Deaf

World Deaf Information Resource Project Launches

Posted on 6 October 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Networking Opportunities, News, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

World Deaf Information Resource Project Launches

A new initiative enables users to find deaf organizations and schools in 149 countries around the world. Launched by the Gallaudet University Center for International Programs and Services (CIPS) in October 2009, the World Deaf Information Resource Project provides contact information for hundreds of international-, national-, and local-level organizations and schools globally. The website also links to on-line reports about the human rights conditions and living situation of deaf people around the world and other information resources for deaf individuals and organizations.

“Deaf people always benefit when deaf organizations, schools, and individuals are able to exchange ideas and information,” says Dr. Asiah Mason, director of CIPS. “But before organizations can communicate with each other, they need a way to find each other. The new World Deaf Information Resource Project lets them do that. It is our hope this can be a powerful information resource for the global deaf community.”

In addition to browsing the website, users also may download most of the same information in either Word or PDF format. The file enables users to produce a 104-page hard copy document for dissemination to contacts who might not have Internet access.

The new website can be accessed at http://cips.gallaudet.edu/wdi.xml. CIPS intends to continue expanding the website and file over time. People are invited to submit information about deaf organizations, schools, and deaf-related information resources not already included in the project to World.Deaf.Info@gallaudet.edu.
CIPS is a unit within the Gallaudet University College of Professional Studies and Outreach and is the university’s one-stop office for all things international. Gallaudet University is the only liberal arts university for deaf students in the world. Mason credits the website as being the brain-child of Dr. Amy Wilson, Director of Gallaudet University’s International Development program, and of Dr. Jay Innes, the Dean of CPSO. Andrea Shettle began the work of gathering information for the website during an internship for the MA degree program in International Development at Gallaudet.

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Helping Find Deaf Organizations Around the World

Posted on 23 June 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Deaf | Tags: , , , , , , , |

The Center for International Programs and Services (CIPS) at Gallaudet University is seeking assistance in identifying both national- and local-level deaf organizations around the world.

Gallaudet is the only liberal arts university for deaf students internationally and is in Washington, DC. CIPS plans to develop a web site providing information for Deaf individuals and deaf organizations around the world. This work is being done in June and July 2009 by a short-term graduate student intern, Andrea Shettle.

As a first step, CIPS wishes to make a list of organizations of Deaf people around the world with their full contact information (name of organization; mailing address; phone number; fax number; SMS; email address if any; website if any). This includes international, national, and local-level organizations. This information could help deaf organizations find each other so they can exchange knowledge and ideas.

If you think you may be able to assist in making this list as accurate and as comprehensive as possible, please contact Andrea Shettle at CIPS (Andrea.Shettle@gallaudet.edu) between now and July 17, 2009. You can help ensure that CIPS does not miss any of the deaf organizations you are familiar with in your country or elsewhere! The emphasis for the next few weeks is on deaf organizations in developing countries. However, information in locating deaf organizations in all countries is welcome.

Everyone who attempts to assist CIPS in assembling this list will eventually receive a Word document file listing all the deaf organizations we are able to find worldwide.

Learn more about CIPS at http://cips.gallaudet.edu
Contact Andrea Shettle in regard to sharing contact information for deaf organizations you are familiar with at Andrea.Shettle@gallaudet.edu between now and July 17, 2009.

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NEWS: Deaf Empowerment Program in Ghana, Uganda Launches

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Deaf, Education, Employment, Interpreting, signed languages, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

First posted in November 2008 at http://www.uclan.ac.uk/ahss/research/islands/sign_language.php

£58,000 for deaf empowerment in Africa

The iSLanDS Centre has received a grant from the Education Partnership Africa programme for capacity building in sub-Saharan Africa.

The project “Training and employability for the deaf communities in Ghana and Uganda” is a joint initiative with the University of Ghana, Kyambogo University in Uganda, and deaf organisations in both countries, and aims at capacity building in the areas of applied sign language studies.

Course and curriculum development includes a sign language interpreter training course at the University of Ghana, a 2-year diploma course for deaf students in Applied Sign Language Studies in Uganda, and summer courses in academic skills development for deaf students. All of these are first-time initiatives, and are realised in close partnership with local deaf organisations.

We expect this project to impact positively on literacy, employability, and access to work for talented deaf participants in these programmes.

For further details, contact the project leader Ulrike Zeshan at uzeshan@uclan.ac.uk, or Sam Lutalo-Kiingi at slutalo-kiingi@uclan.ac.uk



I learned of this program via the Deaf Studies Africa mailing list. All inquiries should please go to either of the project leaders (see email addresses above), NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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SCHOLARSHIPS for Deaf Students in Applied Sign Language Studies, New Delhi, India

Posted on 29 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities, signed languages, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR DEAF STUDENTS
in BA (Hons) Applied Sign Language Studies

An initiative by:

International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies, Preston, UK
Indira Gandhi National Open University, New Delhi, India
Deaf Empowerment Foundation, The Netherlands

Program information

1. THE COURSE

Applied Sign Language Studies brings together the study of sign language and deaf communities with areas of study in applied linguistics, such as first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, language planning and policy, and language pedagogy. Graduates will work as sign language teachers, professionals in the field of language support for deaf people, teaching assistants in deaf education, and interpreter trainers.

The course is designed specifically to be accessible for deaf students and is taught through sign language. “Learning by doing” is included in work placements, lab work, and experiential modules. Deaf students without standard secondary school qualifications can take a one-year preparatory course (“Foundation Entry”) and continue with the BA course afterwards.

The BA in Applied Sign Language Studies is a joint international initiative. The course was developed at the International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies in the UK and will be taught at the Indira Gandhi National Open University in New Delhi, India. The beginning of the programme in 2009 is subject to validation.

2. THE SCHOLARSHIPS

The Deaf Empowerment Foundation is providing scholarships for deaf students in the preparatory Foundation Entry course in the 2009/2010 academic year.

Scholarships for Indian students
These cover one year of tuition fees at Rs. 10,000 and are available to Indian nationals. Students from other developing countries may also be eligible and should confirm their status when applying.

Scholarships for international students
These cover one year of tuition fees at ₤1,500 and are available to non-Indian students. This includes all students from industrialised countries and certain categories of students from developing countries other than India. The latter should confirm their status when applying.

Scholarships are for tuition fees only and do not cover travel, accommodation or living expenses.

CONTACT: scholarship@def-intl.org

From: http://www.def-intl.org/?q=node/20



I received this announcement via the Deaf Studies Africa email discussion group. All inquiries about this opportunity should please be directed to scholarship@def-intl.org, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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FUNDING: Small Grants for Deaf Children

Posted on 23 March 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Deaf, Funding, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

GLOBAL: Small grants programme for deaf children

Since 2002, Deaf Child Worldwide has supported organisations working to help deaf children overcome the barriers that contribute to their poverty and isolation.

Round 8 of Deaf Child Worldwide’s Small Grants Programme (SGP) opens on 19 March 2009 and ends 30 May 2009.

The SGP supports projects which show clear, measurable and sustainable improvements to the lives of deaf children and their families in developing countries.

Deaf Child Worldwide fund projects of up to three years and for a maximum amount of £30,000 (£10,000 per year). Visit the website for information on the SGP and the application process.

Successful projects must meet one or more of Deaf Child Worldwide’s strategic aims. Applicants must consider our cross-cutting themes in the development of their proposal.

Deaf Child Worldwide is focusing its activities in East Africa (Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania), South Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka) and Latin America (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru). You must be based in one of these countries to apply to SGP.

Applications are only accepted in ‘concept note’ format in English or Spanish. The deadline for submission of concept notes to Deaf Child Worldwide is 30 May 2009. Selected projects will start in January 2010.

The following documents can be downloaded from the Deaf Child Worldwide website:

* Background information leaflet containing details of the full eligibility criteria
* Guidance on applying
* Concept note format

Visit: www.deafchildworldwide.info

More details on the Small Grant Programme at http://www.deafchildworldwide.info/where_we_work/small_grants_programme/index.html

More details on how to apply at http://www.deafchildworldwide.info/where_we_work/small_grants_programme/how_to_apply/index.html

Missed the May 30, 2009, deadline? Deaf Child Worldwide offers similar grants on a periodic basis, though not always in the same countries. Consult their web site at www.deafchildworldwide.info to learn of future opportunities like this one.



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development mailing list. Please consult the Deaf Child Worldwide website directly, NOT We Can Do, for more detail on this funding opportunity, including more thorough instructions on how to apply.

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Grassroots Advocacy Leadership Training for International Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals, June 28-July 5, 2009, USA

Posted on 10 March 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

by Simon Guteng

Subject: Grassroots Advocacy Leadership Training for International Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals

It is with much pleasure and enthusiasm that I [Simon Guteng] announce our summer 2009 international leadership training program titled “Grassroots Advocacy Leadership Training for International Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals”, June 28-July 5, 2009.

Committed to improving the quality of personal and professional lives of deaf and hard of hearing individuals, the Gallaudet Leadership Institute and Professional Studies (GLIPS), a unit of the College of Professional Studies and Outreach at Gallaudet University, in collaboration with the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) ensures and assures the following program experiences and outcomes for participants:

1. Thorough understanding of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)

2. Preparation for working at national level leadership positions

3. Skills to organize grassroots level deaf people into dynamic and productive groups

4. Hands-on training in strategic planning and goal setting

5. Knowledge of leadership styles and identification of one’s own strengths

6. Improvement in human relations skills

7. Enhanced knowledge about emotional intelligence and its uses

8. Certificate of attendance and participation

Participation cost per participant is $910. This cost covers program/registration fee, room, and meal.
It DOES NOT include or cover your airfare, ground transportation within and outside of United States, emergency medical/travel insurance, and pocket money.

The World Federation of Deaf (WFD) will dispatch an announcement letter on the leadership training to all National Associations of the Deaf around the world through their Headquarters. You should anticipate this letter of announcement from WFD. Meanwhile, feel free to use this email letter as a valid and legitimate letter to source funds.

For registration, please visit www.regonline.com/grassroots_advocacy.

I look forward to the participation of many deaf leaders from around the world.

Sincerely,
Simon I. Guteng

Simon I. Guteng, Ph.D.
Director
Gallaudet Leadership Institute and Professional Studies
College of Professional Studies and Outreach
Gallaudet University
Hall Memorial Building Room E111A
800 Florida Avenue, NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 250-2130 Voice & Video Phone
1-866-381-8410 Toll Free: Voice & Video Phone
(202) 448-7191 Fax



Simon Guteng’s announcement was recently circulated on the Intl-Dev email news distribution service.

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Intl Summer School Language Documentation and Description June 22-July 3, 2009

Posted on 25 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities, signed languages, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , |

Dear all,
The summer school advertised below is of interest to students of
linguistics focusing on language documentation and description. The
summer school has several sign linguistics courses. Courses may be in
English or French. At this point it is not clear yet whether sign language interpretation can be provided. Questions, comments, and feedback on the issue of sign language interpretation should please be directed to the people coordinating the courses (3lsummerschool@googlemail.com), NOT to We Can Do.

www.hrelp.org/events/3L/index.html

Bonjour à tous,
Voici l’annonce de l’école d’été 3L sur la documentation et
description des langues orales et signées. Il y a des courses en
Anglais et en Français. Actuellement,le question d’interpretation en
LS n’est pas encore reglé.

www.hrelp.org/events/3L/index_fr.html

The Department of Linguistics at the School of Oriental and African
Studies is proud to announce the second 3L International Summer
School on Language Documentation and Description to be held in London beginning on 22nd June and ending on 3rd July 2009. The summer school is a joint initiative of the universities of Lyon, Leiden and SOAS, London as the 3L consortium, and will have two weeks of courses in a range of areas in documentation and description, two conferences, including a student conference, films showings and a number of social events. For details have a look at www.hrelp.org/events/3L/index.html
(or www.hrelp.org/events/3L/index_fr.html en français).

Enrolment for the summer school opens on 20th February, and there will be a discount rate available until 11th May. Scholarships are available to cover fees and accommodation, and to cover fees, accommodation and travel for attendees from a country outside the OECD. There is information about this on the website.

Also, please pass this information to other people who might be
interested in the summer school. If you have any questions write to
3lsummerschool@googlemail.com



I received this announcement via the DeafStudies-Africa listserver. All inquiries about the classes, including questions about whether they will be providing sign interpreters for Deaf students, should please be addressed to the above email address, NOT to We Can Do. People who wish to learn more detail should also please consult the official web site, linked in the announcement above. Thank you.

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Scholarships, BA in Applied Sign Language Studies, India

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities, signed languages, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

The Deaf Empowerment Foundation is offering scholarships for students in the 2009/2010 academic year for study in the newly launched 4-year BA (Hons) Applied Sign Language Studies.

This course is a joint international initiative. It was developed at the International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies in the UK and will be taught at the Indira Gandhi National Open University in New Delhi, India. The beginning of the programme in 2009 is subject to validation.

The 2009/2010 scholarships cover tuition fees for one year full-time study in the Foundation Entry programme, which is a preparatory “Year Zero” of study. The Foundation Entry course focuses on English literacy and other academic skills, including:

English for deaf learners in HE
English reading skills for deaf learners
Text composition skills for deaf learners
Study skills and Personal Development Planning
Information Technology and Numeracy in HE

For further information about the Foundation Entry and the BA in Applied Sign Language Studies, and for further details on scholarship applications, please contact Sibaji Panda at spanda@uclan.ac.uk and click here to read the information sheet, or click here to download the application form (Word format, 144 Kb). See also www.def-intl.org and www.uclan.ac.uk/islands

Deaf students of all nationalities who fulfill the scholarship criteria are eligible. To apply, please email Claire Perdomo at CLPerdomo1@uclan.ac.uk and ask for an application pack to be sent to you. You may also email to request an information sheet to be posted on departmental notice boards etc.

THE APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 MAY 2009.

— Please distribute widely as you see fit —



I received this announcement through the Intl-Dev listserver. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to the Deaf Empowerment Foundation, NOT We Can Do. Thank you.

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JOB POSTS: “Careline Officer”, Mobile Phone Company, Bangladesh

Posted on 10 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , |

The following job vacancy notice is targeted at people in Bangladesh who are deaf or hard of hearing, or who have physical disabilities. The application deadline is February 12, 2009.

Subject: [1191] “Career Opportunity for People with Disabilities!”

Dear Friends,
Please find the following circular on career opportunity for people with Disabilities.

You are cordially requested to disseminate it among deserving persons with disabilities or display it on your notice board.

Hope your cooperation will contribute towards getting employment of a person with disability.

“Career Opportunity for People with Disabilities!”

BanglaLink, a leading Mobile Phone Company in Bangladesh invites applications from deserving candidates for the position of “Careline Officer” for its Customer Support/Call Center division.

This position is exclusively open for men and women with hearing and physical disability.

For detailed information about academic requirement and other competencies please e-mail to awdpbd@gmail.com

Deadline for application is February 12, 2009

Source:
Asst. Information Officer
AWDP-Bangladesh
E-mail: info@awdpbd.org
Web: http://www.awdpbd.org



I received this announcement via the CSID news distribution list, which people may subscribe to for free. All inquiries should please be directed to awdpbd@gmail.com, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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Recursos Españoles: Women’s Health Handbook; and Helping Deaf Children (en ingles y español)

Posted on 10 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Deaf, Health, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Texto español

Hesperian announces two new titles in Spanish and a spiffy new Spanish Web Site:
Un Manual de salud para mujeres con dispacidad, the Spanish version of A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities, arrived to our offices today and we are very excited to have this wonderful material now available in Spanish. Un manual de salud para mujeres con discapacidad, will help women with disabilities overcome these barriers and improve their general health, self-esteem, and abilities to care for themselves and participate in their communities.

We also released the Spanish version of Helping Children Who are Deaf, Ayudar a los niños sordos. Packed with simple activities, this book is a great resource for parents, caregivers, health promoters, and others in teaching children who do not hear well how to communicate to the best of his or her ability.

Both titles can be downloaded http://espanol.hesperian.org/Bienvenidos_de_Hesperian.php and purchased from our brand new Spanish website. This user-friendly, easy-to-navigate web site offers all of the features of our website in English – current health news, information on upcoming publications, and free down-loadable versions of most of our titles. Plus a complete bookstore, all in Spanish, ready to ship anywhere in the world. At http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php


Hesperian anuncia dos nuevos libros en español y nuestra nueva página web

Con el libro Un manual de salud para mujeres con discapacidad, Hesperian les ofrece a las mujeres con discapacidad una manera práctica de conocer sus derechos para gozar de buena salud. Combinando las experiencias y consejos de mujeres con discapacidad de 42 países, con información sobre la salud, profesional y al corriente, este manual es fácil de entender, esta plenamente ilustrado y tiene mucha información útil.

También nos complace presentar el libro Ayudar a los niños sordos, el título más reciente de la Serie de asistencia temprana. Este libro está lleno de actividades sencillas y será un gran recurso para las personas que cuidan a niños sordos, ya sean padres, otros cuidadores y/o promotores de salud, ya que ofrece herramientas para enseñarle a la niña o niño a comunicarse lo mejor que pueda.

Estos libros, además de todos los títulos de Hesperian, pueden ser descargados http://espanol.hesperian.org/Bienvenidos_de_Hesperian.php o adquiridos desde nuestra ¡NUEVA PÁGINA WEB EN ESPAÑOL,! Ahora puede descargar nuestros libros, buscar traducciones en otros idiomas, ver nuestros proyectos actuales y comprar libros en nuestra tienda virtual, listos para ser enviados a cualquier parte del mundo — ¡Todo esto y más ahora en español! A http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php



Thank you to the Hesperian Foundation for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do. The Hesperian Foundation first became famous for their publication, Where There is No Doctor (Donde No Hay Doctor). This book has been used to save lives in hundreds of rural communities throughout developing countries around the world—precisely in places where there is no doctor. Since then, the Hesperian Foundation has produced a growing collection of publications targeted at people with developing countries who may have few other resources that they can use to treat their health or to learn how their community can become a happier place for children with disabilities. Anyone who lives or works in a rural community with few local resources is strongly urged to explore their web site. (http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php en español, http://www.hesperian.org in English).

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JOB POST: Lecturer in Sign Language Linguistics or Deaf Studies, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Posted on 5 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, signed languages, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

IMMIDIATE VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT

• POSITION: Expatriate Lecturers (2)
• Sign Language & Deaf Culture

Position needed: – Lecturer in Linguistics (with expertise in sign language linguistics and/or deaf studies)

Addis Ababa University’s Department of Linguistics has launched the Bachelors of Arts degree in Ethiopian Sign Language and Deaf Culture this academic year (2008-2009). It is the first BA degree course in Sign Language provided in the African continent.

The main objectives of the BA program are to encourage and train:
• sign language teachers in teaching sign language courses at secondary and tertiary levels
• sign linguists in conducting research on Ethiopian Sign Language in order to promote the use, status and function of Ethiopian Sign Language.
• sign language interpreters in the interpreting profession

The program is to:
• Promote collaborative research on Ethiopian Sign Language in conjunction with other institutions of higher learning at local, regional and international levels.
• Provide advisory services to organizations, schools, institutions that work to promote Ethiopian Sign Language and Deaf culture, organize short-term trainings for people involved in Sign language and Deaf Education, compilation of Sign language dictionary etc.

It is a three year regular university program which gives modules focusing on sign language, linguistics, Deaf Culture. Some of the modules the Lecturer is expected to be familiar with are:
• Sign language and Society
• Sign language literature and performance
• Trends in Deaf Education
• The sociology of signing family
• Sign language interpretation and translation
• Deafness in broader perspectives,
• Communication Support for Deaf People (i.e. note-taking, interpreting etc)

We may require the expatriate lecturers (if given sufficient skills needed) to assist us in doing a feasibility study into setting up the African Centre for Deaf Studies and Sign Language Studies at our university.

Contractual time:
The Department of Linguistics and Philology seeks to employ two full-time Lecturer positions. The minimum contractual time is two years as of March 2009 with the possibility of extending the contract.

Requirement:
• Good sign language skills, preferably in American Sign Language
• Postgraduate diploma in Sign linguistics, Deaf Studies, or related field or qualification;
• Knowledge of Deaf history and culture;
• Extensive experience in working with the Deaf community;

The ideal candidates for the position should be a self-starter, detail-oriented, and able to handle multiple assignments and operate in team work and an intense environment.

Salary: details given upon requesting

Application:
Interested candidates are required to send or email a letter of application stating their interest, their curriculum vitae and two letters of references from academics to:

Eyasu Hailu Tamene
Ethiopian Sign Language Program Coordinator
Addis Ababa University, Department of Linguistics
P.O. Box 1176 Addis Ababa
Ethiopia

For further information, please email Eyasu Tamene at: tusaye11@gmail.com



I received this job post announcement via the DeafStudies-Africa email discussion group, which people can subscribe to for free.

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Disability in Non-Western Societies: A Bibliography of Bibliographies

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Middle East and North Africa, Poverty, Resources, signed languages, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Researchers who need to locate journal articles and other publications about people with disabilities throughout history in developing countries face significant barriers. People with disabilities outside of North America and Europe tend to be invisible in much of the published literature and throughout history.

Researchers can consult a list of annotated bibliographies at the Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange (CIRRIE) as a starting point in seeking out thousands of articles that may meet their needs.

These bibliographies do not directly link to the articles in question. In many cases, I suspect these articles may not exist on-line. But the bibliographies could be used to help researchers know what publications they should seek out through the inter-library loan program at their university library.

A few examples of annotated bibliographies include: Disability in the Middle East; Disability and Social Responses in Some Southern African Nations; Disability and Social Response in Afghanistan and Pakistan; Disability & Deafness in North East Africa; Disability and Deafness in East Asia: Social and Educational Responses, from Antiquity to Recent Times; Sign, Gesture, and Deafness in South Asia and South-West Asian Histories; Social Responses to Disability & Poverty in Economically Weaker Countries: Research, Trends, Critique, and Lessons Usually Not Learnt; and more.

Researchers may begin exploring the various bibliographies (by author M. Miles) at

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/bibliography/index.php



I found the page listing M. Miles’ various bibliographies by browsing the CIRRIE web site.

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PAPER: Deaf People in African Histories c. 960s – 1960s

Posted on 19 December 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Deaf, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Individuals interested in investigating the history of Deaf, deaf, or hard of hearing people in any African nation may wish to read the paper entitled, “Deaf People Living and Communicating in African Histories, c. 960s – 1960s” by M. Miles (2005).

The abstract for this paper is as follows:

“Glimpses of the lives and communication of deaf and hearing impaired people are seen in one thousand years of history across Africa. Textual evidence of 100 historical deaf adults and children, of hundreds more in groups, and of gestural communication and formal Sign Language, appears from 42 African nations, sourced in travellers’ accounts, legal and genealogical records, government reports, institutional and missionary archives, academic theses, linguistic studies, folklore, ethnography, novels, religious narrative, mime and dance. The data may assist in construction of valued identities and evidence-based cultural histories. Uses and interpretations remain for deaf people to discuss and choose according to their own varied interests and objectives.”

The article has 190 references, and notes some Africa-wide activities of deaf people, including in relation to deaf studies and sign language studies.

The author, M. Miles, has suggested that organizations of deaf people in each African nation should build their own archives and records of deaf people in order to help create an understanding of what it means to be deaf in Africa in the late 20th and early 21st century.

Read the full text of the article at:

http://www.independentliving.org/docs7/miles2005a.html



Thank you to the author, M. Miles, for announcing this article on the DeafStudies-Africa email-based discussion list.

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Support for Late-Deafened People in Asia

Posted on 16 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Resources, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , |

** Support for Late-Deafened People in Asia **
Danishkadah is in the process of setting up an Asian Group of Late Deafened people. Any Late Deafened (LD) person or organization which has late deafened members may contact the person below for further details about the group.

The group is also open to help others outside of this region to form their own support group. Please contact Akram Muhammad at info@danishkadah.org.pk



This announcement is taken from the Disabled People International newsletter.

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JOB POST: QuickBooks Training for Sub Grantees, Kenya, Handicap International, Dec 15-19, 2008

Posted on 5 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, autism, Blind, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This short-term consultancy position requires someone to provide a five-day training workshop in the use of QuickBooks from December 15 to 19, 2008. Profiles and proposals must be submitted by December 10, 2008.

TERMS OF REFERENCE: QUICKBOOKS TRAINING FOR THE SUB GRANTEES

BACKGROUND

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL (HI) is an international NGO engaged in the field of disability and development. A strong emphasis, however, is placed on empowering people with disabilities through their integration into mainstream development activities and the provision of appropriate health and rehabilitation services to ensure equal opportunities for all.

Currently, HI is working with 6 partner organizations in the USAID/AED funded projects in the field of Disability and HIV & AIDS. The group represents a cross section of disabilities including the deaf, blind and low vision, physically and intellectually disabled.

The main thematic areas of the project activities include;
• Policy and advocacy
• Behavior change communication
• Appropriate IEC materials for the PWD
• Stigma reduction

One focus of the project is to provide technical support, build the capacities of the partner organization and provide funding to enable them implement HIV& AIDS activities.

JUSTIFICATION

Good financial management practice helps an organization to attain effective and efficient use of resources and be more accountable to donors and other stakeholders. Hence, HI would wish to commission training in QuickBooks for her partners as a requisite to ensuring quality and accurate financial record keeping and reporting on usage of donor funding. HI further wishes to install QuickBooks accounting packages for all the partner organizations that are not yet compliant to the package and final set up a cut-off period for compliance by all the organization.

BACKGROUND OF PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

We have detailed as underneath a brief profile of each of the organizations that we are currently collaborating with as a basis of your understanding the scope of each partner. However, it may be worth noting that the proposed training may also include other partners we are yet to bring on board.

DDSHG (DANDORA DEAF SELF HELP GROUP)

Dandora is an organisation of deaf people that was formed over 10 years ago; Structural formation was very minimal in the initial years. Thus, Handicap international organized governance training which has since increased cohesiveness among the group membership. This is expressed through an increase of paid membership, while several board members who were also employees of the organization resigned as employees to pave for a clear segregation of interests. The organization is situated in Dandora area of Nairobi province.

On overall, the organization has sound and consistent financial management and reporting systems. In the period under review the organization was funded to a tune of Ksh. 1,996,453.00 (one million nine hundred ninety six thousand four hundred fifty three only)

BLINK (Blind and Low Vision Network)

Blink’s beneficiaries are primarily blind and/or persons with very low vision. A key issue for this organisation is that their beneficiaries are in different geographical locations. However, they have focal persons in each district that they meet weekly to discuss the needs of the communities. The board members are also representatives of different Community Based Organizations. They function as resource persons and may have their expenses reimbursed and allowances for services provided.

The organisation refers to itself as a Community Based Organization network that helps the individual Community Based Organisations provide support and care to their communities through awareness creation activities on HIV/AIDS. The discussions in the communities are generally broader than the HIV/AIDS, so the meetings are used as an opportunity to discuss other issues.

Blink has received training in project design and management including M&E frameworks, resource mobilisation, programme reporting, financial management, and managing special needs projects (e.g. reproductive health, HIV/AIDS counselling for disabled people, VCT testing). The counsellors are now better equipped to inform visually impaired people about their test results. Their reporting has also improved.

As regards the governance function, both board members and staff members now understand their roles and what is expected of them thanks to the capacity building initiatives by HI. The board members are also informed about the organisation’s activities by the Director on a regular basis.

The backbone of the spending in the organization is mainly logistical, thus the need for well tailored internal checks and balances mechanism that ensures prudence in the commitment of expenditure. In the current grant period the organisation was obligated to spend Ksh.2,728,962.00(two million seven hundred twenty eight thousand nine hundred sixty two only).

KEDAN (Kenya Disabled Action Network)

KEDAN is a youth organisation which is only 4 years old and covers several types of disability, contrary to most of the other disabled people’s organisations that target a particular category of disability (blind, deaf, physically impaired, and albinos – for capacity reasons they are currently unable to include mentally handicapped. The organisation started out with mobilisation, awareness creation and experience sharing and has only actively implemented programme activities since 2005. . They have developed an action plan for the next couple of years which they intend to implement, despite their limited resources, with the help of their motivated supporters.

As regards the needs of the organisation, KEDAN’s staff feels that they need to strengthen their competencies in the area of resource mobilisation, in particular proposal writing. They also need help to manage their existing resources better. Finally, they wish to develop their staff competencies in areas such as leadership and management, IT, and income generating activities.

In the current grant period the group is obligated to spend Ksh. 2,388,811.00 (two million three hundred eighty eight thousand eight hundred and eleven only).

NFSS (Nairobi Family Support Services)

NFSS was started in 1982 by Actionaid and registered as a local NGO in 1996. The Programme Coordinator has been the leader ever since. The organisation receives funding from HI France and from the AED-programme and is also supported by Sense International and the Liliane Foundation.

The mission of the organisation is to raise awareness on HIV-AIDS and disability through their work with community groups and attempt to change the stigma of disabled people in the community and their low-self esteem. The peer educators meet twice a month to exchange experiences.

NFSS has strong networking capacity. The organisation partners with different institutions, especially through referrals: the Liliane foundation (support for disabled people’s surgery), specialised schools (educational assessment), the Ministry of Health, government hospitals, networks of therapists. This gives the organisation high credibility in the communities.

NFSS would like to support “merry-go-rounds” (revolving credit systems), but as most of their beneficiaries are not working, it is difficult to collect the funds.

Until 2005, Action Aid funded a microfinance programme for the parents of disabled children. These loans were considered by some as grants. After having received several loans, and hence being allowed to loan greater sums, gradually, some of the beneficiaries disappeared with their funds. Only about 50% of these parents are able to continue repaying their microloans.

NFSS has an internal control manual but it has not enhanced its usage. There is therefore need to educate the staff on the importance of these procedures and its implementation. In the current grant period the organization is obligated to spend Ksh. 2,211,847.00 (two million two and eleven thousand eight hundred forty seven only).

DIGROT (Disabled Group of Trans Nzoia)

DIGROT was started in 1990 as a self help group of 50 members on the concept of a merry go round. Since 1998, the group has operated a bank account with Kenya Commercial Bank, Kitale Branch. The group started a micro finance lending system; Members were given loans of ksh.500 to Ksh 2,000 at an interest rate of 10% p.a.

In 2000, they received a grant from District Social Development Officer (Poverty Eradication Programme) which they used to loan their members. 14 members were successfully loaned through this programme and 7 defaulted to repay back. DIGROT was trained by HI in 2004 on micro-credit management.

In the year 2001-2003 they approached HI on HIV/AIDS awareness and in 2004 they wrote a proposal to HI on HIV and AIDS and Disability which was funded in May 2006.

DIGROT has representatives from different locations in Trans Nzoia district and was registered as a Community based Organization (CBO) in 2007. DIGROT is a network of DPOs (Disabled Persons Organizations) in Trans Nzoia district and usually conducts quarterly meetings with representatives from these DPOs.

It currently has 224 registered members and each member pays 524 shillings registration fee with a renewal fee of 200 shillings annually. Not all members are fully registered and the money is kept in a savings account.

The organization lacked well defined operational systems and procedures but has been subjected to vigorous capacity building initiatives, the organizations has also just finalized a recruitment exercise where competent and qualified staff have been brought on board.

In the current partnership agreement the organization is obligated to spend Ksh. 1,131,139.00 (one million one thirty one thousand one hundred thirty nine only)

UDPK (United Disabled Persons of Kenya)

United Disabled Persons of Kenya (UDPK) is an umbrella network of persons with disability in Kenya and was established in 1989 with a membership of the following organizations – Kenya Union of the Blind (KUB), Kenya National Association of the Deaf (KNAD) and Kenya Society of the Physically Handicapped (KSPH), Kenya Society for the Mentally Handicapped (KSMH). Kenya Autism Society joined later to champion issues of parents of mentally challenged Albinos and autism.

Currently UDPK has about 200 member organizations. UDPK was formed so that disabled persons could be united and speak with one voice, advocacy and lobbying remains the core objective.

Membership is both by organizations of and for disabled person. UDPK has five full time staff and 13 Field Officers working in different regions and is headquartered in Westlands, along Waiyaki Way. The mission of UDPK is to unite all persons, groups of Persons with Disabilities (PWDs) to advocate for disability issues on a united front. The vision for the organization is a barrier free society where Persons with Disabilities (PWDS) enjoy access to services in all spheres of life.

In the current grant agreement the organization is mandated to spend Ksh.2, 542,345.00 (two million five forty two thousand three hundred forty five only).

GENERAL OBJECTIVE

The general objective of this consultancy is to conduct an application based QuickBooks Training for management and finance staff of Handicap International partners so as to reflect through proper recording keeping and accurate financial reporting an accountable and effective use of donor funds as outlined in the individual budgets of the funded organizations and based on properly defined internal control systems, proper administrative and logistical management.

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE
• To design and develop a training programme that will equip the trainees with relevant skills and knowledge in Quickbooks

PROPOSED METHODOLOGY

HI proposes to hold a five day residential application based training for management and financial staff from each of the partnering organizations.

HI also proposes that the consulting firm shall at all times seek clarifications and/or guidelines from HI on all issues that are not clear and/or appear ambiguous in their opinion. For the purposes of this Training, the contact person for HI is Mr. Erick Karani, the Project Finance Officer.

TASKS OF THE CONSULTANT

1. Development of a training curriculum that shall conform to the afore-mentioned specific and general objectives and/or all other related aspects of QuickBooks financial package.

2. Carry out an evaluation of the training and produce a training report.

EXPECTED RESULTS

At the end of the training, the trainees will be able to:-
• Explain the essence and challenges of QuickBooks.
• Understand the usage and benefits of QuickBooks in financial management.
• Establish the relationship between QuickBooks reports and external reporting.
• Outline the QuickBooks main menu.
• Set up Accounts in the Quickbooks software
• Key in data and prepare accounting documents.
• Record General Journals.
• Prepare Bank Reconciliations.
• Develop Internal and Donor Reporting formats.
• Prepare monthly/annually reports.
• Correct Errors.

TIME FRAME

The training is expected to commence on 15th and end on 19th December, 2008 close of business.

QUALIFICATIONS

The consultant should have :-
• Relevant educational back ground and experience in teaching QuickBooks in a reputable institution.
• Relevant experience in working as a consultant/ lecturer is added advantage.
• Excellent analytical, writing and communication/facilitation skills.

APPLICATION PROCESS

All interested applicants must submit their profiles and proposals on or before 10th December, 2008 5.00 pm by email to the Project Finance Officer at: ekarani@handicap-international.or.ke

The email subject line should be marked: “QuickBooks training for the Sub grantees”



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) mailing list. All inquiries and applications should please be directed to Handicap International as instructed above, NOT to We Can Do.

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Dr. Michael Kemp: Obituary from His Family

Posted on 1 December 2008. Filed under: Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, News, signed languages | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Gallaudet University Provost’s Office has released the following obituary for Dr. Mike Kemp. People who wish to send condolences to his family will want to take note of the contact information provided at the end; condolences should please be sent directly to the family, NOT via We Can Do. I had reported on the news of Kemp’s loss over the weekend. I know that he will be missed not only by the Gallaudet University community but also by the Deaf communities of Vietnam and Thailand.

December 1, 2008

Dear Campus Community:

The family of Dr. Michael Kemp, who passed away last week, has written the following obituary in celebration of Dr. Kemp’s life and accomplishments:

Dr. W. Michael Kemp, 60, a professor in the Department of American Sign Language and Deaf Studies, died on November 24, 2008 in Alexandria, Virginia.

William Michael Kemp was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania to William and Marie Kemp. Deaf from birth, he graduated from Lancaster Catholic High School. Mike, as he was known, received his bachelor’s degree in sociology in 1971 from Gallaudet University, and his master’s degree in deaf education in 1975 from William McDaniel College (formerly Western Maryland College). He earned the degree of Doctor of Education in higher education administration in 1986 from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His dissertation was titled “A Comparison of the Simultaneous Method Evaluation and the Sign Communication Proficiency Interview (SCPI).”

Dr. Kemp taught American Sign Language for 35 years, the last 31 at Gallaudet University. He served for 12 years as chair of three different academic departments before stepping down to focus on teaching and consulting. His main area of interest and expertise was training people to communicate gesturally to prepare for travel abroad.

Since 1980, he had trained sign language instructors throughout the United States and the world, in the Far East, Central and South America, the Caribbean islands, the Middle East, and Europe. He taught at the University of Puerto Rico, the University of British Columbia, Douglas College (in British Columbia), Thailand’s Ratchasuda College, and Vietnam’s Teacher Training Center.

For the last 10 years, Dr. Kemp worked extensively in Thailand and Vietnam with groups of deaf students in the Sign Language Teacher Training Program. He made frequent trips to serve as a visiting professor at the Cao Dang Su Pham (Teaching Training Center) in Dong Nai Province, near Ho Chi Minh City. Last month, Dr. Kemp was invited as a technical expert on information and communication access at the “Gathering Inputs and Recommendations for the Development of the National Law on Disability” conference in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Dr. Kemp received a research stipend award from the National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research to attend the 18th International Congress on Education of the Deaf in 1995 in Tel Aviv, Israel. He also received the T. J. O’Rourke Memorial Award from the American Sign Language Teachers Association in 2002 in recognition of his international work, and the Teacher of the Year Award in 2008 from the Alpha Sigma Pi Fraternity.

Dr. Kemp was a member of the advisory board for the interpreter training program at Northern Virginia Community College, Annandale campus. He was a member of the National and Virginia Associations of the Deaf. He enjoyed photography, reading, traveling, and spending time with his family, especially his grandchildren.

Dr. Kemp is survived by a son, William M. Kemp, Jr., of Fairfax, Virginia; William Jr.’s mother, Dr. Vicki J. Shank, a professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science; his wife of 13 years, Joan Kemp; and two step-daughters, Jennifer Yost Ortiz and her husband, Anthony, and Jamie Yost, a staff interpreter with Gallaudet Interpreting Service, and her husband, Raymond Merritt, a professor in the Department of Biology; and two grandchildren, Zion and Zeke Ortiz. He is also survived by a brother, Thomas Kemp, his wife, Linda, and two nephews, Dan and Jack.

There will be two memorial services. The first will be private, for family and close friends. The second will take place in early 2009 on the Gallaudet University campus, and will be open to the community. The date for this service will be announced at a later time, as will information about memorial contributions.

Condolences may be sent to Dr. Kemp’s son, Bill Kemp, at 13112 Watchwood Lane, Fairfax, VA 22315, and to his wife, Joan Kemp, P.O. Box 4228, Alexandria, VA 22303.



If there are any obituaries for Dr. Kemp that have been written by members of the Deaf communities in Vietnam or Thailand, or that are otherwise centered on his international work in developing nations, I would be interested in publishing them at We Can Do. Or, if these have already been posted elsewhere, then I would like to link to them. Please contact me by leaving a comment below with your email address in the email address field, or send me an email at ashettle[at]patriot.net (substitute the @ at sign @ for [at] to create my address).

A biography of Dr. Kemp is available at http://deafstudies.gallaudet.edu/Faculty-Staff/ASL_and_Deaf_Studies/Kemp_Mike.html. A former student of Dr. Kemp at Gallaudet created a video memorial for Kemp, presented in American Sign Language, at http://deaffilmblog.blogspot.com/2008/11/in-memory-of-dr-mike-kemp-re-defining-d.html.

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BREAKING NEWS: Dr. Mike Kemp Reported to Have Passed Away

Posted on 29 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, News, signed languages | Tags: , , , , |

At about 1 am GMT, I received word that Dr. Mike Kemp has passed away. A member of Gallaudet University’s faculty, Kemp was an international consultant who conducted training workshops in the Far East, Central and South America, the Caribbean islands, Middle East, and Europe. For the past 10 years, he worked in Thailand and Vietnam in sign language teacher training programs. More background on Dr. Kemp is at
. http://deafstudies.gallaudet.edu/Faculty-Staff/ASL_and_Deaf_Studies/Kemp_Mike.html
His web page includes a video of Kemp describing his recent work in American Sign Language.

As of this writing (3 am GMT, Nov 30 ’08) official confirmation has not yet been posted on Gallaudet’s web site but is said to be anticipated soon. [UPDATE Dec 1 ’08, 4 p.m. GMT/UTC: I still have not seen an announcement on Gallaudet’s web site, but the Provost’s office has now circulated an obituary from Kemp’s family. I have posted that obituary at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/12/01/dr-michael-kemp-obituary-from-his-family/.]

When it is posted at Gallaudet’s site, it should probably be available either at http://pr.gallaudet.edu/dailydigest or possibly at
http://news.gallaudet.edu/.

I extend my condolences to all who knew Kemp or who were touched by him or his work.



I first learned this news via the GallyProtest mailing list; the list administrator, Brian Riley, has indicated that he learned of this event through Aidan Mack’s vlog post on the topic (in American Sign Language), sharing how Kemp touched her life as a professor at Gallaudet University.

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NEWS: Deaf Malaysian Writer Wins National Media Award

Posted on 21 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Media & Journalism, News | Tags: , , , , , |

Challenges Deaf writer wins national Media Award

Kuala Lumpur, Oct 26, 2008: CHALLENGES writer James Chua has won the Mercedes-Benz Malaysia Red Ribbon Media Award in Journalism in HIV/AIDS reporting in Malaysia for the print media magazine category (English).

His Winning Entry : HIV/AIDS, a Serious Health Threat in Any Language was published in the very first issue of Challenges Magazine, that is Volume 1/issue 1 April 2008.

We, at Challenges, are so proud of James! Well Done!

more details : www.challengesmagazine.wordpress.com
www.challengesmag.com

Mary Chen
Editor
CHALLENGES
Malaysia’s 1st Cross-disability national magazine
Get your copy today online order :
http://www.challenges.kids.net.my

Get updates here
www.challengesmag.com
contact us: www.challengesmagazine.wordpress.com



Thank you to Mary Chen for submitting this item to We Can Do.

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Videos about Deaf Life: Central Arican Republic, Philippines, Venezuela, Mexico, Austria

Posted on 3 October 2008. Filed under: Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Employment, Latin America & Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , |

Four on-line videos give an overview of deaf communities around the world; all can be viewed at:

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2008/09/24/deaf-awareness-week-striving-for-quality-education/

The first video on this page shares the story of a school for deaf children in the Central African Republic that has been struggling for funding. Several teachers have quit because they have not been paid consistently for the past four years; only two teachers remain struggling on. Unfortunately, this type of story is common in many schools in developing countries–not only in deaf schools. This video is in the signed language of the Central African Republic with English subtitles. As a deaf person, I can’t tell if this video has English voice over for blind people.

The second video was made by deaf students in the Philippines. This video, in Philippines sign language and English subtitles, portrays the difficulties many deaf people in their country confront when they look for jobs after graduation. Unemployment is another challenge that is common to deaf people and disabled people all around the world–not only in developing countries but also in industrialized countries. I don’t know if this video has voice over.

In Venezuela, teachers for the deaf explain the importance of a bilingual and bi-cultural education. Some Venezuelan Sign Language is seen on the screen in the background scenes, and there are some occasional Spanish words on the screen in between visual shots of children in the classroom, etc. Unfortunately there are no subtitles in any language to help deaf people understand what the teachers say in this video. But hearing people who understand Spanish could give this one a try.

The last video has a deaf woman from Mexico and a deaf man from Austria simultaneously demonstrate the Mexican and Austrian fingerspelled alphabets; the cardinal numbers in Mexican and Austrian signed languages; and the names of the months. I’m guessing there is probably no audio description.

Sighted people will note that the Mexican and Austrian signed languages are dramatically different from each other. I can tell you that they are both also very different from American Sign Language–and all three languages are different from the signed language used in the San Jose area of Costa Rica.

In addition to the four videos, the following web page also has links that give more information about the programs described in the videos:

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2008/09/24/deaf-awareness-week-striving-for-quality-education/



Thank you to Sylvia Cabus for alerting me to these on-line videos.

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NEWS: Jamaica HIV & AIDS Program Includes Disabled People

Posted on 2 October 2008. Filed under: Blind, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean | Tags: , , , , |

The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS) program in Jamaica has been taking action to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind in HIV/AIDS education efforts. Initiatives include providing materials in Braille for blind people and incorporating sign language into television public service announcements for deaf people. Read more detail about the project at:

http://www.unaids.org/en/KnowledgeCentre/Resources/FeatureStories/archive/2008/20080905_disability_hiv_jamaica.asp

Learn more about HIV/AIDS in relation to people with disabilities, and some of the resources available to help, by clicking on HIV/AIDS in the pull-down menu under “Topics/Categories” in the right-hand navigation bar.



I learned about this project via a recent issue of the Disabled Peoples International electronic newsletter.

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RESOURCE: Deaf Peers’ Education Manual on Sexuality, HIV & AIDS

Posted on 30 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Research tells us that people with disabilities, and Deaf people, are at higher risk for HIV/AIDS than the general population. But many HIV/AIDS education programs exclude people with disabilities from opportunities to learn how to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS. Sometimes this exclusion is deliberate: some program managers mistakenly assume that Deaf and disabled people don’t need sexuality education because they don’t have sex. In other cases, programs exclude because they don’t offer sign language interpreters, nor do they offer print materials that are accessible to people who are intelligent but who have lacked access to opportunities for an education.

A training manual has been developed that can be used to help trainers learn how to facilitate workshops on sexual health and HIV/AIDS, entitled the The Deaf Peers’ Education Manual (PDF format, 6.44 Mb). This manual is targeted at members of the Kenyan Deaf community. The signs described in the manual, for example, assume knowledge of Kenyan Sign Language, rather than the many other hundreds of signed languages and dialects used around the world. However, most of the content can be easily adapted for use in Deaf communities in other countries.

The manual offers guidance to facilitators on how they can sensitively handle frank discussion of sexuality; the physical and emotional implications of human sexual development; the difference between friendship, infatuation, and real love; how the HIV virus is transmitted; the difference between HIV and AIDS; and how the HIV virus is NOT transmitted. It suggests a range of activities that can be used with Deaf participants to help them understand these complex and sensitive topics.

The manual was first released in 2007. But the organization that initiated the manual, Sahaya International, is interested in revising and updating the manual based on the feedback of other people who use it around the world. At this time, print copies of the manual are not available, but individuals may print their own copy from the PDF file. Koen Van Rampay with Sahaya International invites feedback on the manual, as well as discussion on printing and distributing the manual, at: kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu

More information about Sahaya International; their manual; and their project to teach Deaf people in Kenya about Sexuality and HIV/AIDS is available at:

http://www.sahaya.org/deaf.html

Please note that the manual has some separate, companion materials that trainers can use in educating Deaf participants. One set of printed materials can be used to teach participants basic facts on human sexual anatomy and reproduction. The other teaches participants about common myths related to HIV/AIDS. Both use cartoons and are designed to be used by readers who may have had limited opportunity to pursue an education or acquire literacy skills. The link to the main Deaf Peers’ Education Manual is available near the top of http://www.sahaya.org/deaf.html, but people will need to scroll down to the very bottom of the page to download the other materials.

The linked web page also shows some videos about the Sahaya International project in Kenya. These videos are in Kenya Sign Language with a voice interpreter (presumably in English). Unfortunately, these videos do not have subtitles. This creates a barrier for Deaf people outside of Kenya who might know other signed languages, but not Kenyan Sign Language. This is a shame because some of the people who are likely to have the strongest interest in the Sahaya International project are other Deaf people in other countries who want to emulate their efforts within their own local Deaf communities.

I hope that Sahaya International will find some low-cost (or no-cost) manner for putting subtitles on their videos. A suggestion: Many vloggers (video bloggers) who post to http://www.deafread.com face similar challenges where they wish to subtitle without high tech skills or financial resources. Perhaps a keyword search there would lead to web pages that offer tips, suggestions, and possible resources. Or, if someone reading this at We Can Do can offer the appropriate expertise or technical guidance, perhaps you could contact Sahaya International directly at kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu.



We Can Do learned about the Sahaya International project and manual when Ghulam Nabi Nizamani widely circulated an email originating with Koen Van Rampay.

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Deafblind International Conferences in September 2009 and in 2011

Posted on 30 September 2008. Filed under: Blind, Deaf, Events and Conferences, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , |

The organization Deaf Blind International is currently in the planning stages for two conferences within the next few years.

The first of these will be The Deafblind International 7th European Conference 2009. The theme of this conference will be “Tides, waves and currents in research and action”, and it will be held September 22 to 27, 2009 in Senigallia, Italy. More detail will be made available at www.dbiconference2009.it

The second of these will be the 15th Deafblind InteWorld Conference to be held in Delhi, India in 2011. Details are not yet available. But people interested in attending can keep watching http://www.deafblindinternational.org/standard/conferences.html for forthcoming details. An announcement will be posted there after it becomes available.



Thank you to Ricard Lopez for alerting me to these two conferences.

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Report from Seminar on Disaster Risk Reduction for Deaf People, Persons with Disabilities

Posted on 30 September 2008. Filed under: Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , |

Deaf people, and people with disabilities, are often at high risk during natural disasters and other large-scale emergencies. A seminar on disaster risk reduction for people with disabilities was held in Pakistan last July 2008. A summary of the lectures and presentations are available on-line at:

http://www.danishkadah.org.pk/activities/events/080720-DRR/program.html#speakers_introduction

Among other things, people may read a summary of a lecture describing a curriculum and teaching strategies used to teach deaf students how to protect their safety during disasters. Also included are bullet points from a speech that makes recommendations for the importance of including people with disabilities generally in all stages of disaster prevention and preparation.



We Can Do learned about this conference report via an email circulated by Ghulam Nabi Nizamani, who was one of the presenters at this conference.

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Guyana President Pledges Support to Deaf Awareness Week

Posted on 27 September 2008. Filed under: Deaf, Latin America & Caribbean, News | Tags: , , , |

One We Can Do reader has informed me that Guyana President President Bharrat Jagdeo pledged to support the Deaf Awareness Week initiated by a local Support Group of Deaf Persons. Read more detail in the Kaieteur News at:

http://www.kaieteurnews.com/?p=7626



Thank you to Montgomery Chester for bringing my attention to this story.

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Report on Seminar on Challenges and Hopes of Deaf and Hard of Hearing People

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Capacity Building and Leadership, Deaf, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, News, technology | Tags: , , , , , , |

In late August, a seminar was held in Pakistan entitled “Challenges and Hopes: Deaf and Hard of Hearing People in the 21st century,” sponsored by Danishkadah, an organization for the empowerment of leaders with disabilities.

Lectures were delivered on topics such as cochlear implants; sign language; removing barriers from the environment; assistive technology in education; information technology in developing countries; and others.

The Danishkadah web site has a report summarizing the highlights of what speakers said at:

http://www.danishkadah.org.pk/activities/events/080830-CH/program.html



We Can Do learned about this seminar report via an email from Ghulam Nabi Nizamani.

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10th Asia Pacific Congress on Deafness, August 4-7, 2009, Bangkok, Thailand

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Events and Conferences, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

Invitation to APCD2009

Deadline for submitting abstracts: January 31, 2009.

Dear Friends,

On behalf of the organizing committee, we would like to inform you regarding an upcoming Congress “10th Asia Pacific Congress on Deafness – APCD2009 will be held in connection with 10th Hearing International Annual Meeting-HI and 2nd ASEAN Academy of Neuro-Oto-Audiology-AANOA” at The Landmark Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand during 4-7th August, 2009. This will be another great event. It is my great privilege and pleasure to warmly invite you to be a part of these three combined conferences.

Organizing Committee of APCD2009 will ensure you of the innovative programming, latest technology and opportunity in Medical, Surgical, Rehabilitation and Education for the Hearing Impaired and the Deaf. Conference offers professional development for deaf education, teachers, interpreters, support staffs, professionals in the field of deafness and parents, audiologists and hearing specialists. You will have the opportunities to site visit of professional interest such as diagnostic and rehabilitation technology and school for the deaf in Bangkok .

We promise you that APCD2009 will be memorable from scientific, education and social aspects. We are looking forward to welcoming you to APCD2009.

Please note that the deadline for abstract submission is 31st January 2009.

Additionally, for more information please visit our website at http://www.apcd2009.org/. Any inquiries please do not hesitate to contact us at congress@apcd2009.org.

We will be appreciated if you could kindly forward this email to your members and friends.

Sincerely yours,
Suchitra Prasansuk M.D.
Congress President



This email was recently circulated via the Intl-Dev email news distribution service. All inquiries should be directed to the conference organizers, NOT to We Can Do. As indicated above, please visit the conference website for more detail.

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JOB FAIR, EnAble India, for persons with disabilities for unskilled or manual positions, Oct 5, 2008, Bangalore, India

Posted on 8 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Events and Conferences, Jobs & Internships, Mobility Impariments, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Subject: Job fair for persons with disabilities specially for unskilled / manual positions
EnAble India

October 5, 2008
 
Work Addr: #12, KHB Colony, Koramangala 8th Block,Bangalore 95
Telephone: 080 – 42823636, 2571 4842,
Mobile:        9845313919
Email:         enableindia@yahoo.co.in,
shanti@enable-india.org                                                         
Website:     www.enable-india.org   

To whomever it may concern
Dear Sir / Madam,
 
Greetings from EnAble India!
 
As you may be aware, Enable India is a non-profit organization working for the economic independence of persons with disabilities across India. Our major thrust is pre-employment training, rehabilitation, supplementary education, enabling other organizations, placement
services, etc.
 
EnAble India in collaboration with Confederation of Indian Industries (CII) is organizing job fair for persons with disabilities specially for unskilled / manual positions that are available in companies such as ITC, Building Control Solutions, Integra Apparels, etc.
 
Please look at the details below regarding positions available and types of disabilities suitable and support us to source right disabled candidates. The candidates qualification could be 10 standard or below 10 standard.

All the jobs are feasible for hearing impaired, low vision and mild physically disabled candidates. Require around 60 hearing impaired, 60 low vision and around 60 of persons with physical disability. You could source female candidates from out station also because one or two
companies are providing hostel facilities.
 
Details of the companies requirements
 
Company Name
No of Positions
Location
Disability Types
Types of Positions
Building Control Solutions
30
Bangalore International Airport
Whitefeild
MG Road
Bannergatta Road
Hearing Impaired
Physically Disabled
Low Vision
Parking Attendent/ care takers
Trolley Pushers
Porters

Integra Garments
 
119
HSR Layout
Hearing Impaired
Physically Disabled
Low Vision
(80% jobs are for hearing impaired – girls preferred for machine
operator  fresher positions )
 
Tailors – machine operators,  Helpers – Layers, Relayers, Feeding
helpers, fusing, data entry , Ironing, Kaja button  operators
 
ITC Agarbathi
10
Mysore Road, Chamraj pet
Hearing Impaired
Physically Disabled
Low Vision
Agarbathi packing
ITC Hotel
10
Palace Guttahalli
Hearing impaired / Low vision
House keeping
 
EnAble India staff members are willing to assist your organization to source / call / inform candidates.
 
The candidates can visit us on any of the convenient dates mentioned below for registration and training. (Please look at next page for the detailed schedule)
It is mandatory for candidates to register and attend training to take part in the job fair. The first preference would be given to the trained and good attitude candidates.
 
Kindly source candidates as per the requirements and join hands to provide economic independence for persons with disabilities.
 
We also request you to display this information in your organization notice board to spread the word faster.
Looking forward to hear from you at the earliest.
 
Thank you
 
Warm Regards
 
Job Fair Coordination Team
 
Cell: 9972018873
 

EnAble India –CII Job Fair for unskilled / manual jobs Schedule
 
September – October 2008
 
JOB FAIR ON 5TH OCT
  
JOB Fair on 5th October
REGISTRATION SCHEDULE
 
REGISTRATION SCHEDULE
TIMINGS: 10:00 AM TO 4:00 PM
First Registration
Sep 15, Sep 16
Second Registration
Sep 22, Sep 23
Third Registration
Sep 29, Sep 30

TRAINING SCHEDULE
 
TRAINING SCHEDULE
START DATE
END DATE
# OF DAYS
Disability
First Training
Sep 17
Sep 19
3 days (Sep 17, 18 & 19)
Hearing impaired/low vision/mild physically disabled
Second Training
Sep 24
Sep 26
3 days (Sep 24, 25 & 26)
Third Training
Oct 1
Oct 4
3 days (Oct 1, 3 & 4)

IMPORTANT NOTE
v     Candidates can choose their convenient days of registration and
training (only one day of registration and 3 days of training)
v     Preferably out station candidates can come on the last
registration and training since job fair date is closer
v     Registration for candidates is mandatory
v     Attending and completing training after registration is mandatory
v     Unregistered candidates are not encouraged for the training and
job fair
 
Venue: Livelihood Resource Centre, Leonard Cheshire Homes , Kodi halli,
Old Airport Road, Opposite to Manipal Hospital, Bangalore
 
For further details contact EnAble India on – 9972018873 / 42823636
Email: enableindia@yahoo.co.in,
shanti@enable-india.org
Website: www.enable-india.org



We Can Do received this notice from Mahesh Chandrasekah..

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World Federation of the DeafBlind 9th Helen Keller World Conference, Kampala, Uganda, Oct 22-27, 2009

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Call for Papers, Deaf, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Multiple Disabilities, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that this includes a call for abstracts for proposed presentations and workshops, the deadline for which is February 1, 2009.

FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT

World Federation of the DeafBlind, WFDB 9th Helen Keller World Conference and WFDB 3rd General Assembly

Imperial Royale Hotel, Kampala, Uganda, October 22 – 27, 2009.

Hosting organisation: The National Association of DeafBlind people Uganda, NADBU

Dates and programme:

Arrival Thursday October 22 ,2009 with a welcome reception in the evening

Friday, October 23: HKWC conference plenary sessions

Saturday, October 24: HKWC a day full of workshops 16 different topics

Sunday October 25: HKWC plenary morning session collecting results from workshops and in the afternoon a cultural event/ excursion

October 26 and 27 General Assembly of WFDB until late afternoon

Venue: Imperial Royale hotel in Kampala Uganda, a totally new five star hotel with excellent facilities for our conference.

The hotel has 270 rooms and the Imperial Group has two other hotels nearby from where they will provide free transport to the Conference hotel.

Hotel prices

A single room at Imperial Royale will cost 120 USD per night and a double room 177 USD including breakfast, taxes and free wireless internet access.

www.imperialhotels.co.ug/improyale_overview.htm

Grand Imperial hotel Single room 109 USD double/ twin room 144 USD including breakfast and taxes

www.imperialhotels.co.ug/grand_imperial_overview.htm

Hotel Equatoria single room 86 USD double / twin room 132 USD including breakfast and taxes

www.imperialhotels.co.ug/equatoria_overview.htm

Conference fee
The conference fee will be 200 euros per person for deafblind participants, 200 euros per person for interpreters/ assistants and 250 Euros per person for all others which will include welcome reception, conference material, 5 days lunches, 5 days coffee/ tea breaks, mineral water during the conference, but not excursions, conference dinner or any other dinner ,airport transfer and transport to conference, visa, vaccination and other personal expenses.

Day guests 50 USD including lunch, coffee/tea breaks and water

Sponsored participants

WFDB will sponsor a limited number of participants from developing countries.

Maximum one deafblind participant with interpreter/ assistant per country.

If you need sponsorship, please advice WFDB as soon as possible indicating travel cost from your country to Kampala, Uganda.

Conference theme:

CRPD, changing the lives of persons with deafblindness

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, CRPD is a human rights instrument. How can we use this instrument to ensure that the rights of persons with deafblindness are respected and enforced.

Plenary sessions and workshops will cover the following themes:

What is CRPD and what does it mean for persons with deafblindness?

How can organisations work towards ratification of CRPD in their country ?

When a country has ratified CRPD, what changes will happen?

How can deafblind organisations and individuals use CRPD and its provisions, covering the specific areas:

A. Recognition of deafblindness as a unique disability

B. Recognition of the needs of persons with deafblindness

C. Recognition of modes and means of communication including sign languages

D. Recognition as a Person before the law, legal capacity, dignity and integrity of the person

E. The right to job and livelihood, income generation

F. Support systems, how can we use CRPD to get services of interpreters, personal assistants and other support persons

G. Access to information and communication technology, including hearing aids, vision aids and communication devices

H. Peer support, forming support groups, self help groups and own organisations of persons with deafblindness

I. Women with deafblindness, their special situation and needs

J. International cooperation , North- south partnerships, south – south partnerships,

K. Rehabilitation. Community based rehabilitation and other models of rehabilitation

L. How can persons with deafblindness be included in the educational system? What does inclusive education mean for persons with deafblindness?

M. Access to health care. Prevention and treatment of HIV-Aids.

N. Partnerships with other DPOs , NGOs, government,local government, private enterprise, service providers, other partners.

O. Raising Awareness of the needs and skills of persons with deafblindness

P. Participation of persons with deafblindness in cultural life.

Call for abstracts:

Abstracts of plenary presentations or workshops covering one of these areas, can be sent to the WFDB office before February 1, 2009 see address below.

WFDB contact address:

Lex Grandia, Snehvidevej 13, DK 9400 Noerresundby , Denmark
phone: +45 98 19 20 99
fax: +45 98 19 20 57
e-mail: lex.grandia@mail.dk
wfdb@wfdb.org
website: www.wfdb.org



Lex Grandia recently circulated this notice on the IDA_CRPD_Forum email discussion group. If interested in this conference, then please contact Lex Grandia directly at the contact information provided above, NOT We Can Do. Thank you.

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REPORT: Personal Mobility, Accessibility for Disabled People in South East Europe

Posted on 20 August 2008. Filed under: Blind, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, Mobility Impariments, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Countries that have chosen to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) are now required to protect the right of people with disabilities to personal mobility; and to an accessible environment. But disabled people in the South-Eastern countries of Europe, such as Kosovo, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia, Albania, Croatia, and Hungary, are often denied the right simply to move from one place to another on the same basis as other people in their society. They lack mobility aids such as prosthestic devices, wheelchairs, and crutches; public buildings, and even their own homes, are not accessible to them; and neither is public transportation.

People who wish to learn more about the conditions that limit the mobility of people with disabilities in South East Europe–and what can be done to improve their situation–can consult a report entitled “Free movement of people with disabilities in south east Europe: an inaccessible right?” (PDF format, 1 Mb) This report addresses the mobility and accessibility needs of people with mobility impairments; people who are blind or have vision impairments; people with intellectual disabilities; and deaf people. The 124-page report was published by Handicap International in 2006.

The first part of the report discusses the current situation, and barriers, faced by people with various disabilities in South East Europe. The second part describes good practices that have successfully made the environment more accessible for people with disabilities throughout the region. The third part discusses the importance of awareness raising; the laws and policies needed to improve the situation; the need for training in universal design; and the importance of including people with disabilities in planning all new construction. The report closes with a series of recommendations.

The full report can be downloaded for free in
http://www.disabilitymonitor-see.org/documents/dmi2_eng/dmrII_webeng.pdf

People interested in creating accessible environments, and in the principles of universal design, may also be interested in learning about a free, on-line book on Universal Design and Visitability.



We Can Do learned about this report by exploring the newest resources to be posted at the AskSource.info database on disability issues; health issues; and development.

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NEWS: Disabled People of Pakistan to Receive Wheelchairs, Hearing Aids, Personal Attendants

Posted on 20 August 2008. Filed under: Assistive Devices, Deaf, Mobility Impariments, News, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Milestone National Network of DPOs (Disabled People’s Organizations) in Pakistan recently circulated the following email:

Dear Leaders of disabillity movement

Milestone National Network of DPOs has achieved a big target.

1- Disabled persons of Pakistan can get 1000 Rs every month directlly from the provicial government.

2- Severe disabled persons can get 2000 Rs as BENAZIR SOCIAL SECUTRITY FUND FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING, So its mean that now the severe disabled persons could use Personal attendent services.

3- All assesstive devices are by the Pakistan Bait ul Mall and the federal government. For devices you can send the application in milestone office or in Pakistan Bait ul Mall. An apllication with the copy of Nation ID card.
Disabled persons of Pakistan can get their own wheelchair due to their requirement of disabillity from government ( first 120 wheelchairs allready distributed on 14th Augest by the Zumard Khan sahab and Dr.Israr shah sahab with collaboration of Milestone.
Hearing Aid also available free of coast by the federal Government. 500
white can also distributed on 14th Augest.

4- If a familly have 2 or more the 2 disabled persons in a same familly that familly will declared a special respected familly and will supported by the government.

Dear friend we did this and implementation is also started and if you will not take responsiabillity to make it social movement it will be failed. Share this information with your collegue organizations and members with disabillities.

Lot of Love

Shafiq Ur Rehman
President
MILESTONE
479-omer block Allama Iqbal Town Lahore, Pakistan
MILESTONE H8/4 street NO 7 Next to Pakistan Bait ul Mall, Islamabad Pakistan

More detail about this program has been reported in the Pakistan publication, The News, at

http://www.thenews.com.pk/print1.asp?id=130062



Thank you to Shafiq Ur Rehman and to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for circulating this notice.

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JOB POST: Consultant, Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Posted on 19 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, signed languages | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Please note that this post gives information on two potential consulting positions: one for an international-level consultant for 15 days, the other for a national-level consultant for 30 days. Both consultants will work together for part of the project, but are being recruited separately. Please read all the information below carefully to ensure that you understand the nature of the project and the qualifications desired for each of the two positions so you can decide which of the two is best suited to your background. Please also note that all inquiries and applications should please be sent to the World Bank, NOT to We Can Do.

Deadline: September 12, 2008

Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project
INVIDIDUAL CONSULTING SERVICES
TF No. TF092635
Expressions of interest

The World Bank has received a “seed fund” from the Japan Social Development Fund toward the cost of preparing a Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project (“the Project”), and intends to apply part of the proceeds for consultant services. The services involve a short assignment to: (i) conduct community-based stakeholder consultations, and (ii) in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in the future Project proposal.

(The Project itself will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community. The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf. The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.)

The World Bank now invites eligible consultants to indicate their interest in providing the services. Interested consultants should provide information showing that they are qualified in the field of assignment and provide information on their technical and organizational capabilities.

A consultant will be selected in accordance with the procedures set out in the World Bank’s Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants by World Bank Borrowers (current edition).

Interested consultants may obtain further information at the address below during office hours (0900 to 1700 hours).

Expressions of interest must be e-mailed to jwaite@worldbank.org by September 12, 2008.

Deaf candidates are encouraged to express their interest in this assignment.

World Bank
Attn: Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist
63 Ly Thai To Street
Hanoi, VIETNAM
Tel: +84-4-9346600
Fax: +84-4-9346597
E-mail: jwaite@worldbank.org

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Vietnam: Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Stakeholder Consultation and Project Design: Terms of Reference
International Consultant Services

August 2008

Introduction
The World Bank has received a Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) “seed fund grant” to carry out stakeholder consultations, with a view to developing the detailed design of an Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project in Vietnam (hereafter “the Project”). This detailed design will form the basis of a proposal for a substantive JSDF Grant to finance the Project.

The World Bank intends to apply part of this seed fund to the hire of an international expert, who, in association with a national expert, will conduct the stakeholder consultations and, in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in a future Project proposal.

Background: deaf children’s development
Early childhood is the time of life when access to language models is crucial to the development of language and therefore to future learning. Deaf children rely on the sense of vision as their main channel of learning and communication. Only when young children who are deaf and their family members can use a shared language together will the child’s cognitive and social development proceed normally. The challenge is breaking through the communication gap with a visually supported language. Yet, worldwide, families with deaf infants and toddlers rarely have access to early education support. As a result, the deaf child’s development often suffers, leaving them at a major disadvantage in school and life.

Background: deaf education in Vietnam
In Vietnam, some 40,000 school-age children (i.e. aged 5 to 17) – or 18 out of every 10,000 – find it “very difficult to hear” (i.e. are severely deaf) or “impossible to hear” (i.e. are profoundly deaf). Almost all deaf children are born to hearing parents; for the most part, hearing parents (like hearing adults in general) have little awareness of the Deaf community, its language and its culture. As a result, young deaf children seldom come into contact with deaf adults (or even, until they start school, older deaf children).

In Vietnam, the provision of formal education to deaf youth began over 125 years ago, with an approach that used a sign language as the language of instruction. Despite this long and rich history, many deaf children still never go to school and those deaf children who do attend school often drop out before completing even Grade 5, with very few deaf youth receiving a secondary or tertiary education. Deaf children may attend special schools or mainstream schools. While special school classroom teachers are more likely than mainstream school classroom teachers to supplement their teaching with the use of signs (but generally not in a natural sign language mode), the dominant teaching approach is an “oralist” one that uses Vietnamese as the primary language of instruction.

IDEO Project concept
The Project will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf.

The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.

Consultant activities, outputs and timeline

Under this assignment, the Consultant will:

1. Produce an initial brief concept note to describe: (a) a range of options for Project activities to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) a range of options for Project implementation “civil society organizations” to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) describe the plan for stakeholder consultation under Activity 3. (Output: Brief concept note) [Timeline: Days 1 – 2]

2. Discuss and agree on this concept note with the World Bank supervisor. [Timeline: Day 3]

3. On the basis of the agreed concept note, consult with stakeholders (deaf associations, parents of deaf children, managers/teachers in schools catering specifically for deaf students, specialists addressing deaf education policy/practice/curriculum, NGOs involved with deaf education or disability support more generally) – in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and, if the schedule permits, Haiphong – to (a) determine appropriateness and feasibility of different Project activities, (b) establish appropriate beneficiary/geographical scope of the Project, and (c) identify appropriate civil society organizations (e.g. deaf associations, NGOs or a combination) to implement Project activities. [Timeline: Days 4 – 10]

4. On the basis of Activity 3 consultation, produce a concise report containing specific recommendations (for inclusion in the proposal for the Project) that describe inter alia (a) the range of Project activities, (b) the scope of the Project, especially in terms of target beneficiary age, target beneficiary numbers and target geographical areas, (c) the selection of civil society organizations to be invited to implement the Project, (d) the specifications of the on-going monitoring and evaluation framework (objectives, indicators, information collection, responsible entities, etc.) to assess Project performance throughout its various phases, and (e) the estimated costs of the Project (disaggregated by phase and expenditure category). (Output: Final report) [Timeline: Days 11 – 14]

5. Brief the World Bank supervisor on the findings of the consultation process and other relevant information, the contents of the report and the specific recommendations. (Output: Briefing) [Timeline: Day 15]

Consultant qualifications and experience

The Consultant will have:
 An advanced university degree in Deaf studies, education, social sciences or a related discipline, with expertise in Deaf education (preferably early child education);
 Substantial international experience in Deaf education, preferably in developing countries;
 Substantial international involvement with Deaf communities, preferably in developing countries;
 An understanding of natural sign language modalities, and preferably some knowledge of a natural sign language (especially a Vietnamese or historically related sign language [e.g. a Thai/Lao sign language, French sign language, American sign language]);
 Demonstrated capacity to organize and manage community-based consultation processes (e.g. workshops, focus groups, town-hall meetings, etc.);
 Demonstrated capacity to work effectively in a team, to manage a range of tasks, to work pro-actively and with diligence, and to manage resources effectively while meeting deadlines;
 Excellent report writing skills in English; and
 Strong computer skills in word processing and communication.

Assignment modalities and duration
The International Consultant will carry out this assignment in association with a National Consultant (who will be hired separately by the World Bank). The International Consultant will be the senior member of the team and will have overall responsibility for: (i) the conduct of the consultation events, (ii) the delivery of the initial note and the final report, and (iii) the briefings for the World Bank team.

It is expected that the International Consultant will work approximately 15 days (half of this time spent in Vietnam for the consultation sessions). (The National Consultant will work approximately 30 days, spending the additional days in preparation tasks: contacting stakeholders, conducting pre-meetings with stakeholders, setting up consultation events, organizing stakeholder consultation logistics, facilitating communication at stakeholder consultation events, and liaising with the World Bank supervisor on organizational matters.)

The two members of the team will be selected to ensure that they are able to communicate effectively with each other, as well as – in some working combination – with stakeholders (in Vietnamese or a Vietnamese sign language, as appropriate) and with the World Bank supervisor (in English).

The Consultant will be responsible for: (i) arranging his/her own travel and accommodation; (ii) managing the stakeholder consultation sessions; and (iii) arranging for the production of the initial note and final report. (The World Bank team will be responsible for making all payments associated with stakeholder consultation events [space rental, food, participants’ per-diems, etc.]).

Administration
The work in this contract is supervised by Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank in Hanoi. The Japan Social Development Fund “seed fund grant” that finances this study ends on August 31, 2009.

Annex 1: Partial list of stakeholders

Haiphong Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hải Phòng)
Hanoi Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hà Nội) [http://www.deafhanoi.com & http://360.yahoo.com/clbnnkh/%5D [Contact: Trần Ngọc Tuần]
HCMC Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc TP.HCM)
See also: Asia Pacific Development Center on Disability: List of disability NGOs in Vietnam: http://www.apcdproject.org/Countryprofile/vietnam/nongov.html

Hoa Sua School, Hanoi (Trường Trung học Tư thục Kinh tế Du lịch Hoa Sữa) [http://www.hoasuaschool.com/]
Nhan Chinh School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Dân lập Dạy Trẻ điếc Nhân Chính)
Thanh Tri School, Hanoi (Trương Nuôi dạy Trẻ Khuyết tật Thanh Trì)
Xa Dan School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Xã Đàn)

Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers College, Dong Nai (Dự án Giáo dục Đại học cho Người điếc Việt Nam, Cao đẳng Sư phạm Đồng Nai, TP. Đồng Nai) [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Hoa]
Hy Vong I School, HCMC (Trường Khuyết tật Thính giác Hy Vọng I)
Hy Vong Binh Thanh School, HCMC (Trường Hy Vọng Bình Thạnh)
Thuan An Education Center, Lai Thieu, Binh Duong (Trung tâm Giáo dục Trẻ Khiếm thính Thuận An) [formerly known as École des sourds-muets de Lái-Thiêu] [http://www.thuongvevietnam.org/webseiten/thuanan/html/thuanan_en.html]

Hanoi Pedagogy University Dại học Sư phạm Hà Nội, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt)
HCMC Pedagogy University (Dại học Sư phạm TP.HCM, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt) [Contact: Cao Thị Xuân Mỹ]
Vietnam Institute for Educational Sciences (Bộ Giáo dục và Đào Tạo, Viện Khoa học Giáo dục, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Giáo dục Trẻ Khuyết tật) [Contact: Lê Văn Tạc]

Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi [Contact: Phạm Minh Hằng]
Save the Children UK, Hanoi [http://www.savethechildren.net/vietnam/] [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Bịch]

Annex 2: Partial list of resources

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2002). Ký hiệu Củ chỉ Điệu bộ của Người điếc Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2004). Ký hiệu của Người điếc Việt Nam / Signs of the Deaf in Vietnam. (3 volumes). Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (n.d.). Tài liệu Ngôn ngữ Ký hiệu cho Trẻ Khiếm thính Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Student Handbooks 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Companion Dictionaries 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Locker-McKee, R. (2005). “As one Deaf person to another”: Deaf paraprofessionals in mainstream schools. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 1-48.

Reilly, C. & Nguyen Cong Khanh. (2004). Final Evaluation Report for Inclusive Education For Hearing-Impaired and Deaf Children in Vietnam. Pearl S. Buck International-Vietnam, U.S. Agency for International Development (Grant No. 492-G-0098-00040-00), Hanoi, Vietnam.
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/humanitarian_assistance/the_funds/pubs/reportlst.html)

Reilly, C. (2004-08). “Outside the Dream” Project (Thailand). UNESCO Programme for the Education of Children in Need / Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education and Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. (http://research.gallaudet.edu/sl/)

Woodward, J. (2000). Sign languages and sign language families in Thailand and Viet Nam. In K. Emmorey & H. Lane (eds.), The Signs of Language Revisited: An Anthology in Honor of Ursuala Bellugi and Edward Klima. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 23-47.

Woodward, J. (2003). Sign languages and Deaf identities in Thailand and Viet Nam. In L. Monaghan et al. (eds.), Many Ways to be Deaf. Washington, D.C., USA: Gallaudet University Press, pp. 283-301.

Woodward, J. et al. (2004). Providing higher educational opportunities to Deaf adults in Viet Nam through Vietnamese sign languages. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 232-263.

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Vietnam: Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Stakeholder Consultation and Project Design: Terms of Reference
National Consultant Services

August 2008

Introduction
The World Bank has received a Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) “seed fund grant” to carry out stakeholder consultations, with a view to developing the detailed design of an Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project in Vietnam (hereafter “the Project”). This detailed design will form the basis of a proposal for a substantive JSDF Grant to finance the Project.

The World Bank intends to apply part of this seed fund to the hire of an national expert, who will support an international expert to conduct the stakeholder consultations and, in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in a future Project proposal.

Background: deaf children’s development
Early childhood is the time of life when access to language models is crucial to the development of language and therefore to future learning. Deaf children rely on the sense of vision as their main channel of learning and communication. Only when young children who are deaf and their family members can use a shared language together will the child’s cognitive and social development proceed normally. The challenge is breaking through the communication gap with a visually supported language. Yet, worldwide, families with deaf infants and toddlers rarely have access to early education support. As a result, the deaf child’s development often suffers, leaving them at a major disadvantage in school and life.

Background: deaf education in Vietnam
In Vietnam, some 40,000 school-age children (i.e. aged 5 to 17) – or 18 out of every 10,000 – find it “very difficult to hear” (i.e. are severely deaf) or “impossible to hear” (i.e. are profoundly deaf). Almost all deaf children are born to hearing parents; for the most part, hearing parents (like hearing adults in general) have little awareness of the Deaf community, its language and its culture. As a result, young deaf children seldom come into contact with deaf adults (or even, until they start school, older deaf children).

In Vietnam, the provision of formal education to deaf youth began over 125 years ago, with an approach that used a sign language as the language of instruction. Despite this long and rich history, many deaf children still never go to school and those deaf children who do attend school often drop out before completing even Grade 5, with very few deaf youth receiving a secondary or tertiary education. Deaf children may attend special schools or mainstream schools. While special school classroom teachers are more likely than mainstream school classroom teachers to supplement their teaching with the use of signs (but generally not in a natural sign language mode), the dominant teaching approach is an “oralist” one that uses Vietnamese as the primary language of instruction.

IDEO Project concept
The Project will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf.

The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.

Consultant activities and timeline

Under this assignment, the Consultant will:

1. In advance of the International Consultant’s arrival in Vietnam, contact stakeholders, conduct pre-meetings with stakeholders, set up consultation events, organize stakeholder consultation logistics, and liaise with the World Bank supervisor on organizational matters. [Timeline: Days 1 – 10]

2. Support the International Consultant in producing an initial brief concept note to describe: (a) a range of options for Project activities to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) a range of options for Project implementation “civil society organizations” to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) describe the plan for stakeholder consultation under Activity 3. [Timeline: Days 11 – 12]

3. Participate in the discussion on this concept note with the World Bank supervisor. [Timeline: Day 13]

4. Support the International Consultant in conducting stakeholders consultation events – in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and, if the schedule permits, Haiphong – with particular responsibility for facilitating communication at these events. [Timeline: Days 14 – 20]

5. Support the International Consultant in producing a concise report containing specific recommendations for inclusion in the proposal for the Project. [Timeline: Days 21 – 24]

6. Participate in the briefing with the World Bank supervisor on the findings of the consultation process and other relevant information, the contents of the report and the specific recommendations. [Timeline: Day 25]

7. After the departure of the International Consultant, liaise with the World Bank supervisor on any follow-up tasks related to the assignment. [Timeline: Days 26 – 30]

Consultant qualifications and experience

The national consultant will have:
 At least an upper secondary education qualification (i.e. having completed Grade 12);
 Experience in Deaf education in Vietnam;
 Involvement with Deaf communities in Vietnam;
 Native or near-native proficiency in a Vietnamese sign language;
 Ability to communicate effectively in Vietnamese, and preferably with at least a basic ability to communicate through written English;
 Demonstrated capacity to organize and manage community-based consultation processes (e.g. workshops, focus groups, townhall meetings, etc.); and
 Demonstrated capacity to work effectively in a team, to manage a range of tasks, to work pro-actively and with diligence, and to manage resources effectively while meeting deadlines.

Assignment modalities and duration
The National Consultant will carry out this assignment in association with an International Consultant (who will be hired separately by the World Bank). The National Consultant will be the junior member of the team; as such, he/she will support the International Consultant in all aspects of the carrying out of the assignment and contribute to the content of the assignment outputs. (The International Consultant, as the senior member, will have overall responsibility for: (i) the conduct of the consultation events, (ii) the delivery of the initial note and the final report, and (iii) the briefings for the World Bank team.)

The National Consultant will work approximately 30 days, including 10 days before the arrival of the International Consultant in Vietnam. (It is expected that the International Consultant will work approximately 15 days [half of this time spent in Vietnam for the consultation sessions].)

The two members of the team will be selected to ensure that they are able to communicate effectively with each other, as well as – in some working combination – with stakeholders (in Vietnamese or a Vietnamese sign language, as appropriate) and with the World Bank supervisor (in English).

The Consultant will be responsible for: (i) arranging his/her own travel and accommodation; (ii) managing the stakeholder consultation sessions; and (iii) arranging for the production of the initial note and final report. (The World Bank team will be responsible for making all payments associated with stakeholder consultation events [space rental, food, participants’ per-diems, etc.]).

Administration
The work in this contract is supervised by Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank in Hanoi. The Japan Social Development Fund “seed fund grant” that finances this study ends on August 31, 2009.

Annex 1: Partial list of stakeholders

Haiphong Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hải Phòng)
Hanoi Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hà Nội) [http://www.deafhanoi.com & http://360.yahoo.com/clbnnkh/] [Contact: Trần Ngọc Tuần]
HCMC Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc TP.HCM)
See also: Asia Pacific Development Center on Disability: List of disability NGOs in Vietnam: http://www.apcdproject.org/Countryprofile/vietnam/nongov.html

Hoa Sua School, Hanoi (Trường Trung học Tư thục Kinh tế Du lịch Hoa Sữa) [http://www.hoasuaschool.com/]
Nhan Chinh School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Dân lập Dạy Trẻ điếc Nhân Chính)
Thanh Tri School, Hanoi (Trương Nuôi dạy Trẻ Khuyết tật Thanh Trì)
Xa Dan School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Xã Đàn)

Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers College, Dong Nai (Dự án Giáo dục Đại học cho Người điếc Việt Nam, Cao đẳng Sư phạm Đồng Nai, TP. Đồng Nai) [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Hoa]
Hy Vong I School, HCMC (Trường Khuyết tật Thính giác Hy Vọng I)
Hy Vong Binh Thanh School, HCMC (Trường Hy Vọng Bình Thạnh)
Thuan An Education Center, Lai Thieu, Binh Duong (Trung tâm Giáo dục Trẻ Khiếm thính Thuận An) [formerly known as École des sourds-muets de Lái-Thiêu] [http://www.thuongvevietnam.org/webseiten/thuanan/html/thuanan_en.html]

Hanoi Pedagogy University Dại học Sư phạm Hà Nội, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt)
HCMC Pedagogy University (Dại học Sư phạm TP.HCM, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt) [Contact: Cao Thị Xuân Mỹ]
Vietnam Institute for Educational Sciences (Bộ Giáo dục và Đào Tạo, Viện Khoa học Giáo dục, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Giáo dục Trẻ Khuyết tật) [Contact: Lê Văn Tạc]

Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi [Contact: Phạm Minh Hằng]
Save the Children UK, Hanoi [http://www.savethechildren.net/vietnam/] [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Bịch]

Annex 2: Partial list of resources

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2002). Ký hiệu Củ chỉ Điệu bộ của Người điếc Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2004). Ký hiệu của Người điếc Việt Nam / Signs of the Deaf in Vietnam. (3 volumes). Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (n.d.). Tài liệu Ngôn ngữ Ký hiệu cho Trẻ Khiếm thính Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Student Handbooks 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Companion Dictionaries 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Locker-McKee, R. (2005). “As one Deaf person to another”: Deaf paraprofessionals in mainstream schools. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 1-48.

Reilly, C. & Nguyen Cong Khanh. (2004). Final Evaluation Report for Inclusive Education For Hearing-Impaired and Deaf Children in Vietnam. Pearl S. Buck International-Vietnam, U.S. Agency for International Development (Grant No. 492-G-0098-00040-00), Hanoi, Vietnam.
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/humanitarian_assistance/the_funds/pubs/reportlst.html)

Reilly, C. (2004-08). “Outside the Dream” Project (Thailand). UNESCO Programme for the Education of Children in Need / Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education and Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. (http://research.gallaudet.edu/sl/)

Woodward, J. (2000). Sign languages and sign language families in Thailand and Viet Nam. In K. Emmorey & H. Lane (eds.), The Signs of Language Revisited: An Anthology in Honor of Ursuala Bellugi and Edward Klima. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 23-47.

Woodward, J. (2003). Sign languages and Deaf identities in Thailand and Viet Nam. In L. Monaghan et al. (eds.), Many Ways to be Deaf. Washington, D.C., USA: Gallaudet University Press, pp. 283-301.

Woodward, J. et al. (2004). Providing higher educational opportunities to Deaf adults in Viet Nam through Vietnamese sign languages. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 232-263.

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page



We Can Do received this job post via a contact at the World Bank. Please note that all inquiries, applications, or expressions of interest should be directed to the World Bank, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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Ayudar a los niños sordos–en español: New Hesperian Foundation Title in Spanish

Posted on 19 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Deaf, Families, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, Resources, signed languages | Tags: , , , |

BILINGUAL POST in English and Spanish; bilingual articulo en ingles y español. (¡Ojala que mi español es bastante claro!)

The Hesperian Foundation has released its book entitled Helping Children Who Are Deaf in Spanish for the first time. It can be downloaded in PDF format for free, one chapter at a time.

El “Hesperian Foundation” ha publicado el libro, Ayudar a los niños sordos, en español. Se puede transferido el libro sin coste (en formato PDF) un capítulo a la vez.

Says, the Hesperian Foundation, “Ayudar a los niños sordos (Helping Children Who Are Deaf in Spanish) supports parents and other caregivers in building the communication skills of babies and young children. Packed with simple activities, this book is a great resource for people who care for children who do not hear well including parents, caregivers, health promoters, and
others in teaching a deaf child how to communicate to the best of his or her ability.”

El Hesperian Foundation ha dicho, “Ayudar a los niños sordos apoyo familiar y comunitario para niños que no oyen bien. Los niños que no pueden oír bien necesitan más ayuda para aprender un idioma hablado o un lenguaje de señas, lo cual es muy importante, porque el lenguaje es la base para pensar, solucionar problemas y relacionarnos con otras personas. Este libro está lleno de actividades sencillas y será un gran recurso para las personas que cuidan de niños sordos, ya sean padres, otros cuidadores y/o promotores de salud, ya que les ofrece herramientas para enseñarle al niño a comunicarse lo mejor que pueda.”
http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download_Sordos.php

The Hesperian Foundation produces a wide range of books for people and organizations in developing countries. It’s most famous book is “Where There is No Doctor,” which has helped many workers in rural areas save lives.

El Hesperian Foundation se publica muchos libros varios para personas y organizaciones en países en desarrollo. El libro más famoso es “Donde no hay medico,” lo cual ha ayuda mucho personas en areas campos salvar las vidas.

Download Ayudar a los niños sordos en español at http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download_Sordos.php

Hesperian Foundation has many other books that can be downloaded for free. Most are in English, some are in Spanish, and one is in French. You can find these at http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download.php

El Hesperian Foundation tiene muchos libros libres. Todos son en ingles. Algunos son en español. Uno es en francés. Se puede encontrar todos a http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download.php



I learned about this book through an announcement from the Hesperian Foundation.

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RESOURCE: Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Children, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Less than a decade ago, more than 100 million primary-school aged children still had never entered a classroom. Today, that number has dropped below 80 million, even though the world’s population has grown in that time. Clearly progress has been made. But children with disabilities are being left behind: one-third of the world’s children out of school are disabled. Many of the rest are excluded for other reasons that pose their own set of challenges: some are left behind because they are girls; or because they don’t speak the dominant language of their country; or because they experience discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity.

How can Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and other Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) help schools in their country be more inclusive of students who have commonly been excluded? Save the Children UK has released a new report that offers guidance: “Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience” (PDF format, 4.14 Mb). This report describes successful projects, and the lessons learned, from countries as diverse as Vietnam, Kyrgyzstan, Peru, Bangladesh, China, Somalia, Brazil, Western Balkans, Mongolia, Nepal, Tajikistan, Serbia, India, and Morocco. Children with disabilities are targeted for many of these projects.

The report begins by describing both the conditions that prevent inclusive education and the conditions that can help make it possible. It also analyzes projects that have made it possible for linguistic minority students–and Deaf students–to obtain a bilingual education. Teacher training programs have helped encourage teachers to create more inclusive classrooms for children with disabilities and other students who have historically been excluded. Several countries have used Community-based Education Management Information Systems (C-EMIS) to draw upon the knowledge and motivation of local community members in making education more inclusive. Each chapter ends by discussing what lessons other communities in other countries may find helpful in implementing their own projects.

Advocates who tire of hearing governments complain there isn’t enough money will especially wish to read the 6th chapter on “Addressing financial barriers to inclusive education.” Funding issues are also discussed briefly throughout earlier chapters of Making Schools Inclusive (PDF format, 4.14 Mb).

The 8th chapter points readers to further materials and resources that may be helpful to them in advocating for more inclusive education in their countries.

The full 64-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (4.14 Mb) at http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Making%20schools%20inclusive%20SCUK.pdf.



We Can Do learned of this report through an announcement posted on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. The discussion group is devoted to issues relating to inclusive education in Eastern Africa.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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Symposium on African Sign Languages

Posted on 17 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Deaf, Events and Conferences, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, signed languages, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

The first Symposium on African Sign Languages (SAfSL) will be held in Cologne, Germany from August 17 to 19, 2009.

The symposium, hosted by Dany Adone, Claudia Becker, and Thomas Kaul from the University of Cologne, is being held within a wider conference on African languages, the 6th World Congress of African Lingustics (WOCAL 6), held August 17-21, 2009.

Contributions to the symposium are invited on the following topics:

  • linguistic research on African Sign Languages
  • reports on undocumented or under-documented African Sign Languages
  • reports on endangered African Sign Languages
  • reports on emerging African Sign Languages
  • education and African Sign Languages
  • language policies and African Sign languages

The WOCAL congress language is English. The languages for the Symposium on African Sign Languages, however, are English and International Sign language.

If the Symposium is able to raise enough funds, then they may be able to provide some limited financial support to participants from outside Europe, particularly from Africa. Those who need support are urged to send in their detailed request together with an abstract of their presentation. Beneficiaries will be identified based on this information and will be notified.

People interested in submitting abstracts, attending the conference, applying for assistance, or otherwise learning more detail about the Symposium on African Sign Languages should please consult the conference web site at http://www.uni-koeln.de/phil-fak/afrikanistik/wocal/.

People who still have questions after consulting the WOCAL web site can direct their queries to the conference organizers (NOT We Can Do) at WOCAL6@uni-koeln.de. You may also wish to subscribe to the WOCAL conference newsletter for further updates at WOCAL6-newsletter@uni-koeln.de.



We Can Do learned about this conference via the newly inaugurated DeafStudies-Africa listserv. Further details, and part of the text for this announcement, were gathered from the WOCAL web site.

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CONFERENCE: 2nd Intl Forum of the Deaf in Morocco on Mental Health

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Call for Nominations or Applications, Deaf, Events and Conferences, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Psychiatric Disabilities, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The 2nd international Forum of the Deaf

The 2nd International Forum of the Deaf in Morocco is an initiative that aims to promote: Mental Health awareness among the medical core and the deaf community of Morocco. The establishment of  a national policy to investigate the linguistic, social, mental health, and physical needs of the deaf; for the purpose of developing a cohesive network for the implantation of programs to benefit the unification of the deaf community in Morocco. Subsequently, it will promote contact, participation and cooperation among deaf associations.
 
This Forum is entitled “Mental health and deafness” which will be held in the city of Fez, in order to better educate the population on the issues facing the deaf community.  In accordance with the royal directives, and the initiative of human development, The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf Association, The Africa Contact Group For Mental Health and Deafness and the World Federation of the Deaf are organizing a Forum of the deaf of Morocco from October 9th to 11th 2008.  45 deaf associations with two delegates (1 deaf and 1 hearing) and 120 specialized educators representing all of Morocco national territories will be invited to attend the forum. The forum of the Deaf of Morocco will comprise of three major themes: Mental Health and deafness, Education and academic qualification, and Sign language.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf is engaged in a number of campaigns to raise the standard of living of the deaf in Morocco. There is a growing public interest in the use of sign language in the various social domains where the deaf are involved. These include courts of law, educational institutions, police stations, and other various places of work. An outstanding example of this association’s dedication for the empowerment of the deaf are a special education training for educators May 2008, a SL training for police officers March 2008 and two summer youth camps for the deaf that were held in Rabat August 2006 and Salé August 2007.  These camps gave the deaf youth of Morocco a chance to interact with one another and to build life long friendships.  As well as, the first steps in building cooperation and participation among deaf associations in Morocco.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS), is looking for organizations to help them organize the second international forum of the deaf in Fez.

The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) is a non-governmental organization that strives to address the needs of the entire community, including the deaf youth of Morocco. Its membership consists of over 20 professionals from the city and surrounding areas of the province who have come together to pool their resources and labor in order to help develop the deaf community. The association was incorporated in 2006 under the laws of Morocco with the goal of helping to develop the social and economic roles of the deaf in the larger society. They are led by elected officers, including: a president, treasurer, secretary and vice president, who are chosen each year at an annual meeting.
 
The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) is nonprofit and raises money for projects through donations from members, grants, and donations from local, national and international government, and non-government organizations. The group has received various awards and certificates of recognition from the government in advancing the status of the deaf.

The association established The First International Forum of the Deaf of Morocco in 2006 in collaboration with the Dutch Foundation Marokkofonds.  The forum was an instrumental opportunity to promote deaf issues in Morocco and International.  This association has also
been advocating the nationwide adoption of sign language as the medium of instruction in all deaf schools and training institutions.

Furthermore, they lobby the Moroccan government of the challenges facing the deaf community.  Finally, this association developed and implemented deaf youth summer camps in association with the Ministry of Sports and Youth.
 
The successful projects led by The Moroccan Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) have illustrated the need to develop deaf awareness, and networking skills to overcome the limited opportunities for the deaf community within the Moroccan society as a whole. The members of The Moroccan
Forum of the Deaf (AFMS) approaches international institutions with the idea of organizing a group of deaf associations and helping them develop these specific skills, with an end goal of enabling them to advance from their current social and economic situation.

Expected outcomes

  • Meadows of 200 thousand deaf persons together with the Moroccan medical core will be sensitized on the mental health and human right of the deaf issues.
  • Implementing awareness raising projects.
  • Deaf empowerment.
  • Training in special education and sign language
  • Establishing a wide range of contacts.

Methodology
 The statistics of 200 thousand deaf persons usually expose a big number of the deaf to the means of specific communication of the handicapped and the non-implication of the handicapped in the programs or fight projects against the sexually transmittable diseases.

 After the difficulties proven by this category of the handicapped the Moroccan Forum of the Deaf Association takes advantage of this occasion to initiate a campaign of sensitization on the deaf problems, with the assistance of the interpreters in signs. It will also target the medical core and the Moroccan administrations to explain through the different international experts the importance of mental health and deafness.
 
The proposed forum will focus on many of the aforementioned elements in a professional sitting.  A subcommittee of Moroccan facilitators, French facilitators, and other Volunteers will focus on planning programs, while other members of the Moroccan Forum of the Deaf will concentrate on administrative elements of the forum. In implementing both of these as well as cultural activities, the forum will meet the aforementioned objectives.
 
Economic and Social Exchange:

  • Presentations on management methods for the purposes of developing and implementing projects will be presented.
  • Presentation on education and vocational training.
  • Presentation on sign language in the media.
  • Presentations on the need for a unified signing language for the purpose of educational and social development of the deaf will be presented.
  • Exhibition of handcrafted products made by the deaf will be on display.
  • Associations of the deaf will perform musical concert and theatrical presentations daily.

Workshops

  • Mental health and Deafness
  • Education and vocational training
  • Sign language linguistics

If you have any questions related to the conference please feel free to contact :

Mr. Abdelaziz Arssi- Project Director 
Tel/SMS : 0021262102415
Fax:0021235601651
Mail: fmsourds@gmail.com 

Mr. Mohammed DDich -Program Manager
Tel/SMS:0021266511034
Mail:fmsourds@gmail.com

Mr.Rachid El Ouardi- Finance Manager
Tel/SMS: 0021262216863
Mail: fmsourds@gmail.com 

Thank you for your time and consideration on this important issue facing the deaf community of Morocco. 



We Can Do received this announcement via the AdHoc_IDC listserv. People interested in the conference should please contact one of the organizers directly, not We Can Do. (Note their phone numbers and email address given above.)

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NEWS: Sign Language Training Program Launches in Guyana

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Deaf, Education, Education and Training Opportunities, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Guyana Ministry of Education, in partnership with the Guyana Community Based Rehabilitation Programme (GCBRP), has initiated a sign language training program targeted at improving the quality of education for deaf children, the Kaieteur News has reported. The program will provide sign language training to teachers so they can better accommodate the communicate need of deaf children in their classrooms. It is being offered through the St. Stanislaus College in Brickdam.

Read the original Kaieteur News story entitled “Education Ministry launches sign language training” for more detail at:

http://www.kaieteurnews.com/?p=782



Thank you to Monty Chester for alerting me to this news item.

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TRAINING: New Ethiopian Sign Language & Deaf Culture University Degree

Posted on 25 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Education and Training Opportunities, News, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , |

Press Release – Ethiopian Sign Language degree
No. 1/08

The Department of Linguistics, Addis Ababa University, organized and conducted a one day consultative workshop on a Draft syllabus of a BA program in Ethiopian Sign Language (ESL) and Deaf Culture on March 14, 2008 in Addis Ababa. The purpose of the workshop is to evaluate the draft syllabus with the presence of stakeholders who are working in the area of sign language and Deaf Education. The participants are mainly teachers of Deaf schools, Deaf Students, representatives from Deaf Association, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs, NGOs, various relevant government offices and the university officials.

Ethiopia’s first BA program in ESL and Deaf Culture has the following main objectives:

  • Train Deaf teachers and Deaf sign linguists,
  • Promoting the growth and enrichment of the ESL and,
  • Promote collaborative research on ESL.

It was told by the participants that such initiatives taken by the university is encouraging to minimize the shortage of teachers of deaf students all over the country. This three years BA program is hopefully to be launched in October 2008. Besides, the department has a future plan to set up a Regional Sign Language Center. Therefore, the department invites professionals to support our effort in the improvement of Ethiopian Deaf Education and for the development of Ethiopian Sign Language.

Currently, the department gives a non-credit, free of charge, awareness raising course on ESL and Deaf Culture for the University community. There are about 250 students attending this course in six (6) classes and will be certified on June 2008.

Inquiry about the Sign Language Program in Addis Ababa University can be made to the following addresses:

Dr. Hirut WoldeMariam, Chairperson, Dep’t of Linguistics, AAU
Email- hirutwoldemariam@yahoo.com

Dr. Moges Yigezu, ESL and Deaf Culture Project Leader,
Email- mogesyigezu@yahoo.com.au

Eyasu Hailu, ESL and Deaf Culture Project Coordinator
Email- tusaye11@gmail.com

Department of Linguistics
Addis Ababa University

April 2008



We Can Do obtained this press release via the DeafStudies-Africa listserv. Please note that inquiries related to the Ethiopian Sign Language program should be directed to one of the three email addresses given above, not to We Can Do.

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Listserv on Deaf Studies, Sign Linguistics in Africa

Posted on 13 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Deaf, Middle East and North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Dr Victoria Nyst at Leiden University and Shane Gilchrist ÓhEorpa at the University of Amsterdam have set up a new yahoogroups (listserv) for scholars and researchers in Deaf Studies, Sign Linguistics, and related studies in Africa.

The group is open to people who have some expertise/knowledge about the Deaf Community in Africa.

In order to join the group, you need to send a blank email to:

deafstudies-africa-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

and you will be automatically added.

This group is meant to be a small, informal, perhaps chatty group for scholars in Deaf Studies, Sign Linguistics, and related topics in Africa.

You can read past messages posted in the DeafStudies-Africa listserv via the web at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DeafStudies-Africa/. However, to post messages of your own, you need to be subscribed. Follow the link for more details.



Thank you to Shane Gilchrist ÓhEorpa for circulating this notice on the deafintl listserv.

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JOB POST: Director, Perkins International Program, in Watertown, Massachusetts, USA

Posted on 11 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Children, Deaf, Education, Jobs & Internships, Multiple Disabilities, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Perkins School for the Blind
Job Description

Job Title: Director
Program: Perkins International Program
Supervisor: President
Location: Watertown Campus and Frequent Traveling

The following statements describe the principal duties to be performed. It is not intended to be a complete description of all the requirements of the position.

GENERAL SUMMARY

Provides leadership, collegial supervision and oversight of programs and services for children who are deafblind or blind with multiple disabilities and their families. Coordinate the national and the international work of the Hilton/Perkins Program and other international initiatives. Serve as a member of the Perkins senior management team.

The mission of Perkins International is to improve the quality of life for children who are blind, deafblind or blind with multiple disabilities throughout the world. We collaborate with hundreds of local partners to provide direct services to children and their families, create innovative education programs, expand local and regional expertise, augment leadership skills in teachers and professionals, and promote Braille literacy. We also advocate for policies and programs that impact the lives of children with visual and other disabilities at local, national and international levels. (www.perkins.org)

DUTIES TO BE PERFORMED

  • Regularly visit international program partners to support regional staff in meeting program goals and objectives.
  • Work with government and non-government organizations to develop programs and services, to improve and expand the quantity and quality of services for children who are deafblind or blind with multiple disabilities.
  • Recruit, supervise and manage the work of all national and international program staff, including the oversight of work assignments.
  • Supervise the activities of the Educational Leadership Program.
  • Supervise the activities of on campus projects including research library and information services, DBLINK, and other projects as appropriate to meet national objectives of program.
  • In collaboration with program staff, identify program priorities and additional funding needs for project development. Liaison between program staff and Trust Office for new and ongoing project development and identifying and securing financial and material support with existing and new supporters and donors.
  • Communicate effectively with all staff, trainers and partners.
  • Provide leadership and collegial supervision to insure that all program goals and objectives are being addressed and evaluated, including but not limited to:
  • Working with local personnel to assess the future needs of all Hilton/Perkins and other international projects in the region and arrange for appropriate training, consultation and technical support.
  • Working with colleges, universities and other entities internationally to maintain and establish formal training programs of pre-service training for teachers of the target population.
  • Arranging for the production, translation and dissemination of appropriate literature for parents and professionals in print and on-line formats.
  • Supporting parents and agencies to establish improved services to parents and family members, including the establishment of parent organizations.
  • Supporting the content, logistics and other arrangements for trainings provided by the Program
  • Prepare and manage an annual program budget. Oversee the financial resources allocated to projects. Work with regional staff to draft grant agreements to sub-grantees, and define and monitor a reporting system for each project.
  • Prepare regular narrative reports on activities for inclusion in the Program’s reports to donors.
  • Function as liaison between Perkins management team and international and national program staff. Work collaboratively with personnel on the campus, to plan jointly for training and experiences provided to international visitors to Perkins School for the Blind.
  • Function as the focal point for planning, communication and collaboration between the Perkins International Program and other national and international non-profit organizations, multi-lateral organizations and key governmental agencies to further enhance program’s mission.
  • Coordinate the work with all other Perkins offices including the on-campus programs, the Business Office, Howe Press, Trust office, Communications Office and other Perkins departments.
  • Provide oversight of program office staff and support service operations to ensure facilitation of program objectives.
  • Represent Perkins International at international events which include international development, education, and disability conferences.

COMPENTENCIES
To perform the job successfully, an individual should demonstrate the following competencies:

Problem Solving – Identifies and resolves problems in a timely manner; Gathers and analyzes information skillfully; Develops alternative solutions. Able to deal with frequent change, delays, or unexpected events

Oral and Written Communication – Speaks and writes clearly and persuasively, listens and gets clarification; responds well to questions. Knowledge of technology for communicating.

Leadership – Effectively influences actions and opinions. Inspires and motivates others to perform well.

Diversity – Demonstrates knowledge of EEO policy; Shows respect and sensitivity for cultural differences; promotes a harassment-free environment.

Ethics – Treats people with respect; Keeps commitments. Works with integrity and ethically.

Organizational Support – Follows policies and procedures; Completes administrative tasks correctly and on time.

Judgment – Displays willingness to make decisions; Exhibits sound and accurate judgment. Includes appropriate people in decision-making process and delegates appropriately.

Professionalism – Approaches others in a tactful manner; Reacts well under pressure; Treats others with respect and consideration regardless of their status or position; Accepts responsibility for own actions; Maintains a positive attitude regarding required duties and changes in routines and assignments.

Quality – Demonstrates accuracy and thoroughness; Looks for ways to improve and promote quality; Applies feedback to improve performance.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

Master’s Degree in Special Education with a preference on education of children who are deafblind, or with multiple disabilities or relevant work experience.

A minimum of 7-10 years of experience in a position of increasing management experience and responsibility for consultation to and training of other teachers and personnel. Preference will be given to work in the fields of blindness, deafblindess or multiple disabilities with international work experience.

Extensive knowledge of educational techniques for children who are deafblind and/or blind with additional disabilities.

Understand and appreciate the cultural diversity of the programs and areas in with which Perkins works and the implications for program support and development.

PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS

Ability to travel independently and frequently to international destinations.

PREFERENCE MAY BE GIVEN FOR THE FOLLOWING:

Prior experience in international work as a trainer of teachers within the specific field of blind or deafblind education.

Candidates with Masters in deafblind or multi-handicap education, or the equivalent job experience in working with this same population

Prior experience, whether paid or voluntary, in working for other international governmental or non-governmental organizations.

Perkins School for the Blind is an Affirmative Action Employer. Candidates from diverse background are strongly encouraged to apply.

For more information contact Charles Pimlott at 617-972-7235 or send resumes to Human Resources, Perkins School for the Blind, 175 North Beacon Street, Watertown, MA 02472 or email Employment@Perkins.org.

May 2008

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