Eastern Europe and Central Asia

World Deaf Information Resource Project Launches

Posted on 6 October 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Networking Opportunities, News, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

World Deaf Information Resource Project Launches

A new initiative enables users to find deaf organizations and schools in 149 countries around the world. Launched by the Gallaudet University Center for International Programs and Services (CIPS) in October 2009, the World Deaf Information Resource Project provides contact information for hundreds of international-, national-, and local-level organizations and schools globally. The website also links to on-line reports about the human rights conditions and living situation of deaf people around the world and other information resources for deaf individuals and organizations.

“Deaf people always benefit when deaf organizations, schools, and individuals are able to exchange ideas and information,” says Dr. Asiah Mason, director of CIPS. “But before organizations can communicate with each other, they need a way to find each other. The new World Deaf Information Resource Project lets them do that. It is our hope this can be a powerful information resource for the global deaf community.”

In addition to browsing the website, users also may download most of the same information in either Word or PDF format. The file enables users to produce a 104-page hard copy document for dissemination to contacts who might not have Internet access.

The new website can be accessed at http://cips.gallaudet.edu/wdi.xml. CIPS intends to continue expanding the website and file over time. People are invited to submit information about deaf organizations, schools, and deaf-related information resources not already included in the project to World.Deaf.Info@gallaudet.edu.
CIPS is a unit within the Gallaudet University College of Professional Studies and Outreach and is the university’s one-stop office for all things international. Gallaudet University is the only liberal arts university for deaf students in the world. Mason credits the website as being the brain-child of Dr. Amy Wilson, Director of Gallaudet University’s International Development program, and of Dr. Jay Innes, the Dean of CPSO. Andrea Shettle began the work of gathering information for the website during an internship for the MA degree program in International Development at Gallaudet.

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NEWS: Violence Against Disabled Denounced by Albanian Disability Rights Foundation (English and në gjuhën shqipe)

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Blind, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

në gjuhën shqipe

Tirana, May 22nd, 2009
PRESS RELEASE

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation denounces the violence towards people with disability

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation (ADRF), through this declaration expresses the indignation on the violence exercised on May 21st, 2009 during the peaceful protest organized by blind people in front of the Government Building.

ADRF, expresses its concern for the violence of integrity and dignity of blind people, an action that was done in presence of staff of authorities responsible to guarantee the order and security of the Albanian citizens. Such acts, confirm once again the multiple discrimination and human rights violation faced by people with disability especially women with disability in Albania.

ADRF strongly denounces the act of violence and demand from the Albanian Government to take all measures to punish the person conducting this act and requires compensation to the person to whom violence was exercised.

ADRF makes an appeal to the Albanian Government to undertake in the future concrete measures that aim to eliminate discriminatory situations, to guarantee observance of human rights to all categories of people with disability on equal bases to all Albanian citizens.

ADRF
www.adrf.org.al
Tel: (04) 2269426
Rr: “Bogdani” (ish-A.Z.Çajupi) Pall. 15 Kt i 3, Tirane, Albania

Tiranë më 22.05.2009
DEKLARATE PËR SHTYP

FSHDPAK dënon dhunën e ushtruar ndaj Personave me aftësi të kufizuara në shikim

Fondacioni Shqiptar për të Drejtat e Personave me Aftësi të Kufizuara (FSHDPAK), me anë të kësaj deklarate shpreh indinjatën e thellë për dhunën e ushtruar në datë 21.05.2009, gjatë protestës së organizuar nga personat me aftësi të kufizuar në shikim, përpara selisë së Këshillit të Ministrave.

FSHDPAK, shpreh shqetësimin për cënimin e integritetit dhe dinjitetit të kategorisë të personave me aftësi të kufizuar në shikim, ndodhur për më tepër në prani të organeve të mbrojtjes së rendit dhe sigurisë të shtetasve Shqiptarë. Akte të tilla konfirmojnë edhe njëhërë diskriminimin e shumfishtë dhe shkeljen e të drejtave themelore të njeriut ndaj personave me aftësi të kufizuara dhe në mënyrë të veçantë ndaj grave me aftësi të kufizuara.

FSHDPAK, dënon me forcë aktin e dhunshëm dhe kërkon nga Qeveria Shqiptare marrjen e të gjitha masave për dënimin e dhunuesit dhe dëmshpërblimin e personit ndaj të cilit u ushtrua dhunë.

FSHDPAK, gjithashtu, kërkon të tërheqë vëmendjen e qeverisë Shqiptare për ndërrmarjen në të ardhmen të masave konkrete me synim eleminimin e situatave të tilla diskriminuese, garantimin dhe respektimin e të të drejtave themelore të njeriut për të gjitha kategoritë e personave me aftësi të kufizuar, si pjesë e rëndësishme në shoqërinë Shqiptare.

FSHDPAK
www.adrf.org.al
Tel: (04) 2269426
Rr: “Bogdani” (ish-A.Z.Çajupi) Pall. 15 Kt i 3, Tirane, Shqiperi



We Can Do received this press release via the Asia Pacific Disability email discussion group.

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Tirana, May 22nd, 2009

PRESS RELEASE

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation denounces the violence towards people with disability

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation (ADRF), through this declaration expresses the indignation on the violence exercised on May 21st, 2009 during the peaceful protest organized by blind people in front of the Government Building.

ADRF, expresses its concern for the violence of integrity and dignity of blind people, an action that was done in presence of staff of authorities responsible to guarantee the order and security of the Albanian citizens. Such acts, confirm once again the multiple discrimination and human rights violation faced by people with disability especially women with disability in Albania.

ADRF strongly denounces the act of violence and demand from the Albanian Government to take all measures to punish the person conducting this act and requires compensation to the person to whom violence was exercised.

ADRF makes an appeal to the Albanian Government to undertake in the future concrete measures that aim to eliminate discriminatory situations, to guarantee observance of human rights to all categories of people with disability on equal bases to all Albanian citizens.

ADRF

http://www.adrf.org.al
Tel: (04) 2269426
Rr: “Bogdani” (ish-A.Z.Çajupi) Pall. 15 Kt i 3, Tirane, Albania

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Conference: Working with Children with Special Needs and Their Families: Kyrgyzstan and Intl Experience

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Events and Conferences, Families, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

International conference 7-9 April 2009

[Note application deadline March 6, 2009.]

Dear colleagues!

The Association of Parents of Disabled Children of Bishkek and the Public Association “Shoola Kol” in partnership with HealthProm UK-based charity and the Ministry of Labor and Social Development organizes the 3-day International conference «Innovative approaches to working with children with special needs and their families: Kyrgyzstan and international experience» which will take place at the Dostuk Hotel, Bishkek, on 7-9 April 2009.

Conference aims:

* Present and discuss various approaches to providing support to children with special needs and their families
* Search for ways of cooperation between organizations that support children with special needs and their families in Kyrgyzstan and abroad
* Experience exchange

The conference will see the representatives of government and municipal agencies, nongovernmental local and international organizations that have practical experience in providing early support, education, social support and healthcare services to children with special needs, as well as in the advancement and protection of the rights of people with disabilities.

Conference format: reports, discussion, presentations, workshops, seminars.

During the conference there will be Kyrgyzstan and international experience presented on the following:

* latest models of providing early support to children with multiple disabilities
* innovative approaches of psychological and pedagogical support to children with special needs
* complex rehabilitation and socialization of children and young people with special needs
* protection and advancement of rights of people with disabilities and their families

The final programme of the conference will be developed on the needs and expectations of the participants that sent applications.

The conference invites: heads and specialists of social protection, educational and healthcare government and municipal agencies and nongovernmental organizations that provide support to children with special needs (including with multiple disabilities) and their families.

The selection of participants will based on the applications forms. The applications should be sent before the 6 March 2009 by email ardi.kyrgyzstan@gmail.com of fax: 0312 517634

Participants will be selected before 20 March 2009.

The working language of the conference is Russian, translators will be provided for international participants.

For more information please contact:

ARDI, Bishkek, m-r Kok-Zhar, h.1, polupodval 4, Tel/fax: +996 312 517634, e-mail: ardi.kyrgyzstan@gmail.com



Thank you to Azat Israilov for submitting this announcement to We Can Do. All inquiries, as always, should be directed to the people organizing the opportunity that interests you, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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NEWS: Bulgarians with Mental Disabilities Suffer Inhumane Treatment

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Cognitive Impairments, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Geneva, 3 December 2008

On the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT), the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee (BHC) and the Mental Disability Advocacy Center (MDAC) come together to express their serious concern over the situation of persons with mental disabilities, one of the most marginalised and discriminated groups in Bulgarian society.

In a series of letters to members of the Bulgarian Parliament and Government, officials and elected representatives in the European Union, and the United Nations Special Procedures mandate holders, the three organisations underline that persons with mental disabilities in Bulgaria, “frequently face social exclusion and severe human rights violations, including violence and ill-treatment”, and express their concern that, “[i]nadequate legislation together with entrenched institutional policies and practices also compromise their socio-economic well-being, as well as that of their families”.

Regardless of the skills and capabilities which persons with mental disabilities in Bulgaria possess, they are often deemed incompetent, deprived of their legal capacity and placed under guardianship. Bulgaria’s outdated legislation on deprivation of legal capacity removes a person’s right to make their own decisions and denies the exercise of their basic human rights, including the rights to marry, vote, work, take legal action and seek judicial remedies. Deprivation of a person’s legal capacity also impedes their rights to a fair trial, to own property and to respect for their personal and family life. In most cases, persons with mental disabilities who are placed under guardianship in Bulgaria are forced to live in large and remote residential institutions and to remain there for the rest of their lives. Once institutionalised, they are at risk of ill-treatment from staff and subjected to prison-like regimes. Indeed, living conditions in some of these institutions have been deemed to amount to inhuman and degrading treatment.

Please read the rest of this news release from the World Organization Against Torture at their web site by clicking on the following URL: http://www.omct.org/index.php?id=&lang=eng&actualPageNumber=1&articleId=8204&itemAdmin=article

I received this press release via several sources including the IDA_CRPD_Forum listserver; the AdHoc_IDC listserver; the RatifyNow organization’s listserver; and others. Only the first two paragraphs is quoted here. Please follow the link provided above to read the full story.

Note that “mental disabilities” is often used to refer to both people with intellectual disabilities and also people with psychosocial disabilities. Although these are very different disabilities, both populations in many countries are frequently locked up in the same institutions and may experience similar types of human rights violations.

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FUNDING for Disability Rights Projects in India, Mexico, Ukraine (Text in English, Español, українською мовою, на русском языке)

Posted on 16 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Democratic Participation, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке

Disability Rights Fund Releases 2009 Request for Proposals: 3 New Countries Targeted in First Round
FEBRUARY16, 2009
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF)—a groundbreaking grantmaking collaborative supporting the human rights of people with disabilities—today announced its first 2009 grants round, “Raising Our Voice,” targeted at disabled persons’ organizations (DPOs) in three countries: India, Mexico and Ukraine.

The broad objective of the Fund[1]—which was officially launched in March 2008—is to empower DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).

In 2008, the Fund made one-year grants to 33 organizations in 7 countries (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru; Ghana, Namibia, Uganda; Bangladesh), totaling USD 800,000. Grants ranged from USD 5000 – 50,000 and supported CRPD awareness-raising, strengthening coalitions and networks, and rights advocacy.

In the first round of 2009 grantmaking, applicant organizations may apply within one of two categories: a) single organizations or partnerships and b) national DPO coalitions. Grants to single organizations will range from USD 5,000 to 30,000 and support efforts to build voice and visibility and to develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. Grants to national DPO coalitions will range from USD 30,000 to 70,000 and will support advocacy toward ratification of the CRPD, passage of specific legislation to accord with the CRPD, or the production of shadow reports.

Interested organizations are urged to review the full eligibility criteria and application details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Any questions on the proposal process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org by March 16. The deadline for applications is April 16, 2009.

As a donor representative on the DRF Steering Committee stated, “The launch of DRF’s 2009 grantmaking process marks an exciting expansion of our grantmaking to DPOs in three new countries and an effort to support both more marginalized sectors of the disability community and national coalitions advancing the rights of persons with disabilities.”

DRF’s donors include the American Jewish World Service, an anonymous founding donor, the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom Department for International Development.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
####


Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad
publica convocatoria a presentar propuestas de proyectos en 2009:
Primera ronda de financiamiento va dirigida a tres nuevos países

16 de febrero de 2009
PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (DRF)—una innovadora iniciativa de colaboración que apoya los derechos humanos de estas personas—anunció hoy su primera ronda de financiamiento de 2009, “Alzando nuestra voz”, dirigida a organizaciones de personas con discapacidad (OPD) en tres países: India, México y Ucrania.

El Fondo[2]—iniciado oficialmente en marzo de 2008—tiene el objetivo amplio de empoderar a las OPD del mundo en desarrollo y Europa Oriental/antigua Unión Soviética con el fin de que participen en la ratificación, aplicación y seguimiento de la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD).

En 2008, el Fondo brindó apoyo financiero durante un año a 33 organizaciones en siete países (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Perú, Ghana, Namibia, Uganda y Bangladés), por un total de USD 800,000. Los subsidios, de USD 5,000 a 50,000, apoyaron la toma de conciencia respecto a la CDPD, el fortalecimiento de coaliciones y redes, así como la promoción y defensa de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad.

En la primera ronda de financiamiento de 2009, las organizaciones solicitantes pueden presentar propuestas en una de las siguientes categorías: a) como OPD que trabajan independientemente o en alianza con otras organizaciones, o b) en calidad de coaliciones nacionales de OPD. Las organizaciones de la primera categoría podrán solicitar subsidios desde USD 5,000 hasta 30,000, los cuales han de utilizarse para esfuerzos encaminados a generar voz y visibilidad, como también a desarrollar promoción, defensa y seguimiento de derechos con base en la CDPD. Los subsidios para las coaliciones nacionales de OPD, que oscilan entre USD 30,000 y 70,000, apoyarán acciones de promoción y defensa a favor de la ratificación de la CDPD, la aprobación de legislación específica armonizada con la CDPD o la elaboración de informes sombra.

Se invita a las organizaciones interesadas a leer todos los criterios de selección y los detalles para solicitud de fondos que se encuentran en http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant_spanish.html. Cualquier pregunta relacionada con el proceso de las propuestas debe dirigirse, a más tardar el 16 de marzo, a info@disabilityrightsfund.org. La fecha límite para presentar propuestas de proyectos es el 16 de abril de 2009.

Tal como aseveró una representante de donantes en el Comité Directivo del DRF, “El lanzamiento del proceso de financiamientos del DRF en 2009 constituye una expansión emocionante de nuestro apoyo financiero a las OPD en tres nuevos países; es también un esfuerzo por apoyar tanto a un mayor número de sectores marginados de la comunidad de personas con discapacidad como a coaliciones nacionales para la promoción de los derechos de las personas con discapacidad”.

Entre los donantes del DRF figuran el Servicio Mundial Judío Americano (AJWS), un donante fundador anónimo, el Instituto de la Sociedad Abierta, el Fondo Sigrid Rausing y el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional (DFID) del Reino Unido.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
####

Фонд прав інвалідів публікує запит на грантові заявки 2009 року: для першого етапу обрано три нові країни
16 лютого 2009 р.

БОСТОН (США) – Фонд прав інвалідів (ФПI) – новаторський спільний проект з надання грантів на підтримку прав людей з інвалідністю – оголосив сьогодні про початок першого етапу виділення грантів на 2009 рік, «Піднесімо свій голос», на допомогу організаціям інвалідів (ОІ) у трьох країнах: Індії, Мексиці й Україні.

Загальним завданням Фонду[3], офіційно відкритого в березні 2008 року, є надання ОІ у країнах, що розвиваються, та Східній Європі/колишньому Радянському Союзі можливостей для участі в ратифікації, реалізації та моніторингу дотримання Конвенції ООН про права інвалідів (КПІ).

У 2008 р. Фонд надав річні гранти 33 організаціям семи країн (Еквадор, Нікараґуа, Перу; Ґана, Намібія, Уганда; Банґладеш) на загальну суму $800 000. Гранти, розміром від $5000 до $50 000, були використані на підвищення обізнаності громадськості про КПІ, зміцнення коаліцій та інших об’єднань організацій інвалідів, захисту їх прав.

Протягом першого етапу надання грантів 2009 р. організації-кандидати можуть подати заявки в одній з двох категорій: a) окремі організації чи партнерства та б) національні коаліції ОІ. Гранти окремим організаціям, розміром від $5000 до $30 000, будуть спрямовані на посилення ролі й авторитету ОІ у суспільстві та розробку системи захисту прав інвалідів і моніторингу дотримання КПІ. Гранти національним коаліціям, розміром від $30 000 до $70 000, уможливлять роботу з прискорення ратифікації КПІ, прийняття конкретного законодавства згідно з КПІ або складання «тіньових» звітів.

Зацікавлені організації можуть вивчити критерії відповідності й відбору і всі подробиці процедури подання заявок на вебсайті Фонду, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Усі запитання з процедури подання заявок слід надсилати на адресу info@disabilityrightsfund.org до 16 березня. Граничний термін прийому заявок – 16 квітня 2009 р.

Як сказав один з представників організацій-донорів у Керівному комітеті ФПІ: «Початок процесу надання грантів 2009 року позначить поширення нашої діяльності на три нових країни і наших зусиль з підтримки як найбільш ізольованих груп інвалідів, так і національних коаліцій в галузі захисту прав усіх людей з інвалідністю».

Серед донорів ФПІ – Американська єврейська всесвітня служба, анонімний донор – засновник Фонду, Інститут «Відкрите Суспільство», Фонд Сіґрид Раусінґ та Британський департамент міжнародного розвитку.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке

ПРЕСС-РЕЛИЗ

Фонд прав инвалидов публикует запрос на грантовые заявки 2009 года: на первом этапе выбраны три новые страны
16 февраля 2009 г.

БОСТОН (США) – Фонд прав инвалидов (ФПИ) – новаторский совместный проект по предоставлению грантов в поддержку прав людей с инвалидностью – объявил сегодня о начале первого этапа выделения грантов на 2009 год, «Возвысим свой голос», направленного на помощь организациям инвалидов (ОИ) в трех странах: Индии, Мексике и Украине.

Общей задачей Фонда[4], официально открытого в марте 2008 года, является предоставление ОИ в развивающихся странах и Восточной Европе / бывшем Советском Союзе возможностей для участия в ратификации, реализации и мониторинге выполнения Конвенции ООН о правах инвалидов (КПИ).

В 2008 г. Фонд предоставил годичные гранты 33 организациям семи стран (Эквадор, Никарагуа, Перу; Гана, Намибия, Уганда; Бангладеш) на общую сумму $800 000. Гранты, в размере от $5000 до $50 000, были использованы для повышения осведомленности общественности о КПИ, укрепления коалиций и объединений организаций инвалидов, защиты их прав.
В ходе первого этапа предоставления грантов в 2009 г. организации-соискатели могут подать заявки в одной из двух категорий: a) отдельные организации или партнерства и б) национальные коалиции ОИ. Гранты отдельным организациям, в размере от $5000 до $30 000, будут нацелены на усиление роли и авторитета ОИ в обществе, выработку системы защиты прав инвалидов и мониторинга выполнения КПИ. Гранты национальным коалициям, в размере $30 000–$70 000, будут использованы на работу по ускорению ратификации КПИ, принятию конкретного законодательства в соответствии с КПИ или созданию «теневых» отчетов.

Заинтересованные организации могут изучить критерии соответствия и отбора и все подробности процедуры подачи заявок на вебсайте Фонда, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant.html. Все вопросы по процедуре подачи заявок следует направлять по адресу info@disabilityrightsfund.org до 16 марта. Конечной датой принятия заявок является 16 апреля 2009 г.

Как сказал один из представителей организаций-доноров в Руководящем комитете ФПИ: «Начало процесса предоставления грантов 2009 года знаменует расширение нашей деятельности в трех новых странах и наших усилий по поддержанию как наиболее изолированных групп инвалидов, так и национальных коалиций по защите прав всех людей с инвалидностью».

Среди доноров ФПИ – Американская еврейская всемирная служба, анонимный донор – основатель Фонда, Институт «Открытое Общество», Фонд Сигрид Раусинг и Британский департамент международного развития.

English; Español; українською мовою; на русском языке
####

[1] The Disability Rights Fund is a project of Tides. Back to English text
[2] El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad es un proyecto de Tides.Regresar a Español
[3] Фонд прав інвалідів є проектом Тайдз. українською мовою
[4] Фонд прав инвалидов является проектом Тайдз. на русском языке

English; Español; на русском языке; українською мовою



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for sending me this press release for publication at We Can Do.

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NEWS: Kosovo Disability Community Urges US President-Elect Barack Obama to Support International Disability Rights

Posted on 18 December 2008. Filed under: Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

03 December 2008,
International Day of Persons with Disabilities
Dear Mr. Obama,

Congratulations to US. People and to you personally on your historic win to be 44th President of the United States of America .

Your acceptance speech was so good to hear when many minority groups have been mentioned, specifically persons with disabilities and it shows that you believe in celebrating the diversity present in society.

We are pleased to send you our compliments on your disability platform of four parts:
• Increasing educational opportunities,
• Ending discrimination and promoting equal opportunity,
• Increasing the employment rate of workers with disabilities and
• Supporting independent living of persons with disabilities

We believe those to be the best practices which will lead the world in empowering persons with disabilities to take full advantage of their talents and become independent, integrated members of society.

We, persons with disabilities from Republic of Kosovo congratulate the International Day of Persons with Disabilities as well as the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) to all our friends and colleagues in U.S and to you.

The celebration of 2008 as a significant year in the global disability rights movement, given the entry into force of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities as the first international, legally-binding human rights treaty for persons with disabilities, will give us the opportunities to achieve a vision of a society where all can live with dignity and respect.

Finally, we urge you to use your new position as a world leader for the welfare of persons with disabilities not just in your great country of United States of America , but also in other countries around the world. In short, we want the idea of universal human rights to become a reality to all of us.

Our warmest regards and best wishes from Republic Kosovo

Hiljmnijeta Apuk, Human Rights Defender

On behalf of the membership of Little People of Kosovo, multiethnic NGOs partnership of Voluntary Promotional Program of Disability Mentoring Days – DMD, Monthly magazine “Newspaper to the Rights of Persons with Disabilities of Kosovo” in 6 languages, Hendifer – Ferizaj and Art Coalition of Authentic Culture of Persons with Disabilities.



Thank you to Hiljmnijeta Apuk for granting permission to post this letter at We Can Do. A global campaign is under way to urge people with disabilities, our loved ones, colleagues, and other allies from around the world to send emails to Obama to increase the visibility of disability issues within Obama’s administration. Learn more about the international Call To Action and how you can participate at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/11/07/disabilities-email-obama/. Most of the same text is also in the slide show further below (click on the arrows to move through the show).

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JOB POST: Consultant, Vocational Education and Training for Vulnerable Groups in Eastern Europe, Bulgarian Roma

Posted on 4 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Employment, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Subject: [Bulgarian Roma] Job: Consultant, Vocational Education and Training for Vulnerable Groups in Eastern Europe

A Washington D.C based government contractor is looking for a consultant to compose a report for USAID regarding vocational education and training in Eastern Europe for vulnerable groups, specifically people with disabilities.

The report, work on which would start in immediately, will include two major sections, one addressing training for people with disabilities and the second, training for institutionalized adolescents who will graduate from institutions. Both of these sections of the report should contain a review of best practices and lessons learned from vocational and job skills training programs for persons in the group. As much as possible, this review should rely on information from programs that have been evaluated and on information from programs that have been implemented in the E&E region (although these do not need to have been implemented by USAID). The report should also include a very concrete guide and set of recommendations for Missions who wish to program in this area. These recommendations should include practical, “how-to” advice including a discussion of the conditions that are necessary for these types of programs to be successful, descriptions of types of programs that seem to work best, links and other references to strong model programs so that readers can easily access more information, etc.

Previous experience with writing reports for USAID while certainly and advantage, is not necessarily a must, as long as the candidate has a proven record of producing reports for other governmental agencies, international organizations, and NGOs. The key qualities would be expertise in vocational education and training for people with disabilities in Eastern Europe, the ability to gather and analyze cross-county data from the region, and good writing skills.

Please email rtsanov@jbsinternational.com



This notice was recently circulated, among other places, on the Intl-Dev mailing list, which people may subscribe to for free.

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Disabled People Must Not Pay for Crisis, Says European Disability Forum

Posted on 27 November 2008. Filed under: Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Employment, Human Rights, News, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

français

EDF Statement on the Economic Crisis: Disabled People Must Not Pay for the Crisis

Paris, 16 Novembre 2008 – The European Disability Forum, which is the voice of more than 50 million European people with disabilities, calls on the European Council, Commission and Parliament and other European institutions and all the governments of Europe to ensure disabled people and their families do not pay for the worldwide economic crisis by the reduction in their income, benefits, employment opportunities or in cuts in support to our representative organisations.

The crisis was caused by the irresponsible lending and unacceptable negligence by those in charge of the financial institutions and regulatory bodies of the world. Governments’ response to the ‘credit crunch’ has been to create financial resources to bail out the banks. Now as this lack of confidence feeds its way into the general economic system it is vital that poor, elderly and disabled people and their families of Europe do not pay for this crisis. We already in a precarious position prior to the crisis, therefore call for a reflationary approach to spend more on investment in accessible infra structure, on benefits and the provision of tax relief, so that these groups can buy goods and services so improving the economic situation.

The world through the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities has only just recognised the urgent need to extend the international human rights law framework to disabled people. Society cannot afford to dilute its commitment to human rights including the right to employment and family life. Traditionally disabled people have been the ‘reserve army of labour’, ’the last to be hired the first to be fired’, seen as expendable at times of economic crisis. Disabled People, their families, the unemployed and the poor cannot become the scapegoat for a crisis not of their making. Already the worsening economic position has led to attempts to cut benefits in many countries such as Ireland, Hungary, Sweden and Italy.

The lesson of this crisis – the value of investing in people – is far more important than speculative investment and it benefits the whole of society and strengthens its resistance to such crisis driven changes. If the gap between the disadvantaged and the wealthy widens, it will cost society more in the long run. The EDF will ensure the equality and rights of disabled people come to the top of the political agenda in the forthcoming European Elections.

Cutbacks and mass unemployment will develop a fertile ground for violence, hate crime, undermine solidarity and produce dangerous attitudes for democracy. We call on all those with political and economic decision making responsibility to do all they can to ensure that disabled and poor people are treated with equality and their economic well being is assured by the measures they take at this time. Now is the time for strong action so that in 2010-European Anti Poverty Year- disabled people and other disadvantaged groups do not again come to the top of the agenda.

The European Disability Forum (EDF) is the European umbrella organisation representing the interests of 50 million disabled citizens in Europe. EDF membership includes national umbrella organisations of disabled people from all EU/EEA countries, as well as European NGOs representing the different types of disabilities, organisations and individuals committed to disability issues. The mission of the European Disability Forum is to ensure disabled people full access to fundamental and human rights through their active involvement in policy development and implementation in Europe.

Forum européen des personnes handicapées
>>> Communiqué de presse

Déclaration du Forum Européen des personnes handicapées à propos de la crise financière: Les personnes handicapées ne doivent pas payer la crise

Paris, le 16 novembre 2008 – Représentant 50 millions d’européens en situation de handicap, le Forum Européen des Personnes Handicapées appelle le Conseil Europeén la Commission Européenne et le Parlement Européen, les Institutions Européennes et tous les Gouvernements des pays européens à s’assurer que les personnes handicapées et leurs familles n’aient pas à payer les conséquences de la crise financière internationale par une réduction de leurs revenus, de leurs accès à l’emploi, de leurs moyens de compensation ou par une réduction des moyens attribués à leurs organisations représentatives.

La crise financière a été causée par des accords de prêts irresponsables et des négligences inacceptables de la part des responsables d’Institutions financières et de régulation financières. La réponse des Gouvernements à cette déroute bancaire a été la création de ressources financières pour sauver les banques. Maintenant que la perte de confiance gagne l’économie réelle, il est essentiel que les européens exposés à la pauvreté, à la maladie et aux situations handicap n’aient pas à faire les frais de cette crise. Déjà affectée par la précarité avant cette crise, nous pensons au contraire qu’une politique de relance devrait augmenter les allocations, investir dans l’accessibilité et accorder des avantages fiscaux pour que ces groupes puissent consommer des biens et des services et ainsi soutenir le développement économique.

Avec l’adoption par les Nations Unies de la Convention Internationale pour le droit des personnes handicapées le monde vient juste de reconnaître le besoin urgent d’un élargissement du cadre des Droits de l’Homme aux personnes handicapées. La société ne peut pas se permettre maintenant de d’affaiblir son engagement pour les Droits de la Personne et notamment le droit à l’emploi et le droit à fonder une famille.

Il est depuis longtemps d’usage que la réponse aux besoins des personnes handicapées représente une « réserve d’emploi », ce sont les dernières à être engagées et les premières à être licenciées, perçues comme quantité négligeable. La dégradation de la situation économique a déjà conduit plusieurs pays à vouloir supprimer des avantages acquis, comme en Irlande, en Hongrie, en Suède et en Italie.

La leçon de cette crise est que l’investissement sur le développement des personnes est beaucoup plus essentiel que les investissements spéculatifs, qu’il bénéficie à l’ensemble de la collectivité et qu’il renforce les capacités de réponse collective à ce type de crise. Si le fossé entre les riches et les pauvres s’élargit encore la crise coûtera plus cher et durera plus longtemps. Le Forum Européen des Personnes Handicapées veillera à ce que l’égalité et les droits des personnes handicapes devienne une priorité de l’agenda politique européen lors des prochaines élection européennes.

Les restrictions et l’augmentation du chômage vont créer un terrain propice au développement de la violence, d’attitudes dangereuses pour la démocratie et constituent une menace pour la solidarité. Nous appelons les responsables politiques et économiques à faire face à leur responsabilité et à prendre immédiatement les décisions nécessaires pour que les personnes handicapées, leurs familles et les personnes pauvres soient traitées avec équité et leur avenir économique assuré.

Le Forum européen des personnes handicapées (FEPH) est la plateforme européenne qui représente les intérêts de 50 millions de citoyens handicapés au sein de l’Union européenne. Les organisations membres du FEPH incluent les plateformes nationales des personnes handicapées de tous les Etats membres de l’UE et de l’Espace économique européen, ainsi que les ONG européennes représentant les différents types de handicap. La mission du FEPH est de garantir le respect total des droits fondamentaux et humains des personnes handicapées par le biais d’une implication active dans le développement et application des politiques européennes.



This press release was circulated on the AsiaPacificDisability listserver.

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NEWS: Albanian Disability Rights Foundation Monitors National Action Plan of the National Strategy on People with Disability

Posted on 30 October 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Democratic Participation, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

For Immediate Release
October 23rd, 2008

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation organized on October 23rd, 2008 at the Rogner EuropaPark Hotel, a National Conference to announce to the Public the Report on the Implementation by the Albanian Government of the National Action Plan of the National Strategy on People with Disability (NSPD). This is the second in the series of the monitoring reports for NSPD and it includes the progress made during 2005-2007 by focusing on the status of progress in 2007.

Participants in the Conference Deputy Prime Minister, Genc Pollo, Minister of Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs, Anastas Duro, USAID Mission Director, Roberta Mahoney, Executive Director of the Albanian Disability Rights Foundation, Blerta Cani, and other representatives from governmental and nongovernmental institutions who spoke in the Conference presented facts and findings that came out in the monitoring process.

The data for the monitoring report were mainly collected through six-region surveys with participants from Tirane, Shkoder, Durres, Vlore, Elbasan and Korce. The survey was conducted with participation of 113 government officials at the central, regional and local level, who provided official information on the status of progress on the measure assigned to their office, as well as representatives of four national disability nongovernmental organizations. 954 participant’s people with disabilities and family members from the same six regions were also asked to evaluate the situation in the country in regards to the five areas of the National Action Plan – Accessibility, Services(Health care and Social Services); Education, Employment and Vocational Training, Capacity Building and Legislation through a quantitative-qualitative survey.

The Report acknowledges the increased awareness of the Albanian Government, its engagement in taking more responsibilities for improvement of disability legal and policy framework in Albania.

Still, findings from the monitoring process revealed unrealized tasks in all the five areas of the action plan of the National Strategy on People with Disability. An analysis of all the findings revealed that there has been no progress at all in 41% of the total measures, only two measures have been completed on schedule, this means that the implementation has been delayed for 98% of the measures the National Action Plan.

As a consequence, half of people with disabilities and their families participating in the survey (51.8%) consider their financial situation to be poor; the communities where people with disabilities live continue to be inaccessible to them, 4,534 children with special needs between ages of 6-18 do not receive any form of education; People with disabilities and their family members gave opportunities for employment and vocational training a failing grade. The participants strongly believe that they are not considered as equal partners in the relevant decision making process at the local, regional and central level. They believe that majority of 102,945 officially recognized people with disabilities, are not treated as equal citizens, and they are discriminated against in many fields of life.

The NSPD was written to address the most basic needs of people with disabilities in Albania. The failure of the state agencies to realize the tasks according to the scheduled timelines indicates that work to promote awareness and accountability needs to be enhanced at all levels.

Constant monitoring of the national disability strategy by civil society tends to hold the Albanian government accountable, increase the responsibility and engagement of responsible governmental and non-governmental agencies to place disability in the agenda of the reforms, by challenging exclusion and promoting an all inclusive society.

Efforts of ADRF to monitor implementation of the National Strategy for People with Disability were enabled through financial support of United States Agency for International Development (USAID) under the program of “Promoting the Human Rights for people with Disability in Albania.

Albanian Disability Rights Foundation is an Albanian non-governmental organization that has advocated for the human rights and people with disabilities since 1996. The ADRF empowers individuals with disabilities and their family member, provides technical and policy-level advice regarding human rights, and raises public awareness concerning disabilities.

For further information you may contact:

Blerta Cani
Tel: + 355 4 2269 426
e-mail: adrf@albmail.com

www.adrf.org.al



This press release was recently circulated on the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group.

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NEWS: Invisible in Russia

Posted on 12 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Employment, Human Rights, Inclusion, News | Tags: , , , , |

Individuals with disabilities, and organizations that represent them, recently told Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty that they are still largely invisible in Russian society. They face challenges in education; finding employment; living in the community; and finding accessible services. However, there also has been some progress over time. Children who once would have been kept home from school now receive an education; and people with disabilities are, slowly, becoming integrated into society.

Read the full story about the situation that confronts people with disabilities in Russia at:

http://archive.rferl.org/reports/FullReport.aspx?report=577#736738



I learned about this news story when Ghulam Nabi Nizamani circulated it via email.

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News from Kyrgyzstan: Projects, Laws, Funding Opportunities

Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Families, Funding, Human Rights, News, Policy & Legislation, Uncategorized, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following newsletter was sent to We Can Do from Kyrgyzstan–thanks to Azat Israilov for passing this on. This contains news about projects for people with disabilities in Kyrgyzstan; a new law protecting the rights of people with disabilities; the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and announcements for a couple of funding opportunities. Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

We are for equal possibilities and better future!
INFORMATIONAL BULLETIN

The newsletter is published under the Health Prom project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund

July 2008
Content:
Letter from A.Israilov, national in-country project manager
Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Brief information about participants of the project
HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Young people: new horizons!
President signed the Decree “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The new law about social order accepted
Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for
people with disabilities

Projects on employment for disabled people
The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Grants

Top of this page; Bottom of this page

Dear readers, colleagues and partners,

We welcome you on the pages of the first issue of the Informational bulletin which is published under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund. The important aims of the bulletin will be providing news that are related to children with special needs and their families, and also updating on the progress of the project. The bulletin will be published and distributed once a quarter. At the same time neither the project, nor the bulletin will be involved in political processes in the country. In the first issue you will find some information on the project, its participants and also learn about
some latest events in social sphere of Kyrgyzstan.

It is hoped that the bulletin as a specialist publication will continue its existence beyond the project, and will become a useful source of information for parents and concerned organizations and people. And to become so we will be delighted to publish your interesting news and helpful information which you would like to share with.
Sincerely,
A.Israilov, national in-country project manager

“Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”
Contacts: Bishkek, m/r Kok-Zhar, h. 1, p/p 4, Tel./fax (0312) 517634, aisrail@gmail.com

Top of this page; Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Charitable organisation HealthProm, located in London, UK, together with the Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI) and Public Association “Shoola Kol” has started a project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in the Kyrgyz Republic” funded by the Big Lottery Fund. The project is for three years and will help to establish two rehabilitation and resource centres in two pilot localities – Bishkek and Issyk-Kul oblast with Bokonbaevo v. as a centre. The project aims to improve on improving health and well-being of young children with disabilities and their parents through rehabilitation services, informational support and consultations. The project will not be involved in politics.

Prior to the project beginning there were study visits and research done during which the distress of people with disabilities, especially children, was revealed, whose families belong to the group with the lowest incomes in the country. According to the Ministry of Labour and Social Development, there are about 117 thousand people with disabilities in the republic now, out of them more than nineteen thousand are younger than 18, and 66% out of general number live in rural areas. The number of the disabled makes up 2,1% of the whole population while in the developed countries this figure varies approximately from 10 up to 20% (for example, in
the UK it is about 15%, in Russia up to 10%).

The project will fill the gap in knowledge and information resources in the Republic about prevention of disability, alternative approaches to child disability. Various trainings based on current needs will improve knowledge and skills of people with disabilities as well as of medical and social professionals. There will be developed or translated and published a number of necessary materials, and a specialised web site on disability issues will be created. A specialised microbus for each centre will connect experts and volunteers with disabled children and their families in the remote areas.

“The project focuses on sustainable development of our partners and the centres, and also on cooperation with local communities, non-governmental organisations and relevant local government agencies.” – underlines Tatyana Buynovskaja, the project manager. – “It includes programs on early intervention and providing advisory and practical support to new families with disabled children.” Tamara Dyikanbaeva, ARDI chairwoman, adds: “The project was developed taking into account the needs and wishes of parents and disabled children, considering provision of complex and versatile support to children and their parents. The project activity is based on social model of disability which recognises, that disability is not an illness (and in the developed countries it was recognised and accepted), and disabled people do not need pity and constant
guardianship, but need possibilities to study, work and communicate to become useful members of society”.

As a result of project activities it is planned to reach out about one and a half thousand parents of disabled children, and these children can participate in joint social events together with other children. It is expected in the end of the project the rehabilitation and resource centres in cooperation with local communities and government agencies will become vital for work with disabled children and their parents, and that this experience can be replicated in other regions.

Top of this page; Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

Brief information about participants of the project
Partner organisations responsible for implementing the project:

HealthProm – a charitable non-commercial organisation, based in London, works since 1984 with local communities for improving health and social support for vulnerable women and children in the countries of the former Soviet Union (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Russia, Uzbekistan, Ukraine, Tajikistan and recently in Kyrgyzstan). The primary activities of the organisation are social and medical projects. Recently HealthProm has successfully finished similar (to Kyrgyzstan) a 3-year project in Altay region of Russia. Local authorities immediately supported the initiative and provided premises and financing for two centres.

The Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI), Bishkek, established in 1995, gives advisory support to parents of disabled children, and also aspires to realise capabilities of disabled children and youth by their development and integration into society.

Public Association Shoola Kol, Bokonbaevo v. in Issyk-Kul region, is the human rights organisation and engaged in educational activity and raise public awareness. Shoola Kol also advises and educates people with disabilities and helps them establish NGOs for advancement of interests and rights of disabled people.

People who are involved in the project:
* Tatyana Buynovskaya – HealthProm manager, as well as the project manager “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund.
* Jonathan Watkins – senior project expert, social worker, consultant.
* Mark Hunter – child disability consultant, paediatrician.
* Azat Israilov – in-country project manager in Kyrgyzstan.
* Tamara Dyikanbaeva – Association of Parents of Disabled Children chair, project officer in Bishkek.
* Antonina Lee – Shoola Kol chair, project coordinator in Issyk-Kul region, Bokonbaevo.

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HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Under the project funded by the Big Lottery Fund HealthProm delegation of three people (see list above) have visited Kyrgyzstan for meetings with the representatives of government agencies and international and local non-governmental organisations. Between 11 and 23d May, 33 meetings took place in Bishkek and Bokonbaevo, one of them was an interview to the newspaper “Vechernij Bishkek”. In addition HealthProm representatives visited homes of families with disabled children. The results of these meetings will help partners to define the area of specialization for new rehabilitation centres. These centres will work in close interaction with local authorities and government agencies. Currently through consultations with local authorities and additional meetings there is a search for premises for the future centres as one of overall
project objectives is sustainability of the centres.

Young people: new horizons!
The youth of the Association of Parents of Disabled Children is becoming more active in public life of the country, and has also achieved some successes in education. In June this year Seinep Dyikanbaeva, project and PR manager of ARDI, has been named one of the first New Heroes of Kyrgyzstan for the positive contribution to the development of our society, a nomination organised by NGO “Atool” (Karakol). More detailed information can be found at: http://www.atuul.kg/?pid=19&hid=3. In addition, recently Seinep, a first year student of the American University in the Central Asia, has passed through a rigid competitive selection for a year training in Japan, sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA).

Ukei Muratalieva, another active young volunteer of ARDI, a student of the Kyrgyz Technical University, has been chosen together with other two Kyrgyz citizens for another training program on leadership and building networks, also sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA). She leaves for a month for Tokyo to learn how to train and at the same time to learn how local disabled people live and the organisations of disabled people work. After returning home she will conduct a series of trainings and seminars.
Best wishes to them!

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President signed the Law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
President of the Kyrgyz Republic has signed the law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”.

This law aims to improve social protection of persons with disabilities, provide them with equal with other citizens of the Kyrgyz Republic possibilities to practice their rights and freedoms, avoid restrictions in their lives.
Source: 24.kg, 12 April 2008

UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The General Assembly of the United Nations in the beginning of June, 2008 approved the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. It became the first universal international legal document aiming to protect the rights of persons with various kinds of permanent physical, mental, intellectual or sensor limitations. The convention contains 50 articles that protect and encourage the rights of the disabled, decrease discrimination towards them, provide them with rights to work, health services, education and full participation in society life, and also access to justice, inviolability of person, freedom from exploitation and abuse, and freedom of movement.
Source: 24.kg, 16 June 2008

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The new law about social order accepted
The law accepted in the second reading on 5th June this year intends to involve non-commercial organisations in realisation of government social programs through placing on a competitive basis and implementation the government social orders. This will also allow the government to essentially increase the efficiency of implementation of social programs and to involve in social sphere additional human, material and financial resources from non-government sources and it will partially reduce dependence of the non-governmental organisations on foreign funding.

The Minister of labour and social development of the Kyrgyz Republic Uktomkhan Abdullaeva supporting the law, underlined that “now in Kyrgyzstan, some social establishments, children’s homes, boarding schools, houses for aged people opened by the donor funding and the international organisations are on the verge of closing because of the termination of their financing by the foreign organisations. So why can’t we support the efforts of non-governmental organisations and public associations which will render social services to the
population and care for certain number of the aged, homeless children or the disabled who cannot be accommodated in the formal establishments now since there are no places or shortage of funds?”.

Similar laws has been successfully working for a long time in the countries of Europe, in Kazakhstan and 6 federal areas of Russia. Source:
Source: “The third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for people with disabilities
“The Japanese agency for international cooperation (JICA) plans to open in Kyrgyzstan a centre for people with disabilities”, – informed today at a press conference Uktomkhan Abdullaeva, the Minister of labour and social development of KR. According to her, there is the Asian-Pacific centre on problems of the disabled located in Japan. It is going to expand its activities in Central Asia. “After a working visit by Kyrgyz delegation to Japan it decided to open a head office in Kyrgyzstan for the countries of CA. It will bring to the republic additional investments. After the discussion of details of opening of the centre in October 2008 an international conference will take place in which well-known people with disabilities will take part”, – says Uktomkhan Abdullaeva.

As Minister of labour and social development KP emphasizes, such decision was affected by the new law “About the rights and guarantees of people with disabilities” recently passed by the government. “We have excluded articles from it that this category of people cannot work. Their number in workforce should make not less than 5 percent”, – said Uktomhan Abdullaeva.
Source: 24.kg, 22.05.08

Projects on employment for disabled people
We have to break the stereotype that disabled people are defective, said Edward Vinter, the executive director of Eurasia Foundation in Central Asia (EFCA). According to his words, disabled people in Kyrgyzstan are especially vulnerable group of population as being full members of society they simply cannot get a job. Many businessmen, in his opinion, are just confident that the disabled cannot work properly. In this regard, there are now some projects in Kyrgyzstan aiming to render assistance to disabled people in work search. In particular, the Eurasia Foundation in CA together with the Republican independent association of disabled women has
started cooperation with businesses of Bishkek and their management in granting workplaces for disabled people. There will also be a vacancy fair in Bishkek for people with disabilities.

Besides that, today the World Bank and EFCA declared winners of the Program of small grants of 2008 in Kyrgyzstan. “It is intended for the local organisations of a civil society. For 1996-2007 we have given out 121 small grants for a total sum of $315 thousand”, – said the chief executive of Fund Eurasia in the Central Asia Edward Vinter. Thirteen organisations have become winners.
Source: 24.kg

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The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
The Minister of Education and Science Ishenkul Boldzhurova presented a law providing such a grant recently at a committee meeting on international affairs and inter-parliamentary communications of the parliament of KR. She said, that in 2005 the ministry of education and science requested the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to support children with disabilities. “This project is supported by the Japanese Fund on reduction of poverty which will allocate $1 million, $50 thousands are provided by our government”, – added Ishenkul Boldzhurova.

The minister informed, that in the republic there are now about 19 thousand disabled children of which 250 children study at comprehensive schools in KR, in addition three thousand children study at the special boarding schools.

Ishenkul Boldzhurova noted that grant money will go on preparation of methodical manuals for schools and future teachers for training children with disabilities. According to her, for implementing the future project 35 comprehensive schools all over the country have already been selected – 5 in each region of the country, and also four boarding schools (internats) and two kindergartens.
Source: 24.kg, 15.04.2008

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Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Thanks to allocated 50 holiday vouchers by the Kyrgyzstan Federation of Trade unions the Association of Parents of Disabled Children organised on 4 – 25 July holiday for members of the Association, including 50 children ith special needs. Children’s recreational centre “Ulan” located near Balykchy accommodated them, and under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund transportation expenses for all children have been covered.

The recreational centre can accommodate about 250 people. Besides swimming on lake, there were joint cultural events organised for children, which promoted integration of disabled children with other children, and also promoted tolerance among their peers.

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Grants
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) (Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan) on behalf of the Canadian Foundation announces call for applications for small grants program for Central Asia.

The main areas: poverty reduction, sustainable development, increase participation of women, protection the children’s rights, capacity building for organisations, environment.

The maximum size of a grant is $20,000. The general grant pool is $50,000.

Projects should be short-term ending and presenting a financial report until 1st March 2009. For additional information please write to Anna Zhugan on: Anna. Zhugan@international.gc.ca

Bradley Foundation contests
Bradley Foundation supports: conducting annual events, holding conferences and seminars, purchasing equipment, general support, training, investments related to a project, publications, researches, stipends, development of educational programs.

Applications accepted: 1 March, 1 July, 1 September, 1 December each year.

The size of a grant: from $100 up to $550,000.

Priority areas of support: development of civic sense – projects can be aimed at any sphere of public life (economy, politics, culture, civil society), but they should advance citizenship to the bottom idea of elections and vote. For example, these can be projects showing increased public participation, political or academic research, media projects and others. Building projects and individuals are not financed.

Application procedure can be found at the Fund’s site. Results of selection appear in February, May-June, September and November, depending on application submission. More information can be found at: http://www.bradleyfdn.org/
Source: “the Third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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Volunteer Opportunities in International Disability Field

Posted on 21 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Jobs & Internships, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Volunteer Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Please note that a wide range of short- and long-term volunteer opportunities are listed below. Some offer a limited salary; some do not, but cover expenses related to volunteering. Posts range from 4 to 18 months. People seeking volunteer opportunities should read carefully to understand the qualifications for each individual position, the relevant deadline, and how to apply. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to the organization sponsoring the opportunity, NOT to We Can Do.

Project Officer, Solomon Islands; Assistant Coordinator, Solomon Islands
Handicap International Positions: Background on Handicap International
Project Manager in Rehabilitation, in Herat, Afghanistan
Disaster Risk Reduction Project Manager, Uzbekistan
Disability Expert–Trainer, Uzbekistan
Physiotherapist Supervisor in Amman, Jordan
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Project Officer (Services for Visually Impaired and Blind Unit) – Ministry of Health and Medical Services – Solomon Islands
An incredible opportunity to develop programs to improve services for people who are blind and visually impaired and promote an inclusive society.

Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) department of the Ministry of Health and Medical Services in Honiara promotes independence, rehabilitation, equalisation of opportunities and inclusion for all people with disabilities.

The Services for Visually Impaired and Blind unit seeks a Project Officer to assess the services being provided by CBR and develop new programs that will improve services for people who are blind and visually impaired.

To be considered for this 18 month assignment starting in January 2009 you will have:

· Qualifications in Social Welfare and/or Education
· Extensive experience in a similar field
· Strong program development skills
· Good management experience

Experience delivering programs and services to people who are vision impaired is highly desirable.

The Ministry Of Health and Medical Services is also seeking a suitably experienced Assistant Coordinator to work with the National Coordinator and to provide technical support to the rurally based Rehabilitation Aides. This will involve the introduction of a reporting system and various training functions that need to be refreshed or created.

The successful applicant will be able to demonstrate significant work experience in this sector along with management and training experience.

You will be supported by Australian Volunteers International with airfares, accommodation, briefing and orientation, health and travel insurance, living allowance and ongoing support throughout the assignment.

For full assignment descriptions or to apply for these positions, please visit www.australianvolunteers.com/work
or contact Erika Drury on +61 3 9279 1729 or e-mail edrury@australianvolunteers.com

Applications close 31st August 2008

Source:  Erika Drury, Recruitment Consultant, Australian Volunteers International

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Handicap International Positions:
Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability.  Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, offering them assistance and supporting them in their efforts to become self-reliant. Since its creation, the organisation has set up programmes in approximately 60 countries and intervened in many emergency situations. It has a network of eight national associations (Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA) which provide human and financial resources, manages projects and raises awareness of Handicap International’s actions and campaigns.

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Project Manager in Rehabilitation, Heart, Afghanistan, 6 months to 1 year
Job context :

Being present in Afghanistan since 1996 with a comprehensive approach to respond to the needs of persons with disability and to participate in the reconstruction of the Afghan Health System, Handicap International holds an important geographic position in Afghanistan, implementing inclusion as well as physical rehabilitation projects in the provinces of Kabul, Herat and Kandahar and
 
Job description  :

At regional level, the expatriate would work mainly in Herat to improve the technical abilities of the physiotherapists in the Herat Regional Hospital and in the outreach program run by HI. The 7 physiotherapists working for health public system have received technical, financial and management support since 2003.  HI currently employes 5 physiotherapists plus one as technical assistant.  In regards to technical skills, the main problem is the gap of skills within the team. Clinical reasoning, assessment-reassessment skills and the range of treatment options have to be generally improved.

The project manager would provide consultation on management aspects for the new physiotherapy Centre recently build together with the burn unit in the hospital which is in the process of being handed over to the head of the physiotherapy centre.

S/he would also consult on technical and management aspects the outreach physiotherapy service. HI has also committed to supporting the government’s plan to mainstream disability services within healthcare through Basic Package of Health Services and as such is working with
several NGOs to provide training, screening or direct physiotherapy in certain districts around Herat province.

Beside, the project manager will have to participate to the development of the handover strategies for both rehabilitation projects.

Post constraints :

Security: Afghanistan remains in a post-conflict situation. Kabul and Herat cities are currently stable but there are security constraints especially for women. Outside of Herat city, security is relatively stable compared to the rest of Afghanistan. Travel to Kandahar is especially subject to review of the security situation because it is less stable.

Housing : the person usually shares a house with the other expatriates from HI

Isolation : reliable Internet access and satellite TV

Profile sought :

3 years practical experience in a variety of areas of physiotherapy; experience in teaching and training of physiotherapists, preferably in a developing country

Comprehensive understanding of capacity building issues

Ability to plan own work and manage conflicting priorities;

Good communication (spoken and written) skills, including the ability to draft/edit a variety of written reports and to articulate ideas in a clear, concise style; Good computer skills (Excel …)  

Extremely flexible

Languages : English essential, French an advantage

 Remuneration : Volunteer or salaried status based on experience

Volunteer : 750 or 850€ + allowance, accommodation, medical coverage and insurance

Salaried : 2000 € to 2300 € monthly gross salary + benefits 

Length of Mission : 6 months to 1 year

Start date : 1/09/08 (September 1, 2008)

Closing date for applications: ASAP

For more information, refer to website : www.handicap-international.org

Please send cover letter and resume preferably by e-mail, with as object the ref. :  HS/READHRTAFG

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A Disaster Risk Reduction Project Manager, Uzbekistan, 15 months
Job context :

The project establishment is based on mainstreaming disability issues in Disaster Risk Reduction planning. Disabled People Organizations (DPOs) are the first key partners to mainstream disability issues to DIPECHO partners further to training and working group organized with HI..

DIPECHO partners are the partners that throught their DRR project will mainstream Disability issues within the community further to training and sensitization provided by the DPOs and material published.

The Location for the implementation of the activities are in Tachkent and in Fergana Valley

Duties :

The Project Manager will have to set up and manage the project called : Mainstreaning of Disability issues into Disaster Risk Reduction Planning funding by ECHO.(DIPECHO).

Under the supmpervidion of the Uzbekistan Coordinator, the Project Manager will be supported and will line manage a Disability expert for a period of 6 months.

He/She will line managed a Project Assistant Translator

The PM is responsible for :

PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION

1/ setting up of a DPOs working group with the support of the Disability Expert

2/ The coordination of the training cycle

3/ In link with the Disability Expert, overall coordination  of a survey on ‘Disability confidence’ among DIPECHO DRR trainers for the purpose to measure the ” impact” of the trainings in DRR plan.implementation

4/ monitoring into the community of disability issues in the DRR plan set up

5/ the setting up by DIPECHO partners in 2 institution for children with disabilities of a comprehensive disaster preparedness plan

6/ ensure efficient and fruitfull collaboration with all project partners, in strong link with the Country coordinator.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

1/ Ensure the respect of the commitments of expenditure as defined by
the Head Office

2/Responsible of the budget for the activities ( Budget follow up, cash
forecast,)

TEAM MANAGEMENT

Management of a Project Assistant Translator and of a Disability Expert
(6 months contract)

REPORTING

1/ Prepare  montly report on project implementation (activities,
indicators, partners elationships,..)

2/ Prepare narrative ECHO report ( intermediary and final)

Profile sought :

Diploma in Occupational Therapy or economic, social or management degree.

Essential competencies :

Strong Project Management skills

Diplomatie, public relation

Experience in working in partnership and to develop network

Knowledge of Disaster Risk reduction and of Disability

Desirable competencies or competencies to be acquired :

Monitoring and evaluation

Budget management

Previous experience in central Asia

Previous experience with HI

Languages : English and Russian

Conditions : Volunteer or salaried status, according to experience
Volunteer status : 750 or 850 euros per month according to experience+
benefits

Salaried status : 2100 to 2400 euros per month according to experience
+ benefits

Length of mission : 15 month

Start date :  01 October 2008

Closing date for application : 15th September 2008

Please send CV and covering letter asap to : Ref. PMDRRUzbek

Handicap International
14, avenue Berthelot
69361 LYON CEDEX 07
Or by email:  recrut11@handicap-international.org

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Disability Expert – Trainer, Uzbekistan, 6 months

Job context :

The project establishment is based on mainstreaming disability issues
in Disaster Risk Reduction planning. Disabled People Organizations
(DPOs) are the first key partners to mainstream disability issues to
DIPECHO partners further to training and working group organized with
HI..

DIPECHO partners are the partners that throught their DRR project will mainstream Disability issues within the community further to training and sensitization provided by the DPOs and material published.

The Location for the implementation of the activities are in Tachkent and in Fergana Valley

Duties :

The stake of this post is to provide the technical expertise and
trainings on disability issues to DPOs and DIPECHO partners in order
that the communities are sensitized and include disability issues in
their Disaster Risk Reduction plan.

The Disability Expert will have to support the DPOs to mainstream
Disability issues into Disaster Risk Reduction plan from DIPECHO
partners

Objectives :

1/ Provide expertise and facilitate within the DPOs working group to

2/ Organize a training for 30 trainers of trainers ( members of DPOs)
on inclusive DRR:

3/ Mentor the Trainers of Trainers  and provide guidance in their first
trainings implementation to DIPECHO partners trainers.

4/Design the framework of a survey to carry out on ‘Disability
confidence’ among DIPECHO DRR trainers for the purpose to measure the ”
impact” of the trainings in DRR plan.implementation:.(Survey carried
out with trained and not trained trainers on Disability issues)

5/ Provide support to the DRR Project Manager whenn needed, notably on
monitoring and evaluation issues.

6/ Other tasks could be added according to the needs of the project and
the program.

Profile sought :

Occupational therapist or physiotherapist, or social degree

Essential competencies :

Strong training skills

Knowledge of Disaster Risk reduction

Wide understanding of Disability issue

Desirable competencies or competencies to be acquired :

Autonomy

Previous experience with HI

Experience in working with partner

Languages : English and Russian

Conditions : Volunteer or salaried status, according to experience

Volunteer status : 750 or 850 euros per month according to experience+
benefits

Salaried status : 1900 to 2200 euros per month according to experience + benefits

Length of mission : 15 month

Start date : 01 November 2008

Closing date for application : 15th September 2008

 Please send CV and covering letter asap to : Ref. DETDRRUzbek

Handicap International
14, avenue Berthelot
69361 LYON CEDEX 07
Or by email:  recrut11@handicap-international.org

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Physiotherapist Supervisor, Amman, Jordan, 4 months

Job context :

A surgery programme has been opened by MSF in August 2006 in Amman, targeting Iraqi war victims in need of reconstructive surgery. In order to strengthen physiotherapy as a crucial aspect of care, HI was requested to set up a proper physiotherapy section.

A physiotherapist advisor has been working since November 2007, acting as a supervisor for the physiotherapy team, made of 3 Jordanian physiotherapists. Some lacks in the skills and the general rehabilitation approach have been identified and now need to be addressed.

The physiotherapist supervisor will act both as a supervisor for the 3 physiotherapists and as an on-the-job trainer.

Duties :

Under the responsibility of the Head of Mission, the physiotherapist
supervisor will be in charge of :

–          providing technical training to  physiotherapy staff

–          improving the referral system for patients

–          reinforcing collaboration with surgeons

–          optimizing data collection

Particularities of the post :

Short-term mission.

Profile sought :

Recognized qualification in Physiotherapy essential ; additional
background in Education, Public Health or other relevant fields
desirable.

An experience in a developing country would be an advantage.

 Essential recruitment criteria :

–          Experience as physiotherapist (at least 3 years)

–          Experience in orthopaedic complex cases management

–          Experience in physiotherapy teaching and on-the-job training

–          networking and communication skills (spoken and written)

Desirable competencies or competencies to be acquired :

–          Experience in a developing country is an advantage;

–          Computer skills (Pack Office, Internet etc…)

Languages :

Excellent written and spoken English, Arabic is a plus

Conditions :

Volunteer or salaried status, according to experience

Volunteer status : 750 or 850€ + allowance, accommodation, medical
coverage and insurance

Salaried status : 1800 to 2200€ monthly gross salary + benefits

Length of mission : 4 months

Start date : September 2008

Closing date for applications : 31st August 2008

Please send CV and covering letter asap to : Ref. NC/READJord

Handicap International
14, avenue Berthelot
69361 LYON CEDEX 07
Or by email:  recrut07@handicap-international.org

 Source:  Marly Revuelta, Assistante GRH Programme, Handicap International

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Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for circulating these listings via email.

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REPORT: Personal Mobility, Accessibility for Disabled People in South East Europe

Posted on 20 August 2008. Filed under: Blind, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, Mobility Impariments, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Countries that have chosen to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) are now required to protect the right of people with disabilities to personal mobility; and to an accessible environment. But disabled people in the South-Eastern countries of Europe, such as Kosovo, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia, Albania, Croatia, and Hungary, are often denied the right simply to move from one place to another on the same basis as other people in their society. They lack mobility aids such as prosthestic devices, wheelchairs, and crutches; public buildings, and even their own homes, are not accessible to them; and neither is public transportation.

People who wish to learn more about the conditions that limit the mobility of people with disabilities in South East Europe–and what can be done to improve their situation–can consult a report entitled “Free movement of people with disabilities in south east Europe: an inaccessible right?” (PDF format, 1 Mb) This report addresses the mobility and accessibility needs of people with mobility impairments; people who are blind or have vision impairments; people with intellectual disabilities; and deaf people. The 124-page report was published by Handicap International in 2006.

The first part of the report discusses the current situation, and barriers, faced by people with various disabilities in South East Europe. The second part describes good practices that have successfully made the environment more accessible for people with disabilities throughout the region. The third part discusses the importance of awareness raising; the laws and policies needed to improve the situation; the need for training in universal design; and the importance of including people with disabilities in planning all new construction. The report closes with a series of recommendations.

The full report can be downloaded for free in
http://www.disabilitymonitor-see.org/documents/dmi2_eng/dmrII_webeng.pdf

People interested in creating accessible environments, and in the principles of universal design, may also be interested in learning about a free, on-line book on Universal Design and Visitability.



We Can Do learned about this report by exploring the newest resources to be posted at the AskSource.info database on disability issues; health issues; and development.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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New Website Links Parents of Disabled Children to Information, Resources

Posted on 14 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Resources, South Asian Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

June 27, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Julie Holmquist 952-838-9000

julie.holmquist@PACER.org

New PACER Web site offers information, resources for children with disabilities and their parents across the globe

Parents of children with disabilities living in India, Uzbekistan and across the globe can find a new resource on the Internet.

A new PACER Web site (www.PACER.org/international) acts as a link to resources, organizations, program ideas and practices that can improve the lives of children with disabilities.

The site was recently launched by the nonprofit PACER Center, a National Parent Center for families of children with disabilities located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.

The Web site provides information on the history of disability rights in the United States, as well as a list of links to resources and organizations in the U.S.A. and other countries that focus on helping children with disabilities.

The idea for the site developed from PACER’s collaboration with professionals and government officials in India. This special connection with India began in 2005 when PACER Executive Director Paula Goldberg visited families in India, met with government officials and toured programs for children with disabilities.

Since that time, PACER has co-sponsored India’s first National Conference on technology for children and adults with disabilities, along with India’s National Institute for the Mentally andicapped. PACER has also supported the creation of a new center on assistive technology for children and adults, scheduled to open September 13 at the Spastics Society of Karnatka(SSK) in Bangalore, India.

Creating a Web site was a way to exchange even more information, Goldberg says. Because of PACER’s close ties with India, the site has a wealth of information about disability organizations and laws in that country. In the future, Goldberg says PACER hopes to expand the amount of resources on the Web site specific to other countries.

PACER has a global reputation for helping families of children with disabilities. More than 130 guests from 15 foreign countries have visited PACER in recent years, and in 2007, PACER staff made presentations on disability issues during a satellite conference with Uzbekistan disability leaders. The conference was hosted by the U.S. Embassy.

“We’ve hosted many international guests at PACER who are eager to find additional resources for children with disabilities,” said Shauna McDonald, PACER’s director of community resource development. “The Web site is another way to collaborate and work toward the goal of improving the lives of children with disabilities around the world.”

PACER Center is a National Parent Center for families of children and youth with any disability or special health need. PACER is located at 8161 Normandale Blvd., Minneapolis, MN 55437-1044. For information, call 952-838-9000 (voice); 952-838-0190 (TTY) or 888-248-0822 (toll-free). PACER’s Web site is www.PACER.org and its e-mail address is PACER@PACER.org



This announcement was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

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RESOURCE: Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Children, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Less than a decade ago, more than 100 million primary-school aged children still had never entered a classroom. Today, that number has dropped below 80 million, even though the world’s population has grown in that time. Clearly progress has been made. But children with disabilities are being left behind: one-third of the world’s children out of school are disabled. Many of the rest are excluded for other reasons that pose their own set of challenges: some are left behind because they are girls; or because they don’t speak the dominant language of their country; or because they experience discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity.

How can Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and other Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) help schools in their country be more inclusive of students who have commonly been excluded? Save the Children UK has released a new report that offers guidance: “Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience” (PDF format, 4.14 Mb). This report describes successful projects, and the lessons learned, from countries as diverse as Vietnam, Kyrgyzstan, Peru, Bangladesh, China, Somalia, Brazil, Western Balkans, Mongolia, Nepal, Tajikistan, Serbia, India, and Morocco. Children with disabilities are targeted for many of these projects.

The report begins by describing both the conditions that prevent inclusive education and the conditions that can help make it possible. It also analyzes projects that have made it possible for linguistic minority students–and Deaf students–to obtain a bilingual education. Teacher training programs have helped encourage teachers to create more inclusive classrooms for children with disabilities and other students who have historically been excluded. Several countries have used Community-based Education Management Information Systems (C-EMIS) to draw upon the knowledge and motivation of local community members in making education more inclusive. Each chapter ends by discussing what lessons other communities in other countries may find helpful in implementing their own projects.

Advocates who tire of hearing governments complain there isn’t enough money will especially wish to read the 6th chapter on “Addressing financial barriers to inclusive education.” Funding issues are also discussed briefly throughout earlier chapters of Making Schools Inclusive (PDF format, 4.14 Mb).

The 8th chapter points readers to further materials and resources that may be helpful to them in advocating for more inclusive education in their countries.

The full 64-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (4.14 Mb) at http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Making%20schools%20inclusive%20SCUK.pdf.



We Can Do learned of this report through an announcement posted on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. The discussion group is devoted to issues relating to inclusive education in Eastern Africa.

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NEWS: International Coalition Launches Groundbreaking Disability Rights Fund

Posted on 2 April 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

PRESS RELEASE

International Coalition Launches Groundbreaking Disability Rights Fund
MARCH 31, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Diana Samarasan, Director
Telephone: 617-261-4593
Email: dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org

BOSTON, MA – The Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, the United Kingdom Department for International Development, and an anonymous donor today announced a groundbreaking collaborative to support the human rights for people with disabilities.

Launched on the first anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD), the Disability Rights Fund will provide financial support for human rights advocacy in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union. The broad objective of the Fund will be to empower disabled persons organizations around the world to effectively implement and monitor the CPRD. The Fund is a project of Tides.

“The Fund is a unique partnership among donors and the worldwide disability community,” said Emily Martinez, Director of Special Initiatives at the Open Society Institute. “It will directly support the human rights work of disabled persons organizations in the developing world.”

The CRPD recognizes that self-representation is essential to the enjoyment of human rights. It underscores the importance of including people with disabilities in the development of disability law, policies and programs. Through its unique governance structure, the Disability Rights Fund incorporates this principle.

A global advisory panel, made up of 12 individuals, most of whom are persons with disabilities, will provide recommendations on grantmaking strategies for the Fund; four of the Panel members will also serve on the Fund’s grantmaking decision body. The members of the panel come from five continents and reflect a broad cross-section of the disability community. The majority were nominated by international and regional disabled persons organizations.

The structure of the Fund not only reflects the international disability community’s slogan, “Nothing About Us Without Us,” it also reflects a growing trend within the grantmaking community to better listen to the communities they seek to serve and to redefine the relationship between grantmaker and grantee in the interest of more effective grantmaking.

Grants disbursed by the Disability Rights Fund will be centered on three major areas: increasing the participation of persons with disabilities in their communities through trainings and networking opportunities; developing awareness of the CPRD among stakeholders; and supporting advocacy projects that promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights by persons with disabilities. The Fund expects to make its first grants in late spring/early summer 2008.

“The broad, international support for the Disability Rights Fund is a remarkable characteristic of this grantmaking enterprise. It is our hope that this diversity in funding sources will expand as the Fund develops,” said Diana Samarasan, Director of the Fund.

####



Thank you to Diana Samarasan for sending this press release to We Can Do.

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VOLUNTEER OP with Albanian Ntl Assn of the Deaf

Posted on 28 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, Opportunities, Volunteer Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Please note that the application deadline is March 14, 2008, for this volunteer opportunity scheduled for March 31 to April 25, 2008 (negotiable) in Albania.

ALBANIAN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THE DEAF
VOLUNTEERS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME TRAINING

BACKGROUND

Organizational Name

Albanian National Association of the Deaf (ANAD)
Street Address
Bulevardi “Zhan D’Ark”, Kulla 4, Shkalla 1, Ap. 9,
Tirana, Albania

Postal Address

P.O.Box: 2401/1
Tirane, Albania

Email Addresses

anad@abissnet.com.al

anad.organisation@gmail.com

Contact Person(s)

Eduard Ajas, Manager anad.organisation@gmail.com

Project Home Coordinator

Ms Inkeri Lahtinen inkeri.lahtinen@kl-deafl.fi

The Finnish Association of the Deaf, FAD

ANAD GOALS
The goals of the Albanian National Association of the Deaf (ANAD) are as follows:

  1. To achieve equal opportunities and full participation in Society for people who are Deaf in accordance with the principles and objectives of the United Nations Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other general acts and recommendations of the United Nations Organisation and its specialised agencies.
  2. To become and remain an ordinary member of the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) and to operate in accordance with its principles and objectives.
  3. To ensure that Albanian Government observes all international and national declarations, recommendations on human rights and rights of Deaf people and people with other disabilities.
  4. To promote the creation and development of Provincial Clubs of Deaf people and organisations providing services to Deaf people where such organisations do not already exist in the Republic of Albania.
  5. To promote the unification of Provincial Clubs for Deaf people in the Republic of Albania.
  6. To organise and stimulate the exchange of information and experiences among organisations of and for Deaf people and among professionals specialising in the study of deafness in the Republic of Albania.
  7. To provide advice, assistance and support either directly or indirectly to organisations of and for Deaf people, upon their request whenever appropriate, in the Republic of Albania.
  8. To distribute relevant information about deafness and the current needs of Deaf people through a variety of media and to the government of the Republic of Albania.
  9. To promote the conduct of research and studies in all fields of deafness, including the Albanian Deaf Community, its language and culture
  10. .

  11. To promote the establishment, development and maintenance of education programmes and support services which recognise the specific requirements of Deaf children and adults.
  12. To ensure adequate funding of services for Deaf people by governments and/or other relevant institutions and agencies.
  13. To promote the recognition and acceptance of methods of communication preferred by Deaf people in the Republic of Albania.
  14. To encourage the development and availability of appropriate technology for Deaf people in the Republic of Albania.
  15. To provide a forum where Deaf people can come together as equals to learn about and discuss relevant issues and express their ideas and aspirations in the Republic of Albania.
  16. To foster pride in the Deaf Community, its language and culture.

DESCRIPTION OF THE VOLUNTEERS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

Brief Summary

The Albanian National Association of the Deaf has initiated seven years ago the Organisational Development Project and afterward the association has implemented other projects such as Albanian Sign Language Research; Advocacy Project, Deaf women development; Interpreters Training Project and Albanian Sign Language News Training program. During all this time and through the above mentioned projects the organisation has developed local Deaf staff and members’ skills in organisational management, advocacy, and sign language research by conducting continuous training to them.

The entire mentioned program has been funded by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland and has been implemented in close partnership with the Finnish Association of the Deaf.

In this moment the Albanian National Association of the Deaf needs to transfer the knowledge’s and skills of its staff to other Deaf community members for being able to secure and build up local capacities for a long term management of the association.

For this reason supported by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland ANAD would like to conduct four week training with ANAD Manager and Sign Language and Advocacy Assistants on how to create a group of volunteers and how to work with them on transferring the knowledge of ANAD staff and raising the capacities and skills of the volunteers.

ANAD is seeking for a Deaf adviser from Europe that has a good knowledge and experience in the environment of organisational management and volunteers training and work. The aim of the training is to work with ANAD staff on designing a training program, selecting volunteers for the programme, and supervise the online training sessions.

Duration of Assignment:

A total time of four weeks in March –April 2008

Monday, 31st March 2008 – Friday, 25th April 2008 (negotiable)

The Terms of reference

The ANAD Deaf Adviser for Volunteers Development program will be responsible:

a) To create together with ANAD the selection criteria for the volunteers and guide the actual selection process

b) To create together with ANAD the training programme i.e. guidelines of how to train the volunteers including the training contents i.e what skills, topics need be transferred

c) To guide and supervise each staff member’s training sessions with volunteers in the start in order to ensure that the transfer of capacities do take place

Qualifications:

Essential requirements:
Proven experience and skills in Deaf organisational development training, community training, volunteer training;
Proven good skills in intercultural relations;
Group dynamics;

Desirable requirements:

Experience of working abroad in foreign settings/environments

Assignment Contract

ANAD will prepare a contract for the adviser including compensation of:

Travel Expenses:
ANAD will pay for an economy class travel between the adviser’s home city and the city of Tirana by using the most economic carrier; visa and passport charges; and airport tax will be covered by the project.

Accommodation:
ANAD will provide with accommodation during the assignment period. The adviser will share an apartment with electricity, heating and warm water

Financial Benefits:
The Adviser is responsible for the payments of taxes and social security including Adviser’s pension and travel insurance for the trip.

Assignment Fee:
The applicants are asked to send ANAD their propositions for fee calculated for the entire period of three weeks. The fee request need be announced as a total payment as the candidates are responsible for the payments of any taxes, social security or pension payments of their home country. Please, do note that ANAD is an organization with very limited funding and relies on voluntary assistance. As a result ANAD is incapable of offering payments on the level of the European consultancy fees.

APPLICATION

ANAD welcomes anyone who wishes to apply for the position of Deaf Adviser from Europe for Volunteers Development Program.

Please submit a letter with following information of your reason(s) for applying, contact details, Curriculum Vitae and three professional referees (At least one from National Association of the Deaf)

Please send your application to:

Ms Albana Izeti
Project Co-ordinator
Albanian National Association of the Deaf
P.O.Box: 2401/1
Tirane, Albania

Email Addresses:

anad@abissnet.com.al
anad.organisation@gmail.com

Ms Inkeri Lahtinen
Project Home Coordinator
The Finnish Association of the Deaf, FAD
inkeri.lahtinen@kl-deafl.fi

CLOSING DATE OF APPLICATION: FRIDAY, 14th MARCH 2008



This announcement was circulated on the Intl-Dev listserv, which circulates information of interest to people in the field of international development.

Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere else, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people.

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PUBLICATION: Feb Issue UN Enable Newsletter

Posted on 28 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The second monthly issue of United Nation’s Enable Newsletter has now been released. The initial launch of this newsletter was announced at We Can Do last month.

A sampling of headlines for the February issue is listed below, except that I have modified them to spell out most acronyms. To read the full stories (usually one or two paragraphs each), consult the February issue of the Enable Newsletter at http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=312

  • UN Commission Renews Mandate for Special Rapporteur and Agrees on Mainstreaming Disability in Development.
  • United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator Makes New Commitment to Disability
  • World Bank and Organizaiton for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Conduct Joint Effort for the Achievement of Millennium Development Goals 2 & 3. [We Can Do note, for those new to international development: the Millennium Development Goals are a set of targets agreed upon by country governments and development agencies for reducing global poverty and improving global health; more information at http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/
  • World Bank Psycho-Social Listserv is Open for Sign-Up at http://go.worldbank.org/SIP5GYWK00
  • International Labour Organization (ILO) to Produce Advocacy Kit on Decent Work for Persons with Disabilities
  • Ratification Talk in Serbia
  • Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Raises Awareness in the Maldives
  • Sharing Experiences on Best Practices in Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Services for Persons with Disabilities
  • Identifying Concrete Actions in Mozambique Towards Implementation of the Convention
  • Atlas: Global Resources for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities (Atlas-ID) (We Can Do note: The launch of this Atlas also was announced at We Can Do).
  • United Nations Information Center (UNIC) Moscow Hosts Discussion on Persons with Disabilities

The February issue of the Enable Newsletter also lists several publications and upcoming events. You can read the January or February issue for free. Or you can sign up for a free subscription to receive each month’s newsletter via email, for free. All available at:

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=312



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere else, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people.

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TRAINING: Short Human Rights Courses

Posted on 15 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People interested in taking courses on human rights may wish to consult a
recently updated page that lists more than 60 short courses and summer schools from 2008 to 2009. Some are very general introductions. Others are very specialized courses on indigenous peoples, discrimination, women’s rights, and more. Courses are available in locations around the world, including Africa, Europe, the Americas, Asia, and the Middle East. All these can be found at the humanrightstool.org web site.

Idowu Ajibade, from Nigeria, who did the hard work of updating this page. She has just joined Human Rights Tool’s small team of dedicated volunteers.

Some very interesting courses that Human Rights Tools would like to highlight:

1. CLOSING SOON: Monitoring economic, social and cultural rights. The Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies in Geneva (IHEID), in cooperation with HURIDOCS, is organizing a new course on monitoring and documenting economic, social and cultural rights. It will take place in Geneva, 5 – 9 May 2008. This exciting and much-needed course will be timed to match the second week of the ESC Committee, so you should be able to attend both with the same plane ticket! There are still a few slots for paying participants, but you must apply before 3 March 2008. http://www.huridocs.org/training/escr.

2. CLOSING SOON: Video advocacy course. The Video Advocacy Institute, the first of its kind, is an innovative program that trains human rights defenders to successfully integrate video advocacy into their social change campaigns. When: July 19 – August 2 2008, in Montreal, Canada. Application deadline is 2 March 2008. http://www.witness.org/vai

3. CLOSING SOON: Transitional justice francophone Rabat fellowship program. Transitional justice refers to a range of approaches that societies undertake to reckon with legacies of widespread or systematic human rights abuse as they move from a period of violent conflict or oppression towards peace and democracy. The International Center for Transitional Justice’s francophone Rabat fellowship program will be running from May 2nd to the 25th. It runs for 10 weeks and ICTJ takes in charge the full cost of participation of each participant (including the visa and airfare). Application deadline is 25 February 2008. http://www.ictj.org/en/workshops/fellowships/ottawa/index.html

4. Justice sector reform, Human rights fieldwork IHRN is organizing two courses. The first is entitled “Justice Sector Reform: Applying Human Rights Based Approaches” and will take place at the National University of Ireland, in Maynooth. The dates are from 16 to 20 June 2008, and the application deadline is 2 May 2008. http://www.ihrnetwork.org/new-justice-sector-reform.htm

The second IHRN course is entitled “Human Rights Fieldwork – Principles, Strategies and Skills” will be held in the same location, from 26 October to 2 November 2008. http://www.ihrnetwork.org/hr-fieldwork.htm

See the full listing of short courses and summer courses at:

http://www.humanrightstools.org/shortcourses.htm



We Can Do first found this listing on the Adhoc_IDC email list. People can join this email-based discussion group for the International Disability Caucus on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities for free.

This article is cross-posted at the RatifyNow web site with permission of We Can Do editor. RatifyNow is an organization working to maximize the number of countries that sign, ratify, and implement the international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).


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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (https://wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere OTHER THAN We Can Do, BlogAfrica, or RatifyNow, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people without their permission.

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TRAINING: International Summer School on Human Rights

Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

The Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights is organizing its 19th International Summer School on Human Rights. The School will be held in Warsaw-Miedzeszyn, Poland, between 21 and 28 June 2008.

The application deadline is February 20, 2008.

The School is intended for human rights activists, university teachers and representatives of the institutions from all levels of public administration dealing with human rights issues from Central, Eastern European and CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) countries.

This school is open only to those who have not previously participated in previous Helsinki Foundation Summer or Winter Schools. The program is open to university graduates or last-year university students. The program combines lectures and workshops on the historical and philosophical background of human rights, domestic and international systems of human rights protection as well as applicability of rights of primary importance. The primary languages used in the program will be English and Russian.

The school will offer placements to 65 students. For 35 of these students, the program will be free of charge, including travel expenses and room and board. However, the other 30 students will need to cover their own expenses.

If interested in this program, please go to the website about this program at

http://www.hfhrpol.waw.pl/news130-en.html

More detail about the program and how you can apply is provided at the above web site.



We Can Do learned about this program via the Disabled People International (DPI) electronic newsletter. Some of the text in this post is taken from the Helsinki Foundation web site.

This post is cross-posted at RatifyNow.org with permission of author. RatifyNow.org is an organization working to maximize the number of countries that sign, ratify, and implement the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).


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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (https://wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere OTHER THAN We Can Do, BlogAfrica, or RatifyNow, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people without their permission.

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NEWS: Kosovan People with Intellectual Disabilities Vote for First Time

Posted on 7 February 2008. Filed under: Cognitive Impairments, Democratic Participation, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This press release comes from Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI).

People with Intellectual Disabilities Vote for the First Time in Kosovo
Washington, DC – February 6, 2008

In an effort to build upon the self-advocacy movement of persons with disabilities in Kosovo, Kosovo Mental Disability Rights Initiative (K-MDRI) recently assisted “Ne Per Ne” peer support group members in fully understanding and participating in Kosovo’s historic winter elections to choose national and municipal assembly members and mayors. “Ne Per Ne,” which means “We for Ourselves,” is Eastern Europe’s largest peer support group for persons with intellectual disabilities, started by MDRI.

In preparation for Kosovo’s November elections, the peer support groups invited and welcomed representatives of the major political parties to discuss the importance of the elections, the work of the parties, and the issues that would affect them. Participants were able to ask questions of the candidates such as “what are you going to do regarding jobs for people with disabilities?”

For the first time in their lives, approximately 90% of the peer support group members voted in Kosovo’s elections.

My vote made a difference. I thought it wouldn’t count, but it obviously counted; I’m very happy MDRI helped me realize that.” – Avni (Kacaniku Peer Support Group)

I thought I couldn’t vote because I don’t know how to read; I didn’t know I could bring people with me who could help me.” – Laura (Peja Peer Support Group)

I would get so upset at my peers during the peer support group meetings when they would say that they don’t know how to go to the voting place; it’s very easy, think ahead and plan transportation before hand. I asked my father to take me and he was happy to do that. They could ask someone too – ‘I don’t know how’ is not a valid excuse.” – Gazi (Kamenica Peer Support Group)

Kosovo Mental Disability Rights Initiative (K-MDRI) is an initiative of Mental Disability Rights International as a result of our 2002 report, “Not on the Agenda: Human Rights of People with Mental Disabilities in Kosovo.” To find out more about the work in Kosovo or to read more about MDRI, please visit our website.

MDRI is an international human rights and advocacy organization dedicated to the full participation in society of people with mental disabilities worldwide. For more information, visit their website at www.mdri.org.



This press release was first distributed on the MDRI newsletter. You can receive this newsletter for free via email; sign up at http://visitor.constantcontact.com/email.jsp?m=1101730023584&lang=en.

This item also was distributed on the email list for RatifyNow.org, which also can be joined for free.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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NEWS: Azerbaijan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic sign CRPD

Posted on 17 January 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/yr26xf]

The countries of Azerbaijan and the Lao People’s Democratic Republic recently signed the international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Azerbaijan also signed the accompanying Optional Protocol for the CRPD. This brings the total number of signatories for the CRPD to 123 countries. Among these 123 countries, 69 have also signed the Optional Protocol.

The CRPD declares that all people with all types of disabilities must enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms. It clarifies the ways in which human rights apply to people with disabilities and it identifies areas in which adaptations must be made so that people with disabilities can effectively exercise those rights. Some examples of human rights covered by the CRPD includes: right to life, liberty, and security; freedom from exploitation, violence, and abuse; right to live in the community; freedom of expression and opinion; respect for privacy; right to education; right to health; right to work; and others.

If a disabled person feels their human rights under the CRPD have been violated, they can pursue justice within the usual channels within their own country. However, if all of these channels fail to bring redress, then people living in countries that have ratified the Optional Protocol can then bring complaints to the international Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Signing the CRPD and the Optional Protocol is the first step a country must take toward fully ratifying these treaties. Signing an international treaty, such as the CRPD, commits a country to avoid doing anything that would actively violate that treaty. However, merely signing a treaty does not, by itself, legally bind a country to obeying that treaty. Before a country can be legally obligated to follow a treaty, it must fully ratify it. Also, a treaty cannot take full legal force until and unless enough countries fully ratify (not just sign) the treaty. Twenty countries need to ratify the CRPD before it can take full legal force; 10 countries need to ratify the Optional Protocol before it, too, can take full legal force.

So far, 14 countries have ratified the CRPD and 8 countries have ratified the Optional Protocol. Countries ratifying the CRPD include: Bangladesh, Croatia, Cuba, El Salvador, Gabon, Hungary, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Namibia, Nicaragua, Panama, South Africa, and Spain. Countries ratifying the Optional Protocol include: Croatia, El Salvador, Hungary, Mexico, Namibia, Panama, South Africa, and Spain.

More information about the CRPD and the optional protocol is available at the UN Enable web site and at the RatifyNow web site. The RatifyNow web site also has resources that advocates can use to help persuade their country governments to both sign and also ratify the CRPD and Optional Protocol.



We Can Do learned about Azerbaijan and the Laos People’s Democratic Republic from the UN Enable web site. Information relating to the background of the CRPD and Optional protocol was also gathered from their web site, as well as the RatifyNow web site.

This article has been cross-posted, with slight modifications, both here and at the RatifyNow web site, with permission of author.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do.

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JOB POST (short term): Training for Sign Language News Program in Albania

Posted on 4 January 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Training for Albanian Sign Language News Programme

From: Colin Allen <colinja20@hotmail.com>
Subject: Training for Albanian Sign Language News Programme

Dear friends,

Albanian National Association is looking for the trainers (Deaf and Hearing) to provide a short term training for the Sign Language News Programme in Albania.

Please note the application closing date is on Friday, 14th January 2008.

Wish you a very joyful year!

Warm regards

Colin

Trainers:
ANAD is looking for two trainers to work as a team – one Deaf person and one sign language interpreter. The trainer team is jointly responsible for creating a training plan appropriate for the setting and for training of each specific target group

The Deaf Trainer shall be responsible to work with the team of Deaf News Presenters to prepare the news bulletin presentation from the written language to Albanian Sign Language. The Deaf News Presenter will be responsible to present the news in Albanian Sign Language. Before his/her presentation the Deaf presenter needs to work with the Sign Language Interpreter for better understanding of the given written material by the TV editors.

The Sign Language Interpreter shall be responsible to work with the team of Albanian Sign Language Interpreters to prepare the news bulletin presentation from the spoken language to Albanian Sign Language. The Sign language Interpreter will be responsible to work together with the Deaf presenter on the written news prepared and given by the News editors on Albanian Television.

Assignment Contract

ANAD will prepare a contract with each trainer including compensation of:

Travel Expenses:
ANAD will pay for an economy class travel between the trainer’s home city and the city of Tirana by using the most economic carrier; visa and passport charges; and airport tax will be covered by the project.

Accommodation:
ANAD will provide with accommodation during the assignment period. Trainers will share an apartment with electricity, heating and warm water.

Financial Benefits:
The Trainers are responsible for payment of taxes and social security including Trainer’s pension and travel insurance for the trip.

Assignment Fee:
The applicants are asked to send ANAD their propositions for fee calculated for the entire period of six weeks. The fee request need be announced as a total payment as the candidates are responsible for the payments of any taxes, social security or pension payments of their home country. Please note that ANAD is an organization with very limited funding and relies on voluntary assistance. As a result ANAD is incapable of offering payments on the level of the European consultancy fees.

BACKGROUND
Organizational Name
Albanian National Association of the Deaf (ANAD)

Street Address
Bulevardi “Zhan D’Ark”, Kulla 4, Shkalla 1, Ap. 9,
Tirana, Albania

Postal Address
P.O.Box: 2401/1
Tirane, Albania

Email Addresses
anad@abissnet.com.al
anad.organisation@gmail.com

Contact Person(s)
Eduard Ajas, Manager: anad.organisation@gmail.com

Albana Izeti Project Co-ordinator: albana.izeti@gmail.com

Project Consultant, Colin Allen: deafbalkan@hotmail.com

ANAD GOALS
The goals of the Albanian National Association of the Deaf (ANAD) are as follows:

  1. To achieve equal opportunities and full participation in Society for people who are Deaf in accordance with the principles and objectives of the United Nations Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other general acts and recommendations of the United Nations Organisation and its specialised agencies.
  2. To become and remain an ordinary member of the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) and to operate in accordance with its principles and objectives.
  3. To ensure that Albanian Government observes all international and national declarations, recommendations on human rights and rights of Deaf people and people with other disabilities.
  4. To promote the creation and development of Provincial Clubs of Deaf people and organisations providing services to Deaf people where such organisations do not already exist in the Republic of Albania.
  5. To promote the unification of Provincial Clubs for Deaf people in the Republic of Albania.
  6. To organise and stimulate the exchange of information and experiences among organisations of and for Deaf people and among professionals specialising in the study of deafness in the Republic of Albania.
  7. To provide advice, assistance and support either directly or indirectly to organisations of and for Deaf people, upon their request whenever appropriate, in the Republic of Albania.
  8. To distribute relevant information about deafness and the current needs of Deaf people through a variety of media and to the government of the Republic of Albania.
  9. To promote the conduct of research and studies in all fields of deafness, including the Albanian Deaf Community, its language and culture.
  10. To promote the establishment, development and maintenance of education programmes and support services which recognise the specific requirements of Deaf children and adults.
  11. To ensure adequate funding of services for Deaf people by governments and/or other relevant institutions and agencies.
  12. To promote the recognition and acceptance of methods of communication preferred by Deaf people in the Republic of Albania.
  13. To encourage the development and availability of appropriate technology for Deaf people in the Republic of Albania.
  14. To provide a forum where Deaf people can come together as equals to learn about and discuss relevant issues and express their ideas and aspirations in the Republic of Albania.
  15. To foster pride in the Deaf Community, its language and culture.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ALBANIAN SIGN LANGUAGE NEWS TRAINING PROGRAMME

Brief Summary
The Albanian National Association of the Deaf has initiated this project based on the big need of Albanian Deaf Community for access to information.

Lately The Albanian Government and the Albanian Public Television -TVSH have committed to introduce the News Edition in Albanian Sign Language during the peak hour. The signed language news will be a news bulletin of fifteen minutes during the weekdays.

The reading and writing skills of Deaf people in Albania are limited. There are a small number of Albanian Sign Language Interpreters who are currently receiving the training under the organisation’s Interpreter Training Programme.

ANAD secured a limited funding from the Finnish Association of the Deaf and the Ministry for Foreign Affairs in Finland to implement six week training. ANAD is seeking for two trainers’ one deaf and one hearing that have a good knowledge and experience in the environment of TV news bulletin in signed language.

After the training, ANAD is seeking to appoint preferably three teams consisting of a Deaf person and a sign language interpreter working together. The teams will rotate by presenting the 15-minute daily news bulletin for 5 days in a row.

Suggested Components of the Training:
The suggested training is outlined as follows:
Translation Process of the News Bulletin:
For Hearing Sign Language Interpreters:
The hearing sign language interpreter should work together with the Deaf presenter before the filming of the TV news and he/she will be responsible for translating the news bulletin prepared by the TV editors from the spoken language to the Albanian Sign Language for the Deaf presenter; different techniques of translation; the ways of news bulletin delivery; grammatical adaptations etc.

For Deaf News Presenters: The TV signed news will be signed by Deaf people after doing some practise on the given material. The Deaf people will need some training on how to sign the news bulletin from auto cue to the Albanian Sign Language; different techniques of translation; the ways of news bulletin delivery; grammatical adaptations etc.

Timing:
The time for presenting a news bulletin is radically limited; the News Sign Language Interpreters should know how to deliver the news bulletin in a well managed manner

Clothes:
Suitable outfit to contrast between clothes and hands, make –up etc.

Presentation:
Present a professional image role of the News Sign Language Interpreter on camera.

Please note: Both Deaf and hearing trainers are responsible to prepare a training component in their respective area.

The trainers will capacitate the News Bulletin Teams including the hearing camera crew on how to shoot the footage in appropriate angles so that the presentation in sign language is visually optimal for Deaf viewers. The capacitating includes technical advice on how to arrange appropriate sign language presentation during inserted news stories etc.

Time frame of the training
At least two weeks prior to the workshop, the Workshop Announcement shall be distributed to the members of the Albanian Deaf Community and the Interpreter Training Programme. The Announcement will seek for interested team members and it describes the selection process that will take place during the workshop. At the end of the workshop, a team of evaluators will review each participant and discuss the best candidates to be invited attend to the Intensive Training for at least two weeks.

The aim of the intensive training is to have at least 5-6 candidates from both Deaf and hearing target groups, i.e. maximum 12 persons to work in the Sign Language News program.

At the end of two weeks intensive training each team i.e. a working pair – a Deaf person and a sign language interpreter would need to prepare 15-minute news bulletin presentation for the evaluator team’s review. Out of the projected six candidate teams the evaluators would then select three teams to be appointed for the program work.
The selected three teams would need to attend a week of further training.

During the final training week, all teams need to have an opportunity to rehearse their presentations at the News Television Studio with the studio crew before the actual broadcasts start.

The proposed training plan:

Week One (28 January – 1 February 2008)

  • Arrival and preparation for the meetings with the Television Station, Project Co-ordinator and ANAD staff members
  • Workshop
  • Evaluation to select 6 Potential Deaf and 6 Potential Hearing people for the Intensive Training.

Week Two and Three (4 – 15 February 2008)

  • Intensive Training for two weeks (hours/days)

Suggested training hours:

Monday – Friday from 16.00 – 20.00

Saturday from 10.00 – 17.00

Week Four (18 – 22 February 2008)

  • Select three teams of Deaf person and Sign Language Interpreter to attend the further training.

Week Five (25 – 29 February 2008)

  • One week training at the Television News Station.

Week Six (3 -7 March 2008)

  • Final evaluation of the teams’ capacities and organizing of further training if necessary
  • Training Project Report

Commencement Date:

Monday, 28th January 2008 – Friday, 7th March 2008 negotiable

APPLICATION
ANAD welcomes anyone who wishes to apply for the position of Deaf Trainer and Sign Language Interpreting News Trainer.

Please, do address ANAD a letter with following information: reason(s) for applying, contact details, Curriculum Vitae, tentative training plan/program corresponding to the post you are seeking.

Please send your application package to:

Ms Albana Izeti
Project Co-ordinator
Albanian National Association of the Deaf
P.O.Box: 2401/1
Tirane, Albania
anad@abissnet.com.al
anad.organisation@gmail.com

Ms Inkeri Lahtinen
Project Home Coordinator
The Finnish Association of the Deaf, FAD
inkeri.lahtinen@kl-deafl.fi

Mr Colin Allen
Project Consultant
The Finnish Association of the Deaf, FAD
deafbalkan@hotmail.com

CLOSING DATE OF APPLICATION: MONDAY, 14 JANUARY 2008



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News at Your Fingertips

Posted on 30 December 2007. Filed under: autism, Blind, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Commonwealth Nations, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Deaf, Democratic Participation, East Asia and Central Asia, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Employment, Families, Funding, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, Introduction to "We Can Do", Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation, Reports, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Women |

I have now added a page to the top navigation bar, News, that consolidates all the news and press releases posted at We Can Do since this blog began.

I mostly cribbed this new page from the work I did recently for the We Can Do Retrospective: The First 100 Posts (and Then Some). However, if you compare the two, you will see that there are more items listed under the “News” page in the top navigation bar than there are in the Retrospective post. That’s because, when I wrote the Retrospective post, I made a rule with myself that each We Can Do post would be listed only once, even if it arguably belonged in more than one category. Some of the “news” items reported new resources that might still be helpful for readers months or years from now. So I listed those items under “Resources” in the Retrospective post instead of news. But for the “News” page in the navigation bar, I made sure to include anything that was tagged as “news” when it was first posted.

I will try to keep the “News” page up to date. You will notice that it already includes one news item that has gone up since the Retrospective post.



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We Can Do Retrospective: The First 100 Posts (and Then Some)

Posted on 22 December 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Arts, autism, Blind, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Commonwealth Nations, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Deaf, Democratic Participation, Disability Studies, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, East Asia and Central Asia, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Events and Conferences, Families, Fellowships & Scholarships, Funding, Guest Blogger, Health, HIV/AIDS, Housing, Human Rights, Immigration, Inclusion, Interpreting, Introduction to "We Can Do", Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation, Remittances, Reports, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Violence, Volunteer Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Skip introduction, go straight to the Table of Contents

If you’re new to We Can Do, what interesting information, news, or resources might you have overlooked from the past few months? Although some older items may no longer be interesting, others may still be relevant and helpful a year or three from now. This post can help guide you through the first 100-plus posts at this blog. You can click from the table of contents below to any section of this page that interests you–and then another click on “table of contents” can take you back to the contents, or “top of this page” takes you back to this introduction.

Top of this page


Table of Contents

Table of Contents; Top of this page

About We Can Do

To learn more about the purpose of We Can Do, see About We Can Do. For more on its guiding philosophy, go to Why We Can Do.

Thinking about submitting your own written materials, job posts, conference announcements, or resources to We Can Do? Check the Wish list for written materials and resources.

Want to receive an alert in email when a new post goes up at We Can Do? You can Subscribe to We Can Do for free.

I changed the organization and appearance of We Can Do in early October to its present format.

Table of Contents; Top of this page

The Five Most Popular We Can Do posts

The five listed here are the ones that have attracted the most “page views” since We Can Do began in late July. You may notice that not all of these are featured in the 10 “most popular posts” listed in the right-hand navigation bar. That’s because the navigation bar only lists posts that have received a lot of traffic very recently (I think within the past few days; its done automatically by wordpress so I’m not sure how it works). But here I’m listing the five that have the highest TOTAL page views.

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The Five Most Under-Rated We Can Do posts

Are these posts really under-rated? You’ll have to read them and decide for yourself. But in choosing these five, I used two criteria: 1. These are posts that have received fewer than 100 visitors–sometimes far fewer. 2. These are posts that I think could be helpful or interesting to readers and maybe deserve more attention than they have gotten. These are in no particular order:

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Finding Practical Resources and Case Studies or Helpful Organizations

Finding organizations; Resources for inclusive development; Human rights resources; Case studies; Other helpful resources

Finding organizations
Mainstream international development agencies sometimes say that they don’t know how to find people with disabilities, or their representative organizations, in the developing countries where they work. Reviewing the July post entitled Finding Local Disability Organizations may help point you in the right direction. Also see Disability Organizations in Afghanistan, Asia, Kenya, Uganda.

Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) sometimes aren’t sure where to find mainstream development organizations and resources that might be willing to collaborate with them.

There is an international network of organizations for families of people with Rubinstein Taybi Syndrome.

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Resources for Inclusive Development
Both disability advocates and mainstream development organizations want to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind when countries and organizations fight poverty or improve public health, education, water, and other services. But it can be a challenge to figure out how to make projects and government policies more inclusive. The following resources can help:

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Resources on the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
By now, you may be aware that a global movement is taking place to ratify the international disability rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Many relevant resources are now being produced in relation to the CRPD, some of which have been posted or featured here at We Can Do:

  • Read the CRPD “translated” into plain English.
  • UNICEF has developed a child-friendly version of the CRPD to help children understand disability rights
  • Disabled People International offers two toolkits on ratifying and implementing the CRPD for disability advocates who want to help ensure that all disabled people have their human rights recognized.
  • A handbook on disability rights targeted at parliamentarians can help parliamentarians, people who work in close contact with government agencies, and disability advocates in general, better understand the CRPD.
  • The United Nations’ new web site, UN Enable, is one of the best, and most official, places to find information on the CRPD.
  • Handicap International has produced its own Teaching Kit on the CRPD.
  • The International Disability Equality Agency (IDEA) has issued Equalize It! A Manifesto for Disability Equality in Development Cooperation that expresses their position on how to ensure disability equality in the international development field.
  • Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Case Studies
    Reviewing case studies of projects implemented elsewhere can be a valuable source of ideas that could help you figure out how to run or implement your own projects. I would love to post many more best-practice and failed-practice case studies than I have available right now. If you think you have something worth sharing, please check my Wish List of Written Materials and Resource and contact me at ashettle [at] patriot.net.

    But for now, here are two case studies:

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Other Helpful Resources

    Top of Finding practical resources; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Finding Useful Sources of Information and Research

    Finding academic research, papers, resources, or statistics
    Looking for academic research and academic papers; resources that can be used by people working in the field; or sources of statistics? Some of the following posts may be helpful:

    Information on people with disabilities
    Interested in learning about the living conditions of people with disabilities in specific nations, or in specific thematic areas? Some of the following may be of interest:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Funding Sources

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Academic Papers

    We Can Do has published, or re-published, academic papers, or linked to same, on a range of subjects, including:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    News

    September 2007; October 2007; November 2007; Early December 2007

    September 2007
    At one point in September, the international disability community prematurely thought we might be On the Verge of Making History by ratifying the disability rights community.

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    October 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    November 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Early December 2007

    Top of News; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Opinion Pieces

    So far, the opinion pieces here are all by me. But I would like for We Can Do to be host to an active exchange of ideas and differing perspectives. If you have a strong opinion about something, please consider submitting it. Yes, that includes opinions that disagree with mine! Consult the Wish list for written materials and resources for ideas of the kinds of topics I’m trying to cover at We Can Do.

    Meanwhile, here are a few of my own opinion pieces:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Call for Papers (for Conferences, Journals, Other)

    You might be just now starting your academic career as an undergraduate or graduate student. Or perhaps you have been doing quantitative or qualitative research, or writing policy analysis, or case studies, or social analysis, for years. Either way, if you’re looking for opportunities to present, publish, or otherwise disseminate your papers or run a workshop, then check out these upcoming or ongoing opportunities:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    International Conferences and Events

    Looking for a conference to attend? Here are a few upcoming events:
    January 2008; February 2008; March 2008; April 2008; May 2008; August 2008; September 2008; November 2008

    January 2008
    The South Asian Conference on Autism is being held in New Delhi, India in January 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    February 2008

  • The Disabilities Initiatives in Development Seminar, also in Bangladesh also in February 2008.
  • One for all: Persons with Disabilities Initiative in Development, again in Bangladesh in February 2008.
  • The International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies at the University of Central Lancashire in Preston, UK is holding a conference on sign language research in the UK in February 2008.
  • A conference on the deaf community, sign languages, social issues, civil rights, and creativity will be held on the campus of Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, USA.
  • The Techshare India 2008 Conference on accessibility will be held in New Delhi, India, in February 2008.
  • Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    March 2008
    The 8th annual meeting of the Gulf Disability Society will meet in United Arab Emirates in March 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    April 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    May 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    August 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    September 2008

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    November 2008
    The Association on Women’s Rights in Development (AWID)’s International Forum on Women’s Rights and Development will be held in Cape Town, South Africa in November 2008. A call for proposals is open until January 28, 2008.

    Top of International Conferences and Events; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Jobs, Internships, Volunteer Opportunities

    We Can Do will probably never be a comprehensive job-board. Serious job, internship, or volunteer placement hunters will want to explore other means of finding opportunities. For example, jobs, internships, and volunteer opportunities in the international field generally, or in the disability field generally, can sometimes be found at www.idealist.org. But I do occasionally happen to come across a job announcement. Here are a few that may still be open to applications:

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Education and Training Opportunities

    Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Opportunities

    Missed call for papers; Missed training opportunities; Missed job, internship, and volunteer opportunities; Missed events and conferences

    Some of the material I post at We Can Do is time-sensitive material. That means the conferences announced here have come and gone; job posts have been filled; and deadlines are over. So, if it’s too late for you to do anything about any of the following announcements, then why bother listing them? First, some conference organizers issue compilations of papers and presentations or other interesting materials after their event is over. If a topic interests you, it may be worth communicating with event organizers to see if any follow-up publications are available. Second, organizations that offer one conference, job opportunity, call for papers, etc., may offer something similar in the future. Many conferences, for example, meet every one, two, three, or four years. Monitoring, joining, or communicating with organizations of interest to you could help ensure that you learn about the next opportunity in time to plan for it.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Call for Papers
    The German Journal for Disability and Development called for papers on art and disabilities to be submitted by the end of November 2007.

    Also browse through the listing of upcoming conferences and missed conferences.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Training Opportunities

    In October 2007, the International Labour Organisation had a training course for professionals from developing countries.

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Jobs, Internships, and Volunteer Opportunities
    Remember that it is too late to apply for these specific opportunities. These are listed here in case you want to check out the sponsoring organizations for future opportunities like these:

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    Missed Event and Conference Opportunities

    Top of Missed Opportunities; Table of Contents; Top of this page

    What’s Next for We Can Do?

    I am not yet satisfied with We Can Do. I still see many gaps that I want to repair. I want to find, and post, more materials of a pragmatic nature. By which I mean, material that people in the field can put to immediate use in improving the lives of disabled people in developing countries. If you think you can help me locate helpful materials, please review my Wish list for written materials and resources and contact me.

    I also want to reach more development professionals at mainstream development organizations and more employees and volunteers at international disability organizations. And I want to reach more small DPOs and individual advocates in more developing countries. The knowledge shared at We Can Do cannot help until it is brought to people with disabilities living in poverty in developing countries. That “final mile” can only be bridged by readers like YOU.

    If you want to help, I hope you will consider telling your colleagues and contacts about We Can Do. If you run a web site or a blog, please consider linking to We Can Do at https://wecando.wordpress.com. If you have the skills, the time, and the commitment to launch a We Can Do mirror site translation into some other language, please talk to me (leave a comment or email me at ashettle [at] patriot.net). And please do feel free to print out the more helpful We Can Do posts to share with people you know in developing countries who do not have easy access to the Internet.

    For those of you who like numbers: We Can Do had 285 page views in July; 851 in August; 1305 in September; 2936 in October; 4862 in November; and more than 5100 in the first three weeks of December. And who is responsible for making these numbers happen? Why—you, of course! So, thank you for visiting We Can Do.

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    NEWS: Human Rights Abuses of Disabled Children, Adults in Serbia

    Posted on 17 November 2007. Filed under: Blind, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

    MENTAL DISABILITY RIGHTS INTERNATIONAL

    Embargoed Until November 14th, 2007

    Contact: Laurie Ahern – 202.361.1402
    Eric Rosenthal – 202.361.9195
    Email: Lahern@mdri.org
    Email: Erosenthal@mdri.org

    HUMAN RIGHTS GROUP ACCUSES SERBIA OF TORTURE AND ABUSE AGAINST CHILDREN AND ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES

    Belgrade, Serbia – November 14, 2007 – Following a four year investigation, Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI) released its findings today in a report detailing the human rights abuses perpetrated against children and adults in Serbia with disabilities, forced to live out their lives in institutions. Torment not Treatment: Serbia’s Segregation and Abuse of Children and Adults with Disabilities describes children and adults tied to beds or never allowed to leave their cribs – some for years at a time. In addition, filthy conditions, contagious diseases, lack of medical care, rehabilitation and judicial oversight renders placement in a Serbian institution life threatening for both children and adults. The children and adults had a range of disabilities including Downs Syndrome, deafness, visual impairment, autism, and mobility impairments.

    “These are Serbia’s most vulnerable citizens. Thousands confined to institutions are subjected to inhuman and degrading treatment and abuse. Children and adults tied down and restrained over a lifetime is dangerous and painful treatment tantamount to torture – clear violations of the European Convention on Human Rights,” said Attorney Eric Rosenthal, Executive Director of MDRI and an expert on human rights law.

    “We call on the government of Serbia to stop these abuses immediately and to respect the human rights of all people with disabilities,” concluded Rosenthal.

    For more information visit www.mdri.org, where you can download a copy of the full report in PDF format, videos, and photos. The video footage does not have captions available. As a deaf person, I found that if you read the executive summary of the report and look at some of the photos before viewing the video then most of the images in the video speak for themselves. I’m guessing that there is probably no audio description for blind people; as a sighted deaf person, I’m afraid I’m not in a position to judge how much sense the video will make without it. Readers who are deaf or blind–or who support their interests–may wish to contact MDRI to encourage them to make their video materials available with both captions and audio description.

    MDRI is an international human rights and advocacy organization dedicated to the full participation in society of people with mental disabilities worldwide. We Can Do published an earlier press release from MDRI reporting on similar human rights abuses in Argentina; the Argentina report, entitled Ruined Lives, can still be downloaded from the front page of the MDRI web site (scroll down the page). More reports about human rights abuses of people with disabilities in Turkey, Peru, Uruguay, Mexico, Kosovo, Russia, and Hungary can be downloaded in PDF format from http://www.mdri.org/publications/index.htm

    Most of the text of this blog post comes from the MDRI press release, which can be retrieved at www.mdri.org.


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    Please Submit YOUR Materials to We Can Do

    Posted on 7 November 2007. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Arts, Blind, Call for Papers, Case Studies, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disability Studies, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Families, Funding, Guest Blogger, HIV/AIDS, Housing, Human Rights, Immigration, Interpreting, Introduction to "We Can Do", Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Mobility Impariments, Multiple Disabilities, News, Opinion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, Psychiatric Disabilities, Rehabilitation, Remittances, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Uncategorized, Violence, Volunteer Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Currently, We Can Do gathers news; announcements; academic papers; case studies; opinion pieces; information about resources; and other materials of interest to disabled advocates and international development professionals from a wide range of sources. In addition to these, from time to time, I write fresh content of my own.

    I also hope to be able to depend heavily on YOU–We Can Do readers–for some of the best, most interesting, and helpful materials. Examples of materials that would interest me include, but are not limited to: “best practice” case studies; “failed practice” case studies; checklists; fundraising advice or resources; other pragmatic resources; academic papers or reports; student projects; press releases; opinion pieces; announcements; and more. For more detail, please click on “Wish List for Written Materials and Resources” at the top navigation bar.

    If you can assist with my current top priority, or with any of the other items in my “wish list”, then PLEASE GET IN TOUCH. Email me at ashettle at patriot dot net or leave a short note in the comment area below and I’ll contact you.

    Current Top Priority for We Can Do

    Are you from Croatia, Cuba, Gabon, Hungary, India, Jamaica, or Panama? If so, were you involved with the movement to persuade your government to sign and ratify the international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)? If so PLEASE CONTACT ME (ashettle at patriot dot net, or leave a comment below with your email address).

    I want to interview people involved with these movements (via email) so I can write a story describing what strategies you used; any barriers you faced along the way; how you overcame these barriers; any mistakes you made, how you corrected them, and how other countries can avoid them; what activities or techniques you think were the most critical to your success; and so forth. Sharing this type of information at We Can Do–and elsewhere–could be immensely helpful to disability movements in other countries that are working toward the same goals.

    My primary written language is English, pero puedo escribir y leer, mas o menos, en espanol tambien. (Lo siento para la mala ortografia–no se como crear acentos en WordPress.) Once we are in contact, I will probably have many questions for you–and follow up questions after that!

    Thank you for helping make We Can Do become a strong, good-quality resource for people with disabilities in developing countries and the people who are working hard to meet their needs.

    Edited to Add: I do not post my full email address because any recognizable email address posted on the web then immediately becomes the target of “spam harvesters” and starts receiving tons of unwanted, unsolicited commercial emails. But I spelled it out above and spell it out again here. But this time I’m amplifying it because I realize that not all people have learned how to parse spelled out email addresses:

    My username is: ashettle

    Every email address has an @ at sign @ between the user name and the domain name, thus ashettle@

    My email domain is patriot.net

    Put it all together and you have my email address.

    Or if that is still too confusing–or if it’s just easier for you–then feel free to leave a note below (with your email address in the area provided for it) and I’ll get in touch.


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    IDCS Newsletter: Deaf Children, Families, and Schools

    Posted on 1 October 2007. Filed under: Case Studies, Children, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Families, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    Thank you to the International Deaf Children’s Society (IDCS) for granting their permission to repost their newsletter at We Can Do. This newsletter contains information about a range of programs targeted at deaf children and their families and schools in Burkino Faso; Zimbabwe; Somaliland; Kazakhstan; Afghanistan; and India.

    Note that IDCS would like to receive stories about your experiences in supporting families in improving their ability to communicate with their deaf children for possible use in their next newsletter. Their deadline is October 10, 2007; see the bottom of this post for more detail.

    August 29, 2007
    Learning from Each Other: An Update from the IDCS Network
    The International Deaf Children’s Society (IDCS) is the international development wing of The National Deaf Children’s Society in the UK.

    Families and schools

    In this issue of Learning from Each Other you can find out more about how schools can involve families and communities in their work.

    Education is central in promoting every child’s development. It is a Millennium Development Goal to achieve universal primary education, because it is recognised that education broadens opportunities and choices for young people and helps to fight poverty. As one third of the out-of-school children are disabled – it will be impossible to meet this goal without deaf children getting into school. IDCS believes that this will be impossible without family and community involvement.

    Research by academics like Desforges in the UK have shown that the support children receive from their family makes a big difference to their success at school. The case studies in this newsletter highlight the role that families play globally. Over 90% of deaf children are born into families who are not deaf and who may have little understanding of how they can support their child. That’s why it’s important for schools and families to work together. Read on for some brilliant examples of how this can work in practice!

    For example, you can read a case study from Burkina Faso showing how schools can help families learn the skills they need to support their children more effectively. In addition, parental involvement can really benefit the school by using parents’ unique knowledge, skills and motivation – both in the classroom like in the example from Afghanistan, and at school management and policy level like the project for families in Kazakhstan.

    As so many deaf children are out of school, it’s essential that schools consider how they can reach those parents in the community whose children are not in school. Again, with the right support, other parents whose deaf children have been to school can be the best people to reach out, like the inspiring parent trainers in Zimbabwe.

    Later this year, IDCS will publish Family Friendly! a book of case studies and practical tips about involving families and communities in work with deaf children. Some of the case studies in this newsletter are also featured in the book – so look out for our email publicising the book later in the year! Some existing resources to help you think about how you can improve the way you work with families and communities are featured below.

    Teachers training parents in Burkina Faso

    In order for deaf children to do well at school, it really helps if families are actively involved in their education, and are able to communicate, play or help their children with homework. However it’s not always easy for parents to know what to do.

    After asking parents what they needed, IDCS’s partner CEFISE, a mainstream school where lots of deaf children study, trained a group of teachers to carry out workshops for parents at three other schools for the deaf. During these workshops, teachers provide parents with information about deafness and lots of creative ideas to make learning fun. Using creative techniques proved to be a great way to provide parents with practical skills and motivation to spend more time with their child!

    Follow the link to find out more about this Burkina Faso project, as well as great examples of games and activities.

    Parents outreaching to other parents in Zimbabwe

    Nyadire Primary School is located in a rural area of Zimbabwe where there is little awareness of deafness. With support from IDCS and the NZEVE centre for deaf children, Nyadire School trained two parents to be outreach workers.

    Being visited at home was a great way for parents of out-of-school deaf children to find out more about deafness and their children’s potential. The parent trainers encouraged parents to send their deaf child to school and provided them with information about how they could support learning in the home. The families felt comfortable discussing personal issues with someone who had faced similar challenges and the parent trainers became a real community resource. The school also organised workshops to provide parents with more information and training to help them communicate with their deaf child.

    Follow the link to find out more about this innovative approach to working with parents

    Establishing a parents’ group in Somaliland

    In Somaliland there are only two schools for the deaf. The Hargeisa School for the Deaf is working with parents to support them to advocate for the rights of their child. Getting parents together is also an effective and sustainable way of establishing support networks and a forum to share ideas and experiences.

    The Hargeisa School found that, in order for parents to have an impact, it was important to set up a formal organisation. They provided a group of parents with the necessary skills to organise and register a parents’ group. This group now meets regularly and, together with the school and a group of young deaf people, has carried out advocacy and awareness raising activities.

    Find out more about the process of setting up a parents group

    Working together for children’s rights in Kazakhstan

    Children living in institutions in Kazakhstan are often denied their rights. In addition, many find that communicating with their families is very difficult. With limited parental involvement, professionals have a lot of power over children’s lives. To create change in such a context meant that everyone needed to be involved – that’s why the project working to improve the lives of deaf children in institutions was called Rights for All.

    Using the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child as a tool, this project tried to involve teachers, children and parents. An important achievement was the establishment of an ongoing parents’ group which have quarterly meetings with school directors and are working with the Deaf People’s Association to lobby for policy changes. A resource room staffed by a parent volunteer also helps to provide parents with practical support when they visit the school.

    Read more about how this project aimed to make Rights For All a reality

    A father’s story – getting involved in education in Afghanistan

    Getting involved in their children’s education can radically change parents’ attitudes towards their child’s deafness. As they witness first-hand their child’s capacity for learning and educational success, they can become advocates for other children’s rights.

    Abdul Ghani is the father of six children, four of whom are deaf. He worked for an inclusive education project run by the International Rescue Committee in Afghanistan which helped deaf children, previously denied access to education, to stay in school. His valuable contribution and change of attitude towards his deaf children’s potential shows how parent involvement benefits both schools and families!

    Find out more about our work in Afghanistan.

    Real inclusion requires a supportive family

    In India, the Persons with Disabilities Act says that every disabled child should be able to study in a regular school if that is their choice. Snigdha talks about how she fought to make the act a reality for her deaf daughter, Sneha. This would not have been possible without the support she received in the early days from a family-focused organisation in West Bengal. Snigdha’s story shows why IDCS’s focus on parent-support is so important and gives practical tips for regular schools wishing to include deaf children.

    Read Snigdha’s story to find out more about parenting a deaf child in India and why family support is so important.

    Member spotlight

    IDCS Network member the Loto Taumafai Society in Samoa worked with UNESCO to pilot the Toolkit for Creating Inclusive, Learning Friendly Environments. The second chapter focuses on involving families and communities. It is a very useful tool for any school. However, IDCS thinks that as deaf children have less opportunity than other children to learn incidentally in their community, the ideas presented in this UNESCO publication are even more important for schools where deaf children learn!

    You can read an extract and download the booklet

    More resources

    EENET, the Enabling Education Network is an international information sharing network which promotes the inclusion of marginalised groups in education. Membership is open to all.

    The EENET website contains resources about working with parents including the Family Action for Inclusion book. This tells the stories of family-based advocacy organisations which have contributed to transform education systems in southern Africa, South Asia, Europe and Australia. It has been written for family and community members who may feel isolated and want to form a support group, advocacy organisation, or want to challenge exclusion. It will also be of relevant to those interested in promoting inclusive practices in education, such as teachers, teacher educators and policy makers.

    Find out more about EENET

    Improving family communication

    For our next issue of Learning from Each Other, we would like to focus on family communication. As the articles presented here have shown, communicating with a deaf child at home is extremely important for his or her emotional and educational development. We would be delighted to hear of your experiences of supporting families to improve their ability to communicate with their deaf child.

    What challenges do you face in communicating with deaf children? Have you received support from an organisation or parents of deaf children? Are there any games or exercises that you have found particularly useful? Are you involving deaf adults in family communication exercises?

    As always, please do not worry if you don’t have much experience of writing about your work, just get in touch with any contribution, long or short. We will do our best to include it in the newsletter or publish on our website to share with The IDCS Network.

    Please send us your stories by 10 October 2007 by email, post or fax

    The IDCS Network
    15 Dufferin Street
    London, EC1Y 8UR
    United Kingdom
    idcs@idcs.info
    Fax + 44 (0)20 7251 5020

    http://www.idcs.info


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    CASE STUDY: Early Intervention for Blind Children

    Posted on 20 September 2007. Filed under: Blind, Case Studies, Children, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Multiple Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

    The following case study is written by Irina Germanova Sumarokova, director of Nizhniy Novgorod Regional Charity of Parents of Visually Impaired “Perspektiva.”

    Establish a model of early intervention center for providing permanent medical, social psychological and pedagogic services for families with blind or visually impaired children in Nizhniy Novgorod

    Irina Germanovna Sumarokova
    Director
    Nizhniy Novgorod Regional Charity of Parents of Visually Impaired “Perspektiva”
    Nizhniy Novgorod
    28 M.Pokrovskaya St
    Russia
    7 8312 333402
    Email: irasu at sandy dot ru
    (The above email address should use the @ at sign in place of the word “at,” and an actual dot . in place of the word “dot”, all spelled as one word.)

    Raising a blind of visually impaired preschool child now days is a big challenge. Because of limited sensor system and lack of information about how things happen in the world, blind and visually impaired children have special needs caused by physical and psychological development, and process of social psychological adjustment to now day’s life. From the birth blind or visually impaired child needs special care aimed to form compensatory mechanism and attitude towards the world. If these problems are successfully solved in preschool ages blind and visually impaired children better integrate in community, have better private and social life, better social and psychological well-being, also for this children it is easier to get good education and profession.

    Now days the number of blind and visually impaired children is increasingly growing. The situation is worsened by fact, that last few years as a result of medical successes in nursing of premature newborn children a number of multi-disabled children with blindness increased too.

    In spite of increasing number of these children in most of Russian cities there are no preschool institutions for blind children. There are institutions that work with children with amblyopic and strabismus. Absence of Systematic approach to preschool education of blind and visually impaired children exclude children of this category from preschool education process. Because of this now blind children are raised isolated by parents who do not know ways and perspectives of development of such children. As a result of incompetent pedagogic influence accrue strong developmental lag (physical and psychological) compared to their sighted peers that badly influences their educational process and farther lives of these children.

    The worst situation is with multi-disabled children. According to “Children’s rights declaration each child regardless of disability has a right to education in conformity with his abilities and needs. But special educational institutions cannot fully meet these children’s needs. Multi-disabled children need to have more influence than just blind children. Because of all reasons above establishing an affective system of medical, social, psychological help for families with blind, visually impaired and multi-disabled children is very important for Russia.

    Russian and foreign experience shows that the most effective model of this system is center of early intervention, where psychologists and teachers are working in close contact with parents. In European countries and in the US gained positive experience of work of such centers. This experience shows that rehabilitation work done in preschool ages enables them late to integrate in society and allows to decrease the difference in physical and psychological development of blind and visually impaired children from other children in preschool ages.

    In Russia there is Municipal early intervention center in St. Petersburg. Parents of blind children and multi-disabled children get medical, social, psychological and pedagogic help there. Unfortunately current economic conditions do not allow local government in others Russian districts to give funds for such organization. In this situation the idea of establishing early intervention centers in big cities of Russia on the basis of NGOs becomes significant.

    In Nizhniy Novgorod the early intervention center was established on the basis of Nizhniy Novgorod society of parents of visually impaired and blind children «perspektiva» on November 4 in 2003. It happened in process of activities in project «Developing and inventing a model of early intervention center for blind and visually impaired children» that was implemented by Perspektiva in partnership with Saratov regional organization of All-Russian society of blind and Blind Babies Foundation (San Francisco) from September 1 2003 to September 31 2004. I would like a few words about this organization.

    Nizhniy Novgorod Regional Charity of Parents of Visually Impaired “Perspekiva” was officially registered on 24 of October 2001. The main aims of its activity are:

    • To develop the appropriate environment for successful social rehabilitation of blind and visually impaired and multi-handicapped preschool children;

    • To promote the ideas of social integration of the visually impaired children in media;

    • The main directions of Perspektiva’s activity are:

    • Creating a database of blind and visually impaired children, and children with multi-disabilities as well;

    • Information support of families, having children with the described problems;

    • Consulting parents on their rights and rehabilitation of their children;

    • Providing the families with tactile books, toys and games;

    • Organizing activities and events, helping to integrate these children into society.

    As organization Perspectiva appeared during the Russian-British project “in contact with a family” financed by CAF implemented by Moscow foundation of parents of blind children, Parents from Nizhniy Novgorod participated in it. Perspectiva is the only organization working with blind babies in Nizhniy Novgorod. Since there are no special educational institution for blind, visually impaired and multi-disabled children in Nizhniy Novgorod the main goal for “Perspektiva” now is to establish a center of social and psychological rehabilitation of blind and visually impaired children (early intervention center). At the end of 2001 organization initiated creation of such center and was supported by city administration of Nizhniy Novgorod. City administration gave “Perspektiva” room for it.

    Center was equipped with materials needed in development of blind and visually impaired children: Trampoline, dry water pool, Tunnel, Furniture for children, Set of apparatuses for children, Floor mats, Montessori special equipment. In Center there are a lot of tactile books, special toys, special adapted table games. The special crawling room was made for working with multidisabled children who cannot walk.

    The main goals of our center – to promote continuous patronage of blind and visually impaired children from the moment of diagnose till they gain satisfying social status. Early intervention center’s activity includes two main aspects: work with parents (mothers, fathers, other family members) and work with children.

    Work with parents include:
    • Legal education aimed to raise awareness of parents about their rights;
    • Teaching skills of competent pedagogic influence of such children;
    • Their social and psychological rehabilitation.

    Work with children is based on generalized innovative Russian and foreign experience in this area. In this center the main activities are:

    Rehabilitation classes with blind and visually impaired children and their parents- Children come for such lessons 1-3 times a week depending on their needs. During these lessons children obtain communication, self-serving, orientation skills, learn to play, develop their movements and motor skills of hands. Preschoolers are preparing for going to school. There are individual and small group lessons. Parents attend these lessons too; there they learn how to develop their blind and visually impaired children.

    Consultations for parents on medical, psychological and pedagogic issues. These consultations were available in the centers, at home and by phone. Some parents of children with insignificant visual impairments that do not lead to disability came to the centers for one-time consultations on determining developmental level of their children and about saving and developing vision. Parents of children with serious disorders usually needed to come to the centers for consultations a lot of times. Such families need permanent psychological and pedagogic assistance. Centers provide this kind of assistance for such parents.

    Teaching parents of blind and visually impaired children skills, needed for competent development of their children, – parents receive educational films and brochures; also seminars for parents are organized. Films are very popular, because parents get visual information that they can use with their children in daily routines. Center started to collect films on early intervention for blind and visually impaired children. With help of Blind Babies Foundation now Nizhniy Novgorod center have 8 films, 3 of them were subtitled wit Russian subtitles. «Perspektiva» made 2 films. Also “Perspektiva” produced 8 brochures for parents. The goal of seminars for parents is to introduce parents of visually impaired children to different methods of developing such children. The programs of seminars are very rich. They include different trainings for parents: creating developing environment for blind child at home, teaching blind children orientation and mobility skills, teaching self-help skills, developing other senses…

    Besides functioning as educators centers started to organize vocational activities for children and their parents. We think that such activities will improve understanding and collaboration among families and will help children to learn practical skills better. For example, every year we organize New Year parties, mother’s day and «birthdays» day when all children get presents.

    Many affords were made in order to improve system of revealing blind and visually impaired infants toddlers and preschoolers and involve their families in the project activities. In order to do this, partners established partnerships with governmental authorities, in particular those working with social security, health and education issues. As a result of this work database on such children was created and it continues to grow.

    To disseminate information about early intervention center «Perspektiva» produced colorful fliers with information about the center. These fliers are distributed to parents of visually impaired children through kindergartens that have special groups for such children, social security departments and medical-social expertise agencies, where parents of children who get official status of disabled get flier with recommendation to apply for help to early intervention centers. Fliers are also disseminated through pediatric ophthalmologists at clinics for children.

    Nizhniy Novgorod center’s activity is based on American experience. Three project staff members went to San Francisco to learn more about experience of Blind Babies Foundation in early intervention work with blind and visually impaired children and their families in order to use this experience in Russia. During that trip we learned experience of American partner in providing early intervention services for families of blind and visually impaired children. Because of diverse program of the trip we could see how American methods of developing blind and visually impaired children work on practice. We were able to see different agencies that provide help and education for such children, to learn a lot about work of Blind Babies Foundation and see how it is organized. Together with unique experience we got a lot of printed materials on early intervention for blind and visually impaired children and multydisabled children and 6 videos for parents with practical information. These materials are translated and used by in Nizhniy Novgorod center’s activities.

    We found very useful work of home counselors, who provide home visits to families of blind and visually impaired children. We think that this experience will be very important for Russian early intervention centers. This method of working will allow us to involve much more families, since not all of the families are able to come to the centers for help. Home counselors also could help to involve families at social risk, now it is very challenging to have a contact with them. Coming back to Russia we discussed this ideas with governmental authorities and this year we got some money for establish the center of home visits of blind and visually impaired babies. In May we are starting this program. It is Wonderful result of our work.

    Establishing early intervention centers on the basis of “Perspektiva” in Nizhniy Novgorod solve a problem of preschool development of blind and visually impaired children. This experience is useful for other regions of Russia and other countries that are developed. It also will allow equal opportunities for blind children at schools, and will be a precondition for inventing the model of inclusive education for blind children in Russia.


    I received a copy of this case study via an email listserv called the Disability Information Dissemination Network, managed by the Centre for Services and Information on Disability (CSID) and sponsored by Sightsavers International. You can subscribe to CSID free email distribution list by sending an email to either csid@bdmail.net or to csid@bdonline.com and putting the word “join” in the subject line.


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