews the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. It includes discussion on the challenges of discrimination against women with disabilities; laws among Pacific Island governments; and policies and programs within disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), women’s organizations, and mainstream international development partners. The report concludes with recommendations for improving the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. This April 2009 report, by authors Daniel Stubbs and Sainimili Tawake, covers the situation of 22 Pacific countries and territories. It was published by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Pacific Center.

The research leading to this report found that a few helpful laws, policies, and systems of practice do exist in some countries. However, disabled women do still tend to fare more poorly compared to disabled men or compared to non-disabled women. Specifically, they are often less educated, experience more unemployment, face more violence and abuse, encounter more poverty, are more isolated, have less access to health care, and have lower social status. Women with disabilities also have less access to information about education, health care, their reproductive rights, recreation, politics, or even the weather.

Unfortunately, very limited documentation on the situation of women with disabilities exist in any region, including the Pacific. This report relies partly on extrapolation from what is known about women with disabilities in other regions. This information is supplemented, where possible, with local data, statistics, anecdotes, and other information specific to disabled women in the Pacific.

The full 90-page report can be downloaded for free, in PDF format (981 Kb) at: http://www.undppc.org.fj/_resources/article/files/Final%20PSWD%20BOOKLET.pdf.



I learned about this report via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development email discussion list.

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HIV and Disability Policy Brief Released

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Health, HIV/AIDS, News, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability advocates have long known from observation that people with disabilities around the world are often at higher risk for HIV/AIDS. The difficulty has been in persuading mainstream educators and service providers of this fact. A new policy brief on disability and HIV can help advocates educate governments, mainstream organizations, and agencies about the need to include people with disabilities in HIV-related programs and services.

Disabled people are routinely excluded, sometimes by accident and sometimes on purpose, from mainstream education outreach programs on HIV and from health care services meant for people with AIDS. But a growing body of evidence shows that people with disabilities have an active sex life and are as likely as anyone else in engage in risky behaviors. They also are far more likely to be targeted for sexual assault, particularly from men who have HIV. The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS), World Health Organization (WHO), and the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) have jointly released a new, 8-page policy brief on disability and HIV. This policy brief summarizes what is known about disabled people and their high risk level for being infected with HIV. It also summarizes some of the reasons why they have been excluded from mainstream programs meant to prevent HIV transmission. For example, many workers in the field mistakenly assume that people with disabilities don’t have sex or never abuse drugs. Or they may simply neglect to consider the needs of deaf people who need information delivered in sign language or highly visual materials; blind people who need materials in audio or Braille formats; people with intellectual disabilities who need information in plain language; or people with mobility impairments who may need to attend training workshops held in wheelchair accessible buildings.

The Disability and HIV Policy Brief includes a set of recommendations for governments, including suggestions such as ratifying the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); providing HIV information in different formats tailored for different disability groups; providing people with disabilities with the same range of HIV, sexual, and reproductive health services as the rest of the population; ensuring that people with disabilities are trained to provide HIV-related education and care; and more. The policy brief also includes a few recommendations for civil society (for example, Non-Governmental Organizations) as well as for international agencies. The last section of the policy brief describes an example of AIDS-related activities in South Africa.

Learn more about the new policy brief at http://www.unaids.org/en/KnowledgeCentre/Resources/FeatureStories/archive/2009/20090409_Disability_HIV.asp. Or download the 8-page policy brief in PDF format (207 Kb) at http://data.unaids.org/pub/Manual/2009/jc1632_policy_brief_disability_en.pdf.



We Can Do learned about this policy brief via a notice posted to the IDA CRPD Forum email discussion group. I then gathered additional information about the UNAIDS web site and from the policy brief in PDF format (207 Kb).

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24, 2009

Posted on 9 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I am re-posting the following announcement, partly as a reminder for people who wish to register but also to correct and clarify the instructions for registration:

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24

Posted on 4 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, accessibility, Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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9th Intl Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific 9-13 August 2009, Bali, Indonesia

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, East Asia Pacific Region, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , |

9th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific (ICAAP 9): “Empowering People, Strengthening Networks”

August 09-13, 2009
Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia

The 9th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific in Bali in August 2009 aims to address, among others, issues of mobility, migration, as well as gender and people with disabilities in order to empower the people and strengthen networks to effectively respond to AIDS.

Read more at the official conference web site at http://www.icaap9.org/

Those who wish to present may submit up to two abstracts; the deadline is March 15, 2009. (Under strictly limited circumstances, some abstracts may be accepted as late as June; please consult the official web site for details, NOT We Can Do.)

A limited number of scholarships are available for a few participants to attend the conference.

All people with questions, or who wish to apply to participate in the conference, should please consult the official conference web site at http://www.icaap9.org/ for instructions on how to communicate with the people organizing the conference (NOT We Can Do!), thank you.



I first learned of this conference via an email forwarded from the AWID mailing list. I gathered additional information and links at the official conference web site.

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FUNDS For Humanitarian Programs Helping People Affected by Slavery

Posted on 23 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Funding, Health, Human Rights, Opportunities, Slavery & Trafficking, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Subject: Call for application: Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery; Appel à candidature: Fonds de contributions volontaires sur les formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

English; French

[Note to We Can Do readers: Organizations serving people with disabilities who have been affected by human trafficking, sexual slavery, child labor, forced marriage, or other forms of contemporary slavery may wish to consider this opportunity to devise an appropriate project targeted at, or incorporating, their needs. This fund is not specifically devised for people with disabilities, but grant seekers could argue for their need.]

Dear colleagues,

The United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery allocates project grants (for a maximum of 15 000 USD), for programmes of humanitarian, legal and financial assistance to individuals whose human rights have been severely violated as a result of contemporary forms of slavery.

Contemporary forms of slavery include trafficking, sexual slavery, child labour and child servitude, debt bondage, serfdom and forced labour, forced marriage and sale of wives ect.

Projects undertaken with previous Trust Fund grants include medical and psychological aid, food, shelter, and vocational training to victims of trafficking for sexual and economic exploitation; support to rehabilitation centres for sexually and physically abused street children and a project to identify and release bonded labourers in the carpet industry and stone quarries. Other projects have provided victims with the means to generate sustainable sources of income, such as sewing machines, hairdressing equipment, or farming tools.

Please consult the official web site to download the application form in English, French, or Spanish. Application forms should be duly completed and submitted by 31 March 2009.

If you need more information on the Fund, you can consult the website of the OHCHR: http://www2.ohchr.org/English/about/funds/slavery/index.htm.
You can also contact the OHCHR at MClerc@ohchr.org.

You are more than welcome to disseminate this message to oganisations working with victims of comtemporary forms of slavery.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French

*********************************************************************************************

Chers collègues,

Le Fond de contributions volontaires des Nations Unies pour la lutte contre les formes contemporaines d’esclavage octroi des subventions (pour un maximum de 15 000 dollars des Etats-Unis) aux projets fournissant une aide humanitaire, juridique et financière aux personnes dont les droits de l’homme ont été gravement violés par des formes contemporaines d’esclavage. Les formes contemporaines d’esclavage sont le trafic d’êtres humains, l’esclavage sexuel, le travail des enfants et la servitude des enfants, la servitude pour dettes, le servage, le travail forcé, les marriages forcés et la vente d’épouses ect.

Veuillez trouver ci-dessous le formulaire de demande de subvention en anglais, francais et espagnol. Les formulaires de demande doivent être complétés et soumis avant le 31 Mars 2009. Les projets financés par le passé grâce aux subventions du Fonds, ont pas exemple, permis aux victimes de la traite des êtres humains à des fins sexuelles et commerciales, d’obtenir de l’aide relative aux soins médicaux et psychologiques, à la nourriture, au logement et à la formation professionnelle. Ils ont permis aux enfants des rues abusés sexuellement et physiquement de bénéficier de soutien dans des centres de réhabilitation. Ils ont également permis d’apporter de l’aide à l’identification et à la libération des travailleurs en servitude pour dettes employés à la fabrication des tapis et dans les carrières de pierre. D’autres projets ont permis aux victimes d’obtenir les moyens de générer des sources de revenus durables comme l’achat de machines à coudre, équipements de coiffure et des outils agricoles.

Si vous avez besoin de plus d’information sur le Fond, vous pouvez consulter le site internet du HCDH: http://www2.ohchr.org/french/about/funds/slavery/index.htm Vous pouvez aussi nous contacter en répondant à MClerc@ohchr.org.

N’hésitez pas à diffuser ce message aux organisations travaillants avec les victimes des formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserver.

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Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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JOB POST: Local Diagnostic Expert, Handicap International, Maputo, Mozambique

Posted on 12 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Handicap International is looking for Local Diagnostic Expert
COUNTRY : Mozambique CITY : Maputo
Starting date: 01/04/09 (April 1, 2009)
Length of the assignment : one year
Closing date for application : 01/03/09 (March 1, 2009) Advertisement reference : HB-LDE-Moz0902

Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit-making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, in response to humanitarian crises and the effects of extreme poverty. Handicap International implements programmes of assistance to persons and local organisations, inclusion programmes and programmes focusing on the fight against the main causes of disability. It runs projects in almost 60 countries, with the support of a network of 8 national associations ( Germany, Belgium, Canada, United-States, Luxembourg, United Kingdom and Switzerland)
The organisation employs almost 3300 people worldwide, 330 of whom work in France and in its European and North American sections.
For more details on the association: http://www.handicap-international.fr/en/s/index.html

JOB CONTEXT :
This project is the result of a short emergency project, which objective was to support the victims of PAIOL, the arsenal explosion in Maputo in 2007. The PAIOL project highlights the lack of knowledge and skills of basic services to welcome and take care of people with disabilities. It was also the opportunity to work with the municipalities of Maputo and Matola, and to make a first assessment on the situation of people with disabilities.

This post is based in RAVIM offices, our principal partner for the project. The characteristics of the relationships between the Local Diagnostic Expert, Handicap International Project Team and RAVIM will be detailed within the Partnership Agreement Addendum between Handicap International and RAVIM.

JOB DESCRIPTION :
Challenges and goals :
The decentralization process is quite complex in Maputo and Matola: all the different levels of governmental representatives are present (district, municipal, province and nation). One of the issues will be to get involved and coordinate with all these different governmental levels, in a same objective. The local diagnostic should clarify which are the main competences for each administrative level: district, municipal, province and nation, in the frame of the decentralization process.

Activities :
In collaboration with RAVIM, you will support the realisation of a local diagnosis on the social and economical situation of people with disability, the social representation of Disability and the situation of existing healthcare and social services, regarding the welcoming of vulnerable people (including people with disability and people living with or affected by HIV/AIDS).
Your responsibilities will be to:
==> carry out the local diagnosis
==> analyze the local diagnostic results and propose recommendations in respect to the project objectives.
==> create a database and directory of services
==> organize the dissemination of the results of the local diagnosis among the civil society and government
==> prepare the final evaluation of the project, based on monitoring tools and mechanisms to evaluate the progress of the situation of people with disability and healthcare and social services at regular intervals
==> capitalize documentation and tools used during these activities

CANDIDATE PROFILE :
Mandatory :
We are looking for someone with a Master in Local development field, Social sciences or a Diploma in the healthcare and social sector. Ideally with experience in implementing local/territorial and participative diagnosis or/and realisation of quantitative and qualitative survey,

You have good analysis and synthesis capacities and a good team spirit, you have already worked on mobilising people around a common objective.

Complementary :
Experience in a developing country, knowledge on Disability, inclusive approach and HIV/AIDS

REQUIRED LANGUAGE SKILLS : Portuguese mandatory, English a plus

JOB ENVIRONMENT : possibility to travel with family, access to international school and hospital

EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS :
Volunteer : 750 or 850 Euros monthly indemnity + living allowance paid on the field + accommodation + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance
Salary : 2000 to 2300 gross salary + 457 Euros expatriation allowance + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance + family policy

Please send resume and covering letter with the reference: HB-LDE-Moz0902 to :
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL – 14, avenue Berthelot – 69361 LYON CEDEX 07
by Email : recrut04@handicap-international.org
or by our website : www.handicap-international.org
Please do not telephone

Candidates from Canada or the United States, and nationals of these countries, should send their application to the following address :
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL CANADA
1819 Boulevard René Lévesque, bureau 401 – MONTRÉAL, QUÉBEC – H3H 2P5
Or by email : jobs@handicap-international.ca or fax : 514-937-6685
Please do not telephone



I received this job announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development mailing list.

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Recursos Españoles: Women’s Health Handbook; and Helping Deaf Children (en ingles y español)

Posted on 10 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Deaf, Health, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Texto español

Hesperian announces two new titles in Spanish and a spiffy new Spanish Web Site:
Un Manual de salud para mujeres con dispacidad, the Spanish version of A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities, arrived to our offices today and we are very excited to have this wonderful material now available in Spanish. Un manual de salud para mujeres con discapacidad, will help women with disabilities overcome these barriers and improve their general health, self-esteem, and abilities to care for themselves and participate in their communities.

We also released the Spanish version of Helping Children Who are Deaf, Ayudar a los niños sordos. Packed with simple activities, this book is a great resource for parents, caregivers, health promoters, and others in teaching children who do not hear well how to communicate to the best of his or her ability.

Both titles can be downloaded http://espanol.hesperian.org/Bienvenidos_de_Hesperian.php and purchased from our brand new Spanish website. This user-friendly, easy-to-navigate web site offers all of the features of our website in English – current health news, information on upcoming publications, and free down-loadable versions of most of our titles. Plus a complete bookstore, all in Spanish, ready to ship anywhere in the world. At http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php


Hesperian anuncia dos nuevos libros en español y nuestra nueva página web

Con el libro Un manual de salud para mujeres con discapacidad, Hesperian les ofrece a las mujeres con discapacidad una manera práctica de conocer sus derechos para gozar de buena salud. Combinando las experiencias y consejos de mujeres con discapacidad de 42 países, con información sobre la salud, profesional y al corriente, este manual es fácil de entender, esta plenamente ilustrado y tiene mucha información útil.

También nos complace presentar el libro Ayudar a los niños sordos, el título más reciente de la Serie de asistencia temprana. Este libro está lleno de actividades sencillas y será un gran recurso para las personas que cuidan a niños sordos, ya sean padres, otros cuidadores y/o promotores de salud, ya que ofrece herramientas para enseñarle a la niña o niño a comunicarse lo mejor que pueda.

Estos libros, además de todos los títulos de Hesperian, pueden ser descargados http://espanol.hesperian.org/Bienvenidos_de_Hesperian.php o adquiridos desde nuestra ¡NUEVA PÁGINA WEB EN ESPAÑOL,! Ahora puede descargar nuestros libros, buscar traducciones en otros idiomas, ver nuestros proyectos actuales y comprar libros en nuestra tienda virtual, listos para ser enviados a cualquier parte del mundo — ¡Todo esto y más ahora en español! A http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php



Thank you to the Hesperian Foundation for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do. The Hesperian Foundation first became famous for their publication, Where There is No Doctor (Donde No Hay Doctor). This book has been used to save lives in hundreds of rural communities throughout developing countries around the world—precisely in places where there is no doctor. Since then, the Hesperian Foundation has produced a growing collection of publications targeted at people with developing countries who may have few other resources that they can use to treat their health or to learn how their community can become a happier place for children with disabilities. Anyone who lives or works in a rural community with few local resources is strongly urged to explore their web site. (http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php en español, http://www.hesperian.org in English).

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Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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JOB POST: Project Manager: Making HIV-AIDS Strategies Inclusive, Tanzania

Posted on 6 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

CCBRT is Seeking to Employ a Project Manager for a PEPFAR funded Project

“Making HIV/Aids Strategies Inclusive for People with Disabilities”

Application Deadline February 21, 2009

*Introduction*
Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation Tanzania (CCBRT) is a locally registered Non Governmental Organization (NGO) first established in 1994. It is the largest indigenous provider of disability rehabilitation services in the country. CCBRT aim is to improve the quality of life of people living with disabilities as well as their families and to enable them to claim and use their legitimate human rights.

*Objective*
The PEPFAR project is aimed to considerably increase access for people with disabilities and their care givers to appropriate HIV/AIDS prevention, care, treatment and support services in Tanzania. The project is funded by PEPFAR for the duration of 3 years beginning 2009. CCBRT will coordinate the project in collaboration with the Government of Tanzania, civil society and other stakeholders.

* *

*The Project Manager will have the following responsibilities*

· Setting up, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project.

· Recruitment of part time HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinators in consultation with the Community Program Director.

· Setting up of the National Platform in consultation with governmental, non-governmental and international stakeholders.

· Selection of target districts and partners in consultation with TACAIDS and NACP.

· Coordination and monitoring of the development of minimum guidelines (VCT, care and treatment), development and distribution of various Information Education and Communication (IEC) materials, and respective training manuals.

· Initiation, coordination and evaluation of trainings in collaboration with technical experts and target organizations.

· Further development of IEC, training materials and programs after lessons learnt in collaboration with technical experts.

· Establishment of follow up mechanisms to support trained experts.

· Establishment of collaborations and referral mechanisms between district authorities, disability and HIV/AIDS organizations.

· Provision and coordination of technical / advisory support to partners.

· Assessment and approval of small project proposals for infrastructure adjustments and campaigns in collaboration with CBM US and a representative of the National Platform.

· Development of public awareness programs on disability, equal right and HIV/AIDS.

· Generation of lessons learnt and continuous integration during the project implementation.

· Development of a reader on making HIV/Aids strategies inclusive in collaboration with technical experts.

· Development of annual work plans and setting of annual targets.

· Compilation of narrative / financial reports in collaboration with the CCBRT Finance Manager.

· Coordination and support of the work of the CCBRT Health, HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinator and three HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinators.

*Experience*
The project manager should have

· a minimum of 5 years working experience in HIV/AIDS

· In depth knowledge about HIV/AIDS strategy framework in Tanzania including HSHSP, NGPRS, NMSF as well as HIV/AIDS related working structures and relevant stakeholders in Tanzania.

· Experience in guideline and training programme development

· Proven working experience with vulnerable groups, preferably persons with disabilities

· Good analytic, report writing and presentation skills

· Experience in coordinating and managing larger teams

· Strong written and oral communication ability, both Kiswahili and English

CCBRT will offer an attractive salary package.

The Project manager is expected to start working latest 16th March 2009.

*How to apply*
If you believe you are the ideal candidate with the necessary background, please submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae detailing your experience, supportive documents as well as contact details of three referees to info@ccbrt.or.tz or by post to

CCBRT Executive Director/ P.O Box 23310, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Tel: +255 (0) 22 260 1543 / +255 (0) 22 260 2192 Fax: +255 (0) 22 2601544

Email: info@ccbrt.or.tz Website: http://www.ccbrt.or.tz

*People with disability are highly encouraged to apply.*

*Closing date for applications: 21st Feb* (only short listed candidates will be contacted)



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PAPER: Disability and Contraception in Developing Countries

Posted on 24 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cognitive Impairments, Families, Health, Mobility Impariments, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Doctors, social workers, neighbors, and even family members often mistakenly assume that people with disabilities cannot possibly be interested in sex. Or if they are, others believe they cannot physically participate. Or if they can, others think that no one would want to have sex with them. Because of these myths, people with disabilities are often deliberately excluded from sex education programs and reproductive care services. These include contraception to prevent pregnancy, as well as support for people with disabilities who wish to bear and raise healthy, happy children.

The fact is, a great many people with a wide range of disabilities are capable of having children and desire the rewards that can come with parenthood. And many become excellent parents who raise well-adjusted children. But they often lack family planning services that allow them to make their own choices about how many children to have and when to have them. This may be partly because even family planners who understand the need and importance of counseling for people with disabilities may not know how.

Although people with physical disabilities frequently can and do have children, the nature of some physical disabilities may sometimes affect what kind of contraceptions they can use or how to use them. An article published in 1999 by Family Health International’s journal Network, entitled Disabled Have Many Contraceptive Needs, explains how some physical disabilities, or the medications taken for them, may affect the kinds of contraceptions they are able to use. Family planning professionals may consult this article at http://www.fhi.org/en/rh/pubs/network/v19_2/disableneeds.htm

People with mild intellectual disabilities, and also people with psychosocial disabilities, are often as interested in sexuality as the general population. They also may in some cases wish to have children. Both intellectual disabilities and psychosocial disabilities may affect how well contraceptive options or instructions are understood, or how well they may follow instructions. Another article entitled Mental Disabilities Affect Method Options” discusses various examples of how family planning professionals can account for these factors. This article, also published in 1999, can be read at http://www.fhi.org/en/RH/Pubs/Network/v19_2/mentaldisab.htm



I learned about these articles through a class I’m taking on Gender, Disability and Development this semester. Thanks, Barbara Earth!

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JOB POST: CBR Officer, Dadaab Refugee Camp, Garissa, Kenya

Posted on 19 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Assistive Devices, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

*_VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT_*

*_Position_** : CBR Officer ( Prosthesis & Orthotic) _Responsible to _: CBR Coordinator*

*_Location_** : Dadaab Refugee Camp (Garissa) _Family Status_ : Non Family duty Station*

*_Closing Date_** : Open *

*_THE ORGANIZATION_*

HI began its operations in 1992 as an emergency support programme in Garissa (North Eastern Province). Currently, HI is operating a medical referral project for refugees in this region in partnership with the UNHCR. HIV and AIDS activities are also being provided for the local community.

In 1994, HI launched another emergency support programme for internal displaced persons (IDPs) following inter-ethnic clashes, in Trans Nzoia District (Kitale town). Today, we are running in Kitale the most comprehensive HI Programme on HIV and AIDS in Kenya.

In 2002, in Nairobi we began disability activities with local partners (community-based organisations) focusing on support to networking, inclusive education and access to resources.

In April 2005, we have started a Mine Risk Education (MRE) project for the refugees living in the Kakuma Refugee Camp (near the Sudan border).

*_Rehabilitation project in Dadaab refugee camp:_*

Dadaab Refugee Camps, located in Garissa district, are the main settlement for Somali refugees, with a total population of 170,000 refugees, with a recent new influx^^[1] ^ due to the latest political events and severe drought in the southern parts of Somalia. To date some basic services have been developed to meet the refugees with disability needs. UNHCR, CARE International and other implementing partners working in Dadaab refugee camps raised a concern about the critical situation of the refugees with disability and scarce services provided to them. Therefore, UNHCR solicited Handicap International to support and contribute to develop initiatives towards disabled refugees in Dadaab camps.

An assessment carried out by HI from in February 2007 defined HI intervention with focus in two main areas:

(i) */To develop access to adequate rehabilitation services for persons with disability/*, with particular attention to be paid to technical aids and prosthetic production and rehabilitation and counselling services for children with intellectual disability and/or cerebral palsy; and

(ii) */To facilitate access to humanitarian aid and community development for persons with disability/*, through information sharing, counselling and sensitization of staff and agencies in charge of food distribution, sheltering, health, watsan and construction works, education, community development services and livelihood, etc.

The Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) Project Team will consist of 1 x Project Manager, 1 x CBR Coordinator , 1 x Mainstreaming Officer, 3 x CBR Officers (with technical expertise in differing but complimentary areas), 6 x rehabilitation workers, 6 x technical aids workers (leather work/shoe making and carpentry), and 30 x CBR workers.

* *

*THE POSITION*

Under the responsibility of CBR Coordinator, the CBR Officer (Prosthesis & Orthotic) will offer technical support to the CBR team in ensuring quality production and fitting of prosthetics, esthetics, & other orthopedic devices to persons with disability among refugees and host communities. She/he will also build capacity of the local technicians and rehabilitation staff and take lead in the referrals and follow ups of patients.

*S\he will be responsible for :-*

*1) Supervision and management of mobility aids workshops*

· Supervise operations in all mobility aids workshops present in all the three camps including Dadaab workshop.

· Closely monitor and arrange procurement of equipment and materials as required for workshop – production.

· Provide advice on installation of equipment in the workshops including workshop planning and utilization of workshop consumables

· Ensure P&O workshops’ set up are all up to standards and accepted specifications

· Ensure mobility aids workshops are barrier-free for the easy access to persons with disabilities.

· Ensure all safety measures are observed within the workshops to reduce hazards in the operation of various machinery and equipment.

· Develop proper workshop management systems to ensure effective and efficient P&O workshop management.

· Carry out regular monitoring of workshop activities, technicians’ performance and manufacture of devices.

*2) Capacity Building*

· Identify and provide on-the-job training to local technicians in Prosthetics and Orthotics.

· Develop training curriculum for on-the-job training of local technicians.

· Conduct regular evaluation of the on-job training.

· Provide basic orientation to community CBR workers on the maintenance and repair of devices in the field.

· Train P&O Assistants in Workshop Management and information systems.

*3) Supervision of P&O Assistants*

· Develop job descriptions for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Together with the team, develop weekly work plan for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Carry out induction and appraisal for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Monitor P&O Assistants/Technicians performance and production.

* *

*4) Referrals and Physical rehabilitation*

· Ensure persons with disabilities receive good quality and appropriate prosthetic and orthotic devices and services from the workshops as well as in the field and from Garissa/Kangemi.

· Develop a good and effective patient’s follow up mechanism for patients who are fitted with P&O devices from Garissa general hospital and Kangemi.

· Maintain individual file for each person with disability receiving P&O devices and carry out regular follow up as per the requirement of the particular person.

· Maintain all records pertaining to service delivery.

· Ensure required gait training is provided to the clients after prosthetic and orthotic fitments.

· Ensure that the clients receive rehabilitation therapy as required, e.g. release of contracture and healing of stump edema before fitting devices.

*5) Coordination and networking *

· Maintain necessary coordination with Rehabilitation Therapists.

· Work closely with the Physiotherapist and Occupational therapist for patient treatment, follow-up and evaluation.

· Liaise with Technical Advisors for various technical matters and training programs as necessary.

· Represent the organization at forums, workshops and conferences in the areas of Prosthetics and Orthotics as may be required.

*6) Reporting*

· Produce updated reports at regular intervals as required by the project in terms of donor and organizational requirements.

*7) Others*

· Advice Management on various costs related to P&O materials, equipment, maintenance, training and service delivery.

· Capitalize on new areas of learning in P&O or any specific case histories for internal learning and for external dissemination when required.

*/ /*

*Qualifications and experience required:-*

· Diploma in Orthopaedics with 2 years of experience

· Knowledge of CBR implementation and management

· Ability to work in and lead a team

· Good report writing, presentation, communication and interpersonal skills

· Demonstrated ability to transfer knowledge through informal and formal trainings

· Computer literate with Knowledge of Word, Excel and Internet

· Experience with an International NGO is an added advantage

*Conditions*

Living conditions in Dadaab camp may be challenging (remote area, climate very hot), although facilities are offering minimum of comfort.

R&R leave of 7 days will be provided every 8 weeks of continuous accommodation within Dadaab.

If you feel you are the right candidate for this position, kindly send your application along with an up-to-date CV(including 3 referees) by email to the Human Resources Officer : hrofficer@handicap-international.or.ke

*NB: Applications will be processed as they are received and interviews conducted until the appropriate candidate is selected.*

*The email subject line should be marked: “Application for CBR Officer – Dadaab position”*

* *

*Please do not send your academic certificates and other testimonials they will be requested at a later stage.*

Only short listed candidates will be contacted.

*Handicap International is an Equal Opportunity Employer – Females and Persons with Disability are encouraged to apply ***



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IntraHealth Seeks Information on Access to Sexual Reproductive Health in Developing Countries

Posted on 16 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Health, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

IntraHealth International is seeking both facts and personal stories on access to Sexual Reproductive Health in developing countries.

IntraHealth International, a global health organization, wants to increase awareness about the importance of inclusion of people with disabilities in sexual and reproductive health programs in developing countries. They need:

— Facts on what is being done currently to increase access to health care services,
— Information on local disability organizations in developing countries
— What are the specific barriers and problems that limit access to health care services in general and to SRH in particular
— Any relevant data
— Personal stories about disabled persons and their experiences accessing, or trying to access, sexual and reproductive health care services in developing countries

Please send any info or resources you may have to Cornelia Kip Lee, or to Jim McMahan at:

Cornelia Lee: corneliakip@mac.com U.S. phone: 919-428-3335
Jim McMahan: jmcmahan@intrahealth.org



I received this notice via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list.

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JOB POST: QuickBooks Training for Sub Grantees, Kenya, Handicap International, Dec 15-19, 2008

Posted on 5 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, autism, Blind, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This short-term consultancy position requires someone to provide a five-day training workshop in the use of QuickBooks from December 15 to 19, 2008. Profiles and proposals must be submitted by December 10, 2008.

TERMS OF REFERENCE: QUICKBOOKS TRAINING FOR THE SUB GRANTEES

BACKGROUND

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL (HI) is an international NGO engaged in the field of disability and development. A strong emphasis, however, is placed on empowering people with disabilities through their integration into mainstream development activities and the provision of appropriate health and rehabilitation services to ensure equal opportunities for all.

Currently, HI is working with 6 partner organizations in the USAID/AED funded projects in the field of Disability and HIV & AIDS. The group represents a cross section of disabilities including the deaf, blind and low vision, physically and intellectually disabled.

The main thematic areas of the project activities include;
• Policy and advocacy
• Behavior change communication
• Appropriate IEC materials for the PWD
• Stigma reduction

One focus of the project is to provide technical support, build the capacities of the partner organization and provide funding to enable them implement HIV& AIDS activities.

JUSTIFICATION

Good financial management practice helps an organization to attain effective and efficient use of resources and be more accountable to donors and other stakeholders. Hence, HI would wish to commission training in QuickBooks for her partners as a requisite to ensuring quality and accurate financial record keeping and reporting on usage of donor funding. HI further wishes to install QuickBooks accounting packages for all the partner organizations that are not yet compliant to the package and final set up a cut-off period for compliance by all the organization.

BACKGROUND OF PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

We have detailed as underneath a brief profile of each of the organizations that we are currently collaborating with as a basis of your understanding the scope of each partner. However, it may be worth noting that the proposed training may also include other partners we are yet to bring on board.

DDSHG (DANDORA DEAF SELF HELP GROUP)

Dandora is an organisation of deaf people that was formed over 10 years ago; Structural formation was very minimal in the initial years. Thus, Handicap international organized governance training which has since increased cohesiveness among the group membership. This is expressed through an increase of paid membership, while several board members who were also employees of the organization resigned as employees to pave for a clear segregation of interests. The organization is situated in Dandora area of Nairobi province.

On overall, the organization has sound and consistent financial management and reporting systems. In the period under review the organization was funded to a tune of Ksh. 1,996,453.00 (one million nine hundred ninety six thousand four hundred fifty three only)

BLINK (Blind and Low Vision Network)

Blink’s beneficiaries are primarily blind and/or persons with very low vision. A key issue for this organisation is that their beneficiaries are in different geographical locations. However, they have focal persons in each district that they meet weekly to discuss the needs of the communities. The board members are also representatives of different Community Based Organizations. They function as resource persons and may have their expenses reimbursed and allowances for services provided.

The organisation refers to itself as a Community Based Organization network that helps the individual Community Based Organisations provide support and care to their communities through awareness creation activities on HIV/AIDS. The discussions in the communities are generally broader than the HIV/AIDS, so the meetings are used as an opportunity to discuss other issues.

Blink has received training in project design and management including M&E frameworks, resource mobilisation, programme reporting, financial management, and managing special needs projects (e.g. reproductive health, HIV/AIDS counselling for disabled people, VCT testing). The counsellors are now better equipped to inform visually impaired people about their test results. Their reporting has also improved.

As regards the governance function, both board members and staff members now understand their roles and what is expected of them thanks to the capacity building initiatives by HI. The board members are also informed about the organisation’s activities by the Director on a regular basis.

The backbone of the spending in the organization is mainly logistical, thus the need for well tailored internal checks and balances mechanism that ensures prudence in the commitment of expenditure. In the current grant period the organisation was obligated to spend Ksh.2,728,962.00(two million seven hundred twenty eight thousand nine hundred sixty two only).

KEDAN (Kenya Disabled Action Network)

KEDAN is a youth organisation which is only 4 years old and covers several types of disability, contrary to most of the other disabled people’s organisations that target a particular category of disability (blind, deaf, physically impaired, and albinos – for capacity reasons they are currently unable to include mentally handicapped. The organisation started out with mobilisation, awareness creation and experience sharing and has only actively implemented programme activities since 2005. . They have developed an action plan for the next couple of years which they intend to implement, despite their limited resources, with the help of their motivated supporters.

As regards the needs of the organisation, KEDAN’s staff feels that they need to strengthen their competencies in the area of resource mobilisation, in particular proposal writing. They also need help to manage their existing resources better. Finally, they wish to develop their staff competencies in areas such as leadership and management, IT, and income generating activities.

In the current grant period the group is obligated to spend Ksh. 2,388,811.00 (two million three hundred eighty eight thousand eight hundred and eleven only).

NFSS (Nairobi Family Support Services)

NFSS was started in 1982 by Actionaid and registered as a local NGO in 1996. The Programme Coordinator has been the leader ever since. The organisation receives funding from HI France and from the AED-programme and is also supported by Sense International and the Liliane Foundation.

The mission of the organisation is to raise awareness on HIV-AIDS and disability through their work with community groups and attempt to change the stigma of disabled people in the community and their low-self esteem. The peer educators meet twice a month to exchange experiences.

NFSS has strong networking capacity. The organisation partners with different institutions, especially through referrals: the Liliane foundation (support for disabled people’s surgery), specialised schools (educational assessment), the Ministry of Health, government hospitals, networks of therapists. This gives the organisation high credibility in the communities.

NFSS would like to support “merry-go-rounds” (revolving credit systems), but as most of their beneficiaries are not working, it is difficult to collect the funds.

Until 2005, Action Aid funded a microfinance programme for the parents of disabled children. These loans were considered by some as grants. After having received several loans, and hence being allowed to loan greater sums, gradually, some of the beneficiaries disappeared with their funds. Only about 50% of these parents are able to continue repaying their microloans.

NFSS has an internal control manual but it has not enhanced its usage. There is therefore need to educate the staff on the importance of these procedures and its implementation. In the current grant period the organization is obligated to spend Ksh. 2,211,847.00 (two million two and eleven thousand eight hundred forty seven only).

DIGROT (Disabled Group of Trans Nzoia)

DIGROT was started in 1990 as a self help group of 50 members on the concept of a merry go round. Since 1998, the group has operated a bank account with Kenya Commercial Bank, Kitale Branch. The group started a micro finance lending system; Members were given loans of ksh.500 to Ksh 2,000 at an interest rate of 10% p.a.

In 2000, they received a grant from District Social Development Officer (Poverty Eradication Programme) which they used to loan their members. 14 members were successfully loaned through this programme and 7 defaulted to repay back. DIGROT was trained by HI in 2004 on micro-credit management.

In the year 2001-2003 they approached HI on HIV/AIDS awareness and in 2004 they wrote a proposal to HI on HIV and AIDS and Disability which was funded in May 2006.

DIGROT has representatives from different locations in Trans Nzoia district and was registered as a Community based Organization (CBO) in 2007. DIGROT is a network of DPOs (Disabled Persons Organizations) in Trans Nzoia district and usually conducts quarterly meetings with representatives from these DPOs.

It currently has 224 registered members and each member pays 524 shillings registration fee with a renewal fee of 200 shillings annually. Not all members are fully registered and the money is kept in a savings account.

The organization lacked well defined operational systems and procedures but has been subjected to vigorous capacity building initiatives, the organizations has also just finalized a recruitment exercise where competent and qualified staff have been brought on board.

In the current partnership agreement the organization is obligated to spend Ksh. 1,131,139.00 (one million one thirty one thousand one hundred thirty nine only)

UDPK (United Disabled Persons of Kenya)

United Disabled Persons of Kenya (UDPK) is an umbrella network of persons with disability in Kenya and was established in 1989 with a membership of the following organizations – Kenya Union of the Blind (KUB), Kenya National Association of the Deaf (KNAD) and Kenya Society of the Physically Handicapped (KSPH), Kenya Society for the Mentally Handicapped (KSMH). Kenya Autism Society joined later to champion issues of parents of mentally challenged Albinos and autism.

Currently UDPK has about 200 member organizations. UDPK was formed so that disabled persons could be united and speak with one voice, advocacy and lobbying remains the core objective.

Membership is both by organizations of and for disabled person. UDPK has five full time staff and 13 Field Officers working in different regions and is headquartered in Westlands, along Waiyaki Way. The mission of UDPK is to unite all persons, groups of Persons with Disabilities (PWDs) to advocate for disability issues on a united front. The vision for the organization is a barrier free society where Persons with Disabilities (PWDS) enjoy access to services in all spheres of life.

In the current grant agreement the organization is mandated to spend Ksh.2, 542,345.00 (two million five forty two thousand three hundred forty five only).

GENERAL OBJECTIVE

The general objective of this consultancy is to conduct an application based QuickBooks Training for management and finance staff of Handicap International partners so as to reflect through proper recording keeping and accurate financial reporting an accountable and effective use of donor funds as outlined in the individual budgets of the funded organizations and based on properly defined internal control systems, proper administrative and logistical management.

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE
• To design and develop a training programme that will equip the trainees with relevant skills and knowledge in Quickbooks

PROPOSED METHODOLOGY

HI proposes to hold a five day residential application based training for management and financial staff from each of the partnering organizations.

HI also proposes that the consulting firm shall at all times seek clarifications and/or guidelines from HI on all issues that are not clear and/or appear ambiguous in their opinion. For the purposes of this Training, the contact person for HI is Mr. Erick Karani, the Project Finance Officer.

TASKS OF THE CONSULTANT

1. Development of a training curriculum that shall conform to the afore-mentioned specific and general objectives and/or all other related aspects of QuickBooks financial package.

2. Carry out an evaluation of the training and produce a training report.

EXPECTED RESULTS

At the end of the training, the trainees will be able to:-
• Explain the essence and challenges of QuickBooks.
• Understand the usage and benefits of QuickBooks in financial management.
• Establish the relationship between QuickBooks reports and external reporting.
• Outline the QuickBooks main menu.
• Set up Accounts in the Quickbooks software
• Key in data and prepare accounting documents.
• Record General Journals.
• Prepare Bank Reconciliations.
• Develop Internal and Donor Reporting formats.
• Prepare monthly/annually reports.
• Correct Errors.

TIME FRAME

The training is expected to commence on 15th and end on 19th December, 2008 close of business.

QUALIFICATIONS

The consultant should have :-
• Relevant educational back ground and experience in teaching QuickBooks in a reputable institution.
• Relevant experience in working as a consultant/ lecturer is added advantage.
• Excellent analytical, writing and communication/facilitation skills.

APPLICATION PROCESS

All interested applicants must submit their profiles and proposals on or before 10th December, 2008 5.00 pm by email to the Project Finance Officer at: ekarani@handicap-international.or.ke

The email subject line should be marked: “QuickBooks training for the Sub grantees”



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) mailing list. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to Handicap International as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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JOB POST: Sesotho-speaking Economist/Socio-Economist

Posted on 4 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Health, HIV/AIDS, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Note that resumes/c.v.s need to be submitted by 9 a.m. EST, December 4, 2008. This means by 2 p.m. GMT/UTC time. Please contact Pia Rockhold directly at prockhold@worldbank.org, NOT We Can Do.

Call for Applications
I urgently need a Sesotho speaking STC (Short Term Contract) economist/socio-economist preferable in Lesotho or South Africa, but all can do – for a possible 40 to 60 days assignment in Lesotho from January to July 2009, working with me (epidemiologist and health sector specialist) and another macro economist on the impact of HIV/AIDs on the macro-econmy in Lesotho.

Might anybody out there know somebody I will need the CV and approval of availability latest by early tomorrow (before 9 am DC time).

Best Pia
prockhold@worldbank.org


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JOB POST: Coordinator, Regional Diabetes Project, East Africa, Handicap International

Posted on 25 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Health, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Handicap International is seeking a Coordinator for its Regional Diabetes Projecct. The application deadline for this job post is November 30, 2008.

Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit-making, we work alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, in response to humanitarian crises and the effects of extreme poverty. We implement programmes of assistance to individual people and to local organisations, as well as inclusion programmes and programmes focusing on the fight against the main causes of disability. We run projects in almost 60 countries, with the support of a network of 8 national associations ( Germany, Belgium, Canada, United-States, Luxembourg, United Kingdom and Switzerland) Handicap International employs almost 3300 people worldwide, with 330 staff in France and our European and North American sections. For more information on our organisation : http://www.handicap-international.fr/

WORK CONTEXT
The project’s activities will be concentrated in the rural communities where Handicap International has long-standing relations with the health authorities and other local partners. The project will work alongside the international community and the International Diabetes Federation, as well as with existing regional groups and organisations with expertise in the field of diabetes. The project’s initial objective is to strengthen the health system in order to make primary and secondary health care accessible to the rural population, and to diabetics in particular, and find ways of overcoming the main obstacles to access to health services. Local, national and international awareness-raising campaigns will be used to inform the population about the disease, the risks and means of prevention. The project will aim to demonstrate that the integrated management of diabetes (prevention, care and rehabilitation) should be a priority at both local and regional level. A network will be developed to help ensure the effective coordination of actions implemented locally.
Support to awareness-raising activities will contribute towards :

JOB DESCRIPTION
Challenges and objectives :
The project coordinator will work with a regional team in Burundi, Kenya and Tanzania. He/she will be line-managed by the East Africa Desk Officer. In Burundi and Kenya, the project teams, managed by a national project manager, will work with previously identified local partners. In Tanzania, the project will be directly implemented by our local partner, the Tanzania Diabetes Association. The regional coordinator will therefore closely monitor this partner’s activities and financial reporting.

The geographical scope and wide diversity of human resources involved in the implementation of activities is a new and fundamental aspect of this project and confers a high level of responsibility on the regional coordinator.

Missions and responsibilities :
With regard to the regional dimension of the project, the coordinator is responsible for implementing various activities that will have a regional impact, whilst ensuring the project’s overall coherency.

In each target country, he/she will work closely with the field programme director and national project teams, and with our partner in Tanzania, to establish the planning and monitoring of activities at national level. He/she is also responsible for the operational and financial decisions essential for moving activities forward in a coherent manner and in line with the project’s overall objectives.

He/she is specifically responsible for :
y Implementing policy on information, communication, knowledge-management and lesson-learning in the areas developed by the project. This is a fundamental aspect of the project. He/she will therefore be expected to ensure that work carried out in the different target countries becomes part of a global reflection and that information and knowledge is exchanged between the three countries concerned (e.g. via networking, mobilisation of expertise).
y Relations with partner institutions and stakeholders at regional level y Seeking co-financing in liaison with Desk Officers and Field Programme Directors (relations with regional funding agencies). y Ensuring the implementation of specific training for the national teams as outlined in the project document. y Follow up of capacity-building activities carried out with the diabetes-control associations and of the staff involved in the project. y Support and advice to national teams on diabetes and the methodology specific to the project’s implementation, in consultation with the technical advisers concerned.
y Writing narrative and financial reports and introducing financial and control mechanisms + relations with the EU (in particular the delegation in Nairobi), in liaison with the Desk Officer and Field Programme Director for Kenya.

PROFILE SOUGHT : Essential :
A minimum of four years’ experience of management-coordination and/or support to health projects in a developing country, preferably in Africa.
At least three years’ positive experience of managing senior-level teams and of working in partnership with local associations.
General knowledge of the prevention and global care-management of disabling diseases
Competence in the field of managing and planning multi-country projects
Pedagogical skills ( training experience would be an advantage).
Writing skills (reports, capitalisation documents, research)
Communication skills (ability to listen and express oneself clearly and concisely)
Adaptability and diplomacy
Computer literacy

Additional :
General knowledge of disability issues (Handicap Creation Process, UN convention …)
Qualifications :
Diploma in health or social sciences, with additional training in public health.

WORKING LANGUAGES : French / English compulsory
SPECIFICITIES OF THE POST : The need for regular monitoring missions in the three target countries mean frequent travelling. Education, health and leisure facilities are all available in Nairobi, but the city’s crime rate is high.

CONDITIONS : Depending on experience
Volunteer status : Expatriation allowance of €750 to €850 a month + local allowance + accommodation + 100% health cover and medical repatriation insurance. For more information click here. Salaried status : €2200 to €2500 gross salary according to experience + expatriation allowance of €457 + 100% health cover and medical repatriation insurance + “family policy”. For more information click here.
Please send a CV and covering letter quoting the reference given above.

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL -14, avenue Berthelot -69361 LYON CEDEX 07 Or by Email : recrut11@handicap-international.org
Please do not telephone
Candidates from Canada or the United States and nationals of these countries should send their application to the following address :

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL CANADA 1819 Boulevard René Lévesque, bureau 401 -MONTRÉAL, QUÉBEC -H3H 2P5 Or by email : jobs@handicap-international.ca or fax : 514-937-6685
Please do not telephone



I received this announcement via the <a href=”http://www.gpdd-online.org/mailinglistGlobal Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list.

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NEWS: Jamaica HIV & AIDS Program Includes Disabled People

Posted on 2 October 2008. Filed under: Blind, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean | Tags: , , , , |

The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS) program in Jamaica has been taking action to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind in HIV/AIDS education efforts. Initiatives include providing materials in Braille for blind people and incorporating sign language into television public service announcements for deaf people. Read more detail about the project at:

http://www.unaids.org/en/KnowledgeCentre/Resources/FeatureStories/archive/2008/20080905_disability_hiv_jamaica.asp

Learn more about HIV/AIDS in relation to people with disabilities, and some of the resources available to help, by clicking on HIV/AIDS in the pull-down menu under “Topics/Categories” in the right-hand navigation bar.



I learned about this project via a recent issue of the Disabled Peoples International electronic newsletter.

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RESOURCE: The BIAS FREE Framework: A practical tool for identifying and eliminating social biases

Posted on 1 October 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Health, Inclusion, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The worst myth that most good people have about bias, prejudice, discrimination, and exclusion is that only bad people do these things. If only bad people or bad organizations excluded others on the basis of disability status, gender, race, sexual orientation, religion, or socio-economic class, then the world would be in pretty good shape. And people with disabilities would no longer face frustration when persuading mainstream international development organizations to include their needs and concerns. After all, most of us (or so most of us hope) are good people.

Unfortunately, in the real world, most exclusion is done by good people who don’t even realize that they might be creating barriers simply by carrying on with business as usual. This is because many people simply don’t know enough about the lives, challenges, and strengths of the people in their communities who happen to be different from them. This ignorance is perhaps particularly problematic for people with disabilities because disability is often so profoundly invisible and ignored in many societies. (Did you know, for example, that doorknobs, flourescent lights, and pictures can all create barriers for people with certain disabilities?)

Exclusion caused by good people is often the hardest kind of exclusion to overcome because it first means helping people to understand that “being a good person” and “being a person who excludes others” are not mutually exclusive concepts. Then comes the next big challenge: we can only remove sources of bias in our research, policies, programs, services, and practices if we first learn how to see the bias. So how do we learn to see the biases that are so deeply buried in our environment, in our policies, in our programs, in ourselves?

One possible starting point is a 64-page publication entitled The BIAS FREE Framework: A practical tool for identifying and eliminating social biases in health research. The framework is available in PDF format in English, French, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish, and Vietnamese; and it looks like they plan a Chinese translation as well (the button is there but doesn’t lead anywhere yet).

This framework is not specific to international development. In fact, it’s focus is on eliminating bias in health research. But the manual is meant to be used more broadly by, not only researchers, but also students and policy makers, and could also be used by program directors and service providers. It is also meant for use in both high-income and low-income countries. It does not cover every possible area of bias. But it does include a focus on bias related to disability; to gender; and to race. And some of the broad concepts could be carried over to other types of bias, across many of the different sectors of international development.

The BIAS FREE Framework discusses how bias creeps in and serves to perpetuate social hierachies; how we tend to both overlook differences and also to exagerate them; how many of us forget to account for the complex social hierachies within gender, race, and disability issues, as well as across them. It discusses how people can identify and minimize these biases.

Learn more about the publication, or download it in your preferred language, at:

http://www.globalforumhealth.org/Site/002__What%20we%20do/005__Publications/010__BIAS%20FREE.php

Or, if you are looking for shorter, more accessible essays that may help stretch your thinking about disability issues, and why good people may still do bad things even when trying very hard to do only good things, consider a few samples from an excellent blogger named Amanda Baggs:

No Good Guys or Bad Guys Here

The Vehement Defense of Prejudicial Behavior

And this next one should be read by anyone and everyone who thinks their most important mission is to “help” people–whether by “helping” people they mean disabled people; poor people; people in developing countries; or all three. Do be sure to follow all the links and read those as well. It’s well worth your time to work through all of it. Then set aside some more time to think through all the implications. Are you a “Do-Gooder”? Are you sure?

Do-gooderism: Links, quotes, and discussion

Amanda Baggs has influenced my thinking in all kinds of subtle ways I couldn’t even begin to identify. I have read every single post in her entire blog, including all of the comments and most of her links. And it has been time very well spent.

No, Amanda Baggs doesn’t write about international development. Her focus is on disability rights and a broad spectrum of other issues. But she thinks deeply about power imbalances, power structures, and why oppression happens, in all kinds of ways that most people never think about. Much of it could be extended broadly not only to relationships between disabled people and non-disabled people but also to relationships between poor people and the people who deliver services.

If you have time to explore, I encourage you to go to her blog and do so: http://ballastexistenz.autistics.org



I first learned about The BIAS FREE Framework via the AdHoc_IDC email discussion list.

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RESOURCE: Deaf Peers’ Education Manual on Sexuality, HIV & AIDS

Posted on 30 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Research tells us that people with disabilities, and Deaf people, are at higher risk for HIV/AIDS than the general population. But many HIV/AIDS education programs exclude people with disabilities from opportunities to learn how to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS. Sometimes this exclusion is deliberate: some program managers mistakenly assume that Deaf and disabled people don’t need sexuality education because they don’t have sex. In other cases, programs exclude because they don’t offer sign language interpreters, nor do they offer print materials that are accessible to people who are intelligent but who have lacked access to opportunities for an education.

A training manual has been developed that can be used to help trainers learn how to facilitate workshops on sexual health and HIV/AIDS, entitled the The Deaf Peers’ Education Manual (PDF format, 6.44 Mb). This manual is targeted at members of the Kenyan Deaf community. The signs described in the manual, for example, assume knowledge of Kenyan Sign Language, rather than the many other hundreds of signed languages and dialects used around the world. However, most of the content can be easily adapted for use in Deaf communities in other countries.

The manual offers guidance to facilitators on how they can sensitively handle frank discussion of sexuality; the physical and emotional implications of human sexual development; the difference between friendship, infatuation, and real love; how the HIV virus is transmitted; the difference between HIV and AIDS; and how the HIV virus is NOT transmitted. It suggests a range of activities that can be used with Deaf participants to help them understand these complex and sensitive topics.

The manual was first released in 2007. But the organization that initiated the manual, Sahaya International, is interested in revising and updating the manual based on the feedback of other people who use it around the world. At this time, print copies of the manual are not available, but individuals may print their own copy from the PDF file. Koen Van Rampay with Sahaya International invites feedback on the manual, as well as discussion on printing and distributing the manual, at: kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu

More information about Sahaya International; their manual; and their project to teach Deaf people in Kenya about Sexuality and HIV/AIDS is available at:

http://www.sahaya.org/deaf.html

Please note that the manual has some separate, companion materials that trainers can use in educating Deaf participants. One set of printed materials can be used to teach participants basic facts on human sexual anatomy and reproduction. The other teaches participants about common myths related to HIV/AIDS. Both use cartoons and are designed to be used by readers who may have had limited opportunity to pursue an education or acquire literacy skills. The link to the main Deaf Peers’ Education Manual is available near the top of http://www.sahaya.org/deaf.html, but people will need to scroll down to the very bottom of the page to download the other materials.

The linked web page also shows some videos about the Sahaya International project in Kenya. These videos are in Kenya Sign Language with a voice interpreter (presumably in English). Unfortunately, these videos do not have subtitles. This creates a barrier for Deaf people outside of Kenya who might know other signed languages, but not Kenyan Sign Language. This is a shame because some of the people who are likely to have the strongest interest in the Sahaya International project are other Deaf people in other countries who want to emulate their efforts within their own local Deaf communities.

I hope that Sahaya International will find some low-cost (or no-cost) manner for putting subtitles on their videos. A suggestion: Many vloggers (video bloggers) who post to http://www.deafread.com face similar challenges where they wish to subtitle without high tech skills or financial resources. Perhaps a keyword search there would lead to web pages that offer tips, suggestions, and possible resources. Or, if someone reading this at We Can Do can offer the appropriate expertise or technical guidance, perhaps you could contact Sahaya International directly at kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu.



We Can Do learned about the Sahaya International project and manual when Ghulam Nabi Nizamani widely circulated an email originating with Koen Van Rampay.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Impact of Nanoscale Science on Disability

Posted on 29 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, Health, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Opportunities, Poverty, technology, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for papers On the impact of nanoscale science and technology on disability, community and rehabilitation.
[NOTE from We Can Do editor: The deadline for abstracts is October 30, 2008; full articles can be submitted later, for authors whose abstracts are selected. We Can Do readers will note that the areas of suggested possible focus may include the impact of nanotechnology on people with disabilities in low-income countries; on international development; and on relevant topics such as water and sanitation, the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, and others. Inquiries and abstracts should be directed to the journal, NOT We Can Do.]

For a special issue of the International Journal on Disability, Community & Rehabilitation (IJDCR) (http://www.ijdcr.ca/copyright.shtml)

Guest Editor: Gregor Wolbring, Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies Program, Dept of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary. <gwolbrin@ucalgary.ca>

Invitation
Nanoscale science and technology, while still in its infancy, describes a rapidly growing sphere of enquiry, with many and varied implications for the disability field. To establish a ‘benchmark’ of the current state of knowledge and conceptual understanding, the Editors of IJDCR decided a special issue should be devoted to the topic. Background information and potential topics are presented below.

We invite potential contributors, regardless of fields of study (discipline), to submit 250-word Abstracts that articulate the conceptual arguments and knowledge base to be covered in a critical analysis on some aspect of the impact of nanoscale science and technology on disability, community and/or rehabilitation. Please submit abstracts to the Guest Editor via e-mail by 30 October, 2008.

From selected abstracts, we will request full articles of 3000-5000 words (excluding figures and tables) of original research and scholarship on a range of topics. Note that an invitation to submit an article does not guarantee its publication. Every submitted article will be subject to blind peer review and recommendations arising.

Background
Nanotechnology in all its meanings allows for, among other things, the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale and enables a new paradigm of science and technology that sees different technologies converging at the nanoscale namely:

  • nanoscience and nanotechnology,
  • biotechnology and biomedicine, including genetic engineering,
  • information technology, including advanced computing and communications,
  • cognitive science (neuro-engineering),
  • synthetic biology;

hence, the designation “NBICS” (nano-bio-info-cogno-synbio).

Many lists of anticipated nanoproducts exist (Institute of Nanotechnology 2005;Kostoff et al. 2006). Applications for NBICS products are envisioned in areas such as the environment, energy, water, weapons and other military applications, globalization, agriculture, and health (e.g., more efficient diagnostics and genetic testing, cognitive enhancement; life extension and enhancing human performance in general) (M.Roco 2003). Many believe that advances in NBICS hold the key for extreme life extension to the level of immortality and the achievement of morphological (Anders Sandberg 2001) and genomic freedom(Wolbring 2003). NBICS-medicine is envisioned by some to have the answer to global problems of disease and ill medical and social health. Others argue for the pursuit of ‘morphological freedom’ (Anders Sandberg 2001)–allowing the human body to move beyond typical functioning of the species. Disabled people are often highlighted as the beneficiaries of NBICS-medicine products. NBICS applications and the selling of NBICS health products focuses mostly on offering disabled people medical solutions (prevention or cure/normative adaptation) and might move towards transhumanist solutions (augmentation, enhancement of the human body) but rarely offers social solutions (adaptation of the environment, acceptance, societal cures of equal rights and respect). Many NBICS applications/products for disabled people are envisioned and are under development(Wolbring 2005).

We chose this topic for an issue of IJDCR because of how the discourses around these new and emerging nanoscale science and technologies are emerging and their potential impact on people with disabilities, the communities linked to them and/or practitioners as well as others. Consumers and researchers linked to the disability discourse are involved will shape the positive or negative consequences for everyone involved.

Nanotechnology and NBICS have an impact on disabled people in at least four main ways.

Impact of NBICS on disabled people (Wolbring 2006)

NBICS may develop tools to adapt the environment in which disabled people live and to give disabled people tools that would allow them to deal with environmental challenges. This side of S&T would make the life of disabled people more liveable without changing the identity and biological reality of the disabled person

NBICS may develop tools that would diagnose the part of disabled people’s biological reality seen by others as deficient, defect, impaired and ‘disabled’ thus allowing for preventative measures

NBICS may develop tools that would eliminate that portion of disabled people’s biological reality seen by others as deficient, defect, impaired and ‘disabled’.

NBICS may be a target for – and an influence upon – the discourses, concepts, trends and areas of action that impact disabled persons.

Discourses:

  • The discourse around the term human security
  • The religious discourse
  • The politics of biodiversity
  • The politics of inequity
  • The politics of the ethics discourse.
  • The politics of law:
  • The politics of raising the acceptance level for a given technology
  • The politics of setting goals and priorities
  • The politics of language
  • The politics of self perception and identity (Body politics)
  • The politics of red herrings
  • The politics of interpreting International treaties
  • The politics of governance
  • The Politics of evaluation, measuring, analysis, and outcome tools

Concepts:

  • Self identity security
  • Ability security
  • Cultural identity/diversity
  • Morphological freedom and morphological judgement(Anders Sandberg 2001)
  • Freedom of choice and tyranny of choice
  • Duty to fix oneself
  • Duty to know
  • Parental responsibility
  • Societal responsibility

Trends:

  • Change in the concepts of health, disease and ‘disability’/’impairment’
  • The appearance of enhancement medicine and the acceptance of beyond species-typical functioning
  • Moving from curative to enhancement medicine; decrease in curative medicine and the appearance of the transhumanist/enhancement burden of disease
  • Moving from human rights to sentient rights
  • Moving from morphological freedom to morphological judgement
  • The appearance of the techno poor disabled and impaired
  • Moving from freedom of choice to tyranny of choice judgement

Areas of Action:

  • Nanotechnology/NBIC for development
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and the UN Millennium Development Goals
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and global medical and social health
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and accessibility
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and law
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and water and sanitation
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and disaster management
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and weapons/war
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and ethics/philosophy
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and social science/anthropology
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and community
  • Nanotechnology/NBIC and networking

All of the above discourses, concepts, trends and areas of actions impact on disabled people[1] and others.

Potential contributors to this Special Issue might consider areas from the above table or one of the following topics:

1. What are the potential positive and negative impacts of envisioned nanoscale science and technology products and research and development on:

  • disabled people,
  • the community around them
  • practitioners, consumers and researchers linked to the disability discourse
  • community rehabilitation and the rehabilitation field in general
  • inclusive education and the education of disabled people in general
  • employability of disabled people
  • citizenship of disabled people
  • body image of disabled people
  • medical and social health policies and their impact on disabled people
  • health care for disabled people
  • the elderly
  • disabled people in low income countries
  • laws related to disabled people such as the UN Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
  • the concept of personhood
  • concept of health and health care
  • the measure of disability adjusted life years and other measurements used to guide health care dollar allocation
  • quality of life assessment

2. What are the potential positive and negative impacts of the new social philosophy of transhumanism that is seen as being enabled by nanoscale science and technology products and research and development?
3. What impacts of potential nanoscale science and technology products and research and development onto disabled people will impact other marginalized groups?

For more information about the International Journal of Disability, Community & Rehabilitation (IJDCR) please go to http://www.ijdcr.ca.

References
Anders Sandberg. Morphological Freedom — Why We not just Want it, but Need it. 2001. <http://www.nada.kth.se/~asa/Texts/MorphologicalFreedom.htm>

Institute of Nanotechnology (2005). Research Applications And Markets In Nanotechnology In Europe 2005 <http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reportinfo.asp?report_id=302091&t=t&cat_id=4>

Kostoff, Ronald et al. “The seminal literature of nanotechnology research.” Journal of Nanoparticle Research (2006): 1-21. <http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.1007/s11051-005-9034-9>

M.Roco, W. Bainbridge eds. Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance: Nanotechnology, Biotechnology, Information Technology and Cognitive Science. 2003. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht Hardbound. <http://www.wtec.org/ConvergingTechnologies/Report/NBIC_report.pdf> [PDF format]

Wolbring, G. “SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AND THE TRIPLE D (DISEASE, DISABILITY, DEFECT).” Ed. William Sims Bainbridge Mihail C.Roco National. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic, 2003. 232-43<http://www.wtec.org/ConvergingTechnologies/> <http://www.bioethicsanddisability.org/nbic.html>

Wolbring, G (2005). HTA Initiative #23 The triangle of enhancement medicine, disabled people, and the concept of health: a new challenge for HTA, health research, and health policy Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, Health Technology Assessment Unit, Edmonton, Alberta Canada <http://www.ihe.ca/documents/hta/HTA-FR23.pdf> [PDF format]

Wolbring, G (2006). Scoping paper on Nanotechnology and disabled people. Center for Nanotechnology in Society Arizona State University [On-line]. <http://cns.asu.edu/cns-library/documents/wolbring-scoping%20CD%20final%20edit.doc> [Word format]

——————————————————————————–
[1] The term ‘disabled people’, as used here, reflects the way in which environmental factors impact on the ability of individuals with sensory, motor, cognitive or other variations to participate in society, consistent with its usage by Disabled Peoples’ International.



Thank you to Gregor Wolbring for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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Take Action! Promote the Mainstreaming of Disability in the MDGs

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

MEMORANDUM
TO: GPDD PARTNERS
FROM: GPDD SECRETARIAT
SUBJECT: PROMOTING THE MAINSTREAMING OF DISABILITY IN THE MDGs
DATE:    9/25/2008
 
The General Assembly’s sixty-third session is taking place at the UN headquarters in New York. This session marks a special occasion to highlight the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and a number of consultations and events examining multiple dimensions of MDG activities are taking place throughout the week. This presents a unique opportunity for all concerned stakeholders to advocate for the inclusion of disability in the MDGs.
 
Since the GA Plenary may discuss this issue from October 6 to 8, immediate action is essential. For this reason, the Secretariat of the Global Partnership for Disability and Development is:

1)    Circulating a letter to UN Missions and Foreign Affairs Offices of Member States requesting Member States to make interventions and support a resolution in favor of mainstreaming disabilities in the MDGs.

2)    Encouraging advocates and activists to phone, fax, or e-mail relevant government officials in their countries.

3)    Sending an advisory to relevant media outlets.

We request your support in these actions as well as your suggestions.

Your ideas and participation will make a difference! A sample letter and relevant contact information are attached for your use.

FYI,  a copy of the Secretary-General’s report on mainstreaming disability in monitoring and evaluation of MDGs conducted as part of the Fifth quinquennial  review and appraisal of the World Program of Action concerning Disabled Persons and a short summary are attached, as well.
 
Sincerely,
Maria Verónica Reina
Executive Director
GPDD

Sample Letter
Disability advocates may wish to use this sample letter as inspiration when writing to the UN Mission Office for your country, or when writing to the Foreign Affairs office in your country. Find the full list of UN Mission offices, with the relevant contact information, at http://www.un.org/members/missions.shtml. Search the website for your government to locate the contact information for your country’s equivalent of the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Dear Mr./Ms. Minister of Foreign Affairs (or Head of Delegation):
As members of the Disability and Development community, we want to encourage your government to play a substantive and active role in favor of mainstreaming Disability in the Millennium Development Goals (during the fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action (A/63/183) which will be reviewed by the GA during its 63rd session (6-8 October under Social Development). The report was envisaged as a contribution to reinforcing the disability perspective in reviews of the progress made, and challenges encountered, in implementing the MDGs as requested by GA resolution 62/127.

Mainstreaming disability in the MDGs will help to ensure that no one is excluded from the processes of global development. In view of the enforcement of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, new and concerted efforts should be made in order to accomplish the advancement of persons with disability in the context of development. It is important to note the importance of promoting universal design, the design of products, environments, programmes, and services which are usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. Such increased accessibility benefits all members of society, not only persons with disabilities. Simultaneously, it is also relevant to state that disability specific programs addressing MDG concerns are also needed to guarantee the full inclusion of persons with disabilities on an equal basis with others.

For these reasons, we respectfully urge you to promote a resolution on mainstreaming disability in the MDGs during the fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action at the 63rd Session of the GA.

Sincerely,

Summary Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons (A/63/183)
The full Fifth quinquennial review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons, referred to in Maria Verónica Reina’s letter, was too long to publish here. But someone also disseminated a shorter summary which is provided below.

The fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action (A/63/183) will be reviewed by the General Assembly during its 63rd session(6-8 October under social development)The report was envisaged as a contribution to reinforcing the disability perspective in reviews of progress and challenges encountered in implementing the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as requested by General Assembly resolution 62/127. The resolution also requested the Secretary-General to present proposed updates of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons which were summarized in Annex I to the report. The report also presents Annex II, “Millennium Development Goals: Mainstreaming Disability”, which presents practical guidance on the inclusion of disability in the processes of the MDGs.

The principal issue addressed in the fifth review and appraisal is the emergence of a “new normative and policy architecture” on the advancement of persons with disabilities within the context of development. This architecture comprises the broad policy framework of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons (for policy formulation, planning and development); the tactical guidance for States of the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities; and the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which are legally binding for States parties, and is discussed in the section “International Disability Architecture”.

A second point of importance within the report is the emergence, of regional action plans and programmes on the advancement of persons with disabilities, which reflect needs and priorities of the respective regional actors and their complementary relationship to the international architecture.

A third point addresses the processes of the MDGs and focuses on options suggested in the architecture to ensure that no one is excluded from the processes of global development.

A fourth point within the report discusses the expanded constituencies for the advancement of persons with disabilities. As the median global age is on the rise, disability will have major policy implications because the prevalence of disabilities tends to be higher among older persons. The new constituencies represent important agents in a new and concerted effort as part of a disability-sensitized community to the advancement of persons with disability in the context of development. It is important to note the importance of promoting universal design, the design of products, environments, programmes and services which are usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. Such increased accessibility benefits all members of society, not only persons with disabilities.

The fifth, point, is the need for a single, comprehensive biennial review of progress and obstacles in implementing a global strategy for disability-inclusive development. This unified report on the new disability architecture could facilitate substantive exchange and learning from the findings and recommendations of the CRDP treaty body once established, within the context of development.

Annex I to the Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action – Updates to the World Programme of Action
Annex I discusses the issue of the updating of the World Programme of Action, as requested by General Assembly resolution 62/127.

The report recommends that the General Assembly endorse a plan to develop a Global Strategy toward Disability-Inclusive Development 2010-2015, through regional consultations and contributions from experts. These strategic guidelines could be developed based on the complementarities and synergies of three disability-specific instruments, namely the World Programme of Action, the Standard Rules and the Convention, and could incorporate updates proposed by Member States. There are existing regional guidelines for disability action in the context of development that could provide a basis for the development of a global strategy.
Annex II to the Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action – Millennium Development Goals: Mainstreaming Disability

Annex II provides a selection of examples and guidelines for mainstreaming disability in the MDGs and includes possible indicators to include disability in the monitoring of progress in achieving MDGs.



This call for action, and the associated materials, was recently circulated in several different locations including the IDA_CRPD_Forum and the GPDD mailing list.



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Including Everybody: Website on Disability and MDGs Launched

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), News, Opinion, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
End poverty and hunger. Put all children in school. Empower women. Stop children from dying. Keep pregnant and birthing mothers healthy. Fight AIDS, malaria, and other disease. Create a sustainable environment. And promote global cooperation. These are the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)–an important set of goals agreed upon by key leaders and heads of state from around the world in September 2000. No, they don’t mention people with disabilities at all–and I will come back to this point in a few paragraphs. Or you can ignore me and go straight to the new website on disability and the MDGs. But in theory, the MDGs are meant to help everyone.

Each goal has a set of specific targets to be achieved, most with the deadline set for 2015. For example, the poverty goal includes a target to cut the number of people living on less than $1 a day in half by 2015. And the goal on child mortality includes a target to cut the child mortality rate by two-thirds among children below age 5. Many country governments, multi-lateral development banks, international development organizations, and donors have invested billions of dollars into projects meant to help more countries and regions meet the Millennium Development Goals.

What has the results been? Mixed. Some of the goals, such as the targets for reducing poverty and hunger, or in putting all children in primary school, have been met–and exceeded in many countries particularly in eastern Asia. Progress in southern Asia has helped also. But many countries in sub-Saharan Africa lag far behind in meeting many of the MDGs.

You can read more about the overall progress–or lack of it–at http://www.undp.org/mdg/basics_ontrack.shtml. Or if you only want to look up the progress in the country where you live, work, or care about the most, go to http://www.undp.org/mdg/tracking_countryreports2.shtml.

People with Disabilities and the MDGs
But what about people with disabilities? Unfortunately, they have been so invisible that most programs and governments don’t even count them. That means it’s hard to find reliable numbers that measure whether people with disabilities are included–or left behind–in the haphazard progress that has been made toward the MDGs. But, we can make some educated guesses.

For example, what limited numbers do exist estimate that possibly as many as 98% of children with disabilities in some developing countries never go to school. Personally, I doubt this number is universally true. For one thing, there is a great deal of variation from country to country in how proactive they are about finding creative ways to include children with disabilities in school. Read Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience (PDF format, 4.14 Mb) for examples of progress.

Then, there is probably some variation depending on the disability. A child with a relatively mild walking-related disability, for example, might have only minor difficulty reaching school if it is not too far. Or a child with undiagnosed and unaccommodated dyslexia might sometimes make it through a few years of school, and even learn a little, before they quit in frustration.

But if that 98% figure is anywhere close to the mark, then it is safe to say that the MDG target on universal primary education has failed disabled children miserably. We do know that they are very disproportionately left behind: the UK Department of International Development (DFID) says that one-third of the 72 million children who are out of school have disabilities, even though people with disabilities are only an estimated 10 percent of the world population in general. And this only covers the education-related target of the MDGs; the new website on disability and the MDGs points out gaps in all the rest.

Disability Inclusion is Everyone’s Business
So what’s the answer to this problem? A thorough response to this question would fill a book. One thing, however, is clear: It will not be resolved by any one government or organization working in isolation. And it certainly will not happen if resource-strapped disability-oriented organizations are left to tackle the problem alone. It will take many governments, agencies, and organizations working together–including those that do not normally specialize in disability issues. In short, everybody who is doing anything to address the MDGs needs to identify better ways to include people with disabilities in the work they’re already doing.

This begins by increasing everyone’s awareness of the complex relationship between disability and the MDGs. By “everyone” I mean both disability advocates (so they can help advocate the issue) and also mainstream international development professionals (so they can find ways to ensure their programs are not inadvertently leaving disabled people behind). Either way, you can start learning at the new website on disability and the Millennium Development Goals, Include Everybody, at:

http://www.includeeverybody.org/

What Do I Think of “Include Everybody”?
When you consider that this website is brand new, I think it makes an excellent start at covering the issues. In the long run, as with any new endeavor, I see room for them to expand. For example, their page on achieving universal primary school education or the page on promoting gender equality and empowering women could usefully link to publications such as Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb). Or their page on combating HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases could link to the on-line global survey on disability and HIV/AIDS.

They also could consider eventually developing a one to two page, attractive looking, factsheet on disability and the MDGs that advocates could print out and disseminate when educating others about the topic. They also could consider developing a similarly attractive, one-page factsheet for each of the MDGs individually. The latter could be useful, for example, for passing along to a specialist who only wants to read the information on child mortality without also having to wade through a lot of detail on environmental sustainability. Or vice versa.

But, for now, this web site is a good place to start learning.

http://www.includeeverybody.org/links.php



The Include Everybody website has been publicized in several different locations by now, including the GPDD mailing list, the Intl-Dev mailing list, Joan Durocher’s mailing list, and others.

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Statement on the Millennium Development Goals and Disability, from the Africa Regional Conference

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

THE STATEMENT OF THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE, HELD AT THE PANAFRIC HOTEL, NAIROBI, KENYA 15TH TO 17TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

We, the 200 delegates of the Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference from the, Central, Eastern, Northern, Western and Southern sub regions of Africa met in Nairobi, Kenya, at the Panafric Hotel on 15th to 17th September 2008, to examine the status of MDGs in respect to the inclusion and mainstreaming of disability;

And further to enhance the capacity of leaders from the disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in African countries;

Noting that MDGs have no specific reference to persons with disabilities and therefore their continued exclusion in the campaign processes, policies, planning, programmes and implementation;

Concerned also that disability has not been mentioned in the midway Millennium Development Goals Report;

Further acknowledging that the convention on the rights of PWDs has recently come into effect, to among other things strengthen the resolve for inclusion of people with disabilities;
We note with dismay the continued categorisation of people with disabilities as vulnerable which further marginalises us and consigns us to invisibility, we state that we wish to be recognised as actors in the development processes;

We Resolve As Delegates That We Shall;
• Communicate the outcome of this conference to our governments to review, prioritise and include issues of disability in their Country Statements during their high level meetings on MDGs in New York, in the September 2008 Summit
• Call on our Governments to move and support a motion during the UN General Assembly, calling for the establishment of a new UN Special Agency on Disability; to provide leadership, coordination, harmonisation and enhanced monitoring and reporting.
• Engage our Governments to ensure that People with Disabilities are protected from adverse effects from rising costs and related vulnerabilities and participate and benefit from existing social protection schemes
• Lobby Governments through the African Development Bank and related partners to establish an African Disability Equity Fund to support economic empowerment, entrepreneurship and business of people with disabilities
• Encourage the use of professional campaigners including goodwill ambassadors in promoting disability inclusion
• Recognise the efforts of parents, friends and guardians of people with disabilities and recognise them as part of the wider disability movement
• Uphold the principle of gender equity in disability
• Promote the use of positive language in reference to people with disabilities
We Urge The UN Through Member States;
• To establish a Specialist Agency on Disability in the league of UNICEF and UNIFEM to provide leadership and global accountability on matters related to the disabled people
• To prioritise include and partner with the disability movement in its entire millennium campaign initiatives and develop the strategies for doing so in the September summit
We Urge The AU And Related Bodies To;
• Set up a Disability Desk within all African regional bodies to monitor the implementation of both the convention and human rights violation of people with disabilities within the respective regions.
• Mainstream disability into their programmes and performance management systems
• Establish peer review mechanism and performance management system for disability in Africa
• Ensure political and social economic representation of people with disabilities in NEPAD and develop terms of reference for their participation.
• Work with DPOs to urgently review the structure and mandate of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)
• Extend the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities for another ten years by means of a proclamation by the meeting of the African Heads of State planned for January 2009
• Facilitate self- representation of PWDs in all commissions, Pan Africa Parliament and other structures

We Call On The Secretariat Of African Decade Of Persons With Disability to;
• Establish a programme to develop human resource capacity for policy analysis to act as a watch dog in monitoring disability inclusion
• Allocate responsibilities, roles and duties to the regional federations and other partners in order to ensure effective, well – monitored follow up and implementation strategies
We urge all Government to;
• Ratify, domesticate and implement the UN convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
• Work with DPOs in nominating the members of the panel of experts in convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
• Recognise DPOs as agents of change and therefore as partners in development planning and programmes
• Include people with disabilities and disability into their poverty reduction and development programmes
• Put into place affirmative action to enhance participation in political social and economic sectors
• Include disability data collection within the general national data collection systems recognising diversity in disability
• Use data to inform planning and service delivery and monitoring and evaluation
• Highlight and include disability in the existing MDG indicators in partnership with the disability movement.

We Call On Development Partners To;
• Prioritise disability as a tool for planning and analysis for development assistance and international cooperation in all their international cooperation and assistance (aid, debt relieve and trade)
• Include and consult people with disabilities and their respective organisations in planning, implementation, monitoring and reporting
• Include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes

We Resolve That As Disabled Peoples Organisations We Shall;
• Advocate to ensure that disability issues are mainstreamed in all government, UN agencies and development partners policies, plans and programmes particularly those related to MDGs
• Endeavour to understand the structures of various government, UN agencies and development partners with a view to engaging with them more effectively for full inclusion of people with disabilities
• Advocate development partners to include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes
• Engage and influence the social development process
• Participate in the Social Protection processes to ensure people with disabilities are included
• Advocate and lobby to be included in national poverty reduction strategies and other national development plans and initiatives
• Explore avenues of partnership with private sector in their economic empowerment programes
• Utilize our individual and collective capacity to cause the implementation of programmes related to the MDGs for the benefit of people with disabilities
• Build our own capacity to engage with our government on their commitments and agreement at national and international levels
• Ensure that whatever is agreed at regional or national workshops cascades downward to people with disabilities at the grassroots and rural areas
• Familiarise ourselves with the disability policies of different development agencies and ensure that they benefit us
• Strengthen our unity and common voice in planning, implementation and monitoring processes whilst at the same time recognising diversity in disability
• Restructure and reform our internal governance structures to adopt modern management and good governance systems and increase transparency and accountability to our members
• Nurture and mentor youth with disabilities into leadership succession plans and support them towards social economic empowerment
• Make a paradigm shift from the charity model to the human rights and social development model
• Strategically engage with media for both awareness and advocacy and built our capacity to engage with media
• Sensitise and capacitate the media to various disability needs and to urge them to be inclusive in their presentation and reporting
• Link with African Universities to promote evidence based disability research and to promote disability inclusive academic programmes
• Review through our Governments the Accra Development Plan of Action and cause its implementation for the benefit of PWDs in Africa

These resolutions are the outcomes of the conference, formulated and spoken by the delegates at this esteemed Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference.



This statement from the Africa Regional Conference was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

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Good Practice AWARD COMPETITION for Service Providers in Middle East: Chance to Win 1500 Euro for Organization

Posted on 25 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Education, Funding, Health, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that the application deadline is October 18, 2008.

Funded by:
DISABILITY MONITOR INITIATIVE- MIDDLE EAST
Good Practice Award

The identification and sharing of good practices helps service providers to improve their performance and ultimately provide enhanced services for persons with disabilities. The Disability Monitor Initiative (DMI-ME) is conducting a Good Practice Awards program to recognize good practices in service delivery.

Who can apply:

  • Service providers in Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Palestine and Yemen working in the areas of healthcare, education, livelihood opportunities and social protection – for persons with disabilities
  • Service providers with no more than 40 salaried staff or an annual budget less than $300,000

What is the process:
1. Download the application form from this website www.disabilitymonitor-me.org
2. Complete the application and email to editor@disabilitymonitor-me.org
3. Applications can be submitted until Saturday 18 October 2008
4. The finalists from the region will be shortlisted and notified to arrange a face-to-face meeting to allow gathering of more in-depth information about the good practice
5. Face-to-face meetings will occur during October, November and December 2008, with the final winners notified shortly after all the assessments are completed

What is the prize:
For shortlisted service providers

  • their organization will be listed in the DMI-ME report themed around access to services for persons with disabilities in the Middle East due out in mid 2009
  • will receive a free flight and accommodation for a member of the organization to attend a major Regional Disability Conference for the Middle East scheduled to take place in mid 2009
  • For winning service providers

  • in addition to the above prizes, the organization will ultimately receive €1,500
  • a commemorative plaque presented before the media, recognizing their achievements in demonstrating a good practice for the delivery of social services for persons with disabilities in the Middle East

For more information please visit the DMI-ME website www.disabilitymonitor-me.org or email the team at the DMI-ME on editor@disabilitymonitor-me.org

Unsuccessful applicants will be informed why they were not considered as a winner and the judges’ decision is considered final.

This Good Practice Award competition is being funded by the Christian Blind Mission and Handicap International.



I received this notice via the GPDD mailing list.

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Three JOB POSTS with Hellen Keller International

Posted on 16 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Health, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , |

Three Positions with Helen Keller International
Three separate job positions are described below, all with the organization Helen Keller International; two are in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; the third is in New York City, USA. Please apply directly with Helen Keller International, NOT We Can Do.

Tanzania Senior Nutrition Coordinator/Africa Regional VAS M/E Advisor
Country Director, Tanzania
Director, Human Resources, New York City

Tanzania Senior Nutrition Coordinator/Africa Regional VAS M/E Advisor
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Helen Keller International (HKI) is a non-governmental organization whose mission is to save the sight and lives of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged by combating the causes and consequences of blindness and malnutrition. We do this by establishing programs based on evidence and research in vision, health and nutrition. HKI invites applications for
the position of Tanzania Senior Nutrition Coordinator/Africa Regional Vitamin A Supplementation (VAS) Monitoring and Evaluation (M/E) Advisor, based in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

Scope of Position: Tanzania Senior Nutrition Coordinator
responsibilities include: Ensure effective project planning, management and implementation by the HKI Tanzania Nutrition Team to achieve the objectives agreed to
in grants and contracts for HKI Tanzania’s nutrition and child survival projects. Provide technical expertise to the HKI Tanzania program and collaborating partners in nutrition, behavior change communication (BCC), training, facilitation and curriculum development. Serve as lead liaison with government officials, international and non-governmental organizations, technical advisory groups and other in nutrition and child survival.

Lead the development of all materials/tools for BCC, training, budgeting/planning and for any other requirements. Design and oversee training and capacity development workshops for nutrition and child survival within HKI and at the district, regional and national level. Develop concept papers, proposals and donor reports and document HKI’s experiences in nutrition and child survival.

Africa Regional VAS M/E Advisor responsibilities include: Provide technical support and leadership to Africa country offices implementing VAS programs in collaboration with the regional and deputy regional directors and Headquarters program staff. Ensure all aspects of VAS program planning, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation are in line with grant requirements. Particular focus will be on monitoring and evaluation to inform country programs’ moving to goal of universal coverage. Ensure that the quality, impact, scale and cost-effectiveness of HKI’s VAS programs meet standards. Take lead on consolidating country reporting into regional reports to donors and for internal audiences. Represent HKI at relevant
regional and international meetings. Maintain and further the Agency’s international role in VAS by assisting country offices to document and publish/present relevant programmatic findings and lessons learned.

REQUIREMENTS: Doctoral degree in the field of nutrition or public health
and at least 7 years related experience, including strong quantitative analytic skills, ideally including development and management of nutrition programs, especially those related to micronutrients. Strong technical knowledge of nutrition programs in the developing world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa including demonstrated ability to track and disseminate new developments in the field. Outstanding analytic skills. Two years of work experience in the areas of training, curriculum and BCC materials development. Outstanding oral and written communication skills in English; Kiswahili an advantage.

Proven ability to lead, conceptualize, develop, plan and manage programs.

Proven ability to supervise, impart knowledge, facilitate and train.

Computer literate in use of statistical software, spreadsheets and word-processing. Experience in publishing papers and writing for scientific journals. Ability to undertake regional and local travel (approximately 25-40%). Terms of Employment: Two-year contract renewable upon mutual agreement.

How to Apply: Interested candidates should submit: (1) cover letter; (2) current curriculum vitae in English; (3) a short writing sample (2-3 pages) in English, to Ms. Dora Panagides (Deputy Regional Director, East Central and Southern Africa) dpanagides@hki.org, with a copy to Human Resources
at hkihr@hki.org. Please note “TzNutr” in the subject line. Closing Date: Open until filled. Information about HKI is available at www.hki.org.

*******************************

Country Director
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Helen Keller International (HKI) is an international non-governmental organization. Its’ mission is to save the sight and lives of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged by combating the causes and consequences of blindness and malnutrition. We do this by establishing programs based on
evidence and research in vision, health and nutrition. HKI is seeking a Country Director in Tanzania to represent the Agency and be responsible for all HKI/Tanzania programs. Tanzania is a flagship program for HKI in Africa.

Our current programs focus on nutrition and blindness prevention. In the area of nutrition, HKI works in partnership with the Tanzania Food and Nutrition Council and the National Development Partners Group on Nutrition to strengthen the national vitamin A supplementation program and is a key partner in other micronutrient interventions such as advocating for the use of zinc in the treatment of diarrhea. This effort is supported through A2Z: The USAID Micronutrient and Child Blindness Project. In the area of blindness prevention, HKI works with primary schools in 15 districts to prevent trachoma through school health education, and currently works in 5
districts to reduce the backlog of trichiasis cases. In collaboration with the National Eye Care Program and the Kilimanjaro Centre for Community Ophthalmology, HKI is also implementing vision 2020 programs in the Singida region.

Scope of the Position: The Country Director (CD) is responsible for overseeing the implementation of HKI/Tanzania programs and management of project personnel to achieve the objectives agreed to in grants and contracts. The CD is responsible for generating funding from
international and bilateral agencies, corporations, and individuals to continue and
expand project activities in Tanzania. He/she is responsible for implementing strategic plans to further the overall mission and specific programs of HKI that meet the evolving needs and conditions in Tanzania. The CD is responsible for overall program design and proposal development; program implementation; reporting; and grant management, fiscal planning, and
human resource planning. The CD represents HKI in formal and informal meetings with Tanzanian government officials, international donor agencies, and national technical advisory groups pertinent to HKI project activities.

This position is based in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The CD reports to the Deputy Regional Director for East, Central and Southern Africa and closely collaborates with the HKI Africa Regional Office and Headquarters operations and program staff.

REQUIREMENTS: Minimum of a Masters Degree in public health, nutrition, development, management or related field, with strong preference given to doctoral level degree. Five (5) years demonstrated experience in program development, implementation and evaluation, including strong background in nutrition programs. Demonstrated capacity to mobilize program funding including donor cultivation and grants writing. Demonstrated ability to manage staff and other administrative and financial activities in developing country programs. Experience in managing USAID projects and familiarity with USAID policies and regulations. Experience in data analysis and interpretation is highly desirable. Excellent oral and written English language skills, including the ability to quickly synthesize complex technical and programmatic issues into concise communications. Demonstrated ability to undertake high-level representation and advocacy

To Apply: The initial contract is for two (2) years with possibility of renewal depending on funding. Interested candidates should submit: (1) cover letter; (2) current curriculum vitae in English; (3) a short writing sample (2-3 pages) in English, to Ms. Dora Panagides (Deputy Regional Director, East Central and Southern Africa) dpanagides@hki.org, with a copy to
Human Resources at hkihr@hki.org. Please note CD TANZANIA in the header. All correspondence should include physical and e-mail addresses as well as contact telephone number(s). E-mail applications are preferred.

Information about HKI is available at www.hki.org.

*******************************

Director, Human Resources
New York City

Helen Keller International (HKI) is a 92-year old international non-governmental organization whose mission is to save the sight and lives of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged by combating the causes and consequences of blindness and malnutrition. We do this by establishing programs based on evidence and research in vision, health and nutrition. Helen Keller International has approximately 550 staff located in offices in 19 countries and 7 states and the District of Columbia in the United States, with headquarters in New York City. HKI has created an exciting new position – Director, Human Resources – at its Headquarters office. In
collaboration with the Vice President, Human Resources, the Director will integrate Human Resources with HKI’s strategic plan and operational goals. The Director will oversee the daily operations of the program and be responsible for reviewing, maintaining and enhancing systems including implementing and overseeing policies and programs covering employment and performance management, compensation, benefits, training, employee relations, and legal
compliance. For a more detailed position description, please refer to the HKI website. Key challenges include the: Implementation of a new global HRIS system. Revision and updating of human resources policies, procedures and systems. Comprehensive global compensation and benefits analysis and subsequent program design and implementation

REQUIREMENTS: The Director will have a Bachelors Degree with 5-10 years of
broad generalist international nonprofit experience in a multi-location environment. A PHR/SPHR certification or a Masters Degree is highly desirable. Additionally, exceptional managerial skills, the ability to lead by example, and a demonstrated ability to think strategically, tactically
and creatively is a must. Competence in Human Resources Information Systems (HRIS) and strong computing skills are required.

To apply: Qualified candidates should send a cover letter including current salary and salary requirements and resume to hkihr@hki.org noting “Director,
HR” in the subject heading. Only qualified candidates will be contacted.

Information about HKI is available at www.hki.org.



These job announcements were recently circulated on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development email discussion list.

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Training Workshop on AIDS and Disability, 19-20 November 2008, Soesterberg, The Netherlands

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The application deadline is October 1, 2008, to attend the training seminar November 19-20, 2008. Inquiries should be directed to Enablement, or to h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT We Can Do.

The number of disabled people worldwide is considerable – the figure of 650 million is often quoted. People with a disability and their families also account for 20% of the world’s poorest people. But so far most HIV-AIDS programmes are not accessible to people with disabilities.
International attention to the rights of people with disabilities is increasing especially since May 2008, when the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities has come into effect. However governments and policy makers have generally yet to include disability issues in their AIDS strategic plans. Even within specific disability programmes it is not yet common to ensure that clients of such programmes do have access to appropriate information and services that are related to HIV-AIDS and reproductive health. Leaving disabled people out of HIV-AIDS prevention and care is shortsighted. Given the rapid growth of the epidemic and the size of the global disabled population (an estimated 10% of the world‘s citizens); the AIDS crisis cannot be addressed successfully unless individuals with disability are routinely included in all HIV-AIDS prevention, treatment and outreach efforts!

Local Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) teams, professionals, people with disabilities and their families share the same fears, misconceptions and risks as the rest of the general public with regard to the virus. They urgently need to receive accessible and appropriate information on HIV-AIDS. The launch of the new United Nations CBR Guidelines December 2008 in Bangkok will mean that information on HIV-AIDS will become more easily available for CBR teams as these guidelines pay specific attention to this subject. The goal of the section focusing on HIV-AIDS is to ensure ‘access for all’ to HIV-AIDS information, services and programmes. This goal involves three key areas: increasing individual knowledge, reducing stigma and discrimination and mitigating the impact HIV-AIDS has on families and communities.

During this 2-day workshop outstanding researchers and practitioners will ensure that participants will become sensitized towards the need for inclusion of disabled people within their mainstream HIV-AIDS programmes. They will also discuss strategies, tools and experiences in HIV/AIDS programmes that include disabled people and in CBR and disability programmes which integrate HIV-AIDS with their other activities.

Prospective participants are
• policy makers & planners as well as project staff working in the field of
development cooperation
• policy makers & planners as well as project staff of mainstream HIV¬AIDS organisations
• AIDS activists
• interested academic staff from various university faculties

Overall goal
Mainstream development and HIV¬AIDS organisations understand the importance of inclusion of disabled people in their HIV-AIDS programmes.

Objectives
Participants have an increased awareness about the vulnerability of persons with disabilities to the risk and impact of HIV and AIDS;
Participants have tools and arguments for how to ensure inclusion of disability in HIV-AIDS policies, strategies and programs; Participants are able to advocate within their own organizations for equal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support services for persons with disabilities.

Content
The following content is being discussed:
• Sexual and Reproductive Health: a right of disabled people
• The situation of HIV-AIDS among disabled people world wide
• Specific risk factors
• Inclusion of disabled people in mainstream HIV-AIDS programmes: why (not)?
• Inclusive HIV-AIDS programming
• Effectiveness of inclusive HIV-AIDS programmes
• Community Based Rehabilitation and HIV-AIDS

Lecturing methods
• Short lectures by experts,
• Discussions
• Small group work
• Case study analysis

Lecturing staff Dr. Nora Groce (USA) is a medical anthropologist, interested in the area of global health and international development with particular emphasis on cross-cultural systems of health care and health as human rights issues. Her research interests include issues of disability in international health and development, violence as a global public health problem and equity in access to health care in ethnic and minority communities. Current Research Projects of Nora Groce are:
• Disability and HIV/AIDS knowledge among Disabled Populations (and the Yale University/World Bank Global Survey on HIV/AIDS and Disability);
• World Bank Health Systems Assessment Project;
• Violence against Disabled Children; and
• HIV/AIDS Education in Indigenous Communities: Rites of Passage

George O. Obuya (Kenya) is project co-coordinator of the Deaf Social Counselling & HIV/AIDS Education Program. He is representing the Dar-es Salaam (Tanzania) based and recently formed African Deaf Union in the African Decade for Persons with Disability HIV/AIDS Steering Committee, as well as a senior board member of the Kenya National Association of the Deaf (KNAD).

Jessica de Ruijter is the advocacy officer at VSO Netherlands. She has much experience in the area of HIV prevention and started advocacy on HIV and disability since January 2008. She is also the co-chair of the DCDD working group HIV and Disability.

Dr Peter Rule is a Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Adult Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. He recently completed a three-country study for the World Bank on HIV & AIDS and Disability. He has experience of working with NGOs in KwaZulu-Natal in the fields of adult literacy, disability, gender, HIV/AIDS and early childhood development.

Geert Vanneste is a health and rehabilitation consultant who worked for Christoffel BlindenMission (CBM) in Rwanda (1987-1994) and Tanzania (1994-2007). His main expertise is in the area of CBR but increasingly he became involved in Health and Hospital Management and HIV-AIDS issues. Currently he is Independent Consultant and living in Belgium.

The workshop will be conducted under the leadership of Roelie Wolting and Huib Cornielje and supported by the HIV-AIDS working group of the Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development.

Dates
19th and 20th of November 2008
(10.00 to 17.00 hours)

Venue
Kontakt der Kontinenten, Soesterberg, The Netherlands

Course fees
€ 500,00 (including tea/coffee, lunches and a course map)

Maximum number of participants
24

Application and Further Information
Interested people should apply well in advance (before the 1st of October 2008) by filling out the attached application form.

Huib Cornielje Enablement Langenhorst 36 2402PX Alphen aan den Rijn
Tel: +31-172-436953
Fax: +31-172-244976 E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl Internet: www.enablement.nl
We gratefully acknowledge the financial support provided by CORDAID.

Interested participants should send the following information to h.cornielje@enablement.nl, NOT to We Can Do.

Application form for Disability- HIV&AIDS training
19th and 20th of November 2008

This form to be submitted to: Enablement, Langenhorst 36, 2402PX, Alphen aan den Rijn, The Netherlands. E-mail: h.cornielje@enablement.nl

General Information participant

First name
Family Name
Address
Postal code
City
Country
Telephone
Cell Phone
Fax
E-mail address
Employer/organisation
Profession or function within organisation
Organisation name (if different from information above)
Address
Postal Address
Postal Code
City
Telephone
Cell phone
Fax
E-mail address
Website

Dietary requirements?
If any special requirements please specify

Signature of applicant
Date
Place

Again, send application form to h.cornielje@enablement.nl



The above text was taken from an announcement being circulated by Enablement, an organization committed to disability and rehabilitation management, particularly in less developed nations.

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MULTIPLE JOB POSTS in Vietnam, US, with Viet-Nam Assistance for the Handicapped

Posted on 8 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Health, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Rehabilitation | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Please note that several different job positions are listed below. Please read carefully to ensure you understand which one is best suited to your skills. Inquiries, as always, should please go to the employer, NOT to We Can Do. The application deadline is October 15, 2008.

Viet-Nam Assistance for the Handicapped (VNAH) (www.vnah-hev.org) is an American Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) based outside of Washington, D.C. in Virginia. VNAH’s projects, supported by grants from the U.S government as well as foundations in the U.S and Japan and individual contributions, have provided development and humanitarian assistance to those most in need in Viet Nam since 1990.

On-going projects include technical assistance to local partners, including Vietnamese Government agencies, in the development, enactment and implementation of policies and programs aimed at assisting people with disabilities and Vietnamese local non-profit organizations. VNAH disability programs focus on providing technical assistance on vocational training, employment, rehabilitation services and provision of assistive devices for people with disabilities. VNAH also supports programs in education, small rural development projects and disaster relief assistance.

VNAH is now recruiting experienced international and national staff for the following positions:

Assistant Director, Development
1 U.S. national, based in VNAH head office in McLean, VA, U.S.A.

Major Responsibilities:
· Design and organize special events, public relations campaigns and workshops to promote support to VNAH’s humanitarian programs.

· Work with relevant entities to design and organize fundraising campaigns focused on, but not limited to the Vietnamese-American community.

· Establish and maintain effective relationships with organizations having expertise and experience in ethnic media.

· Establish and maintain relationships with groups, organizations and individuals that bring together Vietnamese-Americans for supporting humanitarian causes in Vietnam.

· Identify and engage voluntary participation of U.S. experts and professionals for medical missions to Vietnam that focused on training in rehabilitation, health care and community-based outreach services.

· Assist in program development, drafting project proposals, reports and information packets.

Requirements:
At least 3 years of practical experience in relevant works, particularly in resource mobilization.
Proven experience and skills in high level communication and PR.
Understanding of developmental works and mobilization of public and private resources.
Experience in program development, drafting proposal.

Assistant Director – Disability Inclusion Project
1 expatriate position based in Hanoi, Vietnam

This position is responsible for on the ground implementation of the USAID-funded project assisting the inclusion of Vietnamese with disabilities (PWD). Project’s objectives include the reform and full implementation of national laws and policies related to PWD, strengthening of PWD organizations and, improved vocational training and job opportunities for the disabled.

Major Responsibilities:
· Assist VNAH management in day-to-day implementation and monitoring of the USAID funded project to assist people with disabilities in Viet Nam

· Supervise project team, who will have responsibilities for all aspects of the project implementation.

· Establish and maintain close working relations with project partners, entities of the Government of Viet Nam, disability community and NGOs involved in similar efforts, as well as the private sector so as to encourage their engagement in efforts to support and employ people with disabilities.

· Support VNAH management in program development, drafting new proposal and mobilize public and private resources.

Requirements:
· At least 3 years of experience in the design and management of development programs.

· Proven experience in the design and implementation of disability policies and programs.

· Experience in annual planning, budgeting and strategy planning.

· High level communication and advocacy skills.

· Experience in personnel management, strong leadership and team building skills.

· Strong skills in verbal and written English.

Rehabilitation/Public Health Generalist

1 international position, based in Danang City, Vietnam

The primary responsibility of the post holder is to work with local and international partners to design and execute a program aimed at improving rehabilitation services to people with disabilities, capacity building to local health service providers and promoting transfer of rehabilitation technology and knowledge from the U.S. to Vietnam.

Major responsibilities:
Support VNAH management/project manager in implementation of the above program.
Support the operations of the American Rehabilitation Clinic in Danang City and associated local health clinics in referral services, provision of center rehabilitation services, evaluation of clinical outcomes and assessment of the quality of services.
Work with local and relevant partners to design and facilitate the training/educational programs aimed at improving capacity of local health service providers and practitioners
Assist in design and implementation of programs promoting the participation of U.S. health professionals and volunteers in VNAH’s programs in Vietnam.
Requirements:

The incumbent position is for a Public Health Generalist, possessing a Masters in Public Health (MPH) degree. It is critical that the post holder possess proven experience and knowledge in public health and community-based rehabilitation services. Other specific requirements include:

Three to five years of experience in program development and works related to public health and/or rehabilitation, direct patient care and community outreach.
A broad working knowledge of the U.S. physical rehabilitation practices and community-based services.
Experience in health outreach and training programs in developing nations is desirable.
Experience in coordination of international development work is a plus.
Ability to work with a diverse population and culture.
Proficiency in spoken and written English.

Project Manager – Disability Project

1 Vietnamese national, based in Kon Tum Province, Central Highlands, Vietnam.

This position is responsible for overseeing the implementation of a project that provides comprehensive rehabilitation services and social economic assistance to disabled people and their families, and capacity building for local health workers in Binh Dinh and Kon Tum Provinces. Post holder will have at least 4 years of experience in managing developmental projects related to disability, rehabilitation or health and community development. The post holder must have leadership experience, ability of personnel development and supervision and strong skills in communication, spoken and written Vietnamese and English.

Project Officers – Disability Project

3 Vietnamese nationals, one each based in Danang, Binh Dinh and Kon Tum Provinces

The Project Officers will be responsible for day-to-day implementation and monitoring of disability related project activities. Successful candidates must have a university or equivalent degree with at least 3 years of practical experience working for international NGO or government organizations in developmental works, preferably in disability or social policy related projects. Candidates must be fluent in verbal and written English and Vietnamese.

Interested candidates please send CV to VNAH at: vnah1@aol.com.

A more detailed job description is provided upon request. Closing date: October 15, 2008. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted for interview.

VNAH is an equal opportunities employer. Candidates with disabilities are encouraged to apply.



Thank you to Joan Durocher for circulating these job post announcements.

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Disability Awareness Action newsletter, Our Rights, Issue 2, August 2008

Posted on 3 September 2008. Filed under: Children, Cognitive Impairments, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Our Rights – issue 2, August 2008

DAA’s newsletter for Disability Lib.

In the interest of solidarity, this newsletter is sent around by email to disabled people and their organisations across the world, and we invite you to forward it freely. We have provided links to internet sites, web pages and video clips, but understand that not all links are technically accessible to all users. From October Our Rights will be available in electronic format and on our website. For our contact details follow this link http://www.daa.org.uk/

Contents
Welcome Hello from DAA
Disability LIB partners
• Central Office
ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth
Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Mind Politics
Stigma
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
Being an Un-Person
Sceptical about The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
60 years of UN Convention on Human Rights
Inclusion means … being given a £50 token?
International News
Canada says ‘go home’ to disabled child
Sex in the City, and world wide
From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
Sit-in at Nursing Home
And Finally …

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******************
Welcome Hello from DAA
Thank you to all of you who took the time to respond to our first issue. We are delighted to be back! We have had replies from around the world.

“I am very happy indeed to get the DAA Newsletter – this is one newsletter that I eagerly look forward to. The articles provided me with new insights and sharpen my understanding.”
“Great newsletter!”
“I access DAA website regularly and will disseminate DAA newsletter to all my contacts.”
“Have just read your first bulletin and I am impressed with its coverage.”
“thanks a lot for your nice news letter. Hope it can help my people in bangladesh.”

Thank you for all your comments. We have improved our technical set-up, so fewer newsletters should land in Junk or Spam email boxes. From October you can access the newsletter on our website. You can request picture supported and word versions. We continue to strive to make our articles interesting, relevant and accessible. Please let us know how we are doing. This edition has two main themes: the body politics of bio-ethics and inclusion. We will also tell you again who we are and what we hope to achieve. Enjoy!
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

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Disability LIB partners
The project has its own website and central office. www.disabilitylib.org.uk
Disability LIB
6 Market Road
London
N7 9PW
England UK
Telephone: 0844 800 4331
Email: contact@disabilitylib.org.uk

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ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
The Social Inclusion Campaign Award from the Sheila McKechnie Foundation was given to the director of ALLFIE, Tara Flood. Tara is also chair of DAA. Tara and the Alliance run a campaign ‘We know inclusion works’. This is in response to the negative reporting in the media. You are invited to send your stories about how inclusion works to info@allfie.org.uk

“Inclusion for me is about society, which respects the humanity of its people.” says a disabled young person in Nottinghamshire. “Inclusion happens when everyone feels appreciated and welcome to participate.”
Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education.

Inclusion is going to school with your friends. “I kept asking myself what words a mother would use to explain to her daughter why they did not want her at her school. Except that she was disabled. If my daughter had only been black, and not disabled too, would the school have been able to do the same?”
Preethi Manuel mother of Zahrah.

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Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth

The media reported that a nine-year-old girl called Lin was moving her lips, but did not actually sing at the opening of the Olympic Games in China. The beautiful voice we all heard was from a different girl, the seven year-old Yang Peiyi. Apparently Yang was not shown on stage nor on television, because she has crooked teeth. Her face and her smile were regarded as not photogenic enough, so she was hidden to avoid damaging China’s international image.

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Often we find disabled people are hidden, out-of-sight and at the margins of society. Society’s underlying cultural preferences in terms of the body and mind is for a particular image of beauty and health: a superficial one.

Our impairment difference is treated like a ‘stigma’, a characteristic that is deeply discredited within one’s society and for which we are rejected. Our difference, it seems, is challenging.

“I experienced a nervous breakdown 20 years ago. Despite recovering from that, then going on to achieve academically and build a good marriage, my family remain wary of me. My sister is bringing up her child to refer to me as “crazy”. She even considers it funny to do so. I have tried to express how hurtful I find this, but my feelings have been overlooked.”
7th August 2008, Guardian ‘Stigmatised by my own family’

In a unique research called ‘Shout’ almost 4,000 mental health service users were involved. The charity Rethink found that 87% of people said they had direct personal experience of stigma and discrimination and reported the negative impact of stigma on their lives.

The damage caused was wide-ranging; the areas affected include employment, family, friendships, neighbours, accessing education, reporting crime, relationships with health professionals, and feeling confident enough to visit the shops, go to the pub or take part in activities in the community, it says.
The Stigma Shout report can be found at http://www.rethink.org/how_we_can_help/campaigning_for_change/moving_people/stigma_shout.html

But this problem goes deeper. If a girl can be excluded for crooked teeth, where does it end? Our society allows science and law to de-select disabled lives.
For impairment reasons they tamper with genetics in an attempt to screen out difference. We have laws that allow late abortion because of so called ‘defects’.We allow bio-ethics to de-select impairment.

In 2004, UKCPD (formerly the British Council of Disabled People) asked “Can human rights apply if we select children or value people’s quality of life on the basis of their genetic make-up or impairment?” http://www.bcodp.org.uk/library/genetics/3disabhr.pdf
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/06/mentalhealth
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/07/mentalhealth.familyandrelationships

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Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
on last month’s theme: Forced Interventions
Being an Un-Person… (8’47’’)
“This is from a handout I gave while speaking at training for staff who work with people who have developmental disabilities. It is about what it means to be dehumanized and it applies to a far greater group of people than the original audience. It is, to make it clear, something that is done to us by other people, not something intrinsic to who we are.

Being an Un-person means that people talk in front of you as if you aren’t there… It means that your existence seems to fill people with disgust and fear. … If you communicate with behaviour, you will be punished, restrained, drugged or put in a behaviour program.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c5_3wqZ3Lk

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Sceptical
A sceptical view was expressed about the usefulness of the Convention. How does it protect the rights of people with mental health issues?

“My organization are skeptical on the UN Convention re Legal Intervention for people with mental health issues and the sense of disabled people being able to join the armed forces.”

For a discussion of how different Articles in the Convention can work together, go to page 47 in this 2007 publication: http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_WORDversion.doc
The text of Article 12 can be accessed at http://www.mindfreedom.org/kb/mental-health-global/united-nations/article-12-un

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The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
This year (2008) we celebrate 60 years of the United Nations Convention on Human Rights, the first international commitment on human rights.

A web campaign http://www.everyhumanhasrights.org/ urges us to embrace the values and goals of the Declaration. To protect the rights of our fellow global villagers and to encourage others to do the same in our communities, workplaces and schools. We are asked to affirm these principles:

“Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, lanaguage, relition, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.” Every Human has Rights

However, our rights as disabled people are not spelled out specifically. It makes no specific mention of the meaning of rights as disabled people. Our experience is that we are often invisible, excluded or forgotten. We are not always included into the general phrase of ‘human’ inhuman rights.

That is why we needed a specific convention and why we are campaigning for our countries to ratify the Convention of the Rights of Disabled Persons.

UN Convention text resources:
Details of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People can be found at
http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=12&pid=150
http://www.un.org/disabilities/convention/conventionfull.shtml
Easy Read version of the Convention
http://www.officefordisability.gov.uk/docs/international-agreement-rights-disabled-people.pdf
For Easy Read versions of the Convention’s extra agreements (Optional Protocols) go to
http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/convention/nz.htm
A child-friendly text of the Convention can be accessed at
http://www.unicef.org/Child_friendly_CRPD.pdf

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Inclusion means … being given a £50 gift token?
A grammar school in Lincolnshire, England, did not listen to a boy with Autism when planning and arranging the 11-plus entrance exam. Under the Disability Discrimination Act any barriers to learning have to be removed, for example by making alternative arrangements or providing reasonable adjustments.

His mother said: “We knew he would struggle with the change in surroundings. Our primary school head teacher suggested we ask if he could sit the test there, or at least in a room on his own. But when I went to the school I was told, ‘No, we don’t make any allowances’.”

As the barriers of unfamiliar surroundings, a crowded room full with unfamiliar people were not removed, the boy was extremely distressed and failed the exam.

The ombudsman Anne Seex said the school had not considered its duties under the Disability Discrimination Act.

The boy was admitted to another grammar school on the basis of his exam results at the end of primary school (called SATs) and his junior school’s recommendation.

The school has apologised, has given the boy a £50 gift token and agreed to handle future cases differently.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/lincolnshire/7542948.stm
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/article4460621.ece

International News

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Canada
Paul and Barbara-Anne Chapman had sold their home in Britain and bought a farmhouse in Nova Scotia, Canada. The local authorities supported and welcomed them.

However, when the family arrived at the airport a border guard refused them entry. Several questions were raised about their work permit, clearance for their black Labrador and about their daughter Lucy, who has Angelman syndrome.

The family claim they were told by a border guard that because Lucy is disabled she would never be allowed into the country, and that she had a lifetime ban.

Mrs Chapman said: “My dog was allowed to stay. My dog has a higher status than my daughter in Canada, just because she is disabled.”

Canada’s immigration rules in section 38 do have a clause that states that you are not eligible for immigration if you would make an excessive demand on health and social services. Presently, “excessive demand” is usually defined as exceeding $15,000 of publicly funded health care costs over the next 5 years. However, in certain family applications, children are exempt from this rule of no entry due to health care costs.

The Convention on the Rights of Disabled People places obligations on countries to protect disabled people’s rights and freedoms. This includes the right to free movement and residency.

Entry to one’s own country is specifically mentioned in Article 18 of the Convention: “Are not deprived, arbitrarily or on the basis of disability, of the right to enter their own country.”

Entry into another country is protected in Article 18, where it says that disabled people should “not be deprived, on the basis of disability, of their ability to obtain, possess and utilize … relevant processes such as immigration proceedings, that may be needed to facilitate exercise of the right to liberty of movement.”

Mr and Mrs Chapman hired a Canadian lawyer to fight the decision.

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=278
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/canada/2519496/Canada-refuses-entry-to-disabled-girl.html

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Sex in the City… and world-wide.
Research has shown that disabled people are being denied the choice to full sexual relationships.

“I want to meet a girl I can become friends with, take to the pub and the cinema and then after a couple of months see where it goes,” Joseph Greene, 23.

The national charity Family Planning Association FPA has organised an information and poster campaign about the right to have sex and relationships. FPA gives people information and advice about sexual health. This is particularly important in view of the continuing rise and impact of HIV (see reports below).

Easy Read, posters and campaign info at
http://www.fpa.org.uk/news/campaigns/current%5Fcampaigns/detail.cfm?contentid=1021
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7540103.stm
http://www.fpa.org.uk/products/learning_disabilities_publications/detail.cfm?contentid=1037

‘Let’s talk About Sex’ was launched in June 2008 for young people with life-limiting health conditions, in a bid to open up a taboo subject and to better support these young people to have the opportunity to experience relationships and explore their sexuality, in a safe, supportive and empathetic environment.
http://www.act.org.uk/content/view/153/1/

Our rights and dignity in connection with these personal areas are protected in the Convention. Article 23 of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People specifically refers to forming relationships and accessing age-appropriate information, reproductive and family planning education.

As part of their obligations, countries who have ratified the Convention, have a duty to develop and change customs or practices. This includes working towards a change in attitude towards disabled people and sex.

Article 4 of the Convention asks governments to develop or change customs and practices which contradict the rights. Community norms, customs and practices of what people believe or how professionals deal with disabled people may go against the ideals laid down in the Convention.

“What is acceptable in the community is for a disabled person to marry another disabled person so that together they share their curse”, says a disabled local councillor in Uganda.
http://www.disabilitykar.net/docs/stories_women.doc

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From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
On August 6th a very important international panel discussion took place. ‘Beyond Barriers: Disability and HIV/AIDS’ gave information about studies from across the world – Brazil, South Africa, Cameroon, and Canada.

Disabled people were found to be consistently more vulnerable to infection. People with learning difficulties and disabled women are often exposed to riskier situations; women in particular experience more unprotected sex than the general population, often as a result of sexual violence.

A researcher in Kwa Zulu-Natal, where there is no disability-specific sex education, encountered a “let sleeping dogs lie” attitude in schools. As a result, she found that disabled children had little access to education or legal protection and were more vulnerable to abuse and infection.

n Cameroon, a study focused on a young deaf population, found that sexual debut was on the whole earlier and riskier than in the general population.
http://eliminateaids.blogspot.com/2008/08/beyond-barriers-disability-and-hivaids.html

The Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV/AIDS is an advocacy tool for all Campaign partners and supporters. We invite you to download this printer-ready version in English, French and Portuguese to disseminate at your various meetings and conferences!
http://www.africacampaign.info/a-nos-lecteurs-francais/index.html
http://www.africacampaign.info/recent-publication/index.html
http://www.dcdd.nl/data/1208782834413_Kampala%20Declaration%20on%20Disability%20and%20HIVAIDS.pdf

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A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
This article argues that despite national laws and certain improvements towards disability rights, El Salvador has only made nominal progress in implementing disability legislation and awareness.

In the context of El Salvador’s twelve-year armed conflict, 70,000 individuals were killed and another 300,000 people were disabled as a result of war.

However, this estimate conflicts with official statistics released by the Ministry of Economy in August 2008. Jesus Martinez, Director of the Landmine Survivors Network-El Salvador is extremely uncomfortable with the results of this 2008 Census.

“It should include accurate and trustworthy statistics about all of the disabled individuals living in this country.” he says.

Disabled people need to be counted in order to be visible in policy action, planning and prioritisation. Article 31 asks countries to find out about disabled people. State parties need collect appropriate information, including statistical and research data, to enable them to formulate and implement policies, which make a reality of the rights in the Convention.

If the Convention marks “a paradigm shift” in attitudes and approaches, then disabled people are not objects that are being counted, but subjects, who have rights and freedoms. As a result of this shift in thinking, ratification of the Convention should also mark a shift in creating a more inclusive society in El Salvador.
http://upsidedownworld.org/main/content/view/1384/74/

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

Sit-in at Nursing Home
Demonstrators organised a sit-in and called for closure of a nursing home in Philadelphia. “There is no justice for someone in a nursing home,” read a sign held by one of the demonstrators.

The group’s goal was to persuade Mayor Nutter to help find homes for 50 or so disabled residents over the next six months, then get out of the nursing-home business. They were successful! Details at:
http://www.adapt.org/ http://www.philly.com/philly/hp/news_update/20080818_Protesters_seek_to_close_Phila__nursing_home.html

Top of page; Contents; Bottom of page

And Finally …
Discrimination is a putrid shade of yellow
It tastes like stale vomit
It smells like rancid fish
Discrimination reminds me of corruption, anger and despair
And sounds like a hooded coward running scared
Discrimination feels like nobody cares …
Extract from Bipolar works blog, 2007

Thank you for your time.
We are pleased to hear from you.
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

Supported by the National Lottery through the Big Lottery Fund.



Thank you to Disability Awareness Action for giving open permission to disseminate and re-publish their newsletter.

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CONFERENCE: 3rd LAC Technical Meeting on STD, HIV-AIDS and Disability

Posted on 30 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

3rd Latin American/Caribbean (LAC) Technical Meeting on STD, HIV-AIDS & Disability
August 1st and 2nd, 2008
City of Mexico
Organized by the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI) and the World Bank With support from the National Council to Prevent Discrimination (CONAPRED, Mexico), the Central American Social Integration System (SISCA), the National Program of STI and AIDS (Brazil) and the Pan American Health Organization

XVII International Conference on AIDS (Mexico August 3rd to 8th 2008)
http://www.aids2008.org

Introduction
People with disability have often been and remained excluded from HIV prevention as well as AIDS care efforts as a result of an aggregation of various taboos and coordination miss opportunities. On one hand, it is often presumed that people with disability are not sexually active and at no risk of infection. Simultaneously, the fact that they have less access to education and social opportunities prevents them from being in touch with preventive information and resources. On the other hand, the organizations of people with disability are generally unknown and themselves unaware of the health and prevention policy making and programming opportunities.

The result of all this is that the exposure of men and women with disabilities to the main risk factors of HIV-AIDS are higher compared to non-disabled population. At the same time, while people living with AIDS have a higher survival rate due to medical advances, a frequent consequence is that there are an increasing number of disabilities (mainly physical and sensorial limitations) secondary to the disease itself or its pharmacologic treatment, indicating emerging needs and services to respond and coordinate.

Over the past two years, sponsored by the World Bank, the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI), in collaboration with several international organizations working in the HIV-AIDS and Disability areas has organized two Technical Meetings (Chile 2006 and Argentina 2007) on STDs, HIV-AIDS and Disability. The main purpose of these meetings has been to facilitate knowledge shearing amongst specialists and encourage policy development to address the increasing interrelation amongst AIDS and Disability.

The main axes of this work have been on

a. Documenting the interface between aids and disability and compiling evidence of emerging needs and responses

b. Identifying opportunities for active collaboration between organizations working in the AIDS and the inclusion fields, to optimise use of existing resources and promote inter-institutional approaches to inclusive aids prevention and rehabilitation services delivery to people living with AIDS.

In 2008, with the support of CONAPRED (in Spanish Consejo Nacional para Prevenir la Discriminación, México), the World Bank and PAHO-WHO the 3rd Technical Meeting will be held in Mexico, on August 1-2, to coincide with the AIDS International Conference (August 3-8, 2008). It will continue working on recommendations for crosscutting and inclusive approaches HIV-AIDS Prevention and Care.

Objectives
The 3rd Experts Meeting on STDs, HIV-AIDS and Disability, seeks to advance the discussion on “Evidence-based Research on the inter connections between AIDS and Disability” and on “Care for people living with AIDS and Disabilities: effective approaches and services”.

Expected Outcomes
The expected outcomes of the meeting are:

o Review of new developments in LAC National AIDS Programs;
o Update bibliographical and research review on the topic;
o Review of new materials and initiatives of international agencies, Civil Society and Academia;
o Review of new content and tools for the LAC HIV-AIDS site on the issue;
o Development of a new set of recommendations for a cross-cutting and inclusive approaches in the area of STD, HIV-AIDS Prevention and Care, with special focus in “Monitoring & Evaluation and Evidence-based Research and on Care Attention for people living with AIDS and Disabilities, as a consequence of the treatment;
o Establishment of a LAC Permanent Working Group, with interagency involvement, south-to-south knowledge sharing and a joint research and implementation agenda;

Participants: Program Managers, Researchers, Practitioner and AIDS and Disability specialists from Latin American and the Caribbean

Venue: National Council to Prevent Discrimination (CONAPRED, Mexico), Dante 14 – 8o piso, Colonia Anzures, Ciudad de México

PROGRAM
Friday August 1st
08.30 Registration
09.00 Opening
09.30 Challenges on AIDS Prevention and Care and Disability
10. 00 Conclusions from the 1st Brazilian and Central American Forums on AIDS and Disability – Discussion
11.00 Coffee
11.30 Services for people living with HIV AIDS and Disabilities
12.30 Lunch
14.00 Working groups
16.30 Plenary
17.00 Closure

Saturday August 2nd
09.00 AIDS and Disability: from taboo to collaboration
09.30 Implementation experiences / Questions and answers
10.30 Coffee
11.00 Emerging topics
o Services development (diagnosis, care, prevention)
o Research and evidences: people living with aids and disabilities secondary to the disease itself or its pharmacological treatment
o Vulnerability of PWD to STI and AIDS
o Discussion
12.30 Lunch and meeting with Ministries of Health and Education*

14.00 Approaches and future strategies
o Research
o Monitoring and Evaluation
o Regional Collaboration
o Dissemination
16.00 Plenary – Strategic collaboration
17.00 Closure
* To be confirmed

Other related activities in Mexico

o “Satellite Session on AIDS and Disability”, organized by Disabled People International (DPI). August 5th 7:00 to 8.30 am (in English)
o “AIDS and Disability: a relationship to be taken into account”, organized by the Inter American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development (IIDI) August 5th 6:30 to 8:30pm (in Spanish)
o “AIDS and Disability: a relationship to be taken into account”, Poster session, (daily, August 3-8) between 12:00-14:00h

Unfortunately, we have not resources to cover flight or other expenses for participants. We hope that participants can gather support from their organizations to travel to Mexico. Please confirm ASAP your willingness to participate. Your participation is extremely important to us and to ensure the inclusion of disability issues amongst the STD and HIV-AIDS agenda in the Latin American and Caribbean Region.



We Can Do received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) email discussion group.

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CONFERENCE: Africa Regional Conference on MDGs and Disability

Posted on 21 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Africa Regional Conference on MDGs and Disability
Regional Conference to be held on September 14th to 19th 2008, in Nairobi, Kenya
AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY
Pan Afric Hotel, Nairobi Kenya
14th to 19th September 2008.
Organizers:
ECUMENICAL DISABILITY ADVOCATES NETWORK (EDAN), SECRETARIAT OF THE AFRICAN DECADE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (SADPD), AFRICAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION (ACDF) AND THE UN MDG CAMPAIGN OFFICE FOR AFRICA

AIM: To enhance the capacity of leaders from disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in MDGs in African countries and to provide knowledge, increase competence and strengthen organizational advocacy strategies and networking skills.

We would like to announce and to invite participants to the above Conference which will bring together leaders of the disability movement, professionals and service providers together to interact in discussion on the MDG campaign, implementation and the implication to persons with Disabilities. The Conference is organized on the backdrop of the fact that 2007-2008 marks the halfway point to 2015, the year set for the achievement of the MDGs and the observation that the campaign and implementation work going on is yet to recognize Disability as a sector that need specific attention.

2007-2008 also marks the coming into force of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). It has been widely acknowledged that one of the shortcomings of the MDGs has been the exclusion of persons with disabilities. Taking this into account, the UNCRPD was drafted to ensure the inclusion of persons with disabilities into the development agenda. In the light of this, there are consistent referrals to the combating of conditions of poverty affecting persons with disabilities and especially their situation in the context of developing countries. Over 80%% of the 650 million persons with disabilities live in the poorest parts of the world. This means that over 20% of the poorest people globally are persons with disabilities.

For the MDGs to have real significance, they cannot ignore those living with disabilities. As James Wolfensohn, the former president of the World Bank has pointed out: “Unless disabled people are brought into the development mainstream, it will be impossible to cut poverty in half by 2015 or to give every girl and boy the chance to achieve a primary education by the same date.

Although persons with disabilities have organized groups which are involved in disability advocacy, awareness and lobbying on other pertinent issues of concern to them, there has been very little interaction with the MDGs campaign and many of them are not aware of it. They are not a consideration in the regional strategies as currently spelt out and implemented. They have continued to be left out of the Campaign relegating them further to marginalization. They therefore cannot engage their governments in this regard. It is necessary that they get involved.

This reality has brought about the need for the Secretariat of African Decade of Persons with Disability (SADPD), Ecumenical disability advocates network EDAN, African Community Development Foundation (ACDF) and UN Millennium Campaign office to partner in a project to facilitate an engagement to bring about the disability factor in all aspects of the MDG Work. This project has among other things the purpose to set in motion capacity building as well as inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities and their organizations in the mainstream campaign activities. The ultimate purpose is to facilitate a process to build a strong disabled person’s organisation DPOs to ensure that the voice of disabled persons will be heard and taken into account in all sectors of national MDG development.

The continental conference was originally expected to bring together a limited number of disability leaders from all over Africa associated with the work of the Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities and the Ecumenical Disability Advocates Network. The number was limited due to resources but we have received recommendations that the conference should be opened up for a wider participation. This announcement is therefore an invitation to persons with disabilities, DPO’s, Service providers and professionals especially those involved in development and issues of MDGs in various Regional Network to this conference. It is also an appeal to individuals and all regional organizations to sponsor those in their networks who can ably take the information back to their countries. Anticipated expenses within Kenya including airport transfers, Conference facilities, accommodation and full board for five days per person is 1,000 US Dollars. This figure does not include the air fare from the port of departure to Nairobi.

The organizing Committee has very limited scholarships to go to a few leaders in the Disability movement as this will facilitate key leadership meetings that will take place alongside and after the MDG Conference. Those in this category are requested to make their applications which will be considered on need basis and early application.

The Conference is as indicated above planned to take place at the Pan Afric Hotel Nairobi, Kenya between 14th and 19th September 2008. The first three business days programme beginning in the morning of Monday, 15th September will be devoted to knowledge dissemination, interactive discussions through workshops and development of advocacy strategies for inclusion in the MDG campaigns and implementation. The last two days will be devoted to the work of the Decade for persons with Disabilities and its relationship to development in the Region. A programme and other information materials will be sent later but those interested are requested to fill in the attached registration form and send it back to facilitate further planning.

Participants who are not in the Decade network and would like to experience a little of the Kenya tourism including group organized game drive may take this option provided there will be enough of them to make a group and that they will have informed us in good time. These arrangements are not part of the conference and their expenses are not included in the figures given for acommodation and board during the conference. Those interested may request for separate information in that connection.

AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY

Pan Afric Hotel, Nairobi Kenya

14th to 19th September 2008.

Organizers:
ECUMENICAL DISABILITY ADVOCATES NETWORK (EDAN), SECRETARIAT OF THE AFRICAN DECADE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (SADPD), AFRICAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION (ACDF) AND THE UN MDG CAMPAIGN OFFICE FOR AFRICA
AIM: To enhance the capacity of leaders from disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in MDGs in African countries and to provide knowledge, increase competence and strengthen organizational advocacy strategies and networking skills.

REGISTRATION FORM
Please type or write clearly in English. Complete registration form may be sent by e-mail (to info@edan.or.ke) or printed and sent by fax. Deadline: August 11th 2008

Surname(s)(as in passport)………………………………………………………………………….
First name(s) (as in passport)…..…………………………………………………………………..
Address …………………………..…………………………………..……………………………
Postal Code …………………………………… Town ………………………………………….
Country …………………………………………………………………………………………..
Home telephone……………………………. Office telephone ………………………………
(Country code/area code/number) (Country code/area code/number)
Fax ……………………………………………. E-mail …………………………………………
(Please provide at least one fax number or one e-mail address for quick communication)
Gender […..] Male […..] Female
Date of birth (day/month/year) …………………………………………………………………..
Your Disability ……………………………………………………………………………………
Profession or occupation .………………………………………………………………………
Organization ……………………………………………………………………………………..
Position in the organisation ……………………………………………………………………
Nationality (country issuing your passport) ……………… Passport number ……………………
Date and place of issue of the passport ……………… Passport valid until ………………..
(day/month/year) (day/month/year)
Sponsoring organization…………………………………………………………………….…..
Special need……………………………………………………………………………………….

Give details of your travel Itinerary:
The Conference Planning Committee will organize accommodation and board and meet the airfare expenses from the port of departure to Nairobi for those it will sponsor. Any other personal expenses, including passport costs, local travel related expenses such as vaccinations, luggage insurance or telecommunication costs are the participants own responsibility.

The planning Committee will organize hotel accommodation and airport pick up on request for the self sponsored participants.

Place……………………….Date…………………………. Signature …………………………

Send your registration to: Samuel Kabue
Executive Secretary
Ecumenical Disability Advocates Network (EDAN)
P.O. Box 22
00200 Nairobi
KENYA
Tel: +254-20-4445837
Fax: +254-20-4445835
E-mail: info@edan.or.ke



We Can Do received this announcement via the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities email news distribution list. Please note that any inquires relating to this conference should please be directed to info@edan.or.ke, or to the contact information given above, NOT to We Can Do.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Child Injuries, Violence, Disability

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Cross-Disability, Health, Opportunities, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Dear colleagues,

The World Health Organization Bulletin will publish a special issue on
Child Injuries, Violence and Disability in May 2009.

A call has gone out for related articles, see
http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/media/news/whobulletin/en/index.html

Authors are encouraged to submit papers by 1 September 2008.

Please forward this call to groups or individuals that you think may be interested.

Thanks
Alana

Alana OFFICER
Coordinator
Disability and Rehabilitation (DAR)
Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability
World Health Organization

Interested authors should please follow the link to the official webpage on the call the papers in order to obtain all details, including guidelines for authors and instructions on how to submit your papers. We Can Do is unable to answer your inquiries. Thank you.



This announcement was circulated by Alana Officer at the World Health Organization. I found this announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group.

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that, although abstracts are due by August 1, 2008, completed papers will not be due until 2009. This same announcement was posted at We Can Do in April, but the editors are circulating this notice again in an attempt to collect more abstracts for them to choose among.

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies
Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

  • What is the relationship between disability and poverty?
  • How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?
  • What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?
  • What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?
  • What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1st.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



This announcement was circulated by Daniel Mont via email. Any inquiries and abstracts should please be directed to Daniel Mont or to Rosangela Berman Bieler as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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RESOURCE: HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey

Posted on 14 July 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Learn about HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities and find resources that can help at the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

A few years ago, the World Bank and Yale University worked together to conduct a global survey on HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities. The findings from this global survey are available in PDF format (about 500 Kb each) in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. People who are serious about learning all that is known about HIV/AIDS among disabled people will also want to browse the many other research articles available on the topic within the “Research” section of the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

People who are more interested in the pragmatic side of how to address the challenge of HIV/AIDS may find it helpful to browse through the materials available within Resources section of the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

Start exploring the website at:

http://cira.med.yale.edu/globalsurvey/

People who wish to gather more information or resources related to HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities around the world will also want to explore the reports, training materials, and other resources at the AskSource.info listing of resources on HIV/AIDS and disability.

You may also wish to browse through previous We Can Do posts on HIV/AIDS for more leads to follow.



I have been familiar with this resource since the World Bank and Yale University released its global survey in 2004. I’ve mentioned the website in passing before at We Can Do, but I thought this resource was important enough to warrant a blog post all to itself.

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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV/AIDS Seeks Health Care Stories

Posted on 16 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This email was recently circulated by Gouwah Samuels.

version française dessous

Dear friends, colleagues and supporters

The time has come! As promised during our last meeting in Kampala the Communications Working Group is working on compiling the inaugural newsletter for the Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV/AIDS. We are hoping to get all submissions this month in order to distribute it via email in July.

The first issues will focus on access to health care. We invite each of you to read through the following questions and send back answers to Myroslava Tataryn: myroslavat@gmail.com by Friday, 27th June at the latest.

Questions for this edition are as follows:

1. How have you involved health care workers in your disability and AIDS initiatives?

2. Have you and/or your organizations engaged in any activities or initiatives promoting Disability and AIDS at local health care centres or hospitals? Please explain.

3. Do you have an statistics regarding people with disabilities accessing HIV/AIDS and/or reproductive health care services? If you do, please share them with us.

Please share your stories and pictures with us! Even though we may not be able to use all of the stories/pictures collected for this first edition of the newsletter. We will be keeping them on our Africa Campaign Databank! Also, please make sure you have secured necessary permission of people in the photos you are sharing.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact one of us:
Gouwah Samuels: gouwah@africandecade.co.za
Grace Musoke: gracejusta@yahoo.co.uk
Myroslava Tataryn: myroslavat@gmail.com

Looking forward to hearing from you soon!

With warm regards,
Myroslava Tataryn: and Gouwah Samuels
For the Africa Campaign Communications Working Group

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Cheres amis, collegues et patrons,

Finalement, comme etait promis a la derniere reunion a Kampala, la group de travail de communication est en train d’assembler le premier bulletin pour la Campagne Africaine du VIH/SIDA et les handicaps. Nous esperons d’obtenir tous vous contributions ce mois-ci enfin de nous permetre de distribuer le bulletin final par email au mois de juillet.

La premier numero de notre bulletin est consacre aux questions concernant l’access aux soins medicaux. Nous vous invitons de lire les questions qui suivent et de repondre a Myroslava Tataryn (myroslavat@gmail.com) avec vos reponses par vendredi, le 27 juin, au plus tard.

Questions pour ce numero:

1. Comment est ce que vous avez implique les travailleurs medicaux dans vous activites du SIDA et l’incapacite?

2. Est ce que vous ou vos organismes sont engages dans des activites ou initiatives qui font la promotion des questions du SIDA et l’incapacites dans des hopitaux ou des centres medicaux dans vos localites? Expliquez s’il vous plait.

3. st ce que vous avez des statistiques selons les persons avec incapacites qui accessent les services de VIH/SIDA ou la sante reproductif? Si oui, s’il vous plait, partagez-les avec nous.

S’il vous plait, partagez vos histoires et vos photos avec nous! Meme si nous ne serons pas capable de publier chacun dans cet premier numro du bulletin nous allons les garder dans la base de donnees de la campagne. Aussi, s’il vous plait, assurez-vous que vous avez les propres authorizations des personnes dans les photos que vous nous envoyez.

Si vous avez n’emporte quelles questions, n’hesitez pas a nous contacter:

Gouwah Samuels: gouwah@africandecade.co.za
Grace Musoke: gracejusta@yahoo.co.uk
Myroslava Tataryn: myroslavat@gmail.com

Nous esperons vous reponses bientot!

Avec sinceres salutations,
Myroslava Tataryn: and Gouwah Samuels
Pour la groupe de travialle de la communication pour la Campagne Africaine



Thank you to Gouwah Samuels for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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NEWS: Kampala, Uganda, Declaration on Disability and HIV & AIDS

Posted on 25 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

From: AfricaCampaign@webmail.co.za
Subject: Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV&AIDS update

******* version française dessous *************

It has been just over three-weeks since we converged for the 2nd General Meeting of the Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV & AIDS was held March 11 – 13, in beautiful Kampala, Uganda.

We would like to once again take this opportunity to express our gratitude to the National Union for Disabled People in Uganda (NUDIPU) and the Government of Uganda, through the Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development for gracefully hosting our gathering. Our gratitude is also extended to The Secretariat of the African Decade, Handicap International and once again NUDIPU for supporting the event and last but not least to each and every member of the National Organizing Committee for their exceptional contribution prior to and during the meeting. It would not have been possible without your sterling efforts, long and hard hours and sleepless nights!!!

We were more that 170 delegates representing more that 20 African countries and 10 countries outside of Africa. We came from a wide variety of backgrounds, including civil society, government, academic and research institutions, international NGOs, funding agencies, international stakeholders in HIV/AIDS work and the media.

In addition to networking and rich exchange among groups and countries, the constitution of five working groups with plans of action to further Campaign objectives, a renewed steering committee, we also gave birth together to the Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV&AIDS. (full text is enclosed in English. Portuguese and French will be forwarded ASAP)

The declaration calls on governments, HIV/AIDS service providers, the African Union, UN agencies, funding agencies, research and academic institutions and disabled people’s organizations to action toward

  • Equal access to HIV/AIDS prevention and services and
  • Full participation by persons with disabilities in the response to HIV/AIDS in every country and at every level.

We hereby encourage you to disseminate this declaration widely within your country, to persons with disabilities, governments, HIV/AIDS service providers, UN agencies, funding agencies, researchers and academic institutions. Please also use opportunities you have with media to highlight this important message. Feel free to add it onto your organisation’s website.

We would like to take this opportunity also to introduce our steering committee and at the same time extend our warmest welcome to the newer members of the committee. They are:

  • Mr. Tambo Camara (Pan African Federation of the Disabled (PAFOD) – Mauritania;
  • Ms. Farida Gulamo (Association of Disabled Mozambicans (ADEMO) – Mozambique;
  • Mr Martin Babu Mwesigwa (National Union of Disabled Persons of Uganda (NUDIPU) – Uganda;
  • Dr. Elly Macha (African Union of the Blind (AFUB) – Kenya;
  • Mrs. Rachel Kachaje (Southern African Federation of the Disabled (SAFOD) – Malawi
  • Mr. Obuya George Onyango (African Deaf Union (ADU) – Kenya;
  • Mr. Paul Tezanou (Chair of the Secretariat of the African Decade) – Cameroon;
  • Hon. Hendrietta Bogopane-Zulu (Member of SA parliament, Disability respresentative of SA National AIDS council executive structure) – South Africa;
  • Ms. Fri Beatrice Bime (Global Fund) – Geneva NEW
  • Mr. Oumar Diop (Handicap FormEduC, Resource Centre for the promotion of the rights of persons with disabilities) – Senegal NEW
  • Mr. David O. Anyaele (Centre for citizens with disabilities) – Nigeria NEW

We would also like to bring your attention to changes in the campaign management. At the end our gathering we said goodbye to Dr. Susan Girois. She will no longer be actively involved in the work on the Campaign Management Team (CMT), although her expertise, experience, guidance and spontaneity will be sought more often than she expects. Her active participation will surely be missed however knowing she’s on call sets the rest of us at ease. In the same breath we would like to welcome two new additions to the CMT: Kevin Henderson who is the HIV&AIDS technical advisor at Handicap International’s Kenya program and Aïda Sarr, a programme manager for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities’ West, North and Central Africa regional programme.

We would like to encourage you to please keep us updated on the developments in your respective countries, regions and districts and we promise to share your experiences with the rest of the world.

Gouwah Samuels, Kevin Henderson, Aïda Sarr
Campaign Management Team

Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV & AIDS

PREAMBLE:

We, the participants of the Second Meeting of the Africa Campaign on Disability and HIV&AIDS representing Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs), Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working with and for persons with disabilities, Funding and Development Agencies from 21 African countries and representatives from other parts of the world, a meeting hosted by the National Union of Disabled Persons of Uganda (NUDIPU) in conjunction with the Government of Uganda, with support from Handicap International and the African Decade Secretariat, in Kampala, Uganda, March 11-13, 2008;

NOTING the fact that the incidence of HIV is disproportionately high among groups that are excluded socially, culturally and economically, including persons with disabilities, and that these groups are disregarded in a majority of national and international HIV/AIDS programming initiatives in Africa. Further noting the importance of mainstreaming disability issues in relevant strategies to achieve sustainable development;

RECOGNIZING that national, regional, continental and international instruments on human rights, such as the United Nations Human Rights Bill and the International Covenants on Human Rights, have proclaimed and agreed that everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in these instruments, without distinction of any kind. Further recognizing the principles and objectives of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 2006, the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS – adopted at the UN General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS in 2001 and the Millennium Development Goals (MDG);

CONSIDERING that despite these various instruments and undertakings to which many United Nations member states are signatories, persons with disabilities continue to face barriers in their participation as equal members of society and violations of their human rights in all parts of the world, including Africa. Persons with disabilities should have the opportunity to be actively involved in decision-making processes about policies and programmes, including those directly concerning them; and the importance of accessibility to the physical, social, economic and cultural environment, to health and education and to information and communication in enabling persons with disabilities to fully enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms. Further considering the fact that children and women with disabilities are often at greater risk, both within and outside the home, of violence, injury or abuse, neglect, maltreatment or exploitation;

We call on all African Governments to include disability in its diversity as a crosscutting issue in ALL poverty reduction strategies.

Mindful of the above preamble, the signatories to the Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV & AIDS make the following call that:

African Governments shall ensure that:

National AIDS strategic plans recognize persons with disabilities as vulnerable to the impact of HIV and AIDS as well as valuable contributors in the response to HIV/AIDS.

National HIV/AIDS monitoring and evaluation systems and the existing population surveillance systems include disability specific and disaggregated indicators to be used for planning and programming purposes;

The National HIV/AIDS Commissions/Councils include active representation of persons with disabilities;

Information Education Communication (IEC) strategies at all levels ensure provision for IEC which is accessible to persons with intellectual, mental, physical and sensory disabilities;

HIV/AIDS is recognized as a cause of disability.

HIV/AIDS prevention specialists and service providers shall:

Develop targeted prevention messages and methods that are disability-specific, gender-specific, age-specific and adapted to local language and cultural variations;

Equip all HIV/AIDS care and support service centres to provide comprehensive information and confidential counselling to persons with intellectual, mental, physical and sensory disabilities;

Provide equal opportunity to persons with disabilities to train for and engage in counselling and care provision (i.e. Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT), Preventing Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) and adherence counsellors, and home based care providers;

Associations of people living with HIV and AIDS recognise the rights of persons with disabilities living with HIV and AIDS to ‘access for all’ and provide greater involvement of persons with disabilities in the issues that affect them.

African Union AIDS portfolio and Africa AIDS Watch shall:

Ensure that their strategies, programmes and monitoring systems include disability in its diversity as a cross-cutting issue.

UNAIDS and its composite UN agencies—UNHCR, UNICEF, WFP, UNDP, UNFPA, UNODC, ILO, UNESCO, WHO and the World Bank—shall:

Recognise disability in its diversity as a cross-cutting issue in all HIV/AIDS policies, guidelines and programmes;

Ensure that their monitoring mechanisms track the involvement of persons with disabilities as planners, implementers as well as beneficiaries of HIV/AIDS programmes.

Funding Agencies shall:

Ensure that their funding requirements include both disability and HIV/AIDS as cross cutting issues;

Provide all key documents related to funding opportunities in formats that are accessible to persons with different types of disabilities;

Ensure that their monitoring mechanisms track the involvement of persons with disabilities in planning and implementation as well as beneficiaries of recipient programmes;

Independent research agencies and academic institutions shall:

Include disability and HIV/AIDS as a priority area for research;

Include disability issues in protocols for designing research programmes;

Ensure that research methods capture data that is disability-specific, gender-specific, age-specific and adapted to local language and cultural variations;

Ensure that persons with disabilities are included as researchers, not only respondents or subjects.

Disabled People’s Organisations shall:

Seek accreditation for civil society representation at the UNGASS through UNAIDS;

Provide/give input into HIV/AIDS country reports through governments;

Solicit the Civil Society Task Force for the High Level HIV/AIDS Meetings for membership and active participation;

Implement measures for the protection and promotion of the rights, needs, confidentiality and dignity of persons with disabilities living with HIV and AIDS;

Raise awareness among persons with disabilities and build HIV/AIDS into their regular programmes;
Avail human resources/disability experts to support the HIV/AIDS response for disabled and non-disabled people at all level

****************************************************************************
***********************

Chers membres du Comité de Pilotage, Sympathisants et Amis de la Campagne Africaine,

Cela fait tout juste 3 semaines depuis que nous nous sommes retrouvés pour la seconde Assemblée Générale de la Campagne Africaine sur le Handicap et le VIH&SIDA. C’était dans la jolie ville de Kampala, Ouganda du 11 au 13 Avril 2008.

Nous aimerions encore une fois saisir cette opportunité pour exprimer notre gratitude à l’Union Nationale des Personnes Handicapées d’Ouganda, au Gouvernement Ougandais, par le biais du Ministère de Genre, du Travail et du Développement Social pour avoir généreusement abrité cette rencontre. Nos remerciements vont également au Secrétariat de la Décennie, Handicap International et encore une fois au NUDIPU pour son soutien sans
faille lors de cet événement. Et enfin, à tous les membres du Comité National d’Organisation pour leur contribution exceptionnelle et efforts considérables déployés avant et durant la réunion. Cela n’aurait pas été possible sans votre dure labeur et nuit sans sommeil !!!

Nous étions plus de 170 délégués venant de plus de 20 pays Africains et 10 hors du continent. Des représentants de la société civile, du gouvernement, d’Institutions académiques, d’ONG internationales, d’Agences de Financement, des partenaires internationaux travaillant dans le domaine du VIH/SIDA et des médias étaient également présents lors de ce grand
rendez-vous.

L’aboutissement de tous nos efforts comme vous le savez, est la Déclaration de Kampala sur le Handicap et le VIH&SIDA. A cela s’ajoute, les discussions fructueuses notées au sein des groupes, la mise en place de 5 groupes de travail avec des plans d’action sur les objectifs de la Campagne et l’entrée au sein du comité de pilotage de nouveaux membres. (ci-joint le texte intégral de la déclaration en Anglais, Portugais et Français, sera transféré ASAP
La Déclaration appelle les gouvernements, les prestataires de services, l’Union Africaine, les Agences des NU, les Agences de financement, les Institutions Académiques et les Organisations de Personnes Handicapées à entreprendre les actions suivantes :

  • L’accès égal à la prévention et aux services du VIH/SIDA et
  • La pleine participation des personnes handicapées à la réponse au VIH/SIDA dans chaque pays et à tous les niveaux.

Nous vous encourageons ainsi, à faire de cette Déclaration une large diffusion dans votre pays, auprès des personnes handicapées, des gouvernements, des prestataires de services, des Agences des NU, des Agences de Financement, des Institutions Académiques. Saisissez les opportunités que vous avez avec les médias pour relayer cet important message auprès du grand public et le publier sur le site web de votre organisation.

Permettez nous également, de vous présenter le comité de pilotage qui s’est élargit et d’accueillir chaleureusement les 3 nouveaux venus :

  • M. Tambo Camara (Panafricaine des Personnes Handicapées (PAFOD) – Mauritanie;
  • Mme. Farida Gulamo (Association des Mozambicains Handicapés (ADEMO) – Mozambique;
  • M. Martin Babu Mwesigwa (Union Nationale des Personnes Handicapées d’Ouganda (NUDIPU) – Ouganda;
  • Dr. Elly Macha (Union Africaine des Aveugles (AFUB) – Kenya;
  • Mme. Rachel Kachaje (Fédération des Personnes Handicapées d’Afrique Australe (SAFOD) – Malawi;
  • M. Obuya George Onyango (Union Africaine des Sourds (ADU) – Kenya;
  • M. Paul Tezanou (Membre du Conseil D’Administration du Secrétariat de la Décennie) – Cameroun ;
  • L’Honorable Député, Hendrietta Bogopane-Zulu (Parlementaire Sud Africaine; Représentante de la structure exécutive du Conseil National de Lutte contre le Sida) Afrique du Sud) – Afrique du Sud;
  • Mme. Fri Beatrice Bime (Global Fund) – Genève NEW
  • M. Oumar Diop (Handicap FormEduC, Centre de Ressources pour la Promotion des Droits des Personnes Handicapées) – Sénégal NEW
  • M. David O. Anyaele (Centre des Citoyens Handicapés) – Nigéria NEW

Autre changement, le départ du Dr Susan Girois de l’Equipe de Gestion de la Campagne à qui nous disons aurevoir. Elle ne sera plus activement impliquée dans le travail de l’Equipe de Gestion de la Campagne (EGC), cependant son expertise sera toujours mise à contribution. Son expérience, ses conseils and sa spontanéité seront plus souvent sollicités qu’elle ne le pense. Sa participation active nous manquera mais la sachant sur répondeur nous rassure. Dans le même temps, nous aimerions souhaiter la bienvenue au sein de l’ECG à Kevin Henderson, Conseiller Technique en VIH&SIDA à Handicap International et Aïda Sarr Assistante du Programme Régional pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest, Central et du Nord, du Secrétariat de la Décennie Africaine des Personnes Handicapées.

Un rapport détaillé y compris la liste des participants vous sera transmis par email end -Avril. Si vous avez besoin d’une copie sur CD, envoyez nous un email à cette adresse : khenderson@handicap-international.or.ke.

Nous souhaitons que vous nous teniez informer des derniers développements dans vos pays respectifs, régions et districts et nous promettons de les partager avec le reste du monde.

Gouwah Samuels, Kevin Henderson, Aïda Sarr
Equipe de Gestion de la Campagne



We Can Do received the Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV&AIDS via the Intl-Dev listserv on international development.

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On-line Course in Global Health and Mental Health in Deaf Communities

Posted on 11 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Health, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Global Health and Mental Health in Deaf Communities

Professional Studies (PST)

*Online Social Work Course *

*July 7 – August 8, 2008*

This 3-credit course is designed as an online course and introduces the student in the allied health and mental health professions to the global health issues and needs of the deaf and hard of hearing community. The course covers the salient issues in health and mental health care of a population that has been historically overlooked by health care providers due to attitude and communication barriers. The intent of the course is to develop knowledge, values and skills which will give students a basic understanding of the health and mental health issues of deaf people, the health disparities to this population, and the need to become advocates for quality care. This course is offered for both Graduate (SWK 795) and Professional Studies (PST 876) credit.

Tuition
If you register for this course as PST 876 (professional studies), then the cost is $690 for US citizens and $1,380 for international students.

If you register for this course for full academic credit as SWK 795, then tuition is $1931 for US citizens and $3861 for international students.

Registrationurl : cpso.gallaudet.edu/x10978.xml

Contact: summer@gallaudet.edu



We Can Do received this announcement via the Intl-Dev listserv on international development.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 26 April 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Education, Employment, Health, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies

Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

 
The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

What is the relationship between disability and poverty?

How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?

What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?

What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?

What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1, 2008.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



Daniel Mont recently circulated this announcement on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

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RESOURCE: African Union of the Blind Web Site

Posted on 22 March 2008. Filed under: Blind, Democratic Participation, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Individuals who share an interest in the self-empowerment of blind people in Africa can turn to the African Union of the Blind (AFUB) web site for a range of information, publications, and helpful resources. The materials at this site will be particularly for people with an interest in HIV/AIDS; women; and youth.

The AFUB website is meant to mobilize, empower, and disseminate information for individuals and organizations supporting people with visual impairments across Africa. AFUB is a pan-African umbrella non-government organization (NGO).

On the page for AFUB publications, readers may download past issues of AFUB news in English or French. Issues of the news letter, Women’s Voices, contain a range of news, advice for independent living, and advocacy tips related to blind African women. Or readers may download manuals on training HIV/AIDS trainers; including blind people in HIV/AIDS education programs; training blind people to advocate and lobby for their rights at the local and national level; and empowering visually impaired youth. Some of these manuals could probably be usefully adapted for use outside of Africa as well.

On the projects page, people may learn about AFUB’s HIV and AIDS Awareness and Training Project; its Gender And Youth Development; and its National Civic Education Program.

The Reports and Policy page offers copies of AFUB’s annual reports and many reports from AFUB’s various training activities and other projects, particularly in the areas of HIV/AIDS awareness and in gender and youth development.

Or, download reports from
past conferences
on HIV/AIDS and on Democracy and Development training.

Begin exploring AFUB’s web site from their home page at:

http://www.afub-uafa.org



We Can Do first found the AFUB web site through the AskSource.info database. Further
details about its contents were found by exploring the AFUB web site
itself. I especially encourage the AFUB
publications
page for anyone seeking pragmatic materials they can use
in the field.

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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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FUNDING: Small Grants for Projects for Deaf Children

Posted on 20 March 2008. Filed under: Children, Deaf, Funding, Health, HIV/AIDS, Latin America & Caribbean, Poverty, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[En español más abajo.]

The following email is being circulated by the UK-based international organization Deaf Child Worldwide (formerly known as International Deaf Child Society):

Dear colleagues,

If are in touch with local organisations that want to start new work with deaf children, then please forward the information below about the latest round of the Deaf Child Worldwide Small Grants Programme.

Thank you so much for your help with this.

English
Round 7 of Deaf Child Worldwide’s Small Grants Programme is now open. The deadline for completed concept notes is 30 May 2008.

The Small Grants Programme (SGP), aims to have an impact on the lives of deaf children, their families, service providers and policy makers by establishing quality partnerships with local organisations based in our priority countries within East Africa, South Asia or Latin America. We fund one to three year projects of up to £10,000 per year.

Go to www.deafchildworldwide.info/sgp for more information about how to apply.

If you applied to SGP in the past, then please note that in 2007, we carried out a strategic review and an evaluation of SGP. We have made some significant changes to the programme. These include:

  • Smaller geographic focus. Now only organisations based in East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda), South Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka), and Andean region of Latin America (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru) can apply.
  • New strategic focus areas. We are only looking for projects which work towards these key areas.
  • Cross-cutting themes. All projects must consider poverty, gender, the social model of disability and sexual health and HIV/AIDS.
  • Longer projects. You can now apply for projects that are from one to three years long.

Please e-mail info@deafchildworldwide.org if you have any questions or would like to discuss your project idea.

Español
Se ha abierto la Ronda 7 del Programa de Pequeñas Subvenciones de Deaf Child Worldwide. El plazo final para la presentación de las notas conceptuales es el 30 de mayo del 2008.

El Programa de Pequeñas Subvenciones (PPS) busca tener un impacto en la vida de niños sordos, sus familias, proveedores de servicios y formuladores de política estableciendo para ello asociaciones de calidad con organizaciones locales con sede en nuestros países prioritarios en África Oriental, Asia del Sur o América Latina. Financiamos proyectos de uno a tres años de hasta £10,000 anuales.

Visiten www.deafchildworldwide.info/pps para mayor información sobre cómo postular.

Si ustedes postularon al PPS en el pasado, entonces tomen en cuenta que en el 2007 llevamos a cabo una revisión estratégica y una evaluación del PPS. Hemos hecho algunos cambios significativos al programa. Éstos son:

  • Foco geográfico más pequeño. Ahora sólo organizaciones con sede en África Oriental (Kenya, Tanzania y Uganda), Asia del Sur (Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistán y Sri Lanka) y la región andina de América Latina (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador y Perú) pueden postular.
  • Nuevos ejes estratégicos. Estamos examinando sólo proyectos que trabajen en pro de estos ejes clave.
  • Temas transversales. Todos los proyectos deben considerar pobreza, género, el modelo social de la discapacidad y salud sexual y VIH/sida.
  • Proyectos más largos. Ahora ustedes pueden postular con proyectos que tengan de uno a tres años de duración.

Si tienen alguna pregunta escríbannos a info@deafchildworldwide.org. Trataremos de responder lo más pronto posible, aunque recién podremos responder a indagaciones en español después del 7 de abril del 2008.

Sírvanse reenviar este email a organizaciones o colegas que ustedes consideren estarían interesados en esta oportunidad.

Best wishes,

Kirsty

KIRSTY WILSON
Programmes Manager
Deaf Child Worldwide
www.deafchildworldwide.org

Deaf Child Worldwide is the only UK based international development agency dedicated to enabling deaf children to overcome poverty and isolation. We are the international development agency of The National Deaf Children’s Society in the UK. Registered Charity No 1016532.

Join our network – receive regular updates and share your experiences about work with deaf children and their families. Contact info@deafchildworldwide.org or add your details at www.deafchildworldwide.info/joinournetwork



We Can Do thanks Kirsty Wilson at Deaf Child Worldwide for passing along this announcement.

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