Education

Disability and Development Online Consultations March 8-28, 2013

Posted on 13 March 2013. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, indigenous people, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, universal design, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

These online consultations (from March 8 to 28th, ie RIGHT NOW) are an opportunity to influence important decisions about how people with disabilities will be included in efforts to reduce poverty around the world.

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have been profoundly influential in making decisions on how to prioritize foreign assistance and government funds in more than 100 developing countries. The global community is now working to identify what goals should replace them after 2015. This means that the next few months will be critical for ensuring that people with disabilities are not again forgotten.  It is important for the global disability community, our constituency organizations, and professionals in the fields of international development and human rights be engaged.

Read below and follow the links for more detail on how individuals can participate in this on-line dialogue.

Online Consultations
As part of the preparatory process for the United Nations General Assembly High-level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD), the HLMDD Online Consultations (HOC) will be conducted from 8 to 28 March 2013. The consultations are co-organised by DESA and UNICEF under the existing platform of the World We Want 2015 (http://www.worldwewant2015.org/enable) in multiple languages.

Please register at: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/register.  If you have difficulty registering, then please email enable@worldwewant2015.org for assistance.

Simultaneous consultations will take place in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. The site is compatible with screen readers, however, if you are unable to access the site, please email your response to: enable@worldwewant2015.org. Please note that the forum is moderated, therefore your post will not appear immediately but will be posted within twenty-four hours.
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Report: Pacific Sisters with Disabilities at the Intersection of Discrimination

Posted on 4 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Employment, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Policy & Legislation, Rehabilitation, Reports, Resources, signed languages, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , |

Both people with disabilities and also women experience discrimination in countries around the world, including within the Pacific region. Women with disabilities experience a double dose of discrimination. A newly released report, entitled Pacific Sisters with Disabilities: at the Intersection of Discrimination (PDF format, 981 Kb), reviews the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. It includes discussion on the challenges of discrimination against women with disabilities; laws among Pacific Island governments; and policies and programs within disabled people’s organizations (DPOs), women’s organizations, and mainstream international development partners. The report concludes with recommendations for improving the situation of women with disabilities in the Pacific region. This April 2009 report, by authors Daniel Stubbs and Sainimili Tawake, covers the situation of 22 Pacific countries and territories. It was published by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Pacific Center.

The research leading to this report found that a few helpful laws, policies, and systems of practice do exist in some countries. However, disabled women do still tend to fare more poorly compared to disabled men or compared to non-disabled women. Specifically, they are often less educated, experience more unemployment, face more violence and abuse, encounter more poverty, are more isolated, have less access to health care, and have lower social status. Women with disabilities also have less access to information about education, health care, their reproductive rights, recreation, politics, or even the weather.

Unfortunately, very limited documentation on the situation of women with disabilities exist in any region, including the Pacific. This report relies partly on extrapolation from what is known about women with disabilities in other regions. This information is supplemented, where possible, with local data, statistics, anecdotes, and other information specific to disabled women in the Pacific.

The full 90-page report can be downloaded for free, in PDF format (981 Kb) at: http://www.undppc.org.fj/_resources/article/files/Final%20PSWD%20BOOKLET.pdf.



I learned about this report via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development email discussion list.

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NEWS: Deaf Empowerment Program in Ghana, Uganda Launches

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Deaf, Education, Employment, Interpreting, signed languages, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

First posted in November 2008 at http://www.uclan.ac.uk/ahss/research/islands/sign_language.php

£58,000 for deaf empowerment in Africa

The iSLanDS Centre has received a grant from the Education Partnership Africa programme for capacity building in sub-Saharan Africa.

The project “Training and employability for the deaf communities in Ghana and Uganda” is a joint initiative with the University of Ghana, Kyambogo University in Uganda, and deaf organisations in both countries, and aims at capacity building in the areas of applied sign language studies.

Course and curriculum development includes a sign language interpreter training course at the University of Ghana, a 2-year diploma course for deaf students in Applied Sign Language Studies in Uganda, and summer courses in academic skills development for deaf students. All of these are first-time initiatives, and are realised in close partnership with local deaf organisations.

We expect this project to impact positively on literacy, employability, and access to work for talented deaf participants in these programmes.

For further details, contact the project leader Ulrike Zeshan at uzeshan@uclan.ac.uk, or Sam Lutalo-Kiingi at slutalo-kiingi@uclan.ac.uk



I learned of this program via the Deaf Studies Africa mailing list. All inquiries should please go to either of the project leaders (see email addresses above), NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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JOB POST: Capacity Builder, Intellectual Disabilities, Bolivia (Texto en ingles y español)

Posted on 11 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Education, Families, Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Texto en español

Capacity Builder in Intellectual Disabilities-Ricerca y Cooperazione, El Alto, Bolivia.

Ricerca y Cooperazione (RC) is an Italian based NGO, with an established development programme in Bolivia, mainly in the area of education for children and youth. Recognising the need for greater inclusion of disabled children in mainstream education, it is implementing an EU funded project entitled ‘Social Inclusion and Mutual Respect’, in coordination with the Municipality of El Alto, in order to educate children, teachers, families and authorities on how to incorporate disabled children into the classroom; a concept which is largely overlooked in Boliva.

Your role will be to compliment the small multidisciplinary technical team of the project, (1 specialist in physical disabilities, 1 in sensory, and you in intellectual) in order that all disabilities are represented. The work will include a diagnostic of children with disabilities in El Alto, designing and implementing training workshops to various beneficiaries, production of educational material, and assist in creating an integral centre – which will serve as a resource for families of disabled children, and also an area for activities with disabled and non-disabled youth.

Ideally educated to Masters level, in a discipline related to intellectual disabilities, you should be experienced in designing and facilitating workshops with participatory methods. Preferably with knowledge and experience in Latin America; of the idiosyncrasies of the disability field in a developing country. Good Spanish and a highly flexible working approach.

Applications can be made in English, Spanish or Italian. Follow this link to view or download a full Job Description. Please send completed applications using the format found here to: feliza@isbolivia.org and e.cipollini@ongrc.org

Deadline for applications: Friday 22nd May 2009.

http://isbolivia.org/blog/?page_id=5


Ricerca y Cooperazione (RC) es una ONG italiana, que cuenta con un programa de desarrollo establecido en Bolivia, principalmente en el área de la educación para jóvenes y niños. Reconociendo la necesidad de una mayor inclusión de los niños con discapacidad en la educación transversal, actualmente se encuentra implementando un proyecto financiado por la UE llamado “Inclusión social y respeto mutuo” en coordinación con el municipio de El Alto, a fin de educar a los niños, maestros, familias y autoridades en cómo incorporar a los niños con discapacidad en las aulas; concepto que es pasado por alto en Bolivia.

Su rol será complementar el equipo técnico multidisciplinario del proyecto. (1 especialista en discapacidad física, 1 en discapacidad sensorial y usted en discapacidad intelectual) para que estén representadas todos los tipos de discapacidad. El trabajo incluirá un diagnóstico de los niños con discapacidad en El Alto, diseñando e implementando talleres de capacitación para varios beneficiarios, producción de materiales educativos y asistir en la creación de un centro integral, el cual servirá como recurso para las familias de los niños con discapacidad como también será un área para las actividades de los jóvenes con o sin discapacidad.

Se requiere una formación universitaria a nivel de Maestría en disciplinas relacionadas con la discapacidad intelectual, con experiencia en diseño y facilitación de talleres con métodos participativos. Preferentemente con conocimientos y experiencia en Latinoamérica en relación a las idiosincrasias en el campo de la discapacidad en un país en desarrollo. Buen conocimiento del castellano y un enfoque de trabajo flexible. Para una Descripcion mas Completa, vea abajo (solo en ingles).

Las solicitudes pueden ser realizadas en idioma inglés, castellano o italiano italiano y enviadas a los siguientes correos electrónicos: feliza@isbolivia.org y e.cipollini@ongrc.org utilizando el formulario encontrado en la siguiente página Web.

Fecha límite para las solicitudes: Viernes 22 de mayo de 2009.



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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24, 2009

Posted on 9 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I am re-posting the following announcement, partly as a reminder for people who wish to register but also to correct and clarify the instructions for registration:

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24

Posted on 4 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, accessibility, Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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JOB Post: Education Specialist, Fast Track Initiative, World Bank

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Education, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ob # 090252
Job Title Education Spec.
Job Family Education
Location: Washington, DC
Appointment International Hire
Job Posted 17-Feb-2009
Closing Date 03-Mar-2009
Language Requirements
English [Essential]
Appointment Type Term (Duration: 2 yrs)
Background / General description
THIS IS A 2 YEAR TERM POSITION WITH POSSIBLE EXTENSION TO 3 YEARS.
To apply go to http://extjobs.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64273552&piPK=64273556&theSitePK=1058433&JobNo=090252&order=descending&sortBy=job-req-num&location=ALL&menuPK=64262364

The Fast Track Initiative (FTI) is a global partnership launched in 2002 to accelerate progress toward the Millennium Development Goal of universal quality primary education by 2015. All low-income countries which demonstrate serious commitment to achieving universal primary completion can receive support from FTI. The FTI is a high visibility and politically sensitive aid platform which currently provides technical and financial support to over 50 countries, with the majority in Africa. The FTI provides direct financial support to countries with endorsed education sector plans through a multi-donor Catalytic Fund which currently has over $1,400 million in commitments through 2009, making it the second largest source of financing for basic education in low income countries. It will also provide support to conflict-affected and other fragile states through the recently created Education Transition Fund managed by UNICEF. The FTI Partnership is supported by a Secretariat housed in the World Bank in Washington, DC.

Duties and Accountabilities
The Education Specialist will provide support to countries developing education sector plans and programs to reach the most vulnerable populations who constitute the majority of out-of-school children. S/he will also work with FTI Secretariat Staff, FTI partners, country donors, civil society organizations and the World Bank to provide substantive input and technical support on a range of education and development topics such as improving quality/learning outcomes; fragile states; strengthening in-country processes; donor harmonization; improving gaps in policy, financing, data, and capacity development; and FTI’s response to HIV/AIDS, gender, and disability issues. S/he will report to the Head of the FTI Secretariat and support and collaborate with the FTI Secretariats’ Senior Education Specialists who lead FTI’s work on learning outcomes and country level processes. Specific responsibilities will include:
1. Out of School/Vulnerable Children Coordinate partnership planning and processes to address key constraints for vulnerable populations to achieving the education MDG.
• Assist in designing, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating a targeted outreach program to reach the populations most at risk of not benefiting from EFA/FTI programs.
• Develop a results framework for working with vulnerable populations. Develop and monitor indicators and activities linked to specific marginalized populations (gender, poverty, rural/urban, disability, and child labor).
• Provide background research on education and development policies as appropriate.
• Strengthen the policy dialogue within the FTI partnership by researching the donor partners’ statements on policy (user fees, language of instruction, disability, gender, etc.) and identifying common principles and shared understandings.
• Liaise with the Interagency Task Team on HIV/AIDS and education and strengthen mechanisms to ensure that this collaboration between education and HIV/AIDS is brought down to the country level.
• Represent the FTI Secretariat on the INEE Working Group on Education and Fragility

2. Country Focal Point Serve as focal point for a select number of FTI endorsed and potential countries.
• Act as first line of contact for all FTI communications with coordinating agency.
• Provide and seek information on ESP development and implementation, including FTI trust fund issues, application procedures, and key events such as joint annual reviews.
• Ensure tools such as the capacity development, inclusion/equity, HIV/AIDs, School Health are utilized when LDGs are developing their ESPs.
• Conduct the FTI Secretariat’s support and advice on ‘Light Touch’ review of ESPs prior to endorsement.
• Monitor and provide guidance to fragile states as they progress through the single entry process.

3. Learning Outcomes Support the FTI Secretariat and Partnership’s work to develop its work plan and activities on learning outcomes within the FTI partnership.
• Provide research and other support for the FTI task team on education quality.
• Provide support for the coordination of partnership planning and processes for measuring learning outcomes in FTI countries.
• Assist in communicating with country Local Education Groups/Coordinating agencies (CA) to gauge interest in their participating in international assessments of learning/quality.

Selection Criteria
• Education: An advanced degree in education or related fields.

• A minimum of 5 years of relevant experience working in the education sector.

• Strong knowledge of and commitment to the principles and procedures of the FTI.

• Knowledge of fragile states policies and financing mechanisms.

• Demonstrated knowledge of and experience in the use of education data, and social and institutional research analytical tools.

• Knowledge of education operations in the World Bank or other major donor or UN agencies.

• Experience with dialogue with government and other partners, including bilateral donors, multilateral organizations, and NGOs.

• Proven ability to work with peers, managers, and a diverse range of partners including donors, civil society groups, governments, and academic institutions.

• Ability to work well in a small team, operate under pressure, deliver high quality work within deadlines, and meet team objectives.

The World Bank Group is committed to achieving diversity in terms of gender, nationality, culture and educational background. Individuals with disabilities are equally encouraged to apply. All applications will be treated in the strictest confidence.

To apply go to http://extjobs.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64273552&piPK=64273556&theSitePK=1058433&JobNo=090252&order=descending&sortBy=job-req-num&location=ALL&menuPK=64262364



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD) mailing list. For other jobs at the World Bank, consult the World Bank Employment page. Most jobs at the World Bank are not disability related, but a few are.

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Enabling Education Network Desires Feedback for Website Redesign

Posted on 5 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note to We Can Do readers: For years, people in the field of disability inclusive education have turned to the Enabling Education Network (EENET) for information, resources, and opportunities for debate. EENET has disseminated the following announcement, and is seeking responses by the end of February 2009.]

This year EENET is going to redesign its website. A very kind volunteer in EENET Asia has offered to do all the work for free. So, now we need to get some feedback from people who use the website, so that we can make sure we create a new website that is more useful and user-friendly.

The attached questions may help you give feedback. But please do tell us anything you want about the website — what is good, what is bad and what you would like to see on the website in future.

Please share this request for feedback with anyone else you know who uses the EENET website.

Thanks in advance for any feedback you can give.
Best wishes
Ingrid

EENET website redesign

In 2009 EENET’s website – www.eenet.org.uk –– is going to be redesigned and relaunched. This will be the first significant redesign since the website was created in 1997. So it’s important that we get it right!

The detailed evaluation of EENET in 2006 told us that there are various aspects of the website that are not user-friendly, and users sometimes find it difficult to locate the information they want from the huge selection available.

We now want to top up the evaluation results with some more recent feedback on what you like and don’t like, and what you want to see on the new website.

The following questions are of particular interest to us, but please feel free to send comments about other aspects of the website as well.

Thank you in advance for your help.

1) Organising documents
There are two main options for how we can organise the content on the website:

(a) we could list documents according to type of document (e.g. training manuals, short articles, long reports, etc). Under this option you would see a list of, for instance, all the training manuals available covering all aspects of inclusive education

(b) we could list documents according to inclusive education themes (e.g. gender, working children, disability, refugees, emergencies, etc). With this option you would see all the information available under that theme (you would see a list of all articles, reports, manuals, posters, links to other websites, etc on the theme of, for instance, ‘inclusive education and refugees’).

Which option would you prefer and why?
We could design the site so that both options are available, but before we take this more complicated route, we first want to know if one option is a lot more popular than the other!

2) Search facility
The current search facility within the EENET website is using outdated technology and isn’t very helpful. To help us improve the search facility, please tell us how you search for items on the EENET website. Do you mostly search for items according to:

  • subject area
  • a known document title
  • country
  • name of an organisation/NGO
  • a known author name
  • other (please specify)

3) Which website section(s) do you find most useful? Why?

4) Which website section(s) do you find least useful? Why?

5) Is there anything about the website that you find particularly confusing or frustrating? If so, how could we overcome this problem?

6) Documents in other languages
We currently have a separate section where users can go directly to a list of documents in other languages (it contains a random selection, as we rely on volunteers to do translations). Should we keep this separate section http://www.eenet.org.uk/other_langs/documents.shtml? Or should we remove this section and simply list any translations next to their English versions?

7) Word, PDF or html
Which format do you prefer / find most convenient for accessing and reading documents? Please explain why you prefer this format.

  • Html pages that you read online
  • PDF file downloads
  • Word file downloads

8) Please tell us about anything else that you think will help us make an EENET website that meets your needs!

If you are not already familiar with it, please explore the EENET website at www.eenet.org.uk. Then, send your responses to the above questions to EENET at info@eenet.org.uk by the end of February 2009.



I received this announcement via EENET’s Eastern Africa email discussion group, which focuses on discussion related to disability inclusion education in Eastern Africa.

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SCHOLARSHIP for Tanzanian Students at University of Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted on 31 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Inclusion, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The University in Edinburgh, Scotland, is offering a scholarship for Tanzanian students for the 2009-2010 academic year. Students need to be enrolled at the Masters level. The application deadline is April 1, 2009.

The Julius Nyerere Master’s Scholarship will cover the full overseas tuition fee, living costs of £10,000, and a return flight from Tanzania to the UK. Details are available at http://www.scholarships.ed.ac.uk/postgraduate/internat/nyerere.htm

You can find details of Masters level education courses at http://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/postgraduate/finder/subjectarea.php?taught=Y&sid=14
Some examples include a program in deaf education; a program in inclusive and special education; a program in working with learners with visual impairments; a program in working with learners with specific learning difficulties; and many more.

Please send any queries direct to scholarships@ed.ac.uk



I learned about this scholarship opportunity via the EENET_Eastern_Africa email discussion group. This mailing list, which focuses on inclusive education in Eastern Africa, can be subscribed to for free.

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Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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JOB POST: USICD Education and Outreach Program Manager, Washington DC, USA

Posted on 30 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Education, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Education and Outreach Program Manager (New!)

Job Summary
The United States International Council on Disabilities (USICD) is looking for a part-time Education and Outreach Program Manager in Washington DC. USICD’s mission is to catalyze and help focus the energy, expertise and resources of the US disability community and the US government to optimize their impact on improving the lives of and circumstances of people with disabilities worldwide and to be an active member of the global disability rights movement. This position offers a unique opportunity to join a groundbreaking organization supporting the rights of people with disabilities in the US and abroad.

As a member of a small team and working with the Executive Director, board members, and other volunteers, the Education and Outreach Program Manager will guide the development and implementation of a national awareness campaign that will include print and electronic outreach materials, constituent volunteer training, and general campaign coordination tasks.

Responsibilities include: communication about the rights and experiences of people with disabilities, training program organization, volunteer coordination, program evaluation, and deadline adherence.

Qualifications Summary
USICD seeks a dynamic, energetic leader with global perspective and experience in developing outreach and education programs. Excellence in writing, delivering presentations, and multiple media formats, including web publishing. Experience in training and managing volunteers, including volunteers with diverse abilities and talents. Ability to work collaboratively and to take direction. Commitment to the advancement of people with disabilities and knowledge of disability cultures in both the United States and internationally.

Bachelor’s degree required, graduate degree in related field a plus. First-hand experience with disability preferred.

Applicants
Applicants should provide a cover letter, a resume, a writing sample and three references. Electronic submissions by email are preferred.

Deadline
The position will remain open for applications until the position is filled.

Contact
Please send responses or inquiries to David Morrissey, Executive Director, at dmorrissey@usicd.org



The above job post is cross-posted from the USICD “opportunities” page.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Life-Long Learning

Posted on 28 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Education, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Enabling Education Network (EENET) is looking for articles for the 2009 issue of its newsletter “Enabling Education”. (First draft and article ideas should be submitted by January 30, 2009.) The theme of the newsletter is life-long learning. If you could write an article about your experiences of inclusive education in relation to informal, non-formal, alternative, pre-school, vocational or higher education, EENET would love to hear from you.

EENET’s goal with the 2009 newsletter is to publish an entire newsletter that contains no articles that look purely at formal primary and secondary education. They hope you can help them achieve this! If you are not an experienced writer, don’t worry. Send EENET your ideas and they will try to help you to develop these ideas into an article. You may also find it helpful to look at some previous newsletter articles when you are developing ideas for your own article. If you don’t already have copies of “Enabling Education”, please look at the EENET newsletters on their website (click on the highlighted text in this sentence to follow the link).

EENET really encourages you to send them articles that have been researched/written by, or in collaboration with, children and young people. EENET also always welcome articles that make use of drawings, photos, etc.

Number of words: articles should be about 600 words long.

Deadline: first drafts or article ideas should be sent to us by
30th January 2009.

More details are available at: http://www.eenet.org.uk/events/call_for_articles_eenet_newsletter_2009.shtml

Or email: info@eenet.org.uk



I learned about this call for papers via EENET’s Facebook page. The text is copied from their original announcement and also from their more detailed call for articles. Inquiries and submissions should please be directed to EENET, NOT We Can Do.

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Disability in Non-Western Societies: A Bibliography of Bibliographies

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Middle East and North Africa, Poverty, Resources, signed languages, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Researchers who need to locate journal articles and other publications about people with disabilities throughout history in developing countries face significant barriers. People with disabilities outside of North America and Europe tend to be invisible in much of the published literature and throughout history.

Researchers can consult a list of annotated bibliographies at the Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange (CIRRIE) as a starting point in seeking out thousands of articles that may meet their needs.

These bibliographies do not directly link to the articles in question. In many cases, I suspect these articles may not exist on-line. But the bibliographies could be used to help researchers know what publications they should seek out through the inter-library loan program at their university library.

A few examples of annotated bibliographies include: Disability in the Middle East; Disability and Social Responses in Some Southern African Nations; Disability and Social Response in Afghanistan and Pakistan; Disability & Deafness in North East Africa; Disability and Deafness in East Asia: Social and Educational Responses, from Antiquity to Recent Times; Sign, Gesture, and Deafness in South Asia and South-West Asian Histories; Social Responses to Disability & Poverty in Economically Weaker Countries: Research, Trends, Critique, and Lessons Usually Not Learnt; and more.

Researchers may begin exploring the various bibliographies (by author M. Miles) at

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/bibliography/index.php



I found the page listing M. Miles’ various bibliographies by browsing the CIRRIE web site.

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4th Annual International Shafallah Forum, April 20-22, 2009, in Doha, Qatar

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that the deadline to submit abstracts is January 23, 2009, at 5 pm EST.

On behalf of the Shafallah Center for Children with Special Needs, I would like to extend a warm invitation for you to submit abstracts for the 4th Annual International Shafallah Forum in Doha, Qatar from April 20th – April 22nd , 2009. For the past three years our Center has been delighted to welcome more than 250 experts in the field and Wives of Heads of State from all over the world to our Forum and we anticipate that this year’s Forum will be no exception.

The 4th Annual International Forum will bring together advocates, family members, scholars, members of government, and professionals from a variety of perspectives to explore the theme of /Achieving Independence/. Together we will explore how to overcome factors that perpetuate disability marginalization, including widespread poverty due to lack of access to education, opportunity, and unfair labor practices. We look to our work, cutting-edge research and programs, to promote independence through universal access to education, inclusive societies, innovative technologies, and poverty-reduction strategies – including micro-enterprise and encouragement of the corporate sector to value and include the disabled in the workforce.

The Forum will feature keynote addresses by global leaders, roundtable discussions, symposia, paper presentations, and exhibits. We welcome the submission of such presentations and have included more detailed information on the following pages.

An accepted presentation to the Shafallah Forum includes complimentary airfare, meals, and accommodation. We hope that you will join us this April in Doha and participate in international dialogue among your peers. Please visit our website at www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org

Abstracts are *due by 5pm EST January 23rd, 2009. *

Sincerely,

*I. Modes of Presentation*

Delegates can present their programs and research in several different formats:

*Symposia *(1 hour – 3 x 15 minute presentations, plus 15 minutes discussion)

A collection of 3 papers presenting the results of different programs/studies/experiences relating to a common research theme. Each should be presented by a different person. The symposium coordinator should provide details for the three papers following the instructions below.

*Individual Papers *(15 minute presentation, plus 5 minutes discussion)

A paper presenting the results of a program/study/experience on a particular topic. Papers will be grouped into symposia according to an identified theme. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each paper offered following the instructions below.

* *

*Posters*

Individuals may present their research on the form of a poster. Posters allow for more extended discussion with delegates interested in the content area of the poster. Posters should be attended by at least one author/director who can address questions related to the poster’s content. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each poster presentation offered following the instructions below. Submission of poster collectives (related research) is encouraged.

* *

*Roundtable Discussions or Debates *

(1 hour)

Discussion about the interpretation of existing research, the state of knowledge in a particular area or the need for more or different kinds of research/programming/policies, can be as important as presenting the results of new studies. Individuals wishing to organize such roundtable discussions or debates should identify three or four speakers, who can each present a point of view. Where discussion and audience participation is the purpose, speakers’ presentations might be limited to 5 minutes. Where debate between the speakers is the purpose, presentations may be longer (10 minutes). Organizers should submit the details of the discussion or debate following the instructions below.

*Exhibit *

Individuals or groups that have a demonstration, specialized equipment, and/or materials that they would like to exhibit are invited to submit a proposal. Exhibits will be given a table with specific presentation time, where they will be asked to be present and are encouraged to leave materials/equipment out for attendees to peruse throughout the Forum.

*II. Abstracts*

Abstracts must be in English. Abstracts longer than permissible will be abridged at the discretion of the program planning committee.

*Theme & Topic:* The conference is to be organized into themes and include general and break-out sessions. Please specify which theme that best fits your session. All abstracts should be prepared using the following headings:

*Instructions for Submitting Paper/Poster Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of authors. Give the email address of person(s) presenting the paper

*Contact details:* Type an asterisk after the presenter’s name and give the affiliation address of the presenting author only

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Preferred mode: *State whether: (a) individual paper or (b) poster

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

*Instructions for Submitting Symposia Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*List:* Authors, affiliations, e-mail addresses and titles of papers to be included in the symposium.

*Moderator: *Give the name and affiliation of the person who has agreed to moderate the symposium. Give the contact details for moderator (email, phone & address).

*Abstract:* Each paper should submit an abstract. This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Roundtable Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of each participant noting the moderator with an asterisk.

*Contact details:* Give the full contact information (email, phone, & address) of all participants

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 400 words and describe the background behind the issue to be discussed or debated and the views to be put forth by each speaker.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Exhibits*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Host: *Give the name, affiliation, e-mail, and phone of the person hosting the exhibit.

*Abstract:* Submit a description of the demonstration/exhibit, its intent, and space requirements

*III. Submission Deadline: 5pm EST, January 23, 2009*

Kindly submit abstracts to: Valerie Karr @ valeriek@brownlloydjames.com

Please label the subject line: _Shafallah Forum Abstract_. Failure to do so may result in abstract not being viewed.

Information about the Shafallah Center and Previous International Forums please visit:

http://www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org



We Can Do received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email news list. All queries and applications should be emailed to Valerie Karr at the Shafallah Center, NOT to We Can Do.

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BREAKING NEWS: Dr. Mike Kemp Reported to Have Passed Away

Posted on 29 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, News, signed languages | Tags: , , , , |

At about 1 am GMT, I received word that Dr. Mike Kemp has passed away. A member of Gallaudet University’s faculty, Kemp was an international consultant who conducted training workshops in the Far East, Central and South America, the Caribbean islands, Middle East, and Europe. For the past 10 years, he worked in Thailand and Vietnam in sign language teacher training programs. More background on Dr. Kemp is at
. http://deafstudies.gallaudet.edu/Faculty-Staff/ASL_and_Deaf_Studies/Kemp_Mike.html
His web page includes a video of Kemp describing his recent work in American Sign Language.

As of this writing (3 am GMT, Nov 30 ’08) official confirmation has not yet been posted on Gallaudet’s web site but is said to be anticipated soon. [UPDATE Dec 1 ’08, 4 p.m. GMT/UTC: I still have not seen an announcement on Gallaudet’s web site, but the Provost’s office has now circulated an obituary from Kemp’s family. I have posted that obituary at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/12/01/dr-michael-kemp-obituary-from-his-family/.]

When it is posted at Gallaudet’s site, it should probably be available either at http://pr.gallaudet.edu/dailydigest or possibly at
http://news.gallaudet.edu/.

I extend my condolences to all who knew Kemp or who were touched by him or his work.



I first learned this news via the GallyProtest mailing list; the list administrator, Brian Riley, has indicated that he learned of this event through Aidan Mack’s vlog post on the topic (in American Sign Language), sharing how Kemp touched her life as a professor at Gallaudet University.

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Give One, Get One XO Laptop Per Child

Posted on 25 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Education, News, Opportunities, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

They’re simple, rugged, and low-cost. And their more ardent fans think they can transform the world–one educated child at a time. Since the first XO laptops rolled off the assembly line in November 2006, hundreds of thousands of children in low-income countries have been using them in the classroom and at home. If you haven’t heard the hype yet, you can explore the website for the new, but increasingly famous One Laptop Per Child project at http://www.laptop.org/.

The latest news is:, people in the US, Canada, and Europe are now able to purchase an XO laptop for a child at home–if they will agree to also buy a laptop for a child they have never met somewhere abroad. From now until December 26, 2008, people in the US, Canada, and Europe may go to amazon.com/XO. A total of $399 in US dollars (or £275 in UK pounds) buys one XO laptop that can be shipped to your child and a second laptop to be shipped to a child in a developing country.

Because they are cheaper than most computers, XO laptops fit a little more easily into the education budgets of developing countries, especially if donors step in to help. Do they really enhance children’s learning experience as dramatically as the XO’s most earnest supporters believe? Some critics are not so sure. But others remain enthusiastic. I’ll let We Can Do readers google for more competing opinions at news.google.com and blogsearch.google.com on their own. But as a small sampling: various articles report that Microsoft and Intel don’t like the competition, and even some former employees of the One Laptop Per Child project are critics of the way the head of the company, Nicolas Negroponte, runs the business. But they seem to like the XO in Peru. And one US blogger with an XO shares his own thoughts on the subject.

What of children with disabilities? The XO is a bit of a mixed bag. Some features are good for some children with some disabilities (eg, built-in camera, good for signing deaf kids). But others are not so great for other children (eg, the interface is very visual–not so great for blind kids). I wrote some more thoughts on the topic last year at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2007/11/16/opinion-one-laptop-per-child—but-is-it-inclusive/.

I remain disappointed now, as I was then, that the people who developed the XO don’t seem to be as proactively inclusive of the needs of people with disabilities as I think they could be and should be. But some independent XO fans and programmers are working on solutions. If you want to join their on-line discussions on the topic, you can sign up for their free email-based discussion group at http://lists.laptop.org/listinfo/accessibility. Or, if you want to learn more about the accessibility issues for XO laptops, you can explore the online “Wiki” community on the topic at http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Accessibility.

What of adults who simply want a cheap, portable laptop for their own use? If you’re in the US, Canada, or Europe, then nothing would stop you from buying one for yourself. But be aware that the keyboard is designed for the small hands of primary school-aged children. If your hands are the same size as most adults, you will find it hard to touch type on the cramped keyboard. You might have to resort to two-fingered (or possibly four-fingered) typing. Also, the interface is geared toward young, creative children who might never have seen a computer before. An adult who has spent too many years using more boring, typical computers for “grown-ups” in developed countries might initially be confused about how to access its most basic programs.

Learn more about its software and hardware at http://www.laptop.org/en/laptop/index.shtml. There is an on-line forum where people who are bewildered by their XOs can ask for help from other users: http://en.forum.laptop.org/. People with more disability-specific questions will probably want to join the accessibility mailing list I mentioned above, at http://lists.laptop.org/listinfo/accessibility so they can exchange ideas, information, and solutions with other list members.

Or if all else fails, give your new XO to a young child you know and ask them to teach you how to use it. That is, if you decide to buy one.



I learned about this year’s “Give One, Get One” project through a mailing from the One Laptop Per Child project.

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JOB POST: Project Manager Inclusive Education Bac Kan province, Vietnam, Handicap International

Posted on 21 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Handicap International IS LOOKING FOR Project Manager Inclusive Education in Bac Kan province, Vietnam.
Posting date: 1st February 2009 Length of the assignment : 2 years
Closing date for application : 21/12/2008 (December 21, 2008)

Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit-making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, in response to humanitarian crises and the effects of extreme poverty. Handicap International implements programmes of assistance to persons and local organisations, inclusion programmes and programmes focusing on the fight against the main causes of disability. It runs projects in almost 60 countries, with the support of a network of 8 national associations ( Germany, Belgium, Canada, United-States, Luxembourg, United Kingdom and Switzerland)

The organisation employs almost 3300 people worldwide, 330 of whom work in France and in its European and North American sections.

For more details on the association: http://www.handicap-international.fr/en/s/index.html

JOB CONTEXT :

Unified from 1975 after 40 years of conflict, Vietnam entered into the Doi Moi process on economy and politics in the mid 80’s to open the country to liberalism. With economic growth rate of more than 8% in 2007, the country is now becoming one of the new Asian Dragons. This development creates a gap between rich areas mainly located in the lowlands and urban areas and remote mountainous regions where people remain poor, despite a 50% fall in poverty over the last 10 years.

The country is very stable with a government ruled by one legal political party. All institutional levels have People Committee representatives from the State to the villages. With around 85 millions inhabitants, Vietnam is highly populated for a territory of 331,000 km2. 54 ethnic groups co-exist in this area; the Kinh (Vietnamese themselves) constitute a majority of 85% and are dispersed nationwide. All other population groups are ethnic minorities mainly located in mountainous provinces.

JOB DESCRIPTION :

The objective aims to implement the Inclusive Education National Plan in Bac Kan province. The project has been designed and submitted as a consortium between Handicap international France and Save the Children Sweden. The project will be implementing with others external partners specialized or working in education domain.

Challenges and goals:

The Project Manager will ensure the effective implementation of the project “Rights-Based Inclusive Education Access for Children with Disability in Bac Kan province, Vietnam” in line with programme and project requirements. The post holder must support and promote the core values and interests of HI. The Project Manager will work under the supervision of the Programme Director based in Hanoi and will manage one to two project assistants, and up to two field staff (to be recruited).

_Activities_ :

/_Manage the project_/:

– To manage the following project areas: implementation of activities, human resources (field staff), finance and communications. To coordinate with partners strategies on Inclusive Education;

– Determine the methodology to be used in the project appropriate to the Vietnamese understanding of inclusion of disabled children in education

– Support the implementation of activities by partners and consultants, to implement an education policy which takes into account disabled children,

– Write the project narrative reports and participate in financial reports,

– Co-ordinate between all the project’s internal and external stakeholders;

– Prepare and participate in the evaluation phases and implement any pertinent recommendations;

– Provide initiatives to develop the project in the relation to the HI Vietnam’s pluri-annual strategy and participate technically in fundraising.

/_Manage the project and site team:_/

– Draw-up job profiles, validate recruitments an individual action plans for each team member

– Train the team in methods, approaches (participative methods, partnership…) or technical aspects (Inclusive Education, Specialized Education, identification and assessment of disabled children); Ensure effective communication within the HI team in Hanoi and other sites.

/_ Assure the project’s technical framework and its representation_/:

– Ensure that the project is implemented in line with Handicap International’s Inclusive Education policy and the Vietnamese education sector plan. /__/

/_Contribute towards the capitalization of experience:_/

– Identify with the Technical Adviser, which issues or subject areas should be capitalized,

– Define a method for collecting good practice with the Technical Adviser

CANDIDATE PROFILE:

_Mandatory:_

– Degree in a relevant discipline ; Education, development or disability (equal to BAC + 4 in France)

– Strong management skills. At least 5 years experiences in his/her field or in project management.

– Sound knowledge of Monitoring and Evaluation techniques and methodology

– Ability to work in partnership with national and local actors

– Experience of working within a multi-cultural environment

– English is essential as all project documentation and reporting systems are in English

_Qualities required_: Group leadership, initiative, creativity, diplomacy, interpersonal skills. Written and oral expression, decision making, good team work skills, strong autonomy.

_Complementary_:

– _Field of studies:_ special Education (Inclusive education, social work…)

– Experience of working in remote area, experience in INGO, experience in Asian context.

REQUIRED LANGUAGE SKILLS: English mandatory both written and oral, French would be an asset.

JOB ENVIRONMENT : The Project Manager will travel to Hanoi once a month to attend a monthly internal HI meeting in order to monitor and share his project with the Hanoi office and the Quang Tri site (HIV/AIDS project).//

EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS :

_Volunteer :_ 750 or 850 Euros monthly indemnity + living allowance paid on the field + accommodation + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance

_Salary :_ 2000 to 2300 + 457 Euros expatriation allowance + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance « + family policy »

Please send resume and covering letter with the above reference to : FPINSERCPEducVietnam1108

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL – 14, avenue Berthelot – 69361 LYON CEDEX 07

Or by Email : recrut11@handicap-international.org

Please do not telephone

Candidates from Canada or the United States, and nationals of these countries, should send their application to the following address :

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL CANADA
1819 Boulevard René Lévesque, bureau 401 – MONTRÉAL, QUÉBEC – H3H 2P5

Or by email : jobs@handicap-international.ca
or fax : 514-937-6685

Please do not telephone



This announcement was previously circulated via the Intl-Dev mailing list; the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list; and other sources.

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UNESCO Flagship to Promote Education Access for Disabled Children

Posted on 12 November 2008. Filed under: Children, Education, Inclusion, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has created a Flagship devoted to improving the reach and quality of inclusive education for students with disabilities in developing countries. As many as 90 percent of children with disabilities in developing countries are denied the opportunity to obtain an education. The Flagship program works in partnership with other United Nations agencies, international and national disability organizations, and donors. It promotes the need for policy makers and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to work in partnership with organizations of, or representing, people with disabilities and their families. The Flagship also promotes the inclusion of education rights for people with disabilities in National Education Plans.

Read more about the Flagship at
http://www.unesco.org/education/efa/know_sharing/flagship_initiatives/disability_last_version.shtml

Read more about inclusive education at
http://portal.unesco.org/education/en/ev.php-URL_ID=56205&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

Download a brochure on the Flagship program (PDF format, 432 Kb) at
http://www.unesco.org/education/efa/know_sharing/flagship_initiatives/depliant_flagship.pdf

People who are interested in promoting educational opportunities for people with disabilities in developing countries will also want to explore the web site for the Enabling Education Network (EENET), an information-sharing resource on inclusive education.

If you have a specific interest in Eastern Africa, then you might wish to learn about an on-line discussion group on inclusive education in Eastern Africa. Select the category education from the pull-down menu under “Categories” to see more We Can Do posts related to education for people with disabilities.



I first learned of the Flagship via the mailing list for the Centre for Services and Information on Disability.

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Videos about Deaf Life: Central Arican Republic, Philippines, Venezuela, Mexico, Austria

Posted on 3 October 2008. Filed under: Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Employment, Latin America & Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , |

Four on-line videos give an overview of deaf communities around the world; all can be viewed at:

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2008/09/24/deaf-awareness-week-striving-for-quality-education/

The first video on this page shares the story of a school for deaf children in the Central African Republic that has been struggling for funding. Several teachers have quit because they have not been paid consistently for the past four years; only two teachers remain struggling on. Unfortunately, this type of story is common in many schools in developing countries–not only in deaf schools. This video is in the signed language of the Central African Republic with English subtitles. As a deaf person, I can’t tell if this video has English voice over for blind people.

The second video was made by deaf students in the Philippines. This video, in Philippines sign language and English subtitles, portrays the difficulties many deaf people in their country confront when they look for jobs after graduation. Unemployment is another challenge that is common to deaf people and disabled people all around the world–not only in developing countries but also in industrialized countries. I don’t know if this video has voice over.

In Venezuela, teachers for the deaf explain the importance of a bilingual and bi-cultural education. Some Venezuelan Sign Language is seen on the screen in the background scenes, and there are some occasional Spanish words on the screen in between visual shots of children in the classroom, etc. Unfortunately there are no subtitles in any language to help deaf people understand what the teachers say in this video. But hearing people who understand Spanish could give this one a try.

The last video has a deaf woman from Mexico and a deaf man from Austria simultaneously demonstrate the Mexican and Austrian fingerspelled alphabets; the cardinal numbers in Mexican and Austrian signed languages; and the names of the months. I’m guessing there is probably no audio description.

Sighted people will note that the Mexican and Austrian signed languages are dramatically different from each other. I can tell you that they are both also very different from American Sign Language–and all three languages are different from the signed language used in the San Jose area of Costa Rica.

In addition to the four videos, the following web page also has links that give more information about the programs described in the videos:

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2008/09/24/deaf-awareness-week-striving-for-quality-education/



Thank you to Sylvia Cabus for alerting me to these on-line videos.

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FOREIGN LANGUAGE SURVEY for US People with Disabilities: Take 10 Minutes to Share Experience Studying, or Being Excluded From Learning, Foreign Languages

Posted on 29 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

NOTE from We Can Do editor: I hope that We Can Do readers with disabilities in the United States will take 10 minutes of their time to participate in a survey on their experiences studying foreign languages–or, as the case might be, on their experience being excluded from these opportunities.

People with disabilities in developing countries cannot lift themselves out of poverty if mainstream international development and humanitarian agencies and organizations continue to overlook their concerns when developing new programs and policies. One important way to ensure that the needs of poor disabled people are always put front and center is for more mainstream international development organizations to hire more disabled employees from all countries. Workers with disabilities need to be employed across all sectors, in all regions, and at all levels of all agencies and organizations, including in management. (Ditto for more employees who have grown up in poverty, or who have grown up in a developing country, or all three.)

Bringing more employees with disaiblities into these organizations, among other things, means we must ensure that more students with disabilities have a way to study foreign languages. This is a critical pre-requisite: it’s not impossible to pursue a career in the field without foreign language skills, but it is harder. But, many people with disabilities in many countries–including the United States–find it difficult to receive appropriate accommodations in foreign language classes.

This foreign language survey is an opportunity for people with disabilities in the United States to take 10 minutes of their time to share their experience with studying foreign languages–or with being excluded from the opportunity. What accommodations worked best for you? Or, what would have helped if you could have had them? The deadline to participate in the survey is October 31, 2008.

Start the survey at http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/47971/foreignlanguages, or if you wish, you may read the original press release about this survey below:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
DATE August 26, 2008

CONTACT: Michele Scheib, Project Specialist
EMAIL: pr@miusa.org

Foreign Language Survey Asks U.S. People with Disabilities to Respond

National surveys show US high school students with disabilities, while increasing in numbers enrolled, still lag behind their non-disabled peers in the percentages taking foreign language courses. Students with and without disabilities are close to equal in the percentages completing foreign language courses at the higher education level. However, the data does not explain what languages are being studied, how successful the learning experience is, and what are the barriers and benefits for people with disabilities at all ages.

Are you a person with a disability from the United States who is interested in taking a survey about foreign language learning and disability? The National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange seeks your and other individuals with disabilities input and experiences.

Take a 10-minute Foreign Language survey online at:
http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/47971/foreignlanguages

Deadline to submit the survey: October 31, 2008

The National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange (NCDE) is sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State and administered by Mobility International USA. The NCDE works to increase the participation and inclusion of people with disabilities in international exchange programs. Contact us at: 541-343-1284 (tel/tty), clearinghouse@miusa.org, http://www.miusa.org/ncde.

The National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange provides free information and referral services related to the participation of people with disabilities in international exchange programs. The Clearinghouse is sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State, and is managed by Mobility International USA, which is celebrating its 27th year as a U.S.-based non-profit organization.

Our mailing address is:
Mobility International USA
132 E. Broadway, Suite 343
Eugene, Oregon 97405 USA

Our telephone/tty:
541-343-1284

If you want to receive these press releases, please subscribe by inquiring with pr@miusa.org.

Copyright (C) 2008 Mobility International USA All rights reserved.



Thank you to MIUSA for circulating this announcement.

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Take Action! Promote the Mainstreaming of Disability in the MDGs

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

MEMORANDUM
TO: GPDD PARTNERS
FROM: GPDD SECRETARIAT
SUBJECT: PROMOTING THE MAINSTREAMING OF DISABILITY IN THE MDGs
DATE:    9/25/2008
 
The General Assembly’s sixty-third session is taking place at the UN headquarters in New York. This session marks a special occasion to highlight the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and a number of consultations and events examining multiple dimensions of MDG activities are taking place throughout the week. This presents a unique opportunity for all concerned stakeholders to advocate for the inclusion of disability in the MDGs.
 
Since the GA Plenary may discuss this issue from October 6 to 8, immediate action is essential. For this reason, the Secretariat of the Global Partnership for Disability and Development is:

1)    Circulating a letter to UN Missions and Foreign Affairs Offices of Member States requesting Member States to make interventions and support a resolution in favor of mainstreaming disabilities in the MDGs.

2)    Encouraging advocates and activists to phone, fax, or e-mail relevant government officials in their countries.

3)    Sending an advisory to relevant media outlets.

We request your support in these actions as well as your suggestions.

Your ideas and participation will make a difference! A sample letter and relevant contact information are attached for your use.

FYI,  a copy of the Secretary-General’s report on mainstreaming disability in monitoring and evaluation of MDGs conducted as part of the Fifth quinquennial  review and appraisal of the World Program of Action concerning Disabled Persons and a short summary are attached, as well.
 
Sincerely,
Maria Verónica Reina
Executive Director
GPDD

Sample Letter
Disability advocates may wish to use this sample letter as inspiration when writing to the UN Mission Office for your country, or when writing to the Foreign Affairs office in your country. Find the full list of UN Mission offices, with the relevant contact information, at http://www.un.org/members/missions.shtml. Search the website for your government to locate the contact information for your country’s equivalent of the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Dear Mr./Ms. Minister of Foreign Affairs (or Head of Delegation):
As members of the Disability and Development community, we want to encourage your government to play a substantive and active role in favor of mainstreaming Disability in the Millennium Development Goals (during the fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action (A/63/183) which will be reviewed by the GA during its 63rd session (6-8 October under Social Development). The report was envisaged as a contribution to reinforcing the disability perspective in reviews of the progress made, and challenges encountered, in implementing the MDGs as requested by GA resolution 62/127.

Mainstreaming disability in the MDGs will help to ensure that no one is excluded from the processes of global development. In view of the enforcement of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, new and concerted efforts should be made in order to accomplish the advancement of persons with disability in the context of development. It is important to note the importance of promoting universal design, the design of products, environments, programmes, and services which are usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. Such increased accessibility benefits all members of society, not only persons with disabilities. Simultaneously, it is also relevant to state that disability specific programs addressing MDG concerns are also needed to guarantee the full inclusion of persons with disabilities on an equal basis with others.

For these reasons, we respectfully urge you to promote a resolution on mainstreaming disability in the MDGs during the fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action at the 63rd Session of the GA.

Sincerely,

Summary Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons (A/63/183)
The full Fifth quinquennial review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons, referred to in Maria Verónica Reina’s letter, was too long to publish here. But someone also disseminated a shorter summary which is provided below.

The fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action (A/63/183) will be reviewed by the General Assembly during its 63rd session(6-8 October under social development)The report was envisaged as a contribution to reinforcing the disability perspective in reviews of progress and challenges encountered in implementing the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as requested by General Assembly resolution 62/127. The resolution also requested the Secretary-General to present proposed updates of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons which were summarized in Annex I to the report. The report also presents Annex II, “Millennium Development Goals: Mainstreaming Disability”, which presents practical guidance on the inclusion of disability in the processes of the MDGs.

The principal issue addressed in the fifth review and appraisal is the emergence of a “new normative and policy architecture” on the advancement of persons with disabilities within the context of development. This architecture comprises the broad policy framework of the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons (for policy formulation, planning and development); the tactical guidance for States of the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunity for Persons with Disabilities; and the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which are legally binding for States parties, and is discussed in the section “International Disability Architecture”.

A second point of importance within the report is the emergence, of regional action plans and programmes on the advancement of persons with disabilities, which reflect needs and priorities of the respective regional actors and their complementary relationship to the international architecture.

A third point addresses the processes of the MDGs and focuses on options suggested in the architecture to ensure that no one is excluded from the processes of global development.

A fourth point within the report discusses the expanded constituencies for the advancement of persons with disabilities. As the median global age is on the rise, disability will have major policy implications because the prevalence of disabilities tends to be higher among older persons. The new constituencies represent important agents in a new and concerted effort as part of a disability-sensitized community to the advancement of persons with disability in the context of development. It is important to note the importance of promoting universal design, the design of products, environments, programmes and services which are usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. Such increased accessibility benefits all members of society, not only persons with disabilities.

The fifth, point, is the need for a single, comprehensive biennial review of progress and obstacles in implementing a global strategy for disability-inclusive development. This unified report on the new disability architecture could facilitate substantive exchange and learning from the findings and recommendations of the CRDP treaty body once established, within the context of development.

Annex I to the Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action – Updates to the World Programme of Action
Annex I discusses the issue of the updating of the World Programme of Action, as requested by General Assembly resolution 62/127.

The report recommends that the General Assembly endorse a plan to develop a Global Strategy toward Disability-Inclusive Development 2010-2015, through regional consultations and contributions from experts. These strategic guidelines could be developed based on the complementarities and synergies of three disability-specific instruments, namely the World Programme of Action, the Standard Rules and the Convention, and could incorporate updates proposed by Member States. There are existing regional guidelines for disability action in the context of development that could provide a basis for the development of a global strategy.
Annex II to the Fifth review and appraisal of the World Programme of Action – Millennium Development Goals: Mainstreaming Disability

Annex II provides a selection of examples and guidelines for mainstreaming disability in the MDGs and includes possible indicators to include disability in the monitoring of progress in achieving MDGs.



This call for action, and the associated materials, was recently circulated in several different locations including the IDA_CRPD_Forum and the GPDD mailing list.



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Including Everybody: Website on Disability and MDGs Launched

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), News, Opinion, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
End poverty and hunger. Put all children in school. Empower women. Stop children from dying. Keep pregnant and birthing mothers healthy. Fight AIDS, malaria, and other disease. Create a sustainable environment. And promote global cooperation. These are the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)–an important set of goals agreed upon by key leaders and heads of state from around the world in September 2000. No, they don’t mention people with disabilities at all–and I will come back to this point in a few paragraphs. Or you can ignore me and go straight to the new website on disability and the MDGs. But in theory, the MDGs are meant to help everyone.

Each goal has a set of specific targets to be achieved, most with the deadline set for 2015. For example, the poverty goal includes a target to cut the number of people living on less than $1 a day in half by 2015. And the goal on child mortality includes a target to cut the child mortality rate by two-thirds among children below age 5. Many country governments, multi-lateral development banks, international development organizations, and donors have invested billions of dollars into projects meant to help more countries and regions meet the Millennium Development Goals.

What has the results been? Mixed. Some of the goals, such as the targets for reducing poverty and hunger, or in putting all children in primary school, have been met–and exceeded in many countries particularly in eastern Asia. Progress in southern Asia has helped also. But many countries in sub-Saharan Africa lag far behind in meeting many of the MDGs.

You can read more about the overall progress–or lack of it–at http://www.undp.org/mdg/basics_ontrack.shtml. Or if you only want to look up the progress in the country where you live, work, or care about the most, go to http://www.undp.org/mdg/tracking_countryreports2.shtml.

People with Disabilities and the MDGs
But what about people with disabilities? Unfortunately, they have been so invisible that most programs and governments don’t even count them. That means it’s hard to find reliable numbers that measure whether people with disabilities are included–or left behind–in the haphazard progress that has been made toward the MDGs. But, we can make some educated guesses.

For example, what limited numbers do exist estimate that possibly as many as 98% of children with disabilities in some developing countries never go to school. Personally, I doubt this number is universally true. For one thing, there is a great deal of variation from country to country in how proactive they are about finding creative ways to include children with disabilities in school. Read Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience (PDF format, 4.14 Mb) for examples of progress.

Then, there is probably some variation depending on the disability. A child with a relatively mild walking-related disability, for example, might have only minor difficulty reaching school if it is not too far. Or a child with undiagnosed and unaccommodated dyslexia might sometimes make it through a few years of school, and even learn a little, before they quit in frustration.

But if that 98% figure is anywhere close to the mark, then it is safe to say that the MDG target on universal primary education has failed disabled children miserably. We do know that they are very disproportionately left behind: the UK Department of International Development (DFID) says that one-third of the 72 million children who are out of school have disabilities, even though people with disabilities are only an estimated 10 percent of the world population in general. And this only covers the education-related target of the MDGs; the new website on disability and the MDGs points out gaps in all the rest.

Disability Inclusion is Everyone’s Business
So what’s the answer to this problem? A thorough response to this question would fill a book. One thing, however, is clear: It will not be resolved by any one government or organization working in isolation. And it certainly will not happen if resource-strapped disability-oriented organizations are left to tackle the problem alone. It will take many governments, agencies, and organizations working together–including those that do not normally specialize in disability issues. In short, everybody who is doing anything to address the MDGs needs to identify better ways to include people with disabilities in the work they’re already doing.

This begins by increasing everyone’s awareness of the complex relationship between disability and the MDGs. By “everyone” I mean both disability advocates (so they can help advocate the issue) and also mainstream international development professionals (so they can find ways to ensure their programs are not inadvertently leaving disabled people behind). Either way, you can start learning at the new website on disability and the Millennium Development Goals, Include Everybody, at:

http://www.includeeverybody.org/

What Do I Think of “Include Everybody”?
When you consider that this website is brand new, I think it makes an excellent start at covering the issues. In the long run, as with any new endeavor, I see room for them to expand. For example, their page on achieving universal primary school education or the page on promoting gender equality and empowering women could usefully link to publications such as Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb). Or their page on combating HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases could link to the on-line global survey on disability and HIV/AIDS.

They also could consider eventually developing a one to two page, attractive looking, factsheet on disability and the MDGs that advocates could print out and disseminate when educating others about the topic. They also could consider developing a similarly attractive, one-page factsheet for each of the MDGs individually. The latter could be useful, for example, for passing along to a specialist who only wants to read the information on child mortality without also having to wade through a lot of detail on environmental sustainability. Or vice versa.

But, for now, this web site is a good place to start learning.

http://www.includeeverybody.org/links.php



The Include Everybody website has been publicized in several different locations by now, including the GPDD mailing list, the Intl-Dev mailing list, Joan Durocher’s mailing list, and others.

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Statement on the Millennium Development Goals and Disability, from the Africa Regional Conference

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

THE STATEMENT OF THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE, HELD AT THE PANAFRIC HOTEL, NAIROBI, KENYA 15TH TO 17TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

We, the 200 delegates of the Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference from the, Central, Eastern, Northern, Western and Southern sub regions of Africa met in Nairobi, Kenya, at the Panafric Hotel on 15th to 17th September 2008, to examine the status of MDGs in respect to the inclusion and mainstreaming of disability;

And further to enhance the capacity of leaders from the disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in African countries;

Noting that MDGs have no specific reference to persons with disabilities and therefore their continued exclusion in the campaign processes, policies, planning, programmes and implementation;

Concerned also that disability has not been mentioned in the midway Millennium Development Goals Report;

Further acknowledging that the convention on the rights of PWDs has recently come into effect, to among other things strengthen the resolve for inclusion of people with disabilities;
We note with dismay the continued categorisation of people with disabilities as vulnerable which further marginalises us and consigns us to invisibility, we state that we wish to be recognised as actors in the development processes;

We Resolve As Delegates That We Shall;
• Communicate the outcome of this conference to our governments to review, prioritise and include issues of disability in their Country Statements during their high level meetings on MDGs in New York, in the September 2008 Summit
• Call on our Governments to move and support a motion during the UN General Assembly, calling for the establishment of a new UN Special Agency on Disability; to provide leadership, coordination, harmonisation and enhanced monitoring and reporting.
• Engage our Governments to ensure that People with Disabilities are protected from adverse effects from rising costs and related vulnerabilities and participate and benefit from existing social protection schemes
• Lobby Governments through the African Development Bank and related partners to establish an African Disability Equity Fund to support economic empowerment, entrepreneurship and business of people with disabilities
• Encourage the use of professional campaigners including goodwill ambassadors in promoting disability inclusion
• Recognise the efforts of parents, friends and guardians of people with disabilities and recognise them as part of the wider disability movement
• Uphold the principle of gender equity in disability
• Promote the use of positive language in reference to people with disabilities
We Urge The UN Through Member States;
• To establish a Specialist Agency on Disability in the league of UNICEF and UNIFEM to provide leadership and global accountability on matters related to the disabled people
• To prioritise include and partner with the disability movement in its entire millennium campaign initiatives and develop the strategies for doing so in the September summit
We Urge The AU And Related Bodies To;
• Set up a Disability Desk within all African regional bodies to monitor the implementation of both the convention and human rights violation of people with disabilities within the respective regions.
• Mainstream disability into their programmes and performance management systems
• Establish peer review mechanism and performance management system for disability in Africa
• Ensure political and social economic representation of people with disabilities in NEPAD and develop terms of reference for their participation.
• Work with DPOs to urgently review the structure and mandate of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)
• Extend the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities for another ten years by means of a proclamation by the meeting of the African Heads of State planned for January 2009
• Facilitate self- representation of PWDs in all commissions, Pan Africa Parliament and other structures

We Call On The Secretariat Of African Decade Of Persons With Disability to;
• Establish a programme to develop human resource capacity for policy analysis to act as a watch dog in monitoring disability inclusion
• Allocate responsibilities, roles and duties to the regional federations and other partners in order to ensure effective, well – monitored follow up and implementation strategies
We urge all Government to;
• Ratify, domesticate and implement the UN convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
• Work with DPOs in nominating the members of the panel of experts in convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
• Recognise DPOs as agents of change and therefore as partners in development planning and programmes
• Include people with disabilities and disability into their poverty reduction and development programmes
• Put into place affirmative action to enhance participation in political social and economic sectors
• Include disability data collection within the general national data collection systems recognising diversity in disability
• Use data to inform planning and service delivery and monitoring and evaluation
• Highlight and include disability in the existing MDG indicators in partnership with the disability movement.

We Call On Development Partners To;
• Prioritise disability as a tool for planning and analysis for development assistance and international cooperation in all their international cooperation and assistance (aid, debt relieve and trade)
• Include and consult people with disabilities and their respective organisations in planning, implementation, monitoring and reporting
• Include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes

We Resolve That As Disabled Peoples Organisations We Shall;
• Advocate to ensure that disability issues are mainstreamed in all government, UN agencies and development partners policies, plans and programmes particularly those related to MDGs
• Endeavour to understand the structures of various government, UN agencies and development partners with a view to engaging with them more effectively for full inclusion of people with disabilities
• Advocate development partners to include disability as a requirement / condition for funding development programmes
• Engage and influence the social development process
• Participate in the Social Protection processes to ensure people with disabilities are included
• Advocate and lobby to be included in national poverty reduction strategies and other national development plans and initiatives
• Explore avenues of partnership with private sector in their economic empowerment programes
• Utilize our individual and collective capacity to cause the implementation of programmes related to the MDGs for the benefit of people with disabilities
• Build our own capacity to engage with our government on their commitments and agreement at national and international levels
• Ensure that whatever is agreed at regional or national workshops cascades downward to people with disabilities at the grassroots and rural areas
• Familiarise ourselves with the disability policies of different development agencies and ensure that they benefit us
• Strengthen our unity and common voice in planning, implementation and monitoring processes whilst at the same time recognising diversity in disability
• Restructure and reform our internal governance structures to adopt modern management and good governance systems and increase transparency and accountability to our members
• Nurture and mentor youth with disabilities into leadership succession plans and support them towards social economic empowerment
• Make a paradigm shift from the charity model to the human rights and social development model
• Strategically engage with media for both awareness and advocacy and built our capacity to engage with media
• Sensitise and capacitate the media to various disability needs and to urge them to be inclusive in their presentation and reporting
• Link with African Universities to promote evidence based disability research and to promote disability inclusive academic programmes
• Review through our Governments the Accra Development Plan of Action and cause its implementation for the benefit of PWDs in Africa

These resolutions are the outcomes of the conference, formulated and spoken by the delegates at this esteemed Millennium Development Goals and Disability Conference.



This statement from the Africa Regional Conference was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

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Good Practice AWARD COMPETITION for Service Providers in Middle East: Chance to Win 1500 Euro for Organization

Posted on 25 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Case Studies, Cross-Disability, Education, Funding, Health, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that the application deadline is October 18, 2008.

Funded by:
DISABILITY MONITOR INITIATIVE- MIDDLE EAST
Good Practice Award

The identification and sharing of good practices helps service providers to improve their performance and ultimately provide enhanced services for persons with disabilities. The Disability Monitor Initiative (DMI-ME) is conducting a Good Practice Awards program to recognize good practices in service delivery.

Who can apply:

  • Service providers in Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Palestine and Yemen working in the areas of healthcare, education, livelihood opportunities and social protection – for persons with disabilities
  • Service providers with no more than 40 salaried staff or an annual budget less than $300,000

What is the process:
1. Download the application form from this website www.disabilitymonitor-me.org
2. Complete the application and email to editor@disabilitymonitor-me.org
3. Applications can be submitted until Saturday 18 October 2008
4. The finalists from the region will be shortlisted and notified to arrange a face-to-face meeting to allow gathering of more in-depth information about the good practice
5. Face-to-face meetings will occur during October, November and December 2008, with the final winners notified shortly after all the assessments are completed

What is the prize:
For shortlisted service providers

  • their organization will be listed in the DMI-ME report themed around access to services for persons with disabilities in the Middle East due out in mid 2009
  • will receive a free flight and accommodation for a member of the organization to attend a major Regional Disability Conference for the Middle East scheduled to take place in mid 2009
  • For winning service providers

  • in addition to the above prizes, the organization will ultimately receive €1,500
  • a commemorative plaque presented before the media, recognizing their achievements in demonstrating a good practice for the delivery of social services for persons with disabilities in the Middle East

For more information please visit the DMI-ME website www.disabilitymonitor-me.org or email the team at the DMI-ME on editor@disabilitymonitor-me.org

Unsuccessful applicants will be informed why they were not considered as a winner and the judges’ decision is considered final.

This Good Practice Award competition is being funded by the Christian Blind Mission and Handicap International.



I received this notice via the GPDD mailing list.

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RESOURCE: Young People Share Views on Inclusive Education

Posted on 24 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Reports, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

A new publication is available from the Enabling Education Network (EENET). It is called “Young Voices: Young people’s views of inclusive education” (PDF format, 905 Kb).
 
This easy-to-read A5 booklet contains photographs and drawings taken by disabled and non-disabled students in Uganda and Tanzania, along with quotes from them about what they think makes a school inclusive. The booklet also summarizes some of the important ideas raised by the students. For example, it points out that many children say that the attitudes of teachers and the encouragement of parents are important to helping them feel included.
 
The booklet was published/funded by the Atlas Allliance (Norway), with the participatory work and book production being handled by EENET.
 
A Kiswahili version and a Braille version will be available before the end of 2008. There is also a short DVD (approx 15 minutes) which accompanies the booklet. Copies will be available from EENET in mid-September.
 
EENET hopes that this booklet/DVD will be useful for advocacy and awareness raising around both inclusive education and the importance of listening to children’s opinions. Please in future send EENET any feedback you have about the booklet/DVD, or how you have used it.
 
The booklet can be downloaded from the EENET website in PDF format (905 Kb):

http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Young%20Voices.pdf

People who need a print copy or the accompanying DVD mailed to them can contact EENET directly and give them their mailing address. People who will want the Braille version or the Kiswahili version when they become available also should contact EENET directly. People may either email info@eenet.org.uk or ingridlewis@eenet.org.uk



This announcement is modified from the text of an email circulated by Ingrid Lewis at EENET on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. EENET Eastern Africa discussions focuses on issues related to inclusive education in the Eastern Africa region and can be joined for free.

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Stories of People with Disabilities in Developing Countries from Around the World

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Democratic Participation, Education, Human Rights, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, Mobility Impariments, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Too often, the voices of people with disabilities are simply not heard–within their country, within their community, or sometimes even within families. The voices of disabled people in developing countries are even more suppressed.

One special issue of the New Internationalist, released in 2005, brings us the voices of people with disabilities from India … Zimbabwe … Sri Lanka … Colombia … Bangladesh … and elsewhere.

The stories and interviews published in their magazine, available for free on-line, share the experiences of people with disabilities in developing countries in their struggle for sexual expression … the harrowing experience of rape … the push to achieve recognition for their human rights … the battle against severe poverty and starvation … success at becoming a blind teacher … getting involved with politics … and overcoming discrimination in the work force.

Browse the stories at the New Internationalist website at:

http://www.newint.org/issue384/index.htm

Each story can be read on-line in html format; they do not need to be downloaded.



I learned of this magazine issue when several of its stories were recently circulated via email on the Disability Information Dissemination Network, which is managed by the Centre for Services and Information on Disability (CSID), Bangladesh, and currently sponsored by Handicap International. People may subscribe directly to the CSID mailing list by sending an email to csid@bdmail.net, csid@bdonline.com, or info@csididnet.org, with the word “join” in the subject line.

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NEWS: Invisible in Russia

Posted on 12 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Employment, Human Rights, Inclusion, News | Tags: , , , , |

Individuals with disabilities, and organizations that represent them, recently told Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty that they are still largely invisible in Russian society. They face challenges in education; finding employment; living in the community; and finding accessible services. However, there also has been some progress over time. Children who once would have been kept home from school now receive an education; and people with disabilities are, slowly, becoming integrated into society.

Read the full story about the situation that confronts people with disabilities in Russia at:

http://archive.rferl.org/reports/FullReport.aspx?report=577#736738



I learned about this news story when Ghulam Nabi Nizamani circulated it via email.

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JOB POST: Inclusive Education Adviser, Kati, Mali: Intellectually disabled children

Posted on 5 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , |

Inclusive education adviser, with a focus on intellectually disabled children
Institut d’Education Populaire (IEP), Kati, Mali

IEP is a collective of community educators working to develop alternative approaches in curriculum, methodology and materials for grassroots education in Mali. Long before inclusive education became official government policy in Mali, IEP’s CIWARA Community School was including disabled children in classes. At a social level, disabled children have become very well integrated, but at an academic level, progress has been very limited: none of the teachers has training related to the needs of disabled children, the government lacks the resources to provide education for all, and IEP is now looking for support in developing teaching, animation, support and evaluation in inclusive schools like CIWARA. Based in Kati (15km from Bamako) and working closely with a small team, you will provide an input in developing curriculum and methodology, provide training to staff members, establish a monitoring and follow-up system, and develop a training module for the programme of teacher training colleges. IEP is looking for someone with specialist expertise (qualifications/experience) related to understanding the needs and capabilities of mentally disabled children in inclusive environments; classroom teaching experience is also essential, together with the capacity to develop materials, a highly flexible, creative and sensitive approach, and a good knowledge of French. (REF: MAL/34)

How to apply: Further details (job description, application form) are available from www.internationalservice.org.uk or from Stella Hobbs, Recruitment Coordinator, shobbs@internationalservice.org.uk.

Download the full job description for this post in Word format at
http://www.internationalservice.org.uk/jobs/pages/job_descrip_word/jobs_01_09_08/IEP_inclusive_education_adviser.doc

A full listing of job vacancies with International Service is available at

http://www.internationalservice.org.uk/jobs/pages/jobs_current_new.htm



Thank you to Stella Hobbs for submitting this job post to We Can Do.

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Disabled Girls in the Classroom: Finding What We Don’t Know

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Reports, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

A report entitled Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) discusses what we don’t know about girls with disabilities in relation to education, and what ought to be done about it.

Readers familiar with gender issues within education know that, in many countries, girls are still more likely to drop out of school–if they ever attend at all. They may be needed at home to fetch the water; they may be afraid of being sexually assaulted on the way to school; or they may be embarrassed about managing their menustration at schools where there is no separate bathroom for girls–or perhaps no bathrooms at all.

Regular We Can Do readers and others familiar with the education field may also recall that about 77 million primary school-aged children today are not enrolled in school–and about one-third of them have disabilities. Schools are reluctant to enroll disabled students; parents may fear subjecting children with disabilities to bullying from the community and thus keep them at home; or decision makers may simply assume that disabled students either cannot learn or would be unable to use their educational degree later on because “no one wants to hire disabled workers.”

But what of girls with disabilities? Being a double minority does tend to come with a triple whammy. Disabled girls are excluded because they have disabilities; they are excluded because they are girls; and then they are excluded yet again when programs might target girls without including disabled girls, or when programs might target children with disabilities without considering the impact of gender.

This would seem to imply that girls with disabilities may face a unique set of barriers when pursuing an education–barriers that neither non-disabled girls nor disabled boys need to consider. If a unique set of barriers, then surely a unique set of solutions would also be needed to ensure that the push to put the last 77 million children into school does not leave behind girls with disabilities. But, how can we tackle these barriers if we don’t have a clear picture of what they are?

The 35-page paper, Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb), is an attempt to pull together what is known about girls in education with what is known about disability in education, coupled with anecdotcal information about how girls with disabilities are affected differently. It provides recommendations for areas researchers should be focusing on and gives a few ideas for things that can help.

This paper was published in 2003. But, unfortunately, I doubt it is significantly dated. I don’t pretend to be intensively familiar with the literature on education among students with disabilities internationally. But a quick skim through a more recent report on disability in education, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), suggests that advancements since 2003 have been far from dramatic.

Perhaps one of the most important purposes of Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) is to help remind gender specialists that girls with disabilities are first and foremost, girls–but will be inherently excluded if not consciously targeted. For We Can Do readers already working on disability issues in education, another purpose is to remind that barriers excluding women and girls from full participation in society impact disabled girls and women just as much–if not more so.

If issues impacting girls with disabilities interests you, then you might also be interested in some of the following We Can Do posts:

Equalizing Educational Opportunity for the Nigerian-Ghanaian Blind Girl Child
Violence Against Blind/VI Girls in Malawi
Report on Violence Against Disabled Children (which I include in this list because violence against girls is often cited as a reason why some girls quit school)
Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children
Report on Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities (the referenced report includes brief references throughout to girls, including in the context of education)
Online discussion of inclusive education in Eastern Africa

Advocates working to promote more educational opportunities for girls with disabilities also may wish to consult, and cite, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), with particular attention to Article 6 (Women with Disabilities); Article 7 (Children with Disabilities); and Article 24 (Education).



I found this report by browsing the AskSource.info database.

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Dhaka University in Bangladesh Creating Disability-Friendly Environment

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, News, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear Friends

Action on Disability and Development (ADD) and Disabled Students Rights Forum in cooperation with Dhaka University organized a roundtable discussion titled ‘Right to education for students with disabilities: Barriers and moving forward to inclusion into mainstream’ held at Senate Bhaban, University of Dhaka on Aug, 2008. Professor S.M.A. Faiz, Vice-Chancellor, University of Dhaka attended the roundtable as Chief Guest while Mr. Mosharraf Hossain, Country Director, ADD moderated the event.

Disabled friendly environment should be ensured in university for disabled students in acquiring higher education. This is why; the authority of the university should be sensitized in building a sustainable infrastructure paving the advancement to the disabled students in getting higher education smoothly. The speakers demanded at the roundtable discussion.

Prof Faiz said, Dhaka University is committed to ensure the disabled friendly environment paving the disabled students in acquiring higher education. We will try our level best to do for the betterment of the disabled students studying in DU. We will bring this issue to the policy making authority in a view to find the better way out mitigating the existing barriers faced by the disabled students. He also assured to award the scholarships to the disabled students more and ease the admission process so far.

The distinguished speakers said that a tiny group of students got chance in getting admission at higher education by their arduous efforts as they always face the grueling barriers from everywhere. So, the authority of Dhaka University should take initiatives to move forward for inception of inclusive education where disabled students will enjoy full facilities having higher education. The issue should be taken as a serious agenda in the policy making level of the university for easing the problems of the disabled students, which could be replicated to other universities.

Among others Prof Dr. AFM Yusuf Haider, Pro-VC, DU, Prof. Md. Muinuddin Khan, VC, ASA University and former adviser to caretaker government, Prof Sirajul Islam Chowdhury, Educationalist, Prof. M. Anower Hossain, General Secretary, Dhaka University Teachers Association, DU, Mr. Anisul Haque, Deputy Editor, Prothom Alo, Sultana Zaman, education expert, Mr. Syed Rezaur Rahman, Registrar, Dhaka University, Mr. Sadek Khan, Syndicate Member, DU, Prof. Farida Rahman, Registrar, Jagannath University, Prof. Syed Anower Hossain, Naimul Islam Khan, Editor, Amader Shamoy Abul Kalam Azad, President, Disabled Students Rights Forum, DU and Mozammel Haque, Advocacy Coordinator, Md. Aktar Uddin, Communication and Fundraising Officer, Fazlul Azim, Human Rights Officer, ADD spoke at the roundtable discussion.

Key findings of the roundtable
• 5% quota should be reserved for the students with disabilities in the university admission process.
• Formulation a policy to ensure higher education uninterruptedly for the students with disabilities
• Set up ramps and disabled friendly spacious and talking lifts in all buildings of the university and introducing Braille readers and writers at the halls of residence.
• Allocation of seats of residential halls should be reserved for student with disabilities
• Seats should be reserved for disabled students at university bus which should also be disabled friendly
• The process of getting scribes (interpreter) for visually impaired persons in delivering examination should be easy and allowed necessary extra time for examination
• Scholarship should be reserved for the students with disabilities
• Every department of university should appoint a disability sensitive teacher to minimize the barriers of the disabled students
• Attitudes of teachers, administrative officers, students should be sensitive to the disabled students, so, the authority should organize training on disability for those groups in a view to deal the disability issue from rights based approach
• UGC should constitute a specific guideline on disability for the universities to deal the students with disabilities and take actions for implementation properly
• Inclusive education should be materialized managing all facilities for the students with disabilities
• Disability issue should be included at policy making body of university as a serious agenda to ensure congenial atmosphere for students with disabilities to obtaining higher education
• Authorities should appoint officials at the university dormitories who would read newspapers for the visually impaired students.

I hereby attach a brief report on the roundtable discussion for your convenience.

Thanking you

Md. Aktar Uddin
Communication and Fundraising Officer
ADD
Cell: 01726-832567



Ensure disabled friendly environment at university for students with disabilities obtaining higher education

Disabled friendly environment should be ensured in university for disabled students in acquiring higher education. This is why; the authority of the university should be sensitized in building a sustainable infrastructure paving the advancement to the disabled students in getting higher education smoothly. The speakers demanded at the roundtable discussion titled `‘Right to education for students with disabilities: Barriers and moving forward to inclusion into mainstream’ held at Senate Bhaban, University of Dhaka yesterday organized by Action on Disability and Development (ADD) and Disabled Students Rights Forum in cooperation with Dhaka University.

Professor S.M.A. Faiz, Vice-Chancellor, University of Dhaka attended the roundtable as Chief Guest while Mr. Mosharraf Hossain, Country Director, ADD moderated the event.

Prof Faiz said, Dhaka University is committed to ensure the disabled friendly environment paving the disabled students in acquiring higher education. We will try our level best to do for the betterment of the disabled students studying in DU. We will bring this issue to the policy making authority in a view to find the better way out mitigating the existing barriers faced by the disabled students. He also assured to award the scholarships to the disabled students more and ease the admission process so far.

He also opined that Physical impairment can not be a bar to get admission in educational institutions. The students with disabilities deserve equal education facilities everywhere. Of course, potentialities lying in disabled students if flourished can play a vital role in advancing social development.

Prof Faiz heard patiently the problems of the disabled students of DU and gave some instant solution to do. He also opined that states should take the disability issue as a serious concern as it covers 10% population of the country, so they must be noticed priority concern from everyone for bringing into mainstream. He also called upon the corporate sectors to come forward standing beside the students with disabilities to bring them into mainstream.

Among others Prof Dr. AFM Yusuf Haider, Pro-VC, DU, Prof. Md. Muinuddin Khan, VC, ASA University and former adviser to caretaker government, Prof Sirajul Islam Chowdhury, Educationalist, Prof. M. Anower Hossain, General Secretary, Dhaka University Teachers Association, DU, Mr. Anisul Haque, Deputy Editor, Prothom Alo, Sultana Zaman, education expert, Mr. Syed Rezaur Rahman, Registrar, Dhaka University, Mr. Sadek Khan, Syndicate Member, DU, Prof. Farida Rahman, Registrar, Jagannath University, Prof. Syed Anower Hossain, Naimul Islam Khan, Editor, Amader Shamoy Abul Kalam Azad, President, Disabled Students Rights Forum, DU and Mozammel Haque, Advocacy Coordinator, Md. Aktar Uddin, Communication and Fundraising Officer, Fazlul Azim, Human Rights Officer, ADD spoke at the roundtable discussion.

Serajul Islam Chowdhury, Professor Emeritus said we have to change our attitudes towards the persons with disabilities. Obviously, we should not think the disability issue as charity, rather an issue of rights. We should respect their capability and dignity. The demand of 5% quota for disabled students is very rational.

Naimul Islam Khan, Editor, the daily Amader Shomoy urged the authority of Dhaka University making disabled friendly environment at DU to give the opportunity the students with disabilities having higher education smoothly through taking all out initiatives.

The distinguished speakers said that a tiny group of students got chance in getting admission at higher education by their arduous efforts as they always face the grueling barriers from
everywhere. So, the authority of Dhaka University should take initiatives to move forward for inception of inclusive education where disabled students will enjoy full facilities having higher education. The issue should be taken as a serious agenda in the policy making level of the university for easing the problems of the disabled students, which could be replicated to other universities.

Key findings of the roundtable
• 5% quota should be reserved for the students with disabilities in the university admission process.
• Formulation a policy to ensure higher education uninterruptedly for the students with disabilities
• Set up ramps and disabled friendly spacious and talking lifts in all buildings of the university and introducing Braille readers and writers at the halls of residence.
• Allocation of seats of residential halls should be reserved for student with disabilities
• Seats should be reserved for disabled students at university bus which should also be disabled friendly
• The process of getting scribes (interpreter) for visually impaired persons in delivering examination should be easy and allowed necessary extra time for examination
• Scholarship should be reserved for the students with disabilities
• Every department of university should appoint a disability sensitive teacher to minimize the barriers of the disabled students
• Attitudes of teachers, administrative officers, students should be sensitive to the disabled students, so, the authority should organize training on disability for those groups in a view to deal the disability issue from rights based approach
• UGC should constitute a specific guideline on disability for the universities to deal the students with disabilities and take actions for implementation properly
• Inclusive education should be materialized managing all facilities for the students with disabilities
• Disability issue should be included at policy making body of university as a serious agenda to ensure congenial atmosphere for students with disabilities to obtaining higher education
• Authorities should appoint officials at the university dormitories who would read newspapers for the visually impaired students.

Achievement
The issue of creating congenial atmosphere for the students with disabilities at universities to obtaining higher education has grabbed the attention of the public and private university authorities, educationalists, researchers, students political leasers, civil society, general students, mass media and other concerns resulting the sensitization will be turned into active support materializing the rights of disabled students in acquiring higher education. All the speakers agreed upon the demands of the roundtable so far. They strongly uttered their commitment to provide their full support and cooperation ensuring rights to education for students with disabilities.

The Vice Chancellor of Dhaka University gave some instant solutions after hearing the problems faced the disabled students and he also assured doing best to minimize the barriers in getting education smoothly. He also declared that Dhaka University will provide all out cooperation to ADD in organizing any programme at Senate Hall of DU regarding the development of disabled people. The roundtable also experienced the prolific confidence, mental strength, active team force and unity among the students with disability in moving forward to materialize their rights to education through strengthening disability movement.



Thank you to Md. Aktar Uddin, Communication and Fundraising Officer at ADD, for circulating this notice and the accompanying report on the DU roundtable.

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JOB POST: Consultant, Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Posted on 19 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, signed languages | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Please note that this post gives information on two potential consulting positions: one for an international-level consultant for 15 days, the other for a national-level consultant for 30 days. Both consultants will work together for part of the project, but are being recruited separately. Please read all the information below carefully to ensure that you understand the nature of the project and the qualifications desired for each of the two positions so you can decide which of the two is best suited to your background. Please also note that all inquiries and applications should please be sent to the World Bank, NOT to We Can Do.

Deadline: September 12, 2008

Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project
INVIDIDUAL CONSULTING SERVICES
TF No. TF092635
Expressions of interest

The World Bank has received a “seed fund” from the Japan Social Development Fund toward the cost of preparing a Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project (“the Project”), and intends to apply part of the proceeds for consultant services. The services involve a short assignment to: (i) conduct community-based stakeholder consultations, and (ii) in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in the future Project proposal.

(The Project itself will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community. The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf. The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.)

The World Bank now invites eligible consultants to indicate their interest in providing the services. Interested consultants should provide information showing that they are qualified in the field of assignment and provide information on their technical and organizational capabilities.

A consultant will be selected in accordance with the procedures set out in the World Bank’s Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants by World Bank Borrowers (current edition).

Interested consultants may obtain further information at the address below during office hours (0900 to 1700 hours).

Expressions of interest must be e-mailed to jwaite@worldbank.org by September 12, 2008.

Deaf candidates are encouraged to express their interest in this assignment.

World Bank
Attn: Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist
63 Ly Thai To Street
Hanoi, VIETNAM
Tel: +84-4-9346600
Fax: +84-4-9346597
E-mail: jwaite@worldbank.org

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Vietnam: Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Stakeholder Consultation and Project Design: Terms of Reference
International Consultant Services

August 2008

Introduction
The World Bank has received a Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) “seed fund grant” to carry out stakeholder consultations, with a view to developing the detailed design of an Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project in Vietnam (hereafter “the Project”). This detailed design will form the basis of a proposal for a substantive JSDF Grant to finance the Project.

The World Bank intends to apply part of this seed fund to the hire of an international expert, who, in association with a national expert, will conduct the stakeholder consultations and, in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in a future Project proposal.

Background: deaf children’s development
Early childhood is the time of life when access to language models is crucial to the development of language and therefore to future learning. Deaf children rely on the sense of vision as their main channel of learning and communication. Only when young children who are deaf and their family members can use a shared language together will the child’s cognitive and social development proceed normally. The challenge is breaking through the communication gap with a visually supported language. Yet, worldwide, families with deaf infants and toddlers rarely have access to early education support. As a result, the deaf child’s development often suffers, leaving them at a major disadvantage in school and life.

Background: deaf education in Vietnam
In Vietnam, some 40,000 school-age children (i.e. aged 5 to 17) – or 18 out of every 10,000 – find it “very difficult to hear” (i.e. are severely deaf) or “impossible to hear” (i.e. are profoundly deaf). Almost all deaf children are born to hearing parents; for the most part, hearing parents (like hearing adults in general) have little awareness of the Deaf community, its language and its culture. As a result, young deaf children seldom come into contact with deaf adults (or even, until they start school, older deaf children).

In Vietnam, the provision of formal education to deaf youth began over 125 years ago, with an approach that used a sign language as the language of instruction. Despite this long and rich history, many deaf children still never go to school and those deaf children who do attend school often drop out before completing even Grade 5, with very few deaf youth receiving a secondary or tertiary education. Deaf children may attend special schools or mainstream schools. While special school classroom teachers are more likely than mainstream school classroom teachers to supplement their teaching with the use of signs (but generally not in a natural sign language mode), the dominant teaching approach is an “oralist” one that uses Vietnamese as the primary language of instruction.

IDEO Project concept
The Project will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf.

The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.

Consultant activities, outputs and timeline

Under this assignment, the Consultant will:

1. Produce an initial brief concept note to describe: (a) a range of options for Project activities to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) a range of options for Project implementation “civil society organizations” to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) describe the plan for stakeholder consultation under Activity 3. (Output: Brief concept note) [Timeline: Days 1 – 2]

2. Discuss and agree on this concept note with the World Bank supervisor. [Timeline: Day 3]

3. On the basis of the agreed concept note, consult with stakeholders (deaf associations, parents of deaf children, managers/teachers in schools catering specifically for deaf students, specialists addressing deaf education policy/practice/curriculum, NGOs involved with deaf education or disability support more generally) – in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and, if the schedule permits, Haiphong – to (a) determine appropriateness and feasibility of different Project activities, (b) establish appropriate beneficiary/geographical scope of the Project, and (c) identify appropriate civil society organizations (e.g. deaf associations, NGOs or a combination) to implement Project activities. [Timeline: Days 4 – 10]

4. On the basis of Activity 3 consultation, produce a concise report containing specific recommendations (for inclusion in the proposal for the Project) that describe inter alia (a) the range of Project activities, (b) the scope of the Project, especially in terms of target beneficiary age, target beneficiary numbers and target geographical areas, (c) the selection of civil society organizations to be invited to implement the Project, (d) the specifications of the on-going monitoring and evaluation framework (objectives, indicators, information collection, responsible entities, etc.) to assess Project performance throughout its various phases, and (e) the estimated costs of the Project (disaggregated by phase and expenditure category). (Output: Final report) [Timeline: Days 11 – 14]

5. Brief the World Bank supervisor on the findings of the consultation process and other relevant information, the contents of the report and the specific recommendations. (Output: Briefing) [Timeline: Day 15]

Consultant qualifications and experience

The Consultant will have:
 An advanced university degree in Deaf studies, education, social sciences or a related discipline, with expertise in Deaf education (preferably early child education);
 Substantial international experience in Deaf education, preferably in developing countries;
 Substantial international involvement with Deaf communities, preferably in developing countries;
 An understanding of natural sign language modalities, and preferably some knowledge of a natural sign language (especially a Vietnamese or historically related sign language [e.g. a Thai/Lao sign language, French sign language, American sign language]);
 Demonstrated capacity to organize and manage community-based consultation processes (e.g. workshops, focus groups, town-hall meetings, etc.);
 Demonstrated capacity to work effectively in a team, to manage a range of tasks, to work pro-actively and with diligence, and to manage resources effectively while meeting deadlines;
 Excellent report writing skills in English; and
 Strong computer skills in word processing and communication.

Assignment modalities and duration
The International Consultant will carry out this assignment in association with a National Consultant (who will be hired separately by the World Bank). The International Consultant will be the senior member of the team and will have overall responsibility for: (i) the conduct of the consultation events, (ii) the delivery of the initial note and the final report, and (iii) the briefings for the World Bank team.

It is expected that the International Consultant will work approximately 15 days (half of this time spent in Vietnam for the consultation sessions). (The National Consultant will work approximately 30 days, spending the additional days in preparation tasks: contacting stakeholders, conducting pre-meetings with stakeholders, setting up consultation events, organizing stakeholder consultation logistics, facilitating communication at stakeholder consultation events, and liaising with the World Bank supervisor on organizational matters.)

The two members of the team will be selected to ensure that they are able to communicate effectively with each other, as well as – in some working combination – with stakeholders (in Vietnamese or a Vietnamese sign language, as appropriate) and with the World Bank supervisor (in English).

The Consultant will be responsible for: (i) arranging his/her own travel and accommodation; (ii) managing the stakeholder consultation sessions; and (iii) arranging for the production of the initial note and final report. (The World Bank team will be responsible for making all payments associated with stakeholder consultation events [space rental, food, participants’ per-diems, etc.]).

Administration
The work in this contract is supervised by Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank in Hanoi. The Japan Social Development Fund “seed fund grant” that finances this study ends on August 31, 2009.

Annex 1: Partial list of stakeholders

Haiphong Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hải Phòng)
Hanoi Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hà Nội) [http://www.deafhanoi.com & http://360.yahoo.com/clbnnkh/%5D [Contact: Trần Ngọc Tuần]
HCMC Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc TP.HCM)
See also: Asia Pacific Development Center on Disability: List of disability NGOs in Vietnam: http://www.apcdproject.org/Countryprofile/vietnam/nongov.html

Hoa Sua School, Hanoi (Trường Trung học Tư thục Kinh tế Du lịch Hoa Sữa) [http://www.hoasuaschool.com/]
Nhan Chinh School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Dân lập Dạy Trẻ điếc Nhân Chính)
Thanh Tri School, Hanoi (Trương Nuôi dạy Trẻ Khuyết tật Thanh Trì)
Xa Dan School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Xã Đàn)

Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers College, Dong Nai (Dự án Giáo dục Đại học cho Người điếc Việt Nam, Cao đẳng Sư phạm Đồng Nai, TP. Đồng Nai) [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Hoa]
Hy Vong I School, HCMC (Trường Khuyết tật Thính giác Hy Vọng I)
Hy Vong Binh Thanh School, HCMC (Trường Hy Vọng Bình Thạnh)
Thuan An Education Center, Lai Thieu, Binh Duong (Trung tâm Giáo dục Trẻ Khiếm thính Thuận An) [formerly known as École des sourds-muets de Lái-Thiêu] [http://www.thuongvevietnam.org/webseiten/thuanan/html/thuanan_en.html]

Hanoi Pedagogy University Dại học Sư phạm Hà Nội, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt)
HCMC Pedagogy University (Dại học Sư phạm TP.HCM, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt) [Contact: Cao Thị Xuân Mỹ]
Vietnam Institute for Educational Sciences (Bộ Giáo dục và Đào Tạo, Viện Khoa học Giáo dục, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Giáo dục Trẻ Khuyết tật) [Contact: Lê Văn Tạc]

Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi [Contact: Phạm Minh Hằng]
Save the Children UK, Hanoi [http://www.savethechildren.net/vietnam/] [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Bịch]

Annex 2: Partial list of resources

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2002). Ký hiệu Củ chỉ Điệu bộ của Người điếc Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2004). Ký hiệu của Người điếc Việt Nam / Signs of the Deaf in Vietnam. (3 volumes). Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (n.d.). Tài liệu Ngôn ngữ Ký hiệu cho Trẻ Khiếm thính Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Student Handbooks 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Companion Dictionaries 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Locker-McKee, R. (2005). “As one Deaf person to another”: Deaf paraprofessionals in mainstream schools. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 1-48.

Reilly, C. & Nguyen Cong Khanh. (2004). Final Evaluation Report for Inclusive Education For Hearing-Impaired and Deaf Children in Vietnam. Pearl S. Buck International-Vietnam, U.S. Agency for International Development (Grant No. 492-G-0098-00040-00), Hanoi, Vietnam.
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/humanitarian_assistance/the_funds/pubs/reportlst.html)

Reilly, C. (2004-08). “Outside the Dream” Project (Thailand). UNESCO Programme for the Education of Children in Need / Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education and Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. (http://research.gallaudet.edu/sl/)

Woodward, J. (2000). Sign languages and sign language families in Thailand and Viet Nam. In K. Emmorey & H. Lane (eds.), The Signs of Language Revisited: An Anthology in Honor of Ursuala Bellugi and Edward Klima. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 23-47.

Woodward, J. (2003). Sign languages and Deaf identities in Thailand and Viet Nam. In L. Monaghan et al. (eds.), Many Ways to be Deaf. Washington, D.C., USA: Gallaudet University Press, pp. 283-301.

Woodward, J. et al. (2004). Providing higher educational opportunities to Deaf adults in Viet Nam through Vietnamese sign languages. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 232-263.

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Vietnam: Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Stakeholder Consultation and Project Design: Terms of Reference
National Consultant Services

August 2008

Introduction
The World Bank has received a Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) “seed fund grant” to carry out stakeholder consultations, with a view to developing the detailed design of an Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project in Vietnam (hereafter “the Project”). This detailed design will form the basis of a proposal for a substantive JSDF Grant to finance the Project.

The World Bank intends to apply part of this seed fund to the hire of an national expert, who will support an international expert to conduct the stakeholder consultations and, in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in a future Project proposal.

Background: deaf children’s development
Early childhood is the time of life when access to language models is crucial to the development of language and therefore to future learning. Deaf children rely on the sense of vision as their main channel of learning and communication. Only when young children who are deaf and their family members can use a shared language together will the child’s cognitive and social development proceed normally. The challenge is breaking through the communication gap with a visually supported language. Yet, worldwide, families with deaf infants and toddlers rarely have access to early education support. As a result, the deaf child’s development often suffers, leaving them at a major disadvantage in school and life.

Background: deaf education in Vietnam
In Vietnam, some 40,000 school-age children (i.e. aged 5 to 17) – or 18 out of every 10,000 – find it “very difficult to hear” (i.e. are severely deaf) or “impossible to hear” (i.e. are profoundly deaf). Almost all deaf children are born to hearing parents; for the most part, hearing parents (like hearing adults in general) have little awareness of the Deaf community, its language and its culture. As a result, young deaf children seldom come into contact with deaf adults (or even, until they start school, older deaf children).

In Vietnam, the provision of formal education to deaf youth began over 125 years ago, with an approach that used a sign language as the language of instruction. Despite this long and rich history, many deaf children still never go to school and those deaf children who do attend school often drop out before completing even Grade 5, with very few deaf youth receiving a secondary or tertiary education. Deaf children may attend special schools or mainstream schools. While special school classroom teachers are more likely than mainstream school classroom teachers to supplement their teaching with the use of signs (but generally not in a natural sign language mode), the dominant teaching approach is an “oralist” one that uses Vietnamese as the primary language of instruction.

IDEO Project concept
The Project will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf.

The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.

Consultant activities and timeline

Under this assignment, the Consultant will:

1. In advance of the International Consultant’s arrival in Vietnam, contact stakeholders, conduct pre-meetings with stakeholders, set up consultation events, organize stakeholder consultation logistics, and liaise with the World Bank supervisor on organizational matters. [Timeline: Days 1 – 10]

2. Support the International Consultant in producing an initial brief concept note to describe: (a) a range of options for Project activities to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) a range of options for Project implementation “civil society organizations” to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) describe the plan for stakeholder consultation under Activity 3. [Timeline: Days 11 – 12]

3. Participate in the discussion on this concept note with the World Bank supervisor. [Timeline: Day 13]

4. Support the International Consultant in conducting stakeholders consultation events – in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and, if the schedule permits, Haiphong – with particular responsibility for facilitating communication at these events. [Timeline: Days 14 – 20]

5. Support the International Consultant in producing a concise report containing specific recommendations for inclusion in the proposal for the Project. [Timeline: Days 21 – 24]

6. Participate in the briefing with the World Bank supervisor on the findings of the consultation process and other relevant information, the contents of the report and the specific recommendations. [Timeline: Day 25]

7. After the departure of the International Consultant, liaise with the World Bank supervisor on any follow-up tasks related to the assignment. [Timeline: Days 26 – 30]

Consultant qualifications and experience

The national consultant will have:
 At least an upper secondary education qualification (i.e. having completed Grade 12);
 Experience in Deaf education in Vietnam;
 Involvement with Deaf communities in Vietnam;
 Native or near-native proficiency in a Vietnamese sign language;
 Ability to communicate effectively in Vietnamese, and preferably with at least a basic ability to communicate through written English;
 Demonstrated capacity to organize and manage community-based consultation processes (e.g. workshops, focus groups, townhall meetings, etc.); and
 Demonstrated capacity to work effectively in a team, to manage a range of tasks, to work pro-actively and with diligence, and to manage resources effectively while meeting deadlines.

Assignment modalities and duration
The National Consultant will carry out this assignment in association with an International Consultant (who will be hired separately by the World Bank). The National Consultant will be the junior member of the team; as such, he/she will support the International Consultant in all aspects of the carrying out of the assignment and contribute to the content of the assignment outputs. (The International Consultant, as the senior member, will have overall responsibility for: (i) the conduct of the consultation events, (ii) the delivery of the initial note and the final report, and (iii) the briefings for the World Bank team.)

The National Consultant will work approximately 30 days, including 10 days before the arrival of the International Consultant in Vietnam. (It is expected that the International Consultant will work approximately 15 days [half of this time spent in Vietnam for the consultation sessions].)

The two members of the team will be selected to ensure that they are able to communicate effectively with each other, as well as – in some working combination – with stakeholders (in Vietnamese or a Vietnamese sign language, as appropriate) and with the World Bank supervisor (in English).

The Consultant will be responsible for: (i) arranging his/her own travel and accommodation; (ii) managing the stakeholder consultation sessions; and (iii) arranging for the production of the initial note and final report. (The World Bank team will be responsible for making all payments associated with stakeholder consultation events [space rental, food, participants’ per-diems, etc.]).

Administration
The work in this contract is supervised by Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank in Hanoi. The Japan Social Development Fund “seed fund grant” that finances this study ends on August 31, 2009.

Annex 1: Partial list of stakeholders

Haiphong Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hải Phòng)
Hanoi Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hà Nội) [http://www.deafhanoi.com & http://360.yahoo.com/clbnnkh/] [Contact: Trần Ngọc Tuần]
HCMC Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc TP.HCM)
See also: Asia Pacific Development Center on Disability: List of disability NGOs in Vietnam: http://www.apcdproject.org/Countryprofile/vietnam/nongov.html

Hoa Sua School, Hanoi (Trường Trung học Tư thục Kinh tế Du lịch Hoa Sữa) [http://www.hoasuaschool.com/]
Nhan Chinh School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Dân lập Dạy Trẻ điếc Nhân Chính)
Thanh Tri School, Hanoi (Trương Nuôi dạy Trẻ Khuyết tật Thanh Trì)
Xa Dan School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Xã Đàn)

Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers College, Dong Nai (Dự án Giáo dục Đại học cho Người điếc Việt Nam, Cao đẳng Sư phạm Đồng Nai, TP. Đồng Nai) [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Hoa]
Hy Vong I School, HCMC (Trường Khuyết tật Thính giác Hy Vọng I)
Hy Vong Binh Thanh School, HCMC (Trường Hy Vọng Bình Thạnh)
Thuan An Education Center, Lai Thieu, Binh Duong (Trung tâm Giáo dục Trẻ Khiếm thính Thuận An) [formerly known as École des sourds-muets de Lái-Thiêu] [http://www.thuongvevietnam.org/webseiten/thuanan/html/thuanan_en.html]

Hanoi Pedagogy University Dại học Sư phạm Hà Nội, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt)
HCMC Pedagogy University (Dại học Sư phạm TP.HCM, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt) [Contact: Cao Thị Xuân Mỹ]
Vietnam Institute for Educational Sciences (Bộ Giáo dục và Đào Tạo, Viện Khoa học Giáo dục, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Giáo dục Trẻ Khuyết tật) [Contact: Lê Văn Tạc]

Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi [Contact: Phạm Minh Hằng]
Save the Children UK, Hanoi [http://www.savethechildren.net/vietnam/] [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Bịch]

Annex 2: Partial list of resources

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2002). Ký hiệu Củ chỉ Điệu bộ của Người điếc Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2004). Ký hiệu của Người điếc Việt Nam / Signs of the Deaf in Vietnam. (3 volumes). Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (n.d.). Tài liệu Ngôn ngữ Ký hiệu cho Trẻ Khiếm thính Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Student Handbooks 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Companion Dictionaries 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Locker-McKee, R. (2005). “As one Deaf person to another”: Deaf paraprofessionals in mainstream schools. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 1-48.

Reilly, C. & Nguyen Cong Khanh. (2004). Final Evaluation Report for Inclusive Education For Hearing-Impaired and Deaf Children in Vietnam. Pearl S. Buck International-Vietnam, U.S. Agency for International Development (Grant No. 492-G-0098-00040-00), Hanoi, Vietnam.
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/humanitarian_assistance/the_funds/pubs/reportlst.html)

Reilly, C. (2004-08). “Outside the Dream” Project (Thailand). UNESCO Programme for the Education of Children in Need / Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education and Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. (http://research.gallaudet.edu/sl/)

Woodward, J. (2000). Sign languages and sign language families in Thailand and Viet Nam. In K. Emmorey & H. Lane (eds.), The Signs of Language Revisited: An Anthology in Honor of Ursuala Bellugi and Edward Klima. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 23-47.

Woodward, J. (2003). Sign languages and Deaf identities in Thailand and Viet Nam. In L. Monaghan et al. (eds.), Many Ways to be Deaf. Washington, D.C., USA: Gallaudet University Press, pp. 283-301.

Woodward, J. et al. (2004). Providing higher educational opportunities to Deaf adults in Viet Nam through Vietnamese sign languages. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 232-263.

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page



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CONFERENCE: Africa Regional Conference on MDGs and Disability

Posted on 21 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Africa Regional Conference on MDGs and Disability
Regional Conference to be held on September 14th to 19th 2008, in Nairobi, Kenya
AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY
Pan Afric Hotel, Nairobi Kenya
14th to 19th September 2008.
Organizers:
ECUMENICAL DISABILITY ADVOCATES NETWORK (EDAN), SECRETARIAT OF THE AFRICAN DECADE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (SADPD), AFRICAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION (ACDF) AND THE UN MDG CAMPAIGN OFFICE FOR AFRICA

AIM: To enhance the capacity of leaders from disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in MDGs in African countries and to provide knowledge, increase competence and strengthen organizational advocacy strategies and networking skills.

We would like to announce and to invite participants to the above Conference which will bring together leaders of the disability movement, professionals and service providers together to interact in discussion on the MDG campaign, implementation and the implication to persons with Disabilities. The Conference is organized on the backdrop of the fact that 2007-2008 marks the halfway point to 2015, the year set for the achievement of the MDGs and the observation that the campaign and implementation work going on is yet to recognize Disability as a sector that need specific attention.

2007-2008 also marks the coming into force of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). It has been widely acknowledged that one of the shortcomings of the MDGs has been the exclusion of persons with disabilities. Taking this into account, the UNCRPD was drafted to ensure the inclusion of persons with disabilities into the development agenda. In the light of this, there are consistent referrals to the combating of conditions of poverty affecting persons with disabilities and especially their situation in the context of developing countries. Over 80%% of the 650 million persons with disabilities live in the poorest parts of the world. This means that over 20% of the poorest people globally are persons with disabilities.

For the MDGs to have real significance, they cannot ignore those living with disabilities. As James Wolfensohn, the former president of the World Bank has pointed out: “Unless disabled people are brought into the development mainstream, it will be impossible to cut poverty in half by 2015 or to give every girl and boy the chance to achieve a primary education by the same date.

Although persons with disabilities have organized groups which are involved in disability advocacy, awareness and lobbying on other pertinent issues of concern to them, there has been very little interaction with the MDGs campaign and many of them are not aware of it. They are not a consideration in the regional strategies as currently spelt out and implemented. They have continued to be left out of the Campaign relegating them further to marginalization. They therefore cannot engage their governments in this regard. It is necessary that they get involved.

This reality has brought about the need for the Secretariat of African Decade of Persons with Disability (SADPD), Ecumenical disability advocates network EDAN, African Community Development Foundation (ACDF) and UN Millennium Campaign office to partner in a project to facilitate an engagement to bring about the disability factor in all aspects of the MDG Work. This project has among other things the purpose to set in motion capacity building as well as inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities and their organizations in the mainstream campaign activities. The ultimate purpose is to facilitate a process to build a strong disabled person’s organisation DPOs to ensure that the voice of disabled persons will be heard and taken into account in all sectors of national MDG development.

The continental conference was originally expected to bring together a limited number of disability leaders from all over Africa associated with the work of the Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities and the Ecumenical Disability Advocates Network. The number was limited due to resources but we have received recommendations that the conference should be opened up for a wider participation. This announcement is therefore an invitation to persons with disabilities, DPO’s, Service providers and professionals especially those involved in development and issues of MDGs in various Regional Network to this conference. It is also an appeal to individuals and all regional organizations to sponsor those in their networks who can ably take the information back to their countries. Anticipated expenses within Kenya including airport transfers, Conference facilities, accommodation and full board for five days per person is 1,000 US Dollars. This figure does not include the air fare from the port of departure to Nairobi.

The organizing Committee has very limited scholarships to go to a few leaders in the Disability movement as this will facilitate key leadership meetings that will take place alongside and after the MDG Conference. Those in this category are requested to make their applications which will be considered on need basis and early application.

The Conference is as indicated above planned to take place at the Pan Afric Hotel Nairobi, Kenya between 14th and 19th September 2008. The first three business days programme beginning in the morning of Monday, 15th September will be devoted to knowledge dissemination, interactive discussions through workshops and development of advocacy strategies for inclusion in the MDG campaigns and implementation. The last two days will be devoted to the work of the Decade for persons with Disabilities and its relationship to development in the Region. A programme and other information materials will be sent later but those interested are requested to fill in the attached registration form and send it back to facilitate further planning.

Participants who are not in the Decade network and would like to experience a little of the Kenya tourism including group organized game drive may take this option provided there will be enough of them to make a group and that they will have informed us in good time. These arrangements are not part of the conference and their expenses are not included in the figures given for acommodation and board during the conference. Those interested may request for separate information in that connection.

AFRICA REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DISABILITY

Pan Afric Hotel, Nairobi Kenya

14th to 19th September 2008.

Organizers:
ECUMENICAL DISABILITY ADVOCATES NETWORK (EDAN), SECRETARIAT OF THE AFRICAN DECADE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (SADPD), AFRICAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION (ACDF) AND THE UN MDG CAMPAIGN OFFICE FOR AFRICA
AIM: To enhance the capacity of leaders from disability and development sectors on effective mainstreaming of disability in MDGs in African countries and to provide knowledge, increase competence and strengthen organizational advocacy strategies and networking skills.

REGISTRATION FORM
Please type or write clearly in English. Complete registration form may be sent by e-mail (to info@edan.or.ke) or printed and sent by fax. Deadline: August 11th 2008

Surname(s)(as in passport)………………………………………………………………………….
First name(s) (as in passport)…..…………………………………………………………………..
Address …………………………..…………………………………..……………………………
Postal Code …………………………………… Town ………………………………………….
Country …………………………………………………………………………………………..
Home telephone……………………………. Office telephone ………………………………
(Country code/area code/number) (Country code/area code/number)
Fax ……………………………………………. E-mail …………………………………………
(Please provide at least one fax number or one e-mail address for quick communication)
Gender […..] Male […..] Female
Date of birth (day/month/year) …………………………………………………………………..
Your Disability ……………………………………………………………………………………
Profession or occupation .………………………………………………………………………
Organization ……………………………………………………………………………………..
Position in the organisation ……………………………………………………………………
Nationality (country issuing your passport) ……………… Passport number ……………………
Date and place of issue of the passport ……………… Passport valid until ………………..
(day/month/year) (day/month/year)
Sponsoring organization…………………………………………………………………….…..
Special need……………………………………………………………………………………….

Give details of your travel Itinerary:
The Conference Planning Committee will organize accommodation and board and meet the airfare expenses from the port of departure to Nairobi for those it will sponsor. Any other personal expenses, including passport costs, local travel related expenses such as vaccinations, luggage insurance or telecommunication costs are the participants own responsibility.

The planning Committee will organize hotel accommodation and airport pick up on request for the self sponsored participants.

Place……………………….Date…………………………. Signature …………………………

Send your registration to: Samuel Kabue
Executive Secretary
Ecumenical Disability Advocates Network (EDAN)
P.O. Box 22
00200 Nairobi
KENYA
Tel: +254-20-4445837
Fax: +254-20-4445835
E-mail: info@edan.or.ke



We Can Do received this announcement via the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities email news distribution list. Please note that any inquires relating to this conference should please be directed to info@edan.or.ke, or to the contact information given above, NOT to We Can Do.

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that, although abstracts are due by August 1, 2008, completed papers will not be due until 2009. This same announcement was posted at We Can Do in April, but the editors are circulating this notice again in an attempt to collect more abstracts for them to choose among.

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies
Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

  • What is the relationship between disability and poverty?
  • How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?
  • What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?
  • What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?
  • What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1st.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



This announcement was circulated by Daniel Mont via email. Any inquiries and abstracts should please be directed to Daniel Mont or to Rosangela Berman Bieler as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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RESOURCE: Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Children, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Less than a decade ago, more than 100 million primary-school aged children still had never entered a classroom. Today, that number has dropped below 80 million, even though the world’s population has grown in that time. Clearly progress has been made. But children with disabilities are being left behind: one-third of the world’s children out of school are disabled. Many of the rest are excluded for other reasons that pose their own set of challenges: some are left behind because they are girls; or because they don’t speak the dominant language of their country; or because they experience discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity.

How can Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and other Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) help schools in their country be more inclusive of students who have commonly been excluded? Save the Children UK has released a new report that offers guidance: “Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience” (PDF format, 4.14 Mb). This report describes successful projects, and the lessons learned, from countries as diverse as Vietnam, Kyrgyzstan, Peru, Bangladesh, China, Somalia, Brazil, Western Balkans, Mongolia, Nepal, Tajikistan, Serbia, India, and Morocco. Children with disabilities are targeted for many of these projects.

The report begins by describing both the conditions that prevent inclusive education and the conditions that can help make it possible. It also analyzes projects that have made it possible for linguistic minority students–and Deaf students–to obtain a bilingual education. Teacher training programs have helped encourage teachers to create more inclusive classrooms for children with disabilities and other students who have historically been excluded. Several countries have used Community-based Education Management Information Systems (C-EMIS) to draw upon the knowledge and motivation of local community members in making education more inclusive. Each chapter ends by discussing what lessons other communities in other countries may find helpful in implementing their own projects.

Advocates who tire of hearing governments complain there isn’t enough money will especially wish to read the 6th chapter on “Addressing financial barriers to inclusive education.” Funding issues are also discussed briefly throughout earlier chapters of Making Schools Inclusive (PDF format, 4.14 Mb).

The 8th chapter points readers to further materials and resources that may be helpful to them in advocating for more inclusive education in their countries.

The full 64-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (4.14 Mb) at http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Making%20schools%20inclusive%20SCUK.pdf.



We Can Do learned of this report through an announcement posted on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. The discussion group is devoted to issues relating to inclusive education in Eastern Africa.

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JOB POST: Inclusive Education Consultant Tibet Autonomous Region

Posted on 25 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Application deadline: July 4, 2008. Applications should be sent to hr@handicap-int.org.cn, NOT We Can Do.

TERMS of REFERENCE

Inclusive Education Consultant – Tibet Autonomous Region

1. Background Information
Handicap International (HI) has been operating in the Tibet Autonomous Region since 2000, in cooperation with the Tibet Disabled Persons’ Federation (TDPF) at regional level and the Lhasa, Shigatse and Chamdo Disabled Persons’ Federation at prefecture level. Four different projects have been established in the fields of orthopaedics, physiotherapy, support to deaf people’s association and community-based rehabilitation services (CBR).

The present consultancy will contribute to the CBR project. This project started in 2001, focusing on children and young adults with disabilities under 21 years old in Lhasa Urban District. Eight rehabilitation workers were trained in basic physical rehabilitation and are now well experienced. They follow-up children with disabilities at home, teaching the families with basic rehabilitation, providing counselling, referring the children to appropriate rehabilitation and
medical care services.

School inclusion for children with disabilities remains a major difficulty in the region, even at the level of primary education. While the rehabilitation workers are also in charge of referring the children into mainstream schools, it is done on a case-by-case basis and there is neither close accompaniment of the children in those schools nor adaptation of the school environment and teaching methods within the classrooms. 

During the last 2 years, the CBR project has changed its orientation to address other needs (e.g. access to leisure services) and get more participation and support from governmental bureaus and community members. It has also started acting in rural areas of Lhasa prefecture.
In addition to the rehabilitation workers, the current CBR team working on the project implementation includes an HI project manager, a physiotherapist (partner staff from the TDPF) acting as a team leader, and a representative of the partner at prefecture level (Lhasa Disabled
Persons’ Federation, Lhasa DPF) acting as a coordinator with the different governmental bureaus involved in the action. One person from the civil affairs bureau at County/Urban District level is also supporting the field coordination and monitoring process. When activities are related to education, the person in charge of the education sector at Lhasa DPF and a reference person from the research department of the relevant county/urban district education bureau also join the team.

In 2007, two primary pilot schools have been selected in Lhasa prefecture in collaboration with the regional and municipal education bureaus where to start inclusive education projects including building adaptation and development of child-to-child groups. One of the schools is located in Jia Er Duo, a rural village in Medrogonkha County, the other one being Zangre school in Lhasa Urban District. In September 2007, a seminar on inclusive education has been organized to present the basis of inclusive education concepts. Attendees were teachers from different primary schools as well as staff from education bureaus and Lhasa DPF.

2. Objective of the assignment
By the end of the assignment, the teachers of the two pilot schools will have gained the specific technical skills to better support and follow-up children with disabilities in their schools and start child-to-child support activities. The partners’ staff (Lhasa DPF representing the education sector, staff from research departments within education bureaus, civil affairs representatives, county education bureau representatives) will start monitoring efficiently the
implementation of the activities within the schools.

3. Methodology
First phase:  The first phase will focus on the following topics:

  • Conduct an assessment of the current situation in the pilot schools in terms of existing facilities and resources to analyze their capacity for integration of children with disabilities
  • Develop intervention and training strategies including monitoring and evaluation procedures in close collaboration with the partners. The intervention should consider the involvement of community members acting as volunteers within the school.

Second phase: The second phase will consist in trainings delivery. The trainees will be teachers and managers from the two pilot schools, staff from municipal education bureau, county/urban district education bureau, civil affairs, Lhasa DPF and TDPF. The reference team will consist in one person from Lhasa DPF in charge of education, one person from the research department of county/urban district education bureau, one rehabilitation worker in charge of supervising the social rehabilitation activities of the CBR project, one person from the county civil affairs and one person from each of the two pilot schools.

The trainings will cover, but will not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Identification of children in the schools with learning difficulties
    or in needs of a support
  • How to assess that a child is ready to go to school
  • Setting-up an individual curriculum for each of the child to be
    followed-up (Individual Action Plan)
  • How to organize, carry out and monitor child-to-child support
  • Training for the teachers on how to organize and provide awareness on
    disability for the students
  • Training of the reference team on how to follow-up and monitor the
    implementation (activities and needs analysis)
  • Possibly, if there is no time constraint, training on special teaching skills: Braille, sign language and intellectual disability. This will be organized in collaboration with other organizations (Tibet Deaf Association, Braille without Borders, Lhasa Special Education
    School).

Third phase: The third phase will be organized as follows:

  • Close follow-up of the implementation process with the trainees, implementation of corrective measures
  • Provide refresher training for all the trainees and reference team.

4. Duration
The assignment is expected to be conducted from July 1st to November 30th 2008 as follows:

  • First phase: 1 month
  • Second phase: 2 months
  • Third phase: 2 months
  • Restitution on the mission with key stakeholders (1 day).

5. Expected outputs

  • A first report containing an analysis of the situation and the description of the principles for the development of intervention and training strategies, monitoring and evaluation processes
  • Training handouts for the education professionals
  • Guidelines for the volunteers who can support inclusive activities within the schools
  • End of mission report with recommendations

The reports be submitted in English; handouts and guidelines will be submitted in Chinese.

6. Qualifications

  • University degree, preferably in the field of education or social sciences
  • Experience in working with Chinese governmental departments
  • Experience in working in rural and urban schools in China
  • Good knowledge of existing education policies and strategies for children with disabilities in China
  • Previous experience as a trainer in the field of education
  • Computer literacy (Word, Excel, Power Point)
  • Good English writing skills
  • Chinese national.

7. Submission requests
Handicap International invites experts to express their interest through submission of a current CV and a cover letter in English addressing each of the following:

a. Availability for the period
b. Major experiences in the field of inclusive education
c. Relevant work experience in China from previous
d. Consultancy fee in RMB (rate per day) with a detail on what it covers.

Please send your application at the following E-mail address: hr@handicap-int.org.cn

For more details on the job content, please contact Ms. Kalsang Dickyi at                0891 68 37 899        

Deadline for application: 4th July, 2008



We Can Do received this job posting via the listserve for the RatifyNow organization.

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LISTSERVE: On-line Discussion of Inclusive Education in Eastern Africa

Posted on 24 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear Colleagues,
 
To support the growing interest in the area of Inclusive Education throughout Eastern Africa, an Eastern Africa Discussion Group was set up to help facilitate discussions, networking and information sharing on this topic.  This discussion group is associated with EENET – The Enabling Education Network, which is a UK based information sharing network which promotes the inclusion of marginalized groups in education world wide.
 
The initial discussion group that was established was inundated with SPAM.  To overcome this problem the discussion group is now utilizing a Yahoo Group for discussion, which is free of SPAM.
 
If you would like to join the Eastern Africa Discussion Group, please send an email to eenet_eastern_africa-owner@yahoogroups.co.uk stating your interest to join the discussion group.   Or you may also join via the web at http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/eenet_eastern_africa/

If you join and decide later you do not want to be a part of the group any longer, you can unsubscribe at any time.
 
If you know any one else who you think might be interested in joining this group, please pass this message to them so as they have the information necessary to join.
 
Kind Regards,
 
Dimity Taylor
Coordinator
EENET Eastern Africa



Thank you to Dimity Taylor for submitting this announcement to We Can Do.

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NEWS: Sign Language Training Program Launches in Guyana

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Deaf, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Guyana Ministry of Education, in partnership with the Guyana Community Based Rehabilitation Programme (GCBRP), has initiated a sign language training program targeted at improving the quality of education for deaf children, the Kaieteur News has reported. The program will provide sign language training to teachers so they can better accommodate the communicate need of deaf children in their classrooms. It is being offered through the St. Stanislaus College in Brickdam.

Read the original Kaieteur News story entitled “Education Ministry launches sign language training” for more detail at:

http://www.kaieteurnews.com/?p=782



Thank you to Monty Chester for alerting me to this news item.

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EENET Recruiting Steering Group Members to Promote Inclusive Education

Posted on 10 June 2008. Filed under: Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Opportunities, Volunteer Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Please note that applications should be directed to EENET, not to We Can Do; read carefully for links, email address, and instructions. The deadline is June 24, 2008.

EENET steering group: user group representatives

Background to EENET’s Steering Group
The Enabling Education Network (EENET) is a global information network that helps education practitioners and stakeholders to document and share their experiences of inclusive, child-friendly education. The network prioritises the information needs of southern countries. It aims to reach those who are often excluded from other international information systems or debates, or who cannot afford to buy information resources. EENET’s users include local and international Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), teachers, parents, students, government officials, academics, etc.

EENET has a very small co-ordination office in the UK, employing one staff member and a few volunteers, but still manages to support the information needs of thousands of people in 200 countries. Independent regional networks, based on EENET’s vision and mission, are also being developed in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

To find out more about EENET’s information sharing activities visit www.eenet.org.uk; email info@eenet.org.uk; or write to EENET, c/o ESI, School of Education, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK

EENET’s role is to champion inclusive education. But it also seeks to challenge the status quo, to ask difficult questions and encourage debates on controversial topics. To ensure that EENET fulfils this role, and continues to meet the information needs of its diverse target audience, the network has a Steering Group which has not been very active for several years, but is now being reformed.

EENET Steering Group function and role of members

  • The Steering Group will monitor EENET’s activities and makes suggestions for changes.
  • Steering Group members will represent the views of EENET’s founders, its regional networking partners, international NGOs/donors, and, very importantly, its target users.
  • Steering Group members will assist EENET staff with taking action in key areas of EENET’s development (e.g. fundraising) if they have skills and experience in a relevant area.

User group representatives
Two or three Steering Group representatives will be appointed from among EENET’s ‘grassroots’ users. While they will not be able to represent the full diversity of EENET’s users, they will bring to the Steering Group a valuable ‘reality check’ on the needs, challenges and potential contributions of EENET’s users.

These ‘grassroots’ Steering Group representatives will be selected based on the following criteria:

Essential

  • Good communication skills, preferably in English.
  • Able to communicate by email, and also if possible by telephone or using internet phone or chat systems.
  • Able to travel to the UK and other countries (e.g. must have a passport, or be able to obtain a passport and travel visas without difficulties).
  • Enthusiasm about the aims, values and principles of EENET, and a commitment to contributing as fully as possible to the Steering Group.

One or more of the following are desired:

    Awareness of:
  • child rights
  • education issues
  • disability and/or other diversity issues
  • community development issues.
  • First hand experience of inclusive education (as a student, teacher, parent, local education official, teacher trainer, etc).
  • Experience of being an activist or in other ways representing a marginlised, discriminated against or excluded group (e.g. women/girls; disabled people; refugees; working children, etc).
  • Awareness of EENET and/or an active member of EENET’s network.
  • Awareness of and/or an active member of other south-based, south-focused information sharing and advocacy networks.
  • Financial issues
    Steering Group members are unpaid volunteers. There is no salary for being a Steering Group member. However, EENET will cover all costs relating to attending meetings (e.g. travel, accommodation, meals and other essential daily living expenses) and participating in telephone conferences or internet chats.

    Application to become an EENET Steering Group member

    Closing date for applications: 24th June 2008

    Personal details
    Name:
    Nationality:
    Postal address:
    Tel. no:
    Fax no:
    Mobile no:
    Email:
    Other, e.g. Skype name:

    Do you have a passport?

    Are you aware of any possible restrictions to your freedom to travel to other countries?

    Are you available 8-12 September 2008 (the dates for the next Steering Group meeting)?

    Supporting information
    Describe your involvement with EENET so far (e.g. when did you first learn about EENET; when did you first read the newsletter; what communication have you had with EENET; what other EENET activities have you been involved in?)

    Why are you interested in becoming a member of EENET’s Steering Group?

    Explain any experience you have with the following (this can be experience gained through your personal life or through work):

    • education/inclusive education
    • child rights/human rights
    • community development
    • equality and diversity issues.

    Explain what you think inclusive education means.

    Why do you think it is important for EENET to promote inclusive education and help people to share information on inclusive education?

    Please provide any other information you think will support your application.

    References
    Please supply the names and contact details of 2 people who can provide references for you. At least one referee should know you in a professional or work capacity or have direct experience of your involvement in inclusive education activities/advocacy.

    Referee 1
    Name:
    Address:
    Email:
    Tel:
    Fax:

    Referee 2
    Name:
    Address:
    Email:
    Tel:
    Fax:
    Please return your completed form to:
    Email: info@eenet.org.uk
    Address: EENET, c/o ESI, School of Education, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
    Fax: +44 (0)161 275 3548



    We Can Do received this announcement via the EENET Eastern Africa listserv. Again, applications should please be directed to EENET in accordance to the instructions above, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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    Equal Opportunity for All: Teaching Disability Rights in the Caribbean

    Posted on 2 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Human Rights, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Disabled Peoples’ International (DPI) North America and the Caribbean (NAC) has released a guide that can be used to educate the general public about disability etiquette and the disability rights movement. The 33-page booklet, entitled Equal Opportunities for All: Respecting the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (PDF format 551 Kb), is targeted at people in the North American and Caribbean regions who are new to disability. But most of its information is broad enough that it may be useful for people in other regions as well.

    International development professionals new to disability issues may find this guide helpful in answering questions they were too embarassed to ask disability advocates directly. Disability advocates may find the booklet’s simple, accessible language and clear information helpful in their public outreach campaigns.

    The booklet defines “disability”; describes what a “barrier free” world would look like; and recommends appropriate language to use when referring to people with disabilities. It also shares basic advice for etiquette useful for people who have little to no prior experience interacting with disabled people. For example, it encourages readers to speak directly to a person with disabilities–not to their friend, aide, or interpreter. It also shares more specific advice for interacting with people who are blind; deaf; have specific learning disabilities; have intellectual disabilities; use a wheelchair; or who have psycho-social (psychiatric) disabilities.

    Subsequent sections of the booklet tackle topics such as mainstreaming in education; how to make schools, places of employment, and the community more accessible; and the new Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The guide presents arguments for why everyone (not just people with disabilities) should care about accessibility.

    People unfamiliar with the disability-oriented resources available in the Caribbean region will want to turn to this booklet’s listing of organizations and schools in Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and Trinidad and Tobago. (Want to find more disability-related organizations? Try checking other We Can Do posts that point to specific organizations or to resources for finding them.)

    A glossary in the back helps people new to disability issues understand basic terminology such as “accommodation.”

    You can download the booklet (PDF format, 551 Kb) at:

    http://caribbean.dpi.org/Equal%20Opportunities%20for%20All%20-%20May%2008%20Update.pdf



    I first learned about this handbook via the Disabled Peoples’ International electronic newsletter. I gathered further detail by skimming the guide itself.

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    International Conference: Inclusive Education, the Way of the Future

    Posted on 2 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Opportunities, Reports, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The International Bureau of Education is holding its 48th session of the International Conference on Education (ICE) this 25 – 28 November 2008 in Geneva, Switzerland. The theme will be “Inclusive Education: the Way of the Future.”

    The International Conference on Education is usually predominantly tailored for the needs of Ministers of Education who represent country governments around the world. However, other partners such as researchers, practitioners, representatives of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations also participate in the ICE dialogue.

    Debates at the November 2008 session of ICE are expected to focus on the following themes:

    (i) approaches, scope and content (to broaden the understanding of the theory and the practice of inclusive education);
    (ii) public policies (to demonstrate the role of governments in the development and the implementation of policies on inclusive education);
    (iii) systems, links and transitions (to create inclusive education systems which offer opportunities for lifelong learning);
    (iv) learners and teachers (to foster a learning environment where teachers are equipped to meet the learners’ diverse expectations and needs).

    As of this writing (June 2, 2008), I could not locate registration information at the ICE conference web site. However, even for people unable to attend the November conference, the web site still offers an abundance of materials that may be of interest to people involved in the education field.

    If you scroll down the page at the ICE conference site, you will see a listing of past Preparatory Meetings on Inclusive Education. Many of these include links to Executive Summaries or other reports based on the results of these past meetings. Further down the page, you will see links to reports from Working Groups of the International Bureau of Education Council regarding planning for the 48th ICE conference.

    For further (or upcoming) details on the November 2008 conference on Inclusive Education, please consult their web site directly at

    http://www.ibe.unesco.org/International/ICE48/English/index.html

    Let me please amplify that We Can Do is unable to respond to individual inquiries about this or any other event, toolkit, funding source, or other resource publicized at this site. Instead, please follow the above link.



    I first learned about this conference by browsing the Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development web site.

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    This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

    Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

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    • The Mwanza Computer Literacy Project

      The Mwanza Computer Literacy Project

      The Tusaidiane Disabilities Resources and Charity Organization of Tanzania (TDRCT) would like to improve computer literacy and self-employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Mwanza, Tanzania, and promote their empowerment.

      This organization is run by people who themselves have disabilities. I have known the man who founded this organization for some years. If his organization can quickly raise $5000 from 40 donors within a few days, then GlobalGiving will feature their organization on its website. This will enable them to attract more prospective funders. I have made a donation to them, I hope others will consider doing the same.
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    • Help the U.S. Ratify the Disability Treaty!

      Image of an hour glass overlaid on image of the Capitol building in DC. Text says, "Time is running out! Now is the time for the Senate to Act! Ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities! www.disabilitytreaty.org #CRPD

      Learn why the CRPD matters and how to take action at www.disabilitytreaty.org!

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