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JOB POST: Capacity Builder, Intellectual Disabilities, Bolivia (Texto en ingles y español)

Posted on 11 May 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Education, Families, Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Texto en español

Capacity Builder in Intellectual Disabilities-Ricerca y Cooperazione, El Alto, Bolivia.

Ricerca y Cooperazione (RC) is an Italian based NGO, with an established development programme in Bolivia, mainly in the area of education for children and youth. Recognising the need for greater inclusion of disabled children in mainstream education, it is implementing an EU funded project entitled ‘Social Inclusion and Mutual Respect’, in coordination with the Municipality of El Alto, in order to educate children, teachers, families and authorities on how to incorporate disabled children into the classroom; a concept which is largely overlooked in Boliva.

Your role will be to compliment the small multidisciplinary technical team of the project, (1 specialist in physical disabilities, 1 in sensory, and you in intellectual) in order that all disabilities are represented. The work will include a diagnostic of children with disabilities in El Alto, designing and implementing training workshops to various beneficiaries, production of educational material, and assist in creating an integral centre – which will serve as a resource for families of disabled children, and also an area for activities with disabled and non-disabled youth.

Ideally educated to Masters level, in a discipline related to intellectual disabilities, you should be experienced in designing and facilitating workshops with participatory methods. Preferably with knowledge and experience in Latin America; of the idiosyncrasies of the disability field in a developing country. Good Spanish and a highly flexible working approach.

Applications can be made in English, Spanish or Italian. Follow this link to view or download a full Job Description. Please send completed applications using the format found here to: feliza@isbolivia.org and e.cipollini@ongrc.org

Deadline for applications: Friday 22nd May 2009.

http://isbolivia.org/blog/?page_id=5


Ricerca y Cooperazione (RC) es una ONG italiana, que cuenta con un programa de desarrollo establecido en Bolivia, principalmente en el área de la educación para jóvenes y niños. Reconociendo la necesidad de una mayor inclusión de los niños con discapacidad en la educación transversal, actualmente se encuentra implementando un proyecto financiado por la UE llamado “Inclusión social y respeto mutuo” en coordinación con el municipio de El Alto, a fin de educar a los niños, maestros, familias y autoridades en cómo incorporar a los niños con discapacidad en las aulas; concepto que es pasado por alto en Bolivia.

Su rol será complementar el equipo técnico multidisciplinario del proyecto. (1 especialista en discapacidad física, 1 en discapacidad sensorial y usted en discapacidad intelectual) para que estén representadas todos los tipos de discapacidad. El trabajo incluirá un diagnóstico de los niños con discapacidad en El Alto, diseñando e implementando talleres de capacitación para varios beneficiarios, producción de materiales educativos y asistir en la creación de un centro integral, el cual servirá como recurso para las familias de los niños con discapacidad como también será un área para las actividades de los jóvenes con o sin discapacidad.

Se requiere una formación universitaria a nivel de Maestría en disciplinas relacionadas con la discapacidad intelectual, con experiencia en diseño y facilitación de talleres con métodos participativos. Preferentemente con conocimientos y experiencia en Latinoamérica en relación a las idiosincrasias en el campo de la discapacidad en un país en desarrollo. Buen conocimiento del castellano y un enfoque de trabajo flexible. Para una Descripcion mas Completa, vea abajo (solo en ingles).

Las solicitudes pueden ser realizadas en idioma inglés, castellano o italiano italiano y enviadas a los siguientes correos electrónicos: feliza@isbolivia.org y e.cipollini@ongrc.org utilizando el formulario encontrado en la siguiente página Web.

Fecha límite para las solicitudes: Viernes 22 de mayo de 2009.



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Training Opportunity: Digital Storytelling Project, June 8-12, 2009, for African Youth with Disabilities and Allies

Posted on 16 April 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Families, Funding, Media & Journalism, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD)
APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet
invite you to
Submit an application to participate in a Digital Storytelling Project
Application DUE 3 May 2009
Workshop dates 8 -12 June 2009

“It’s in the telling of our stories that we discover how much of our experiences and learning we have in common with others. Stories make our connection with others and with the world real. They weave together our individual experiences to reveal a picture of a community, a group and a country.”

Introduction

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) in partnership with APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet, invite you to submit an application to participate in a digital storytelling workshop. We are inviting people living and working in Africa who would like to empower others and affect change by documenting their journey and telling their story. Applicants must be:

(1) parents/carers of children with disabilities and youth
(2) young people with disabilities
(3) people working in organizations to promote the rights of children and youth with disabilities e.g. Advocates, students, CBR workers, teachers, journalists, information activists, content developers, programme officer/managers,

Participants will develop short videos reflecting the experiences of parents and youth with disabilities in particular with regards to challenges and successes in accessing inclusive education, health, employment and acceptance in their communities and country. Participants will also examine the power dimensions of story-telling and how we retain the authenticity of our own voice, as well as the voices of the people whose stories we document, preserve or disseminate.

Parents, youth and individuals working in the field have many stories to tell, but never have the time, knowledge, equipment and space to reflect, understand and tell their own stories, share their responses, understandings and experiences.

There is a large amount of information on the internet but very little that reflects the lived realities of those affected and people working in the field of disability in Africa.

The workshop aims to:
• document real-life stories of a cross-section of parents and youth with disabilities as well as those working in the field
• empower people to tell their own stories, while at the same time create a powerful advocacy tool that can be used in their country and beyond.
• develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills,
• enable parents and youth with disabilities to share and network amongst each other.

More about the workshop

In the workshop we will explore people’s own stories and learn how to develop a story line, use photo’s, video clips, and drawings to tell your story in an effective way.

There is space for twelve applicants who will participate in a five day digital storytelling workshop, 8 -12 June 2009.

In the month before the workshop delegates will need to join an online study group, collect content for their story (pictures etc) and begin to learn some of the software.

At the workshop participants will learn to use computer software and other equipment necessary for making a short (3-5 minutes) multimedia digital story.

The digital storytelling workshop is hands-on and computer intensive, requiring commitment and willingness to develop a short, personal story; learn new software and edit a short digital video of five minutes in length.

Digital storytelling is not like writing a formal document; it’s more like creative, autobiographical writing. To see an example, check out the website
http://www.takebackthetech.net
http://www.silencespeaks.org

In order to be eligible to participate, you must be able to attend all five days of the workshop, and be able to travel to South Africa to arrive by 7 June, departing 13 June 2009. Travel and accommodation will be sponsored by the SADPD. You must be willing to allow your story, or part of it, to be used in advocacy by SADPD and APC WNSP’s Take Back the Tech campaign. The workshop will be conducted in ENGLISH so other language speakers must have a good proficiency in English. Sign language and French / Portugese interpretation will be provided if necessary (Please motivate for this in application form).

This workshop is a chance to learn new skills and tell your story in a creative and visual format. It’s a lot of work . . . AND a lot of fun.

Copyright:
All stories are owned by the person who made them. The story is your story and will be licensed under a Creative Commons license. We are open to discussing a formula that respects your privacy and confidentiality should you be uncomfortable with the widespread sharing and dissemination of some parts of your story. We would like your stories to be part of a public effort promote the rights and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities and their families.

Who Should Apply?
• We are looking for stories told by parent, youth and individuals working in the field of Disability.
• Applicants must be living and working in Africa (preference will be given to women)
• Applicants must preferably be based in an organisation, institution or network, but individuals will also be considered.
• Youth should between the ages of 18 – 35
• The training is in English. Participants must speak and understand English but are welcome to produce their story in any language they choose. If however you require translation into French and Portuguese please motivate in your application.
• The story you tell has to be about you and your experiences. It can be about situations or events but it must be a personal story told in the first person
• The workshop requires a basic level of computer literacy.
• Applicants must be willing to avail themselves for future advocacy work or training in digital stories in their country.

Instructions:
Please complete the form below and email it as a file attachment to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za
DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING APPLICATIONS is 3 May 2009. If you have any questions, feel free to email or Skype Nafisa on nafisababoo. Incomplete forms will not be considered for selection.

APPLICATION FORM

Date:
Name:
Address:
Country:
Organisation:
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Age:
Date of birth:
Disability:
Support needs (Enlarge print, Braille, translation etc)

Please describe in a few sentences the main point of the story you would like to tell.

What issues does your story address?

What do you hope to get out of the digital storytelling workshop?

Have you talked to anyone about the story you’d like to share, or is this the first time you’ll be talking about it in a group?

If this is your first time talking about it, what do you think it’ll be like for you to share the story with a group of people ?

Please write a draft of the story you’d like to share, below. It should be no more than 500 words (about one and ½ pages, double-spaced, typed). Your story should be written in the first-person. Note: If you’d like to see examples of other people’s digital stories, you can go to http://www.silencespeaks.org or http://www.womensnet.org.za or http://www.takebackthetech.net

Please briefly describe to us what you use computers for.

What is your familiarity with the following Software Programs and Processes? Please put an “x” to the right of the statements that most apply.

Using a PC (Windows Operating System) or a Macintosh Computer
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Scanning Photos or Other Images
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Photoshop
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Premiere
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Do you know how to (please mark YES or NO)
Open software applications YES/NO
Save documents and find them again YES/NO
How to use a mouse, cut and paste, drag and drop. YES/NO

It would be useful to know the following applications – Microsoft office or Open office, and using web browsers such as Internet Explorer or Firefox.

There are a limited number of spaces in the workshop. So please note that the submission of an application is no guarantee that APC-Africa-Women will be able to support you to attend. Successful applicants will be notified 5th May 2009.

Thank You!

INFORMATION ABOUT THE ORGANIZATIONS

About the Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities
The African Decade of Persons with Disabilities was proclaimed by the African Union for the period 1999 – 2009. The main goals of the African Decade are to raise awareness about the situation of the estimated 60-80 million persons with disabilities in the region and to identify solutions tailored to the African Experience that enhance participation, equality and empowerment of Africans with Disabilities. The overall aims and priorities of the Decade are stipulated in an AU- Continental Plan of Action. A Secretariat was established to facilitate the realization of these objectives.
The Secretariat is an international Non Governmental Organisation, established in 2004 by all the major Regional Disabled People’s Organisations to give a new dynamism to the implementation of the Continental Plan of Action. It is hosted, at the request of African Union by South Africa in Cape-Town where its headquarters are located. The mission of the Secretariat of the African Decade is to empower Governments, DPO´s, Decade steering committee’s (DSC) and development organizations to work in partnership to include disability and persons with disabilities into policies and programs in all sectors of society. The strategy of action of the Secretariat is to
• Build the capacities of DPOs, persons with disabilities who are most vulnerable and the Decade Steering Committees to enable them to advocate and lobby their respective government so that they integrate disability into all their development processes.
• Advocate and lobby for mainstreaming of disability in the policies and programmes.
• Raise awareness around the main issues related to persons with disabilities in society.
Http://www.sadpd.org

About APC-Africa-Women

APC-Africa-women is the African regional network of the Association for Progressive Communications Women’s Networking Support Programme (APC WNSP). APC WNSP is a global network of women who support women networking for social change and women’s empowerment, through the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). We promote gender equality in the design, development, implementation, access to and use of ICTs and in the policy decisions and frameworks that regulate them. We have a special focus on redressing inequities based on women’s social or ethnic background – through the provision of research, training, information, and support activities in the field of ICT policy, skills-sharing in the access and use of ICT, and women’s network-building.
Http://www.apcwomen.org

APC-Africa-Women hosts Women’s Electronic Network Training (WENT) workshops every two years. WENT workshops aim to build the skills and capacities of women and their organisations to utilise ICTs in women’s empowerment, social development work and policy advocacy. In 2003 participants at WENT Africa developed skills in the repackaging of information through the convergence of old and new technologies using radio and in building websites using a Content Management System. Weaving through the training were sessions on gender and ICT policy issues. In 2005 WENT Africa was hosted in Kampala and using a two-track system, trained women technicians in the use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and women managers of NGOs in technology planning. More information can be viewed at http://wentafrica.blogspot.com/

About Women’sNet
Women’sNet works to advance gender equality and justice in South Africa through the use of ICTs by providing training and facilitating content dissemination and creation that supports women, girls, and women’s and gender organisations and networks to take control of their own content and ICT use. The organisation is one of the few working on technology for social change in South Africa, and the first to do this from a gender perspective our work has focused on technology for purpose – strengthening women’s organisations specifically and civil society in general – to use ICTs for achieving gender justice.
Http://www.womensnet.org.za



This announcement was disseminated on the EENET Eastern Africa listserver. All applications and inquiries should please be directed to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za , NOT to We Can Do.

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FUNDING: Small Grants for Deaf Children

Posted on 23 March 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Deaf, Funding, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

GLOBAL: Small grants programme for deaf children

Since 2002, Deaf Child Worldwide has supported organisations working to help deaf children overcome the barriers that contribute to their poverty and isolation.

Round 8 of Deaf Child Worldwide’s Small Grants Programme (SGP) opens on 19 March 2009 and ends 30 May 2009.

The SGP supports projects which show clear, measurable and sustainable improvements to the lives of deaf children and their families in developing countries.

Deaf Child Worldwide fund projects of up to three years and for a maximum amount of £30,000 (£10,000 per year). Visit the website for information on the SGP and the application process.

Successful projects must meet one or more of Deaf Child Worldwide’s strategic aims. Applicants must consider our cross-cutting themes in the development of their proposal.

Deaf Child Worldwide is focusing its activities in East Africa (Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania), South Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka) and Latin America (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru). You must be based in one of these countries to apply to SGP.

Applications are only accepted in ‘concept note’ format in English or Spanish. The deadline for submission of concept notes to Deaf Child Worldwide is 30 May 2009. Selected projects will start in January 2010.

The following documents can be downloaded from the Deaf Child Worldwide website:

* Background information leaflet containing details of the full eligibility criteria
* Guidance on applying
* Concept note format

Visit: www.deafchildworldwide.info

More details on the Small Grant Programme at http://www.deafchildworldwide.info/where_we_work/small_grants_programme/index.html

More details on how to apply at http://www.deafchildworldwide.info/where_we_work/small_grants_programme/how_to_apply/index.html

Missed the May 30, 2009, deadline? Deaf Child Worldwide offers similar grants on a periodic basis, though not always in the same countries. Consult their web site at www.deafchildworldwide.info to learn of future opportunities like this one.



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development mailing list. Please consult the Deaf Child Worldwide website directly, NOT We Can Do, for more detail on this funding opportunity, including more thorough instructions on how to apply.

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JOB Post: Education Specialist, Fast Track Initiative, World Bank

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Education, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ob # 090252
Job Title Education Spec.
Job Family Education
Location: Washington, DC
Appointment International Hire
Job Posted 17-Feb-2009
Closing Date 03-Mar-2009
Language Requirements
English [Essential]
Appointment Type Term (Duration: 2 yrs)
Background / General description
THIS IS A 2 YEAR TERM POSITION WITH POSSIBLE EXTENSION TO 3 YEARS.
To apply go to http://extjobs.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64273552&piPK=64273556&theSitePK=1058433&JobNo=090252&order=descending&sortBy=job-req-num&location=ALL&menuPK=64262364

The Fast Track Initiative (FTI) is a global partnership launched in 2002 to accelerate progress toward the Millennium Development Goal of universal quality primary education by 2015. All low-income countries which demonstrate serious commitment to achieving universal primary completion can receive support from FTI. The FTI is a high visibility and politically sensitive aid platform which currently provides technical and financial support to over 50 countries, with the majority in Africa. The FTI provides direct financial support to countries with endorsed education sector plans through a multi-donor Catalytic Fund which currently has over $1,400 million in commitments through 2009, making it the second largest source of financing for basic education in low income countries. It will also provide support to conflict-affected and other fragile states through the recently created Education Transition Fund managed by UNICEF. The FTI Partnership is supported by a Secretariat housed in the World Bank in Washington, DC.

Duties and Accountabilities
The Education Specialist will provide support to countries developing education sector plans and programs to reach the most vulnerable populations who constitute the majority of out-of-school children. S/he will also work with FTI Secretariat Staff, FTI partners, country donors, civil society organizations and the World Bank to provide substantive input and technical support on a range of education and development topics such as improving quality/learning outcomes; fragile states; strengthening in-country processes; donor harmonization; improving gaps in policy, financing, data, and capacity development; and FTI’s response to HIV/AIDS, gender, and disability issues. S/he will report to the Head of the FTI Secretariat and support and collaborate with the FTI Secretariats’ Senior Education Specialists who lead FTI’s work on learning outcomes and country level processes. Specific responsibilities will include:
1. Out of School/Vulnerable Children Coordinate partnership planning and processes to address key constraints for vulnerable populations to achieving the education MDG.
• Assist in designing, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating a targeted outreach program to reach the populations most at risk of not benefiting from EFA/FTI programs.
• Develop a results framework for working with vulnerable populations. Develop and monitor indicators and activities linked to specific marginalized populations (gender, poverty, rural/urban, disability, and child labor).
• Provide background research on education and development policies as appropriate.
• Strengthen the policy dialogue within the FTI partnership by researching the donor partners’ statements on policy (user fees, language of instruction, disability, gender, etc.) and identifying common principles and shared understandings.
• Liaise with the Interagency Task Team on HIV/AIDS and education and strengthen mechanisms to ensure that this collaboration between education and HIV/AIDS is brought down to the country level.
• Represent the FTI Secretariat on the INEE Working Group on Education and Fragility

2. Country Focal Point Serve as focal point for a select number of FTI endorsed and potential countries.
• Act as first line of contact for all FTI communications with coordinating agency.
• Provide and seek information on ESP development and implementation, including FTI trust fund issues, application procedures, and key events such as joint annual reviews.
• Ensure tools such as the capacity development, inclusion/equity, HIV/AIDs, School Health are utilized when LDGs are developing their ESPs.
• Conduct the FTI Secretariat’s support and advice on ‘Light Touch’ review of ESPs prior to endorsement.
• Monitor and provide guidance to fragile states as they progress through the single entry process.

3. Learning Outcomes Support the FTI Secretariat and Partnership’s work to develop its work plan and activities on learning outcomes within the FTI partnership.
• Provide research and other support for the FTI task team on education quality.
• Provide support for the coordination of partnership planning and processes for measuring learning outcomes in FTI countries.
• Assist in communicating with country Local Education Groups/Coordinating agencies (CA) to gauge interest in their participating in international assessments of learning/quality.

Selection Criteria
• Education: An advanced degree in education or related fields.

• A minimum of 5 years of relevant experience working in the education sector.

• Strong knowledge of and commitment to the principles and procedures of the FTI.

• Knowledge of fragile states policies and financing mechanisms.

• Demonstrated knowledge of and experience in the use of education data, and social and institutional research analytical tools.

• Knowledge of education operations in the World Bank or other major donor or UN agencies.

• Experience with dialogue with government and other partners, including bilateral donors, multilateral organizations, and NGOs.

• Proven ability to work with peers, managers, and a diverse range of partners including donors, civil society groups, governments, and academic institutions.

• Ability to work well in a small team, operate under pressure, deliver high quality work within deadlines, and meet team objectives.

The World Bank Group is committed to achieving diversity in terms of gender, nationality, culture and educational background. Individuals with disabilities are equally encouraged to apply. All applications will be treated in the strictest confidence.

To apply go to http://extjobs.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64273552&piPK=64273556&theSitePK=1058433&JobNo=090252&order=descending&sortBy=job-req-num&location=ALL&menuPK=64262364



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD) mailing list. For other jobs at the World Bank, consult the World Bank Employment page. Most jobs at the World Bank are not disability related, but a few are.

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Conference: Working with Children with Special Needs and Their Families: Kyrgyzstan and Intl Experience

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Events and Conferences, Families, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

International conference 7-9 April 2009

[Note application deadline March 6, 2009.]

Dear colleagues!

The Association of Parents of Disabled Children of Bishkek and the Public Association “Shoola Kol” in partnership with HealthProm UK-based charity and the Ministry of Labor and Social Development organizes the 3-day International conference «Innovative approaches to working with children with special needs and their families: Kyrgyzstan and international experience» which will take place at the Dostuk Hotel, Bishkek, on 7-9 April 2009.

Conference aims:

* Present and discuss various approaches to providing support to children with special needs and their families
* Search for ways of cooperation between organizations that support children with special needs and their families in Kyrgyzstan and abroad
* Experience exchange

The conference will see the representatives of government and municipal agencies, nongovernmental local and international organizations that have practical experience in providing early support, education, social support and healthcare services to children with special needs, as well as in the advancement and protection of the rights of people with disabilities.

Conference format: reports, discussion, presentations, workshops, seminars.

During the conference there will be Kyrgyzstan and international experience presented on the following:

* latest models of providing early support to children with multiple disabilities
* innovative approaches of psychological and pedagogical support to children with special needs
* complex rehabilitation and socialization of children and young people with special needs
* protection and advancement of rights of people with disabilities and their families

The final programme of the conference will be developed on the needs and expectations of the participants that sent applications.

The conference invites: heads and specialists of social protection, educational and healthcare government and municipal agencies and nongovernmental organizations that provide support to children with special needs (including with multiple disabilities) and their families.

The selection of participants will based on the applications forms. The applications should be sent before the 6 March 2009 by email ardi.kyrgyzstan@gmail.com of fax: 0312 517634

Participants will be selected before 20 March 2009.

The working language of the conference is Russian, translators will be provided for international participants.

For more information please contact:

ARDI, Bishkek, m-r Kok-Zhar, h.1, polupodval 4, Tel/fax: +996 312 517634, e-mail: ardi.kyrgyzstan@gmail.com



Thank you to Azat Israilov for submitting this announcement to We Can Do. All inquiries, as always, should be directed to the people organizing the opportunity that interests you, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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FUNDS For Humanitarian Programs Helping People Affected by Slavery

Posted on 23 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Funding, Health, Human Rights, Opportunities, Slavery & Trafficking, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Subject: Call for application: Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery; Appel à candidature: Fonds de contributions volontaires sur les formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

English; French

[Note to We Can Do readers: Organizations serving people with disabilities who have been affected by human trafficking, sexual slavery, child labor, forced marriage, or other forms of contemporary slavery may wish to consider this opportunity to devise an appropriate project targeted at, or incorporating, their needs. This fund is not specifically devised for people with disabilities, but grant seekers could argue for their need.]

Dear colleagues,

The United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery allocates project grants (for a maximum of 15 000 USD), for programmes of humanitarian, legal and financial assistance to individuals whose human rights have been severely violated as a result of contemporary forms of slavery.

Contemporary forms of slavery include trafficking, sexual slavery, child labour and child servitude, debt bondage, serfdom and forced labour, forced marriage and sale of wives ect.

Projects undertaken with previous Trust Fund grants include medical and psychological aid, food, shelter, and vocational training to victims of trafficking for sexual and economic exploitation; support to rehabilitation centres for sexually and physically abused street children and a project to identify and release bonded labourers in the carpet industry and stone quarries. Other projects have provided victims with the means to generate sustainable sources of income, such as sewing machines, hairdressing equipment, or farming tools.

Please consult the official web site to download the application form in English, French, or Spanish. Application forms should be duly completed and submitted by 31 March 2009.

If you need more information on the Fund, you can consult the website of the OHCHR: http://www2.ohchr.org/English/about/funds/slavery/index.htm.
You can also contact the OHCHR at MClerc@ohchr.org.

You are more than welcome to disseminate this message to oganisations working with victims of comtemporary forms of slavery.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French

*********************************************************************************************

Chers collègues,

Le Fond de contributions volontaires des Nations Unies pour la lutte contre les formes contemporaines d’esclavage octroi des subventions (pour un maximum de 15 000 dollars des Etats-Unis) aux projets fournissant une aide humanitaire, juridique et financière aux personnes dont les droits de l’homme ont été gravement violés par des formes contemporaines d’esclavage. Les formes contemporaines d’esclavage sont le trafic d’êtres humains, l’esclavage sexuel, le travail des enfants et la servitude des enfants, la servitude pour dettes, le servage, le travail forcé, les marriages forcés et la vente d’épouses ect.

Veuillez trouver ci-dessous le formulaire de demande de subvention en anglais, francais et espagnol. Les formulaires de demande doivent être complétés et soumis avant le 31 Mars 2009. Les projets financés par le passé grâce aux subventions du Fonds, ont pas exemple, permis aux victimes de la traite des êtres humains à des fins sexuelles et commerciales, d’obtenir de l’aide relative aux soins médicaux et psychologiques, à la nourriture, au logement et à la formation professionnelle. Ils ont permis aux enfants des rues abusés sexuellement et physiquement de bénéficier de soutien dans des centres de réhabilitation. Ils ont également permis d’apporter de l’aide à l’identification et à la libération des travailleurs en servitude pour dettes employés à la fabrication des tapis et dans les carrières de pierre. D’autres projets ont permis aux victimes d’obtenir les moyens de générer des sources de revenus durables comme l’achat de machines à coudre, équipements de coiffure et des outils agricoles.

Si vous avez besoin de plus d’information sur le Fond, vous pouvez consulter le site internet du HCDH: http://www2.ohchr.org/french/about/funds/slavery/index.htm Vous pouvez aussi nous contacter en répondant à MClerc@ohchr.org.

N’hésitez pas à diffuser ce message aux organisations travaillants avec les victimes des formes contemporaines d’esclavage.

Melanie Clerc
United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Unit
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
1211 Geneva
Tel: +41 22 928 9737 -9164
Fax: +41 22 928 9010

English; French



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development listserver.

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Intl Leadership Forum for Young Leaders, 1-9 August 2009

Posted on 22 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Events and Conferences, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Opportunities, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

International Leadership Forum Announcement – Call for Applications

[Note to We Can Do readers: This opportunity is not targeted at disability advocates, but young leaders with an interest in disability-related advocacy may wish to read the criteria below and consider whether their interests may usefully intersect.]

The UNESCO Chair & Institute of Comparative Human Rights at the University of Connecticut invites applications for the fifth annual International Leadership Programme: A Global Intergenerational Forum, to be held August 1 – 9, 2009 in Storrs, Connecticut, USA. Applications must be received by February 27, 2009.

The Forum seeks to empower young leaders by involving them in finding solutions to emerging human rights problems, and nurturing individuals to be effective leaders in the field of human rights.

To this end, the Forum will:

• Introduce participants to the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
• Build a network of solidarity among human rights leaders
• Expand the knowledge relevant to human rights practice
• Provide tools and a platform for open debates
• Provide programmes, activities and processes necessary for human rights leadership
• Promote the sharing of experiences and understanding
• Showcase speakers on such topics as: health and human rights, education, the environment, the plight of child soldiers, the use of media, fundraising, conflict resolution and transformation; litigation and advocacy

The UNESCO Chair will provide all conference participants with dormitory housing, meals, ground transportation in Connecticut, resource materials and a certificate of participation.

Young people between the ages of 18-30, with community service experience, and with demonstrated ability to work on solutions to human rights problems, should apply. Relevant issues include, but are not limited to, human trafficking, the plight of children, refugees, hunger, HIV/AIDs, gender discrimination, racism, classism, the environment and peace education.

Conference will be held in English only. Fluency in English is required. Applicants will be selected based on the strength of their application essay, demonstrated commitment to human rights (practical/hands-on experience), potential impact on the individual and their potential contribution to the Forum, regional and gender representation.

Programme details and application materials can be accessed by linking to www.unescochair.uconn.edu or http://www.unescochair.uconn.edu/upspecialevents.htm

Nana Amos
Program Manager
University of Connecticut
UNESCO Chair & Institute of Comparative Human Rights
UConn-ANC Partnership
233 Glenbrook Road, Unit 4124
Storrs, CT 06269-4124
860.486.3054 Phone
860.486.2545 Fax
www.unescochair.uconn.edu
–~–~———~–~—-~————~——-~–~—-~
Scholarship and Job are posted at
http://Cambodiajobs.blogspot.com



I received this announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability listserver. If you have inquiries about this opportunity or wish to apply for it, then please follow the relevant web links provided above and follow the instructions at the official web site. We Can Do is NOT able to assist you with your questions about this event–please contact the people organizing the forum directly. Thank you.

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Pakistan Art Competition for Children With Disabilities

Posted on 15 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Children, Events and Conferences, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Network of Organizations Working for People with Disabilities in Pakistan (NOWPDP) is sponsoring a national art competition for children with disabilities aged 12 to 16. The age limit is waived for participants with mental disabilities. All member and non-member schools are invited to participate. The competition will be held on the 1st of March 2009 in Karachi; and at a slightly later date in Lahore & Islamabad. However, names of children to compete should be submitted by February 19, 2009.

For further details about the competition, along with instructions for how to participate, please visit the NOWPDP web site at:

http://nowpdp.org/News/ArtCompitition.aspx



I learned about this competition via Ghulam Nabi Nizamani. All people who wish to make inquiries should please inquire directly with NOWPDP, according to the instructions on their web site, NOT with We Can Do. Thank you.

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Call for Papers: Poverty and Intellectual Disabilities

Posted on 10 February 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Families, Inclusion, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability is seeking submissions for a special issue of their publication that will examine poverty, deprivation, social exclusion and disadvantage. The particular focus of this issue will be on understanding the role that poverty and social deprivation play in shaping the life chances of children and adults with intellectual disabilities, and the role of policy in reducing inequalities and inequity for this population. The aim of this special issue is to explore issues of poverty and social disadvantage in the broadest terms. Papers that express the points of view of people with disabilities and/or their families are particularly welcome. This includes having those with disabilities and their families serve as researchers and/or co-authors as well as participants in the research. We would also particularly welcome papers addressing issues of poverty and deprivation from low and middle income countries. This topic is appropriate for both qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

The closing date for submission is 31st December 2009, although later submission dates may be possible with the agreement of the editors. The anticipated date for publication is 2011. If the special issue is oversubscribed papers will be selected by date of submission.

The Guest Editors, Eric Emerson and Susan Parish, will manage the editorial process. Enquiries and papers for consideration should be directed to Dr Eric Emerson (eric.emerson@lancaster.ac.uk) or Dr Susan Parish (parish@unc.edu) with a copy to JIDD’s Editorial Assistant, Penny Crino (pcrino@med.usyd.edu.au), clearly identified as a Special Issue submission. Electronic submission is preferred.



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Developing (GPDD) listserver.

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Recursos Españoles: Women’s Health Handbook; and Helping Deaf Children (en ingles y español)

Posted on 10 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Deaf, Health, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Texto español

Hesperian announces two new titles in Spanish and a spiffy new Spanish Web Site:
Un Manual de salud para mujeres con dispacidad, the Spanish version of A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities, arrived to our offices today and we are very excited to have this wonderful material now available in Spanish. Un manual de salud para mujeres con discapacidad, will help women with disabilities overcome these barriers and improve their general health, self-esteem, and abilities to care for themselves and participate in their communities.

We also released the Spanish version of Helping Children Who are Deaf, Ayudar a los niños sordos. Packed with simple activities, this book is a great resource for parents, caregivers, health promoters, and others in teaching children who do not hear well how to communicate to the best of his or her ability.

Both titles can be downloaded http://espanol.hesperian.org/Bienvenidos_de_Hesperian.php and purchased from our brand new Spanish website. This user-friendly, easy-to-navigate web site offers all of the features of our website in English – current health news, information on upcoming publications, and free down-loadable versions of most of our titles. Plus a complete bookstore, all in Spanish, ready to ship anywhere in the world. At http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php


Hesperian anuncia dos nuevos libros en español y nuestra nueva página web

Con el libro Un manual de salud para mujeres con discapacidad, Hesperian les ofrece a las mujeres con discapacidad una manera práctica de conocer sus derechos para gozar de buena salud. Combinando las experiencias y consejos de mujeres con discapacidad de 42 países, con información sobre la salud, profesional y al corriente, este manual es fácil de entender, esta plenamente ilustrado y tiene mucha información útil.

También nos complace presentar el libro Ayudar a los niños sordos, el título más reciente de la Serie de asistencia temprana. Este libro está lleno de actividades sencillas y será un gran recurso para las personas que cuidan a niños sordos, ya sean padres, otros cuidadores y/o promotores de salud, ya que ofrece herramientas para enseñarle a la niña o niño a comunicarse lo mejor que pueda.

Estos libros, además de todos los títulos de Hesperian, pueden ser descargados http://espanol.hesperian.org/Bienvenidos_de_Hesperian.php o adquiridos desde nuestra ¡NUEVA PÁGINA WEB EN ESPAÑOL,! Ahora puede descargar nuestros libros, buscar traducciones en otros idiomas, ver nuestros proyectos actuales y comprar libros en nuestra tienda virtual, listos para ser enviados a cualquier parte del mundo — ¡Todo esto y más ahora en español! A http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php



Thank you to the Hesperian Foundation for submitting this announcement for publication at We Can Do. The Hesperian Foundation first became famous for their publication, Where There is No Doctor (Donde No Hay Doctor). This book has been used to save lives in hundreds of rural communities throughout developing countries around the world—precisely in places where there is no doctor. Since then, the Hesperian Foundation has produced a growing collection of publications targeted at people with developing countries who may have few other resources that they can use to treat their health or to learn how their community can become a happier place for children with disabilities. Anyone who lives or works in a rural community with few local resources is strongly urged to explore their web site. (http://espanol.hesperian.org/index.php en español, http://www.hesperian.org in English).

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Enabling Education Network Desires Feedback for Website Redesign

Posted on 5 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note to We Can Do readers: For years, people in the field of disability inclusive education have turned to the Enabling Education Network (EENET) for information, resources, and opportunities for debate. EENET has disseminated the following announcement, and is seeking responses by the end of February 2009.]

This year EENET is going to redesign its website. A very kind volunteer in EENET Asia has offered to do all the work for free. So, now we need to get some feedback from people who use the website, so that we can make sure we create a new website that is more useful and user-friendly.

The attached questions may help you give feedback. But please do tell us anything you want about the website — what is good, what is bad and what you would like to see on the website in future.

Please share this request for feedback with anyone else you know who uses the EENET website.

Thanks in advance for any feedback you can give.
Best wishes
Ingrid

EENET website redesign

In 2009 EENET’s website – www.eenet.org.uk –– is going to be redesigned and relaunched. This will be the first significant redesign since the website was created in 1997. So it’s important that we get it right!

The detailed evaluation of EENET in 2006 told us that there are various aspects of the website that are not user-friendly, and users sometimes find it difficult to locate the information they want from the huge selection available.

We now want to top up the evaluation results with some more recent feedback on what you like and don’t like, and what you want to see on the new website.

The following questions are of particular interest to us, but please feel free to send comments about other aspects of the website as well.

Thank you in advance for your help.

1) Organising documents
There are two main options for how we can organise the content on the website:

(a) we could list documents according to type of document (e.g. training manuals, short articles, long reports, etc). Under this option you would see a list of, for instance, all the training manuals available covering all aspects of inclusive education

(b) we could list documents according to inclusive education themes (e.g. gender, working children, disability, refugees, emergencies, etc). With this option you would see all the information available under that theme (you would see a list of all articles, reports, manuals, posters, links to other websites, etc on the theme of, for instance, ‘inclusive education and refugees’).

Which option would you prefer and why?
We could design the site so that both options are available, but before we take this more complicated route, we first want to know if one option is a lot more popular than the other!

2) Search facility
The current search facility within the EENET website is using outdated technology and isn’t very helpful. To help us improve the search facility, please tell us how you search for items on the EENET website. Do you mostly search for items according to:

  • subject area
  • a known document title
  • country
  • name of an organisation/NGO
  • a known author name
  • other (please specify)

3) Which website section(s) do you find most useful? Why?

4) Which website section(s) do you find least useful? Why?

5) Is there anything about the website that you find particularly confusing or frustrating? If so, how could we overcome this problem?

6) Documents in other languages
We currently have a separate section where users can go directly to a list of documents in other languages (it contains a random selection, as we rely on volunteers to do translations). Should we keep this separate section http://www.eenet.org.uk/other_langs/documents.shtml? Or should we remove this section and simply list any translations next to their English versions?

7) Word, PDF or html
Which format do you prefer / find most convenient for accessing and reading documents? Please explain why you prefer this format.

  • Html pages that you read online
  • PDF file downloads
  • Word file downloads

8) Please tell us about anything else that you think will help us make an EENET website that meets your needs!

If you are not already familiar with it, please explore the EENET website at www.eenet.org.uk. Then, send your responses to the above questions to EENET at info@eenet.org.uk by the end of February 2009.



I received this announcement via EENET’s Eastern Africa email discussion group, which focuses on discussion related to disability inclusion education in Eastern Africa.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Life-Long Learning

Posted on 28 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Education, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Enabling Education Network (EENET) is looking for articles for the 2009 issue of its newsletter “Enabling Education”. (First draft and article ideas should be submitted by January 30, 2009.) The theme of the newsletter is life-long learning. If you could write an article about your experiences of inclusive education in relation to informal, non-formal, alternative, pre-school, vocational or higher education, EENET would love to hear from you.

EENET’s goal with the 2009 newsletter is to publish an entire newsletter that contains no articles that look purely at formal primary and secondary education. They hope you can help them achieve this! If you are not an experienced writer, don’t worry. Send EENET your ideas and they will try to help you to develop these ideas into an article. You may also find it helpful to look at some previous newsletter articles when you are developing ideas for your own article. If you don’t already have copies of “Enabling Education”, please look at the EENET newsletters on their website (click on the highlighted text in this sentence to follow the link).

EENET really encourages you to send them articles that have been researched/written by, or in collaboration with, children and young people. EENET also always welcome articles that make use of drawings, photos, etc.

Number of words: articles should be about 600 words long.

Deadline: first drafts or article ideas should be sent to us by
30th January 2009.

More details are available at: http://www.eenet.org.uk/events/call_for_articles_eenet_newsletter_2009.shtml

Or email: info@eenet.org.uk



I learned about this call for papers via EENET’s Facebook page. The text is copied from their original announcement and also from their more detailed call for articles. Inquiries and submissions should please be directed to EENET, NOT We Can Do.

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4th Annual International Shafallah Forum, April 20-22, 2009, in Doha, Qatar

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that the deadline to submit abstracts is January 23, 2009, at 5 pm EST.

On behalf of the Shafallah Center for Children with Special Needs, I would like to extend a warm invitation for you to submit abstracts for the 4th Annual International Shafallah Forum in Doha, Qatar from April 20th – April 22nd , 2009. For the past three years our Center has been delighted to welcome more than 250 experts in the field and Wives of Heads of State from all over the world to our Forum and we anticipate that this year’s Forum will be no exception.

The 4th Annual International Forum will bring together advocates, family members, scholars, members of government, and professionals from a variety of perspectives to explore the theme of /Achieving Independence/. Together we will explore how to overcome factors that perpetuate disability marginalization, including widespread poverty due to lack of access to education, opportunity, and unfair labor practices. We look to our work, cutting-edge research and programs, to promote independence through universal access to education, inclusive societies, innovative technologies, and poverty-reduction strategies – including micro-enterprise and encouragement of the corporate sector to value and include the disabled in the workforce.

The Forum will feature keynote addresses by global leaders, roundtable discussions, symposia, paper presentations, and exhibits. We welcome the submission of such presentations and have included more detailed information on the following pages.

An accepted presentation to the Shafallah Forum includes complimentary airfare, meals, and accommodation. We hope that you will join us this April in Doha and participate in international dialogue among your peers. Please visit our website at www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org

Abstracts are *due by 5pm EST January 23rd, 2009. *

Sincerely,

*I. Modes of Presentation*

Delegates can present their programs and research in several different formats:

*Symposia *(1 hour – 3 x 15 minute presentations, plus 15 minutes discussion)

A collection of 3 papers presenting the results of different programs/studies/experiences relating to a common research theme. Each should be presented by a different person. The symposium coordinator should provide details for the three papers following the instructions below.

*Individual Papers *(15 minute presentation, plus 5 minutes discussion)

A paper presenting the results of a program/study/experience on a particular topic. Papers will be grouped into symposia according to an identified theme. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each paper offered following the instructions below.

* *

*Posters*

Individuals may present their research on the form of a poster. Posters allow for more extended discussion with delegates interested in the content area of the poster. Posters should be attended by at least one author/director who can address questions related to the poster’s content. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each poster presentation offered following the instructions below. Submission of poster collectives (related research) is encouraged.

* *

*Roundtable Discussions or Debates *

(1 hour)

Discussion about the interpretation of existing research, the state of knowledge in a particular area or the need for more or different kinds of research/programming/policies, can be as important as presenting the results of new studies. Individuals wishing to organize such roundtable discussions or debates should identify three or four speakers, who can each present a point of view. Where discussion and audience participation is the purpose, speakers’ presentations might be limited to 5 minutes. Where debate between the speakers is the purpose, presentations may be longer (10 minutes). Organizers should submit the details of the discussion or debate following the instructions below.

*Exhibit *

Individuals or groups that have a demonstration, specialized equipment, and/or materials that they would like to exhibit are invited to submit a proposal. Exhibits will be given a table with specific presentation time, where they will be asked to be present and are encouraged to leave materials/equipment out for attendees to peruse throughout the Forum.

*II. Abstracts*

Abstracts must be in English. Abstracts longer than permissible will be abridged at the discretion of the program planning committee.

*Theme & Topic:* The conference is to be organized into themes and include general and break-out sessions. Please specify which theme that best fits your session. All abstracts should be prepared using the following headings:

*Instructions for Submitting Paper/Poster Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of authors. Give the email address of person(s) presenting the paper

*Contact details:* Type an asterisk after the presenter’s name and give the affiliation address of the presenting author only

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Preferred mode: *State whether: (a) individual paper or (b) poster

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

*Instructions for Submitting Symposia Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*List:* Authors, affiliations, e-mail addresses and titles of papers to be included in the symposium.

*Moderator: *Give the name and affiliation of the person who has agreed to moderate the symposium. Give the contact details for moderator (email, phone & address).

*Abstract:* Each paper should submit an abstract. This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Roundtable Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of each participant noting the moderator with an asterisk.

*Contact details:* Give the full contact information (email, phone, & address) of all participants

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 400 words and describe the background behind the issue to be discussed or debated and the views to be put forth by each speaker.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Exhibits*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Host: *Give the name, affiliation, e-mail, and phone of the person hosting the exhibit.

*Abstract:* Submit a description of the demonstration/exhibit, its intent, and space requirements

*III. Submission Deadline: 5pm EST, January 23, 2009*

Kindly submit abstracts to: Valerie Karr @ valeriek@brownlloydjames.com

Please label the subject line: _Shafallah Forum Abstract_. Failure to do so may result in abstract not being viewed.

Information about the Shafallah Center and Previous International Forums please visit:

http://www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org



We Can Do received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email news list. All queries and applications should be emailed to Valerie Karr at the Shafallah Center, NOT to We Can Do.

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Give One, Get One XO Laptop Per Child

Posted on 25 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Education, News, Opportunities, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

They’re simple, rugged, and low-cost. And their more ardent fans think they can transform the world–one educated child at a time. Since the first XO laptops rolled off the assembly line in November 2006, hundreds of thousands of children in low-income countries have been using them in the classroom and at home. If you haven’t heard the hype yet, you can explore the website for the new, but increasingly famous One Laptop Per Child project at http://www.laptop.org/.

The latest news is:, people in the US, Canada, and Europe are now able to purchase an XO laptop for a child at home–if they will agree to also buy a laptop for a child they have never met somewhere abroad. From now until December 26, 2008, people in the US, Canada, and Europe may go to amazon.com/XO. A total of $399 in US dollars (or £275 in UK pounds) buys one XO laptop that can be shipped to your child and a second laptop to be shipped to a child in a developing country.

Because they are cheaper than most computers, XO laptops fit a little more easily into the education budgets of developing countries, especially if donors step in to help. Do they really enhance children’s learning experience as dramatically as the XO’s most earnest supporters believe? Some critics are not so sure. But others remain enthusiastic. I’ll let We Can Do readers google for more competing opinions at news.google.com and blogsearch.google.com on their own. But as a small sampling: various articles report that Microsoft and Intel don’t like the competition, and even some former employees of the One Laptop Per Child project are critics of the way the head of the company, Nicolas Negroponte, runs the business. But they seem to like the XO in Peru. And one US blogger with an XO shares his own thoughts on the subject.

What of children with disabilities? The XO is a bit of a mixed bag. Some features are good for some children with some disabilities (eg, built-in camera, good for signing deaf kids). But others are not so great for other children (eg, the interface is very visual–not so great for blind kids). I wrote some more thoughts on the topic last year at https://wecando.wordpress.com/2007/11/16/opinion-one-laptop-per-child—but-is-it-inclusive/.

I remain disappointed now, as I was then, that the people who developed the XO don’t seem to be as proactively inclusive of the needs of people with disabilities as I think they could be and should be. But some independent XO fans and programmers are working on solutions. If you want to join their on-line discussions on the topic, you can sign up for their free email-based discussion group at http://lists.laptop.org/listinfo/accessibility. Or, if you want to learn more about the accessibility issues for XO laptops, you can explore the online “Wiki” community on the topic at http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Accessibility.

What of adults who simply want a cheap, portable laptop for their own use? If you’re in the US, Canada, or Europe, then nothing would stop you from buying one for yourself. But be aware that the keyboard is designed for the small hands of primary school-aged children. If your hands are the same size as most adults, you will find it hard to touch type on the cramped keyboard. You might have to resort to two-fingered (or possibly four-fingered) typing. Also, the interface is geared toward young, creative children who might never have seen a computer before. An adult who has spent too many years using more boring, typical computers for “grown-ups” in developed countries might initially be confused about how to access its most basic programs.

Learn more about its software and hardware at http://www.laptop.org/en/laptop/index.shtml. There is an on-line forum where people who are bewildered by their XOs can ask for help from other users: http://en.forum.laptop.org/. People with more disability-specific questions will probably want to join the accessibility mailing list I mentioned above, at http://lists.laptop.org/listinfo/accessibility so they can exchange ideas, information, and solutions with other list members.

Or if all else fails, give your new XO to a young child you know and ask them to teach you how to use it. That is, if you decide to buy one.



I learned about this year’s “Give One, Get One” project through a mailing from the One Laptop Per Child project.

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JOB POST: Project Manager Inclusive Education Bac Kan province, Vietnam, Handicap International

Posted on 21 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Handicap International IS LOOKING FOR Project Manager Inclusive Education in Bac Kan province, Vietnam.
Posting date: 1st February 2009 Length of the assignment : 2 years
Closing date for application : 21/12/2008 (December 21, 2008)

Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit-making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, in response to humanitarian crises and the effects of extreme poverty. Handicap International implements programmes of assistance to persons and local organisations, inclusion programmes and programmes focusing on the fight against the main causes of disability. It runs projects in almost 60 countries, with the support of a network of 8 national associations ( Germany, Belgium, Canada, United-States, Luxembourg, United Kingdom and Switzerland)

The organisation employs almost 3300 people worldwide, 330 of whom work in France and in its European and North American sections.

For more details on the association: http://www.handicap-international.fr/en/s/index.html

JOB CONTEXT :

Unified from 1975 after 40 years of conflict, Vietnam entered into the Doi Moi process on economy and politics in the mid 80’s to open the country to liberalism. With economic growth rate of more than 8% in 2007, the country is now becoming one of the new Asian Dragons. This development creates a gap between rich areas mainly located in the lowlands and urban areas and remote mountainous regions where people remain poor, despite a 50% fall in poverty over the last 10 years.

The country is very stable with a government ruled by one legal political party. All institutional levels have People Committee representatives from the State to the villages. With around 85 millions inhabitants, Vietnam is highly populated for a territory of 331,000 km2. 54 ethnic groups co-exist in this area; the Kinh (Vietnamese themselves) constitute a majority of 85% and are dispersed nationwide. All other population groups are ethnic minorities mainly located in mountainous provinces.

JOB DESCRIPTION :

The objective aims to implement the Inclusive Education National Plan in Bac Kan province. The project has been designed and submitted as a consortium between Handicap international France and Save the Children Sweden. The project will be implementing with others external partners specialized or working in education domain.

Challenges and goals:

The Project Manager will ensure the effective implementation of the project “Rights-Based Inclusive Education Access for Children with Disability in Bac Kan province, Vietnam” in line with programme and project requirements. The post holder must support and promote the core values and interests of HI. The Project Manager will work under the supervision of the Programme Director based in Hanoi and will manage one to two project assistants, and up to two field staff (to be recruited).

_Activities_ :

/_Manage the project_/:

– To manage the following project areas: implementation of activities, human resources (field staff), finance and communications. To coordinate with partners strategies on Inclusive Education;

– Determine the methodology to be used in the project appropriate to the Vietnamese understanding of inclusion of disabled children in education

– Support the implementation of activities by partners and consultants, to implement an education policy which takes into account disabled children,

– Write the project narrative reports and participate in financial reports,

– Co-ordinate between all the project’s internal and external stakeholders;

– Prepare and participate in the evaluation phases and implement any pertinent recommendations;

– Provide initiatives to develop the project in the relation to the HI Vietnam’s pluri-annual strategy and participate technically in fundraising.

/_Manage the project and site team:_/

– Draw-up job profiles, validate recruitments an individual action plans for each team member

– Train the team in methods, approaches (participative methods, partnership…) or technical aspects (Inclusive Education, Specialized Education, identification and assessment of disabled children); Ensure effective communication within the HI team in Hanoi and other sites.

/_ Assure the project’s technical framework and its representation_/:

– Ensure that the project is implemented in line with Handicap International’s Inclusive Education policy and the Vietnamese education sector plan. /__/

/_Contribute towards the capitalization of experience:_/

– Identify with the Technical Adviser, which issues or subject areas should be capitalized,

– Define a method for collecting good practice with the Technical Adviser

CANDIDATE PROFILE:

_Mandatory:_

– Degree in a relevant discipline ; Education, development or disability (equal to BAC + 4 in France)

– Strong management skills. At least 5 years experiences in his/her field or in project management.

– Sound knowledge of Monitoring and Evaluation techniques and methodology

– Ability to work in partnership with national and local actors

– Experience of working within a multi-cultural environment

– English is essential as all project documentation and reporting systems are in English

_Qualities required_: Group leadership, initiative, creativity, diplomacy, interpersonal skills. Written and oral expression, decision making, good team work skills, strong autonomy.

_Complementary_:

– _Field of studies:_ special Education (Inclusive education, social work…)

– Experience of working in remote area, experience in INGO, experience in Asian context.

REQUIRED LANGUAGE SKILLS: English mandatory both written and oral, French would be an asset.

JOB ENVIRONMENT : The Project Manager will travel to Hanoi once a month to attend a monthly internal HI meeting in order to monitor and share his project with the Hanoi office and the Quang Tri site (HIV/AIDS project).//

EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS :

_Volunteer :_ 750 or 850 Euros monthly indemnity + living allowance paid on the field + accommodation + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance

_Salary :_ 2000 to 2300 + 457 Euros expatriation allowance + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance « + family policy »

Please send resume and covering letter with the above reference to : FPINSERCPEducVietnam1108

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL – 14, avenue Berthelot – 69361 LYON CEDEX 07

Or by Email : recrut11@handicap-international.org

Please do not telephone

Candidates from Canada or the United States, and nationals of these countries, should send their application to the following address :

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL CANADA
1819 Boulevard René Lévesque, bureau 401 – MONTRÉAL, QUÉBEC – H3H 2P5

Or by email : jobs@handicap-international.ca
or fax : 514-937-6685

Please do not telephone



This announcement was previously circulated via the Intl-Dev mailing list; the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list; and other sources.

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UNESCO Flagship to Promote Education Access for Disabled Children

Posted on 12 November 2008. Filed under: Children, Education, Inclusion, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has created a Flagship devoted to improving the reach and quality of inclusive education for students with disabilities in developing countries. As many as 90 percent of children with disabilities in developing countries are denied the opportunity to obtain an education. The Flagship program works in partnership with other United Nations agencies, international and national disability organizations, and donors. It promotes the need for policy makers and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to work in partnership with organizations of, or representing, people with disabilities and their families. The Flagship also promotes the inclusion of education rights for people with disabilities in National Education Plans.

Read more about the Flagship at
http://www.unesco.org/education/efa/know_sharing/flagship_initiatives/disability_last_version.shtml

Read more about inclusive education at
http://portal.unesco.org/education/en/ev.php-URL_ID=56205&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

Download a brochure on the Flagship program (PDF format, 432 Kb) at
http://www.unesco.org/education/efa/know_sharing/flagship_initiatives/depliant_flagship.pdf

People who are interested in promoting educational opportunities for people with disabilities in developing countries will also want to explore the web site for the Enabling Education Network (EENET), an information-sharing resource on inclusive education.

If you have a specific interest in Eastern Africa, then you might wish to learn about an on-line discussion group on inclusive education in Eastern Africa. Select the category education from the pull-down menu under “Categories” to see more We Can Do posts related to education for people with disabilities.



I first learned of the Flagship via the mailing list for the Centre for Services and Information on Disability.

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World Vision International Peace Prize NOMINATIONS Sought

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Opportunities, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

World Vision International Peace Prize

[It is my hope that We Can Do readers will consider whether they might know an individual with disabilities, or a disability-oriented organization, that might qualify for the World Vision International Peace Prize. The winning organization will receive $5,000; the winning individual will receive $1,000. The deadline to submit nominations is February 15, 2009. The following text is copy/pasted from the World Vision guidelines for the awards, which can also be downloaded in PDF format. The guidelines are also available in French and in Spanish.]

Guidelines

Purpose
The purpose of the World Vision International Peace Prize is to annually recognize and honor one individual who is a catalyst for peacemaking and one organisation which champions the integration of peacebuilding into relief, development and advocacy programmes.

Two award recipients shall be named annually under this World Vision International Peace Prize:
1. Peacebuilding Award – given to an agency or organisation that excels at integrating peacebuilding into relief, development or advocacy activities, and mobilising communities to build a durable peace
2. Peacemaking Award – given to an individual who has taken risks and excelled in being a catalyst in either bringing conflicted parties together to resolve a conflict or in enabling a peace process that engages peacemakers, mediators and people of moral authority who bring hope that a significant destructive conflict can be resolved.

The first award focuses on World Vision’s area of greatest expertise in peacebuilding, namely integrating peacebuilding in relief, development and advocacy. Key programmatic themes of World Vision include the role of children, youth and women in building peace.

The second award focuses on World Vision’s secondary area of focus, making a significant contribution to community-based peacemaking, serving as a catalyst and building bridges so that other organisations and individuals can assist in resolving destructive conflicts that put all development at risk.

Description of award
The World Vision International Peace Prize is given annually in honor and memory of Steve Williams (1951-2007), World Vision UK Senior Policy Advisor on Peace and Conflict. Steve brought vast experience in peacebuilding, conflict analysis and policy analysis to World Vision UK, and served as the Co-convener of PaxNet, the World Vision global peacebuilding network.

He distinguished himself not only within World Vision but within the peace community around the world as one who integrated his conflict analysis and policy work, was committed in his personal, family and work life to work for peace and reconciliation, strongly supported programmes of Children as Peacebuilders, and was a great advocate for peace with justice.

It is in this spirit that the World Vision International Peace Prize was established to honor his life, his work and his memory. The awardees each year may be little known to the public but each will serve as profound examples of peacemaking and peacebuilding in a world of conflict.

Nomination and selection process principles

Eligibility

Organisations and individuals that are external or internal to World Vision International may be nominated with equal consideration. Local community-based organisations as well as global humanitarian and development organisations are eligible for nomination.

Qualifications
The Awards Committee will give particular attention and consideration to nominees who mobilise children, youth and women in peacebuilding. A nomination will be strongest when the organisations or individuals demonstrate that their work and programme is built on careful context and conflict analysis, and produces credible policy and advocacy influence that contributes toward peace.

Monetary Prize and Trophy
Each organisation and individual who is awarded the World Vision International Peace Prize will receive both a monetary award ($5,000 for an organisation and $1,000 for an individual) and a physical trophy with the award designation.

Use of the award
The monetary award is to be used at the sole discretion of the awardees to further the work of the individual or the organisation in their continued role in peacemaking and peacebuilding.

Procedures for nomination
Nominees may come either from within or from outside World Vision. Self-nominations are accepted. The World Vision International Peace Prize Nomination Form can be found online at www.wvi.org/peaceprize. It should be completed in full and sent by email to: wvi_peaceprize@wvi.org by the final day for submission: February 15, 2009.

Selection process
The World Vision International Director of Peacebuilding and the Peacebuilding Unit will initially review all applications to determine which ones meet the criteria and are the strongest candidates. A vetting process will assess the nominations and develop a preliminary list of finalists. The entries from those finalists will be posted online for one month, allowing the global peacebuilding community to view, vet and rank the nominees. A short list of nominees for each prize will then be submitted to an International Peace Prize Awards Committee which will review the nominations and select the winner in each category. Decisions of the Committee will be final.

Peace Prize deadlines
September 21, 2008 International Day of Peace: Announcement and Solicitation of Nominations
February 15, 2009 Final Day for Submission of Nominations
June 30, 2009 Awardees informed privately of their selection
September 21, 2009 Announcement of Prize recipients, presentations and call for nominees for 2010 competition

Award presentation
Awards will be presented by the World Vision International President or designee on the International Day of Peace, September 21, 2009.

To find out more about World Vision’s Peacebuilding work and team, go to www.wvi.org/peaceprize.

[We Can Do readers should please note that the official web site for the World Vision International Peace Prize is at

http://www.wvi.org/wvi/wviweb.nsf/maindocs/AC6E33C8CE519993882574C50060CD3E?opendocument

People interested in learning more about the World Vision Peace Prize should please follow the link to their web site. Nomination forms can be downloaded at their web site in English, Spanish, or French. Any questions about the prize that are not adequately addressed by the World Vision Peace Prize website should please be directed to wvi_peaceprize@wvi.org, NOT to We Can Do.]



I learned about this prize via the Disabled Peoples’ International email newsletter.

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Including Everybody: Website on Disability and MDGs Launched

Posted on 26 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), News, Opinion, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
End poverty and hunger. Put all children in school. Empower women. Stop children from dying. Keep pregnant and birthing mothers healthy. Fight AIDS, malaria, and other disease. Create a sustainable environment. And promote global cooperation. These are the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)–an important set of goals agreed upon by key leaders and heads of state from around the world in September 2000. No, they don’t mention people with disabilities at all–and I will come back to this point in a few paragraphs. Or you can ignore me and go straight to the new website on disability and the MDGs. But in theory, the MDGs are meant to help everyone.

Each goal has a set of specific targets to be achieved, most with the deadline set for 2015. For example, the poverty goal includes a target to cut the number of people living on less than $1 a day in half by 2015. And the goal on child mortality includes a target to cut the child mortality rate by two-thirds among children below age 5. Many country governments, multi-lateral development banks, international development organizations, and donors have invested billions of dollars into projects meant to help more countries and regions meet the Millennium Development Goals.

What has the results been? Mixed. Some of the goals, such as the targets for reducing poverty and hunger, or in putting all children in primary school, have been met–and exceeded in many countries particularly in eastern Asia. Progress in southern Asia has helped also. But many countries in sub-Saharan Africa lag far behind in meeting many of the MDGs.

You can read more about the overall progress–or lack of it–at http://www.undp.org/mdg/basics_ontrack.shtml. Or if you only want to look up the progress in the country where you live, work, or care about the most, go to http://www.undp.org/mdg/tracking_countryreports2.shtml.

People with Disabilities and the MDGs
But what about people with disabilities? Unfortunately, they have been so invisible that most programs and governments don’t even count them. That means it’s hard to find reliable numbers that measure whether people with disabilities are included–or left behind–in the haphazard progress that has been made toward the MDGs. But, we can make some educated guesses.

For example, what limited numbers do exist estimate that possibly as many as 98% of children with disabilities in some developing countries never go to school. Personally, I doubt this number is universally true. For one thing, there is a great deal of variation from country to country in how proactive they are about finding creative ways to include children with disabilities in school. Read Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience (PDF format, 4.14 Mb) for examples of progress.

Then, there is probably some variation depending on the disability. A child with a relatively mild walking-related disability, for example, might have only minor difficulty reaching school if it is not too far. Or a child with undiagnosed and unaccommodated dyslexia might sometimes make it through a few years of school, and even learn a little, before they quit in frustration.

But if that 98% figure is anywhere close to the mark, then it is safe to say that the MDG target on universal primary education has failed disabled children miserably. We do know that they are very disproportionately left behind: the UK Department of International Development (DFID) says that one-third of the 72 million children who are out of school have disabilities, even though people with disabilities are only an estimated 10 percent of the world population in general. And this only covers the education-related target of the MDGs; the new website on disability and the MDGs points out gaps in all the rest.

Disability Inclusion is Everyone’s Business
So what’s the answer to this problem? A thorough response to this question would fill a book. One thing, however, is clear: It will not be resolved by any one government or organization working in isolation. And it certainly will not happen if resource-strapped disability-oriented organizations are left to tackle the problem alone. It will take many governments, agencies, and organizations working together–including those that do not normally specialize in disability issues. In short, everybody who is doing anything to address the MDGs needs to identify better ways to include people with disabilities in the work they’re already doing.

This begins by increasing everyone’s awareness of the complex relationship between disability and the MDGs. By “everyone” I mean both disability advocates (so they can help advocate the issue) and also mainstream international development professionals (so they can find ways to ensure their programs are not inadvertently leaving disabled people behind). Either way, you can start learning at the new website on disability and the Millennium Development Goals, Include Everybody, at:

http://www.includeeverybody.org/

What Do I Think of “Include Everybody”?
When you consider that this website is brand new, I think it makes an excellent start at covering the issues. In the long run, as with any new endeavor, I see room for them to expand. For example, their page on achieving universal primary school education or the page on promoting gender equality and empowering women could usefully link to publications such as Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb). Or their page on combating HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases could link to the on-line global survey on disability and HIV/AIDS.

They also could consider eventually developing a one to two page, attractive looking, factsheet on disability and the MDGs that advocates could print out and disseminate when educating others about the topic. They also could consider developing a similarly attractive, one-page factsheet for each of the MDGs individually. The latter could be useful, for example, for passing along to a specialist who only wants to read the information on child mortality without also having to wade through a lot of detail on environmental sustainability. Or vice versa.

But, for now, this web site is a good place to start learning.

http://www.includeeverybody.org/links.php



The Include Everybody website has been publicized in several different locations by now, including the GPDD mailing list, the Intl-Dev mailing list, Joan Durocher’s mailing list, and others.

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RESOURCE: Young People Share Views on Inclusive Education

Posted on 24 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Reports, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

A new publication is available from the Enabling Education Network (EENET). It is called “Young Voices: Young people’s views of inclusive education” (PDF format, 905 Kb).
 
This easy-to-read A5 booklet contains photographs and drawings taken by disabled and non-disabled students in Uganda and Tanzania, along with quotes from them about what they think makes a school inclusive. The booklet also summarizes some of the important ideas raised by the students. For example, it points out that many children say that the attitudes of teachers and the encouragement of parents are important to helping them feel included.
 
The booklet was published/funded by the Atlas Allliance (Norway), with the participatory work and book production being handled by EENET.
 
A Kiswahili version and a Braille version will be available before the end of 2008. There is also a short DVD (approx 15 minutes) which accompanies the booklet. Copies will be available from EENET in mid-September.
 
EENET hopes that this booklet/DVD will be useful for advocacy and awareness raising around both inclusive education and the importance of listening to children’s opinions. Please in future send EENET any feedback you have about the booklet/DVD, or how you have used it.
 
The booklet can be downloaded from the EENET website in PDF format (905 Kb):

http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Young%20Voices.pdf

People who need a print copy or the accompanying DVD mailed to them can contact EENET directly and give them their mailing address. People who will want the Braille version or the Kiswahili version when they become available also should contact EENET directly. People may either email info@eenet.org.uk or ingridlewis@eenet.org.uk



This announcement is modified from the text of an email circulated by Ingrid Lewis at EENET on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. EENET Eastern Africa discussions focuses on issues related to inclusive education in the Eastern Africa region and can be joined for free.

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Events and Competitions for Sri Lanka Children with Disabilities

Posted on 12 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Nominations or Applications, Call for Papers, Children, Cross-Disability, News, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Saviya Development Foundation (SDF) will implement various programmes aiming at disabled children in Galle, Matara and Hambantota districts.

Saviya Athvela Vocational Training Center in Kamburugamuva facilitates male and female students with physical impairment and has made arrangements to obtain the accreditation of tertiary and vocational education commission for the one year courses of repairing domestic
electrical equipments and motor rewinding.

A training centre with residential facilities for female children with autism in Nalavana, Kananke, Weligama and a boys’ home for the mentally handicapped in Akmeemana, Galle are also managed by the SDF.

SDF has also organised a series of painting, poster and writing competitions to be implemented at national level.

Children, between 10 to 15 years can participate in the junior competitions while those over 15 years can participate in the senior competitions. Children who are not disabled can also participate in the competitions.

Contributions should be sent before November 20, 2008. Rs. 5,000 will be awarded to the first prize winner while Rs. 3,000 will be awarded to the second and Rs. 2,000 to the third prize winners. Singing and dancing competitions for boys and girls are also planned under senior and junior levels.

Essays can be presented on ‘Community participation towards making the persons with disabilities partners in the society, ‘Facilitate the fulfillment of aspirations of the persons with disabilities through providing easy access.

Safeguard equality and equity of the persons with disabilities and the necessity to launch community interventions to combat social stigma. Essays of seniors should not be less than 400 words while it should not be less than 300 words for juniors.

The topics of paintings and posters are – “We will came to this world with dignity’, “Persons with disability” and “Humanity Rights and A productive alternative through skills development”.

Information can be obtained by writing to Saviya Development Foundation, 24A, Wewelwala Road, Bataganvila, Galle or calling 091-2245781 and 091-2234281. sdfsri@sltnet.lk or sdf@sri.lanka.net
http://www.saviya.org/



This text is taken from an announcement circulated by Ghulam Nabi Nizamani.

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JOB POST: Inclusive Education Adviser, Kati, Mali: Intellectually disabled children

Posted on 5 September 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , |

Inclusive education adviser, with a focus on intellectually disabled children
Institut d’Education Populaire (IEP), Kati, Mali

IEP is a collective of community educators working to develop alternative approaches in curriculum, methodology and materials for grassroots education in Mali. Long before inclusive education became official government policy in Mali, IEP’s CIWARA Community School was including disabled children in classes. At a social level, disabled children have become very well integrated, but at an academic level, progress has been very limited: none of the teachers has training related to the needs of disabled children, the government lacks the resources to provide education for all, and IEP is now looking for support in developing teaching, animation, support and evaluation in inclusive schools like CIWARA. Based in Kati (15km from Bamako) and working closely with a small team, you will provide an input in developing curriculum and methodology, provide training to staff members, establish a monitoring and follow-up system, and develop a training module for the programme of teacher training colleges. IEP is looking for someone with specialist expertise (qualifications/experience) related to understanding the needs and capabilities of mentally disabled children in inclusive environments; classroom teaching experience is also essential, together with the capacity to develop materials, a highly flexible, creative and sensitive approach, and a good knowledge of French. (REF: MAL/34)

How to apply: Further details (job description, application form) are available from www.internationalservice.org.uk or from Stella Hobbs, Recruitment Coordinator, shobbs@internationalservice.org.uk.

Download the full job description for this post in Word format at
http://www.internationalservice.org.uk/jobs/pages/job_descrip_word/jobs_01_09_08/IEP_inclusive_education_adviser.doc

A full listing of job vacancies with International Service is available at

http://www.internationalservice.org.uk/jobs/pages/jobs_current_new.htm



Thank you to Stella Hobbs for submitting this job post to We Can Do.

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Disability Awareness Action newsletter, Our Rights, Issue 2, August 2008

Posted on 3 September 2008. Filed under: Children, Cognitive Impairments, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, News, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Our Rights – issue 2, August 2008

DAA’s newsletter for Disability Lib.

In the interest of solidarity, this newsletter is sent around by email to disabled people and their organisations across the world, and we invite you to forward it freely. We have provided links to internet sites, web pages and video clips, but understand that not all links are technically accessible to all users. From October Our Rights will be available in electronic format and on our website. For our contact details follow this link http://www.daa.org.uk/

Contents
Welcome Hello from DAA
Disability LIB partners
• Central Office
ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth
Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Mind Politics
Stigma
Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
Being an Un-Person
Sceptical about The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
60 years of UN Convention on Human Rights
Inclusion means … being given a £50 token?
International News
Canada says ‘go home’ to disabled child
Sex in the City, and world wide
From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
Sit-in at Nursing Home
And Finally …

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******************
Welcome Hello from DAA
Thank you to all of you who took the time to respond to our first issue. We are delighted to be back! We have had replies from around the world.

“I am very happy indeed to get the DAA Newsletter – this is one newsletter that I eagerly look forward to. The articles provided me with new insights and sharpen my understanding.”
“Great newsletter!”
“I access DAA website regularly and will disseminate DAA newsletter to all my contacts.”
“Have just read your first bulletin and I am impressed with its coverage.”
“thanks a lot for your nice news letter. Hope it can help my people in bangladesh.”

Thank you for all your comments. We have improved our technical set-up, so fewer newsletters should land in Junk or Spam email boxes. From October you can access the newsletter on our website. You can request picture supported and word versions. We continue to strive to make our articles interesting, relevant and accessible. Please let us know how we are doing. This edition has two main themes: the body politics of bio-ethics and inclusion. We will also tell you again who we are and what we hope to achieve. Enjoy!
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

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Disability LIB partners
The project has its own website and central office. www.disabilitylib.org.uk
Disability LIB
6 Market Road
London
N7 9PW
England UK
Telephone: 0844 800 4331
Email: contact@disabilitylib.org.uk

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ALLFIE Tara Flood recognised for Inclusion Now campaign work
The Social Inclusion Campaign Award from the Sheila McKechnie Foundation was given to the director of ALLFIE, Tara Flood. Tara is also chair of DAA. Tara and the Alliance run a campaign ‘We know inclusion works’. This is in response to the negative reporting in the media. You are invited to send your stories about how inclusion works to info@allfie.org.uk

“Inclusion for me is about society, which respects the humanity of its people.” says a disabled young person in Nottinghamshire. “Inclusion happens when everyone feels appreciated and welcome to participate.”
Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education.

Inclusion is going to school with your friends. “I kept asking myself what words a mother would use to explain to her daughter why they did not want her at her school. Except that she was disabled. If my daughter had only been black, and not disabled too, would the school have been able to do the same?”
Preethi Manuel mother of Zahrah.

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Disabled by Society …. Our stories: Body Politics
Excluded because of crooked teeth

The media reported that a nine-year-old girl called Lin was moving her lips, but did not actually sing at the opening of the Olympic Games in China. The beautiful voice we all heard was from a different girl, the seven year-old Yang Peiyi. Apparently Yang was not shown on stage nor on television, because she has crooked teeth. Her face and her smile were regarded as not photogenic enough, so she was hidden to avoid damaging China’s international image.

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Often we find disabled people are hidden, out-of-sight and at the margins of society. Society’s underlying cultural preferences in terms of the body and mind is for a particular image of beauty and health: a superficial one.

Our impairment difference is treated like a ‘stigma’, a characteristic that is deeply discredited within one’s society and for which we are rejected. Our difference, it seems, is challenging.

“I experienced a nervous breakdown 20 years ago. Despite recovering from that, then going on to achieve academically and build a good marriage, my family remain wary of me. My sister is bringing up her child to refer to me as “crazy”. She even considers it funny to do so. I have tried to express how hurtful I find this, but my feelings have been overlooked.”
7th August 2008, Guardian ‘Stigmatised by my own family’

In a unique research called ‘Shout’ almost 4,000 mental health service users were involved. The charity Rethink found that 87% of people said they had direct personal experience of stigma and discrimination and reported the negative impact of stigma on their lives.

The damage caused was wide-ranging; the areas affected include employment, family, friendships, neighbours, accessing education, reporting crime, relationships with health professionals, and feeling confident enough to visit the shops, go to the pub or take part in activities in the community, it says.
The Stigma Shout report can be found at http://www.rethink.org/how_we_can_help/campaigning_for_change/moving_people/stigma_shout.html

But this problem goes deeper. If a girl can be excluded for crooked teeth, where does it end? Our society allows science and law to de-select disabled lives.
For impairment reasons they tamper with genetics in an attempt to screen out difference. We have laws that allow late abortion because of so called ‘defects’.We allow bio-ethics to de-select impairment.

In 2004, UKCPD (formerly the British Council of Disabled People) asked “Can human rights apply if we select children or value people’s quality of life on the basis of their genetic make-up or impairment?” http://www.bcodp.org.uk/library/genetics/3disabhr.pdf
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/06/mentalhealth
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/07/mentalhealth.familyandrelationships

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Disabled by Society … Our Stories: Your Say
on last month’s theme: Forced Interventions
Being an Un-Person… (8’47’’)
“This is from a handout I gave while speaking at training for staff who work with people who have developmental disabilities. It is about what it means to be dehumanized and it applies to a far greater group of people than the original audience. It is, to make it clear, something that is done to us by other people, not something intrinsic to who we are.

Being an Un-person means that people talk in front of you as if you aren’t there… It means that your existence seems to fill people with disgust and fear. … If you communicate with behaviour, you will be punished, restrained, drugged or put in a behaviour program.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c5_3wqZ3Lk

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Sceptical
A sceptical view was expressed about the usefulness of the Convention. How does it protect the rights of people with mental health issues?

“My organization are skeptical on the UN Convention re Legal Intervention for people with mental health issues and the sense of disabled people being able to join the armed forces.”

For a discussion of how different Articles in the Convention can work together, go to page 47 in this 2007 publication: http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_WORDversion.doc
The text of Article 12 can be accessed at http://www.mindfreedom.org/kb/mental-health-global/united-nations/article-12-un

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The UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled People
This year (2008) we celebrate 60 years of the United Nations Convention on Human Rights, the first international commitment on human rights.

A web campaign http://www.everyhumanhasrights.org/ urges us to embrace the values and goals of the Declaration. To protect the rights of our fellow global villagers and to encourage others to do the same in our communities, workplaces and schools. We are asked to affirm these principles:

“Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, lanaguage, relition, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.” Every Human has Rights

However, our rights as disabled people are not spelled out specifically. It makes no specific mention of the meaning of rights as disabled people. Our experience is that we are often invisible, excluded or forgotten. We are not always included into the general phrase of ‘human’ inhuman rights.

That is why we needed a specific convention and why we are campaigning for our countries to ratify the Convention of the Rights of Disabled Persons.

UN Convention text resources:
Details of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People can be found at
http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=12&pid=150
http://www.un.org/disabilities/convention/conventionfull.shtml
Easy Read version of the Convention
http://www.officefordisability.gov.uk/docs/international-agreement-rights-disabled-people.pdf
For Easy Read versions of the Convention’s extra agreements (Optional Protocols) go to
http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/convention/nz.htm
A child-friendly text of the Convention can be accessed at
http://www.unicef.org/Child_friendly_CRPD.pdf

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Inclusion means … being given a £50 gift token?
A grammar school in Lincolnshire, England, did not listen to a boy with Autism when planning and arranging the 11-plus entrance exam. Under the Disability Discrimination Act any barriers to learning have to be removed, for example by making alternative arrangements or providing reasonable adjustments.

His mother said: “We knew he would struggle with the change in surroundings. Our primary school head teacher suggested we ask if he could sit the test there, or at least in a room on his own. But when I went to the school I was told, ‘No, we don’t make any allowances’.”

As the barriers of unfamiliar surroundings, a crowded room full with unfamiliar people were not removed, the boy was extremely distressed and failed the exam.

The ombudsman Anne Seex said the school had not considered its duties under the Disability Discrimination Act.

The boy was admitted to another grammar school on the basis of his exam results at the end of primary school (called SATs) and his junior school’s recommendation.

The school has apologised, has given the boy a £50 gift token and agreed to handle future cases differently.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/lincolnshire/7542948.stm
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/article4460621.ece

International News

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Canada
Paul and Barbara-Anne Chapman had sold their home in Britain and bought a farmhouse in Nova Scotia, Canada. The local authorities supported and welcomed them.

However, when the family arrived at the airport a border guard refused them entry. Several questions were raised about their work permit, clearance for their black Labrador and about their daughter Lucy, who has Angelman syndrome.

The family claim they were told by a border guard that because Lucy is disabled she would never be allowed into the country, and that she had a lifetime ban.

Mrs Chapman said: “My dog was allowed to stay. My dog has a higher status than my daughter in Canada, just because she is disabled.”

Canada’s immigration rules in section 38 do have a clause that states that you are not eligible for immigration if you would make an excessive demand on health and social services. Presently, “excessive demand” is usually defined as exceeding $15,000 of publicly funded health care costs over the next 5 years. However, in certain family applications, children are exempt from this rule of no entry due to health care costs.

The Convention on the Rights of Disabled People places obligations on countries to protect disabled people’s rights and freedoms. This includes the right to free movement and residency.

Entry to one’s own country is specifically mentioned in Article 18 of the Convention: “Are not deprived, arbitrarily or on the basis of disability, of the right to enter their own country.”

Entry into another country is protected in Article 18, where it says that disabled people should “not be deprived, on the basis of disability, of their ability to obtain, possess and utilize … relevant processes such as immigration proceedings, that may be needed to facilitate exercise of the right to liberty of movement.”

Mr and Mrs Chapman hired a Canadian lawyer to fight the decision.

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=278
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/canada/2519496/Canada-refuses-entry-to-disabled-girl.html

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Sex in the City… and world-wide.
Research has shown that disabled people are being denied the choice to full sexual relationships.

“I want to meet a girl I can become friends with, take to the pub and the cinema and then after a couple of months see where it goes,” Joseph Greene, 23.

The national charity Family Planning Association FPA has organised an information and poster campaign about the right to have sex and relationships. FPA gives people information and advice about sexual health. This is particularly important in view of the continuing rise and impact of HIV (see reports below).

Easy Read, posters and campaign info at
http://www.fpa.org.uk/news/campaigns/current%5Fcampaigns/detail.cfm?contentid=1021
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7540103.stm
http://www.fpa.org.uk/products/learning_disabilities_publications/detail.cfm?contentid=1037

‘Let’s talk About Sex’ was launched in June 2008 for young people with life-limiting health conditions, in a bid to open up a taboo subject and to better support these young people to have the opportunity to experience relationships and explore their sexuality, in a safe, supportive and empathetic environment.
http://www.act.org.uk/content/view/153/1/

Our rights and dignity in connection with these personal areas are protected in the Convention. Article 23 of the Convention on the Rights of Disabled People specifically refers to forming relationships and accessing age-appropriate information, reproductive and family planning education.

As part of their obligations, countries who have ratified the Convention, have a duty to develop and change customs or practices. This includes working towards a change in attitude towards disabled people and sex.

Article 4 of the Convention asks governments to develop or change customs and practices which contradict the rights. Community norms, customs and practices of what people believe or how professionals deal with disabled people may go against the ideals laid down in the Convention.

“What is acceptable in the community is for a disabled person to marry another disabled person so that together they share their curse”, says a disabled local councillor in Uganda.
http://www.disabilitykar.net/docs/stories_women.doc

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From Mexico to India: Disability and HIV
On August 6th a very important international panel discussion took place. ‘Beyond Barriers: Disability and HIV/AIDS’ gave information about studies from across the world – Brazil, South Africa, Cameroon, and Canada.

Disabled people were found to be consistently more vulnerable to infection. People with learning difficulties and disabled women are often exposed to riskier situations; women in particular experience more unprotected sex than the general population, often as a result of sexual violence.

A researcher in Kwa Zulu-Natal, where there is no disability-specific sex education, encountered a “let sleeping dogs lie” attitude in schools. As a result, she found that disabled children had little access to education or legal protection and were more vulnerable to abuse and infection.

n Cameroon, a study focused on a young deaf population, found that sexual debut was on the whole earlier and riskier than in the general population.
http://eliminateaids.blogspot.com/2008/08/beyond-barriers-disability-and-hivaids.html

The Kampala Declaration on Disability and HIV/AIDS is an advocacy tool for all Campaign partners and supporters. We invite you to download this printer-ready version in English, French and Portuguese to disseminate at your various meetings and conferences!
http://www.africacampaign.info/a-nos-lecteurs-francais/index.html
http://www.africacampaign.info/recent-publication/index.html
http://www.dcdd.nl/data/1208782834413_Kampala%20Declaration%20on%20Disability%20and%20HIVAIDS.pdf

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A short recent history of the Disability Rights Movement in El Salvador
This article argues that despite national laws and certain improvements towards disability rights, El Salvador has only made nominal progress in implementing disability legislation and awareness.

In the context of El Salvador’s twelve-year armed conflict, 70,000 individuals were killed and another 300,000 people were disabled as a result of war.

However, this estimate conflicts with official statistics released by the Ministry of Economy in August 2008. Jesus Martinez, Director of the Landmine Survivors Network-El Salvador is extremely uncomfortable with the results of this 2008 Census.

“It should include accurate and trustworthy statistics about all of the disabled individuals living in this country.” he says.

Disabled people need to be counted in order to be visible in policy action, planning and prioritisation. Article 31 asks countries to find out about disabled people. State parties need collect appropriate information, including statistical and research data, to enable them to formulate and implement policies, which make a reality of the rights in the Convention.

If the Convention marks “a paradigm shift” in attitudes and approaches, then disabled people are not objects that are being counted, but subjects, who have rights and freedoms. As a result of this shift in thinking, ratification of the Convention should also mark a shift in creating a more inclusive society in El Salvador.
http://upsidedownworld.org/main/content/view/1384/74/

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Sit-in at Nursing Home
Demonstrators organised a sit-in and called for closure of a nursing home in Philadelphia. “There is no justice for someone in a nursing home,” read a sign held by one of the demonstrators.

The group’s goal was to persuade Mayor Nutter to help find homes for 50 or so disabled residents over the next six months, then get out of the nursing-home business. They were successful! Details at:
http://www.adapt.org/ http://www.philly.com/philly/hp/news_update/20080818_Protesters_seek_to_close_Phila__nursing_home.html

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And Finally …
Discrimination is a putrid shade of yellow
It tastes like stale vomit
It smells like rancid fish
Discrimination reminds me of corruption, anger and despair
And sounds like a hooded coward running scared
Discrimination feels like nobody cares …
Extract from Bipolar works blog, 2007

Thank you for your time.
We are pleased to hear from you.
Email: mysay4daa@live.co.uk

Supported by the National Lottery through the Big Lottery Fund.



Thank you to Disability Awareness Action for giving open permission to disseminate and re-publish their newsletter.

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Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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News from Kyrgyzstan: Projects, Laws, Funding Opportunities

Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Families, Funding, Human Rights, News, Policy & Legislation, Uncategorized, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The following newsletter was sent to We Can Do from Kyrgyzstan–thanks to Azat Israilov for passing this on. This contains news about projects for people with disabilities in Kyrgyzstan; a new law protecting the rights of people with disabilities; the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and announcements for a couple of funding opportunities. Content of Newsletter; Bottom of this page

We are for equal possibilities and better future!
INFORMATIONAL BULLETIN

The newsletter is published under the Health Prom project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund

July 2008
Content:
Letter from A.Israilov, national in-country project manager
Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Brief information about participants of the project
HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Young people: new horizons!
President signed the Decree “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The new law about social order accepted
Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for
people with disabilities

Projects on employment for disabled people
The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Grants

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Dear readers, colleagues and partners,

We welcome you on the pages of the first issue of the Informational bulletin which is published under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund. The important aims of the bulletin will be providing news that are related to children with special needs and their families, and also updating on the progress of the project. The bulletin will be published and distributed once a quarter. At the same time neither the project, nor the bulletin will be involved in political processes in the country. In the first issue you will find some information on the project, its participants and also learn about
some latest events in social sphere of Kyrgyzstan.

It is hoped that the bulletin as a specialist publication will continue its existence beyond the project, and will become a useful source of information for parents and concerned organizations and people. And to become so we will be delighted to publish your interesting news and helpful information which you would like to share with.
Sincerely,
A.Israilov, national in-country project manager

“Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”
Contacts: Bishkek, m/r Kok-Zhar, h. 1, p/p 4, Tel./fax (0312) 517634, aisrail@gmail.com

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Project “Supporting young disabled children and their families” funded by the Big Lottery Fund started in Kyrgyzstan
Charitable organisation HealthProm, located in London, UK, together with the Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI) and Public Association “Shoola Kol” has started a project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in the Kyrgyz Republic” funded by the Big Lottery Fund. The project is for three years and will help to establish two rehabilitation and resource centres in two pilot localities – Bishkek and Issyk-Kul oblast with Bokonbaevo v. as a centre. The project aims to improve on improving health and well-being of young children with disabilities and their parents through rehabilitation services, informational support and consultations. The project will not be involved in politics.

Prior to the project beginning there were study visits and research done during which the distress of people with disabilities, especially children, was revealed, whose families belong to the group with the lowest incomes in the country. According to the Ministry of Labour and Social Development, there are about 117 thousand people with disabilities in the republic now, out of them more than nineteen thousand are younger than 18, and 66% out of general number live in rural areas. The number of the disabled makes up 2,1% of the whole population while in the developed countries this figure varies approximately from 10 up to 20% (for example, in
the UK it is about 15%, in Russia up to 10%).

The project will fill the gap in knowledge and information resources in the Republic about prevention of disability, alternative approaches to child disability. Various trainings based on current needs will improve knowledge and skills of people with disabilities as well as of medical and social professionals. There will be developed or translated and published a number of necessary materials, and a specialised web site on disability issues will be created. A specialised microbus for each centre will connect experts and volunteers with disabled children and their families in the remote areas.

“The project focuses on sustainable development of our partners and the centres, and also on cooperation with local communities, non-governmental organisations and relevant local government agencies.” – underlines Tatyana Buynovskaja, the project manager. – “It includes programs on early intervention and providing advisory and practical support to new families with disabled children.” Tamara Dyikanbaeva, ARDI chairwoman, adds: “The project was developed taking into account the needs and wishes of parents and disabled children, considering provision of complex and versatile support to children and their parents. The project activity is based on social model of disability which recognises, that disability is not an illness (and in the developed countries it was recognised and accepted), and disabled people do not need pity and constant
guardianship, but need possibilities to study, work and communicate to become useful members of society”.

As a result of project activities it is planned to reach out about one and a half thousand parents of disabled children, and these children can participate in joint social events together with other children. It is expected in the end of the project the rehabilitation and resource centres in cooperation with local communities and government agencies will become vital for work with disabled children and their parents, and that this experience can be replicated in other regions.

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Brief information about participants of the project
Partner organisations responsible for implementing the project:

HealthProm – a charitable non-commercial organisation, based in London, works since 1984 with local communities for improving health and social support for vulnerable women and children in the countries of the former Soviet Union (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Russia, Uzbekistan, Ukraine, Tajikistan and recently in Kyrgyzstan). The primary activities of the organisation are social and medical projects. Recently HealthProm has successfully finished similar (to Kyrgyzstan) a 3-year project in Altay region of Russia. Local authorities immediately supported the initiative and provided premises and financing for two centres.

The Association of Parents of Disabled Children (ARDI), Bishkek, established in 1995, gives advisory support to parents of disabled children, and also aspires to realise capabilities of disabled children and youth by their development and integration into society.

Public Association Shoola Kol, Bokonbaevo v. in Issyk-Kul region, is the human rights organisation and engaged in educational activity and raise public awareness. Shoola Kol also advises and educates people with disabilities and helps them establish NGOs for advancement of interests and rights of disabled people.

People who are involved in the project:
* Tatyana Buynovskaya – HealthProm manager, as well as the project manager “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR”, financed by the Big Lottery Fund.
* Jonathan Watkins – senior project expert, social worker, consultant.
* Mark Hunter – child disability consultant, paediatrician.
* Azat Israilov – in-country project manager in Kyrgyzstan.
* Tamara Dyikanbaeva – Association of Parents of Disabled Children chair, project officer in Bishkek.
* Antonina Lee – Shoola Kol chair, project coordinator in Issyk-Kul region, Bokonbaevo.

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HealthProm visit to Kyrgyzstan to start the project
Under the project funded by the Big Lottery Fund HealthProm delegation of three people (see list above) have visited Kyrgyzstan for meetings with the representatives of government agencies and international and local non-governmental organisations. Between 11 and 23d May, 33 meetings took place in Bishkek and Bokonbaevo, one of them was an interview to the newspaper “Vechernij Bishkek”. In addition HealthProm representatives visited homes of families with disabled children. The results of these meetings will help partners to define the area of specialization for new rehabilitation centres. These centres will work in close interaction with local authorities and government agencies. Currently through consultations with local authorities and additional meetings there is a search for premises for the future centres as one of overall
project objectives is sustainability of the centres.

Young people: new horizons!
The youth of the Association of Parents of Disabled Children is becoming more active in public life of the country, and has also achieved some successes in education. In June this year Seinep Dyikanbaeva, project and PR manager of ARDI, has been named one of the first New Heroes of Kyrgyzstan for the positive contribution to the development of our society, a nomination organised by NGO “Atool” (Karakol). More detailed information can be found at: http://www.atuul.kg/?pid=19&hid=3. In addition, recently Seinep, a first year student of the American University in the Central Asia, has passed through a rigid competitive selection for a year training in Japan, sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA).

Ukei Muratalieva, another active young volunteer of ARDI, a student of the Kyrgyz Technical University, has been chosen together with other two Kyrgyz citizens for another training program on leadership and building networks, also sponsored by the Japanese International Agency on Cooperation (JICA). She leaves for a month for Tokyo to learn how to train and at the same time to learn how local disabled people live and the organisations of disabled people work. After returning home she will conduct a series of trainings and seminars.
Best wishes to them!

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President signed the Law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”
President of the Kyrgyz Republic has signed the law “About the rights and guarantees for persons with disabilities”.

This law aims to improve social protection of persons with disabilities, provide them with equal with other citizens of the Kyrgyz Republic possibilities to practice their rights and freedoms, avoid restrictions in their lives.
Source: 24.kg, 12 April 2008

UN adopted the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities
The General Assembly of the United Nations in the beginning of June, 2008 approved the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. It became the first universal international legal document aiming to protect the rights of persons with various kinds of permanent physical, mental, intellectual or sensor limitations. The convention contains 50 articles that protect and encourage the rights of the disabled, decrease discrimination towards them, provide them with rights to work, health services, education and full participation in society life, and also access to justice, inviolability of person, freedom from exploitation and abuse, and freedom of movement.
Source: 24.kg, 16 June 2008

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The new law about social order accepted
The law accepted in the second reading on 5th June this year intends to involve non-commercial organisations in realisation of government social programs through placing on a competitive basis and implementation the government social orders. This will also allow the government to essentially increase the efficiency of implementation of social programs and to involve in social sphere additional human, material and financial resources from non-government sources and it will partially reduce dependence of the non-governmental organisations on foreign funding.

The Minister of labour and social development of the Kyrgyz Republic Uktomkhan Abdullaeva supporting the law, underlined that “now in Kyrgyzstan, some social establishments, children’s homes, boarding schools, houses for aged people opened by the donor funding and the international organisations are on the verge of closing because of the termination of their financing by the foreign organisations. So why can’t we support the efforts of non-governmental organisations and public associations which will render social services to the
population and care for certain number of the aged, homeless children or the disabled who cannot be accommodated in the formal establishments now since there are no places or shortage of funds?”.

Similar laws has been successfully working for a long time in the countries of Europe, in Kazakhstan and 6 federal areas of Russia. Source:
Source: “The third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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Japanese agency for international cooperation plans to open a centre for people with disabilities
“The Japanese agency for international cooperation (JICA) plans to open in Kyrgyzstan a centre for people with disabilities”, – informed today at a press conference Uktomkhan Abdullaeva, the Minister of labour and social development of KR. According to her, there is the Asian-Pacific centre on problems of the disabled located in Japan. It is going to expand its activities in Central Asia. “After a working visit by Kyrgyz delegation to Japan it decided to open a head office in Kyrgyzstan for the countries of CA. It will bring to the republic additional investments. After the discussion of details of opening of the centre in October 2008 an international conference will take place in which well-known people with disabilities will take part”, – says Uktomkhan Abdullaeva.

As Minister of labour and social development KP emphasizes, such decision was affected by the new law “About the rights and guarantees of people with disabilities” recently passed by the government. “We have excluded articles from it that this category of people cannot work. Their number in workforce should make not less than 5 percent”, – said Uktomhan Abdullaeva.
Source: 24.kg, 22.05.08

Projects on employment for disabled people
We have to break the stereotype that disabled people are defective, said Edward Vinter, the executive director of Eurasia Foundation in Central Asia (EFCA). According to his words, disabled people in Kyrgyzstan are especially vulnerable group of population as being full members of society they simply cannot get a job. Many businessmen, in his opinion, are just confident that the disabled cannot work properly. In this regard, there are now some projects in Kyrgyzstan aiming to render assistance to disabled people in work search. In particular, the Eurasia Foundation in CA together with the Republican independent association of disabled women has
started cooperation with businesses of Bishkek and their management in granting workplaces for disabled people. There will also be a vacancy fair in Bishkek for people with disabilities.

Besides that, today the World Bank and EFCA declared winners of the Program of small grants of 2008 in Kyrgyzstan. “It is intended for the local organisations of a civil society. For 1996-2007 we have given out 121 small grants for a total sum of $315 thousand”, – said the chief executive of Fund Eurasia in the Central Asia Edward Vinter. Thirteen organisations have become winners.
Source: 24.kg

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The Japanese fund of reduction of poverty is intended to support disabled children
The Minister of Education and Science Ishenkul Boldzhurova presented a law providing such a grant recently at a committee meeting on international affairs and inter-parliamentary communications of the parliament of KR. She said, that in 2005 the ministry of education and science requested the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to support children with disabilities. “This project is supported by the Japanese Fund on reduction of poverty which will allocate $1 million, $50 thousands are provided by our government”, – added Ishenkul Boldzhurova.

The minister informed, that in the republic there are now about 19 thousand disabled children of which 250 children study at comprehensive schools in KR, in addition three thousand children study at the special boarding schools.

Ishenkul Boldzhurova noted that grant money will go on preparation of methodical manuals for schools and future teachers for training children with disabilities. According to her, for implementing the future project 35 comprehensive schools all over the country have already been selected – 5 in each region of the country, and also four boarding schools (internats) and two kindergartens.
Source: 24.kg, 15.04.2008

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Children on holiday in Issyk Kul
Thanks to allocated 50 holiday vouchers by the Kyrgyzstan Federation of Trade unions the Association of Parents of Disabled Children organised on 4 – 25 July holiday for members of the Association, including 50 children ith special needs. Children’s recreational centre “Ulan” located near Balykchy accommodated them, and under the HealthProm project “Supporting young disabled children and their families in KR” funded by the Big Lottery Fund transportation expenses for all children have been covered.

The recreational centre can accommodate about 250 people. Besides swimming on lake, there were joint cultural events organised for children, which promoted integration of disabled children with other children, and also promoted tolerance among their peers.

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Grants
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) (Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan) on behalf of the Canadian Foundation announces call for applications for small grants program for Central Asia.

The main areas: poverty reduction, sustainable development, increase participation of women, protection the children’s rights, capacity building for organisations, environment.

The maximum size of a grant is $20,000. The general grant pool is $50,000.

Projects should be short-term ending and presenting a financial report until 1st March 2009. For additional information please write to Anna Zhugan on: Anna. Zhugan@international.gc.ca

Bradley Foundation contests
Bradley Foundation supports: conducting annual events, holding conferences and seminars, purchasing equipment, general support, training, investments related to a project, publications, researches, stipends, development of educational programs.

Applications accepted: 1 March, 1 July, 1 September, 1 December each year.

The size of a grant: from $100 up to $550,000.

Priority areas of support: development of civic sense – projects can be aimed at any sphere of public life (economy, politics, culture, civil society), but they should advance citizenship to the bottom idea of elections and vote. For example, these can be projects showing increased public participation, political or academic research, media projects and others. Building projects and individuals are not financed.

Application procedure can be found at the Fund’s site. Results of selection appear in February, May-June, September and November, depending on application submission. More information can be found at: http://www.bradleyfdn.org/
Source: “the Third sector” 16 (42), June 2008

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This newsletter sent to We Can Do by Azat Israilov. People who wish to receive future issues of this newsletter, in PDF format, via email should inquire by email at aisrail@gmail.com (NOT with We Can Do)

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Masters of Advanced Studies in Children’s Rights

Posted on 26 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , |

Found in a recent issue of the Disabled Peoples International electronic newsletter:

“Applicants are needed for the 2009-2010 Master of Advanced Studies in Children’s Rights (MCR), an interdisciplinary part-time postgraduate programme in children’s rights, which is jointly organized by the Institut Universitaire Kurt Bösch (IUKB) in Sion and the University of Fribourg, both in Switzerland.

Program begins 16 February 2009 and the deadline for applications is 15 September 2008. Contact Sarah Bruchez through the website at http://www.iukb.ch/index.php?id=63

It is not clear from their web site to what extent the program will include content on the unique needs and situation of children with disabilities, or the unique needs of children in developing countries. Nor is it clear how well the program will accommodate the needs of participants with disabilities. However, nothing ventured, nothing gained: it is my hope that We Can Do readers with an interest in the human rights of children with disabilities will follow the link to the web page for the Master of Advanced Studies in Children’s Rights and inquire directly with Sarah Bruchez in regard to these questions:

Sarah Bruchez, Programme Secretary
Institut Universitaire Kurt Bösch (IUKB)
MAS in Children’s Rights
P.O. Box 4176 – CH-1950 Sion 4
Tel. +41 (27) 205 73 00
Fax +41 (27) 205 73 01
Email: mcr@iukb.ch

I would be interested in learning of the experience of We Can Do readers with this program; feel free to share in the comments area further below.



Quoted text borrowed from DPI Newsletter; Sarah Bruchez’s contact information taken from Masters of Advanced Studies in Children’s Rights’ website.

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Disabled Girls in the Classroom: Finding What We Don’t Know

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Reports, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

A report entitled Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) discusses what we don’t know about girls with disabilities in relation to education, and what ought to be done about it.

Readers familiar with gender issues within education know that, in many countries, girls are still more likely to drop out of school–if they ever attend at all. They may be needed at home to fetch the water; they may be afraid of being sexually assaulted on the way to school; or they may be embarrassed about managing their menustration at schools where there is no separate bathroom for girls–or perhaps no bathrooms at all.

Regular We Can Do readers and others familiar with the education field may also recall that about 77 million primary school-aged children today are not enrolled in school–and about one-third of them have disabilities. Schools are reluctant to enroll disabled students; parents may fear subjecting children with disabilities to bullying from the community and thus keep them at home; or decision makers may simply assume that disabled students either cannot learn or would be unable to use their educational degree later on because “no one wants to hire disabled workers.”

But what of girls with disabilities? Being a double minority does tend to come with a triple whammy. Disabled girls are excluded because they have disabilities; they are excluded because they are girls; and then they are excluded yet again when programs might target girls without including disabled girls, or when programs might target children with disabilities without considering the impact of gender.

This would seem to imply that girls with disabilities may face a unique set of barriers when pursuing an education–barriers that neither non-disabled girls nor disabled boys need to consider. If a unique set of barriers, then surely a unique set of solutions would also be needed to ensure that the push to put the last 77 million children into school does not leave behind girls with disabilities. But, how can we tackle these barriers if we don’t have a clear picture of what they are?

The 35-page paper, Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb), is an attempt to pull together what is known about girls in education with what is known about disability in education, coupled with anecdotcal information about how girls with disabilities are affected differently. It provides recommendations for areas researchers should be focusing on and gives a few ideas for things that can help.

This paper was published in 2003. But, unfortunately, I doubt it is significantly dated. I don’t pretend to be intensively familiar with the literature on education among students with disabilities internationally. But a quick skim through a more recent report on disability in education, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), suggests that advancements since 2003 have been far from dramatic.

Perhaps one of the most important purposes of Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) is to help remind gender specialists that girls with disabilities are first and foremost, girls–but will be inherently excluded if not consciously targeted. For We Can Do readers already working on disability issues in education, another purpose is to remind that barriers excluding women and girls from full participation in society impact disabled girls and women just as much–if not more so.

If issues impacting girls with disabilities interests you, then you might also be interested in some of the following We Can Do posts:

Equalizing Educational Opportunity for the Nigerian-Ghanaian Blind Girl Child
Violence Against Blind/VI Girls in Malawi
Report on Violence Against Disabled Children (which I include in this list because violence against girls is often cited as a reason why some girls quit school)
Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children
Report on Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities (the referenced report includes brief references throughout to girls, including in the context of education)
Online discussion of inclusive education in Eastern Africa

Advocates working to promote more educational opportunities for girls with disabilities also may wish to consult, and cite, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), with particular attention to Article 6 (Women with Disabilities); Article 7 (Children with Disabilities); and Article 24 (Education).



I found this report by browsing the AskSource.info database.

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We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

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JOB POST: Consultant, Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Posted on 19 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, signed languages | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Please note that this post gives information on two potential consulting positions: one for an international-level consultant for 15 days, the other for a national-level consultant for 30 days. Both consultants will work together for part of the project, but are being recruited separately. Please read all the information below carefully to ensure that you understand the nature of the project and the qualifications desired for each of the two positions so you can decide which of the two is best suited to your background. Please also note that all inquiries and applications should please be sent to the World Bank, NOT to We Can Do.

Deadline: September 12, 2008

Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project
INVIDIDUAL CONSULTING SERVICES
TF No. TF092635
Expressions of interest

The World Bank has received a “seed fund” from the Japan Social Development Fund toward the cost of preparing a Vietnam Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project (“the Project”), and intends to apply part of the proceeds for consultant services. The services involve a short assignment to: (i) conduct community-based stakeholder consultations, and (ii) in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in the future Project proposal.

(The Project itself will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community. The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf. The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.)

The World Bank now invites eligible consultants to indicate their interest in providing the services. Interested consultants should provide information showing that they are qualified in the field of assignment and provide information on their technical and organizational capabilities.

A consultant will be selected in accordance with the procedures set out in the World Bank’s Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants by World Bank Borrowers (current edition).

Interested consultants may obtain further information at the address below during office hours (0900 to 1700 hours).

Expressions of interest must be e-mailed to jwaite@worldbank.org by September 12, 2008.

Deaf candidates are encouraged to express their interest in this assignment.

World Bank
Attn: Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist
63 Ly Thai To Street
Hanoi, VIETNAM
Tel: +84-4-9346600
Fax: +84-4-9346597
E-mail: jwaite@worldbank.org

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Vietnam: Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Stakeholder Consultation and Project Design: Terms of Reference
International Consultant Services

August 2008

Introduction
The World Bank has received a Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) “seed fund grant” to carry out stakeholder consultations, with a view to developing the detailed design of an Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project in Vietnam (hereafter “the Project”). This detailed design will form the basis of a proposal for a substantive JSDF Grant to finance the Project.

The World Bank intends to apply part of this seed fund to the hire of an international expert, who, in association with a national expert, will conduct the stakeholder consultations and, in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in a future Project proposal.

Background: deaf children’s development
Early childhood is the time of life when access to language models is crucial to the development of language and therefore to future learning. Deaf children rely on the sense of vision as their main channel of learning and communication. Only when young children who are deaf and their family members can use a shared language together will the child’s cognitive and social development proceed normally. The challenge is breaking through the communication gap with a visually supported language. Yet, worldwide, families with deaf infants and toddlers rarely have access to early education support. As a result, the deaf child’s development often suffers, leaving them at a major disadvantage in school and life.

Background: deaf education in Vietnam
In Vietnam, some 40,000 school-age children (i.e. aged 5 to 17) – or 18 out of every 10,000 – find it “very difficult to hear” (i.e. are severely deaf) or “impossible to hear” (i.e. are profoundly deaf). Almost all deaf children are born to hearing parents; for the most part, hearing parents (like hearing adults in general) have little awareness of the Deaf community, its language and its culture. As a result, young deaf children seldom come into contact with deaf adults (or even, until they start school, older deaf children).

In Vietnam, the provision of formal education to deaf youth began over 125 years ago, with an approach that used a sign language as the language of instruction. Despite this long and rich history, many deaf children still never go to school and those deaf children who do attend school often drop out before completing even Grade 5, with very few deaf youth receiving a secondary or tertiary education. Deaf children may attend special schools or mainstream schools. While special school classroom teachers are more likely than mainstream school classroom teachers to supplement their teaching with the use of signs (but generally not in a natural sign language mode), the dominant teaching approach is an “oralist” one that uses Vietnamese as the primary language of instruction.

IDEO Project concept
The Project will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf.

The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.

Consultant activities, outputs and timeline

Under this assignment, the Consultant will:

1. Produce an initial brief concept note to describe: (a) a range of options for Project activities to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) a range of options for Project implementation “civil society organizations” to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) describe the plan for stakeholder consultation under Activity 3. (Output: Brief concept note) [Timeline: Days 1 – 2]

2. Discuss and agree on this concept note with the World Bank supervisor. [Timeline: Day 3]

3. On the basis of the agreed concept note, consult with stakeholders (deaf associations, parents of deaf children, managers/teachers in schools catering specifically for deaf students, specialists addressing deaf education policy/practice/curriculum, NGOs involved with deaf education or disability support more generally) – in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and, if the schedule permits, Haiphong – to (a) determine appropriateness and feasibility of different Project activities, (b) establish appropriate beneficiary/geographical scope of the Project, and (c) identify appropriate civil society organizations (e.g. deaf associations, NGOs or a combination) to implement Project activities. [Timeline: Days 4 – 10]

4. On the basis of Activity 3 consultation, produce a concise report containing specific recommendations (for inclusion in the proposal for the Project) that describe inter alia (a) the range of Project activities, (b) the scope of the Project, especially in terms of target beneficiary age, target beneficiary numbers and target geographical areas, (c) the selection of civil society organizations to be invited to implement the Project, (d) the specifications of the on-going monitoring and evaluation framework (objectives, indicators, information collection, responsible entities, etc.) to assess Project performance throughout its various phases, and (e) the estimated costs of the Project (disaggregated by phase and expenditure category). (Output: Final report) [Timeline: Days 11 – 14]

5. Brief the World Bank supervisor on the findings of the consultation process and other relevant information, the contents of the report and the specific recommendations. (Output: Briefing) [Timeline: Day 15]

Consultant qualifications and experience

The Consultant will have:
 An advanced university degree in Deaf studies, education, social sciences or a related discipline, with expertise in Deaf education (preferably early child education);
 Substantial international experience in Deaf education, preferably in developing countries;
 Substantial international involvement with Deaf communities, preferably in developing countries;
 An understanding of natural sign language modalities, and preferably some knowledge of a natural sign language (especially a Vietnamese or historically related sign language [e.g. a Thai/Lao sign language, French sign language, American sign language]);
 Demonstrated capacity to organize and manage community-based consultation processes (e.g. workshops, focus groups, town-hall meetings, etc.);
 Demonstrated capacity to work effectively in a team, to manage a range of tasks, to work pro-actively and with diligence, and to manage resources effectively while meeting deadlines;
 Excellent report writing skills in English; and
 Strong computer skills in word processing and communication.

Assignment modalities and duration
The International Consultant will carry out this assignment in association with a National Consultant (who will be hired separately by the World Bank). The International Consultant will be the senior member of the team and will have overall responsibility for: (i) the conduct of the consultation events, (ii) the delivery of the initial note and the final report, and (iii) the briefings for the World Bank team.

It is expected that the International Consultant will work approximately 15 days (half of this time spent in Vietnam for the consultation sessions). (The National Consultant will work approximately 30 days, spending the additional days in preparation tasks: contacting stakeholders, conducting pre-meetings with stakeholders, setting up consultation events, organizing stakeholder consultation logistics, facilitating communication at stakeholder consultation events, and liaising with the World Bank supervisor on organizational matters.)

The two members of the team will be selected to ensure that they are able to communicate effectively with each other, as well as – in some working combination – with stakeholders (in Vietnamese or a Vietnamese sign language, as appropriate) and with the World Bank supervisor (in English).

The Consultant will be responsible for: (i) arranging his/her own travel and accommodation; (ii) managing the stakeholder consultation sessions; and (iii) arranging for the production of the initial note and final report. (The World Bank team will be responsible for making all payments associated with stakeholder consultation events [space rental, food, participants’ per-diems, etc.]).

Administration
The work in this contract is supervised by Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank in Hanoi. The Japan Social Development Fund “seed fund grant” that finances this study ends on August 31, 2009.

Annex 1: Partial list of stakeholders

Haiphong Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hải Phòng)
Hanoi Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hà Nội) [http://www.deafhanoi.com & http://360.yahoo.com/clbnnkh/%5D [Contact: Trần Ngọc Tuần]
HCMC Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc TP.HCM)
See also: Asia Pacific Development Center on Disability: List of disability NGOs in Vietnam: http://www.apcdproject.org/Countryprofile/vietnam/nongov.html

Hoa Sua School, Hanoi (Trường Trung học Tư thục Kinh tế Du lịch Hoa Sữa) [http://www.hoasuaschool.com/]
Nhan Chinh School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Dân lập Dạy Trẻ điếc Nhân Chính)
Thanh Tri School, Hanoi (Trương Nuôi dạy Trẻ Khuyết tật Thanh Trì)
Xa Dan School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Xã Đàn)

Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers College, Dong Nai (Dự án Giáo dục Đại học cho Người điếc Việt Nam, Cao đẳng Sư phạm Đồng Nai, TP. Đồng Nai) [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Hoa]
Hy Vong I School, HCMC (Trường Khuyết tật Thính giác Hy Vọng I)
Hy Vong Binh Thanh School, HCMC (Trường Hy Vọng Bình Thạnh)
Thuan An Education Center, Lai Thieu, Binh Duong (Trung tâm Giáo dục Trẻ Khiếm thính Thuận An) [formerly known as École des sourds-muets de Lái-Thiêu] [http://www.thuongvevietnam.org/webseiten/thuanan/html/thuanan_en.html]

Hanoi Pedagogy University Dại học Sư phạm Hà Nội, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt)
HCMC Pedagogy University (Dại học Sư phạm TP.HCM, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt) [Contact: Cao Thị Xuân Mỹ]
Vietnam Institute for Educational Sciences (Bộ Giáo dục và Đào Tạo, Viện Khoa học Giáo dục, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Giáo dục Trẻ Khuyết tật) [Contact: Lê Văn Tạc]

Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi [Contact: Phạm Minh Hằng]
Save the Children UK, Hanoi [http://www.savethechildren.net/vietnam/] [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Bịch]

Annex 2: Partial list of resources

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2002). Ký hiệu Củ chỉ Điệu bộ của Người điếc Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2004). Ký hiệu của Người điếc Việt Nam / Signs of the Deaf in Vietnam. (3 volumes). Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (n.d.). Tài liệu Ngôn ngữ Ký hiệu cho Trẻ Khiếm thính Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Student Handbooks 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Companion Dictionaries 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Locker-McKee, R. (2005). “As one Deaf person to another”: Deaf paraprofessionals in mainstream schools. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 1-48.

Reilly, C. & Nguyen Cong Khanh. (2004). Final Evaluation Report for Inclusive Education For Hearing-Impaired and Deaf Children in Vietnam. Pearl S. Buck International-Vietnam, U.S. Agency for International Development (Grant No. 492-G-0098-00040-00), Hanoi, Vietnam.
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/humanitarian_assistance/the_funds/pubs/reportlst.html)

Reilly, C. (2004-08). “Outside the Dream” Project (Thailand). UNESCO Programme for the Education of Children in Need / Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education and Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. (http://research.gallaudet.edu/sl/)

Woodward, J. (2000). Sign languages and sign language families in Thailand and Viet Nam. In K. Emmorey & H. Lane (eds.), The Signs of Language Revisited: An Anthology in Honor of Ursuala Bellugi and Edward Klima. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 23-47.

Woodward, J. (2003). Sign languages and Deaf identities in Thailand and Viet Nam. In L. Monaghan et al. (eds.), Many Ways to be Deaf. Washington, D.C., USA: Gallaudet University Press, pp. 283-301.

Woodward, J. et al. (2004). Providing higher educational opportunities to Deaf adults in Viet Nam through Vietnamese sign languages. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 232-263.

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page

Vietnam: Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project

Stakeholder Consultation and Project Design: Terms of Reference
National Consultant Services

August 2008

Introduction
The World Bank has received a Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) “seed fund grant” to carry out stakeholder consultations, with a view to developing the detailed design of an Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project in Vietnam (hereafter “the Project”). This detailed design will form the basis of a proposal for a substantive JSDF Grant to finance the Project.

The World Bank intends to apply part of this seed fund to the hire of an national expert, who will support an international expert to conduct the stakeholder consultations and, in light of the results of these consultations and other relevant information, produce a report containing specific recommendations for the World Bank team to include in a future Project proposal.

Background: deaf children’s development
Early childhood is the time of life when access to language models is crucial to the development of language and therefore to future learning. Deaf children rely on the sense of vision as their main channel of learning and communication. Only when young children who are deaf and their family members can use a shared language together will the child’s cognitive and social development proceed normally. The challenge is breaking through the communication gap with a visually supported language. Yet, worldwide, families with deaf infants and toddlers rarely have access to early education support. As a result, the deaf child’s development often suffers, leaving them at a major disadvantage in school and life.

Background: deaf education in Vietnam
In Vietnam, some 40,000 school-age children (i.e. aged 5 to 17) – or 18 out of every 10,000 – find it “very difficult to hear” (i.e. are severely deaf) or “impossible to hear” (i.e. are profoundly deaf). Almost all deaf children are born to hearing parents; for the most part, hearing parents (like hearing adults in general) have little awareness of the Deaf community, its language and its culture. As a result, young deaf children seldom come into contact with deaf adults (or even, until they start school, older deaf children).

In Vietnam, the provision of formal education to deaf youth began over 125 years ago, with an approach that used a sign language as the language of instruction. Despite this long and rich history, many deaf children still never go to school and those deaf children who do attend school often drop out before completing even Grade 5, with very few deaf youth receiving a secondary or tertiary education. Deaf children may attend special schools or mainstream schools. While special school classroom teachers are more likely than mainstream school classroom teachers to supplement their teaching with the use of signs (but generally not in a natural sign language mode), the dominant teaching approach is an “oralist” one that uses Vietnamese as the primary language of instruction.

IDEO Project concept
The Project will aim to develop a model for cost-effective and community-based activities that improve deaf children’s readiness to benefit early from educational opportunities. It would enable deaf children and their parents to engage in a systematic and structured way with deaf adults, who are well integrated into the local deaf community and fluent in the local sign language. This engagement would provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language and their parents with knowledge and confidence about their children’s capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

The Project would support activities that involve deaf adults in paraprofessional positions as: (a) social role models (e.g. self-awareness, cultural identify, interpersonal behaviors); (b) sign language trainers (e.g. teach sign language to children and teach basic signs to parents, especially through play situations); and (c) advocates (e.g. advise and educated parents through modeling communication strategies and deaf cultural perspectives). Delivery of services relies on an untapped asset: adults who are deaf who are fluent in using the local sign language. Through training in early education and language learning these fluent signers develop themselves as valuable educational resources, rich with local knowledge, language skills, educational capacities, and motivation to improve the lives of poor and otherwise isolated children and youth who are deaf.

The primary beneficiaries would be deaf children, especially those aged 0-6, in the Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and/or Haiphong areas (where the deaf communities appear to be the most organized). A systematic and structured engagement with deaf adults (from younger to older adults) who are fluent signers would enhance the children’s readiness and capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities. Secondary beneficiaries would include (a) the deaf children’s parents, who would improve their ability to communicate with their children and gain confidence in their children’s capacity to benefit from formal education opportunities, and (b) the deaf adults involved in the outreach program, who would gain in confidence, recognition and a new career track as outreach workers.

Consultant activities and timeline

Under this assignment, the Consultant will:

1. In advance of the International Consultant’s arrival in Vietnam, contact stakeholders, conduct pre-meetings with stakeholders, set up consultation events, organize stakeholder consultation logistics, and liaise with the World Bank supervisor on organizational matters. [Timeline: Days 1 – 10]

2. Support the International Consultant in producing an initial brief concept note to describe: (a) a range of options for Project activities to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) a range of options for Project implementation “civil society organizations” to be discussed during stakeholder consultations, (b) describe the plan for stakeholder consultation under Activity 3. [Timeline: Days 11 – 12]

3. Participate in the discussion on this concept note with the World Bank supervisor. [Timeline: Day 13]

4. Support the International Consultant in conducting stakeholders consultation events – in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and, if the schedule permits, Haiphong – with particular responsibility for facilitating communication at these events. [Timeline: Days 14 – 20]

5. Support the International Consultant in producing a concise report containing specific recommendations for inclusion in the proposal for the Project. [Timeline: Days 21 – 24]

6. Participate in the briefing with the World Bank supervisor on the findings of the consultation process and other relevant information, the contents of the report and the specific recommendations. [Timeline: Day 25]

7. After the departure of the International Consultant, liaise with the World Bank supervisor on any follow-up tasks related to the assignment. [Timeline: Days 26 – 30]

Consultant qualifications and experience

The national consultant will have:
 At least an upper secondary education qualification (i.e. having completed Grade 12);
 Experience in Deaf education in Vietnam;
 Involvement with Deaf communities in Vietnam;
 Native or near-native proficiency in a Vietnamese sign language;
 Ability to communicate effectively in Vietnamese, and preferably with at least a basic ability to communicate through written English;
 Demonstrated capacity to organize and manage community-based consultation processes (e.g. workshops, focus groups, townhall meetings, etc.); and
 Demonstrated capacity to work effectively in a team, to manage a range of tasks, to work pro-actively and with diligence, and to manage resources effectively while meeting deadlines.

Assignment modalities and duration
The National Consultant will carry out this assignment in association with an International Consultant (who will be hired separately by the World Bank). The National Consultant will be the junior member of the team; as such, he/she will support the International Consultant in all aspects of the carrying out of the assignment and contribute to the content of the assignment outputs. (The International Consultant, as the senior member, will have overall responsibility for: (i) the conduct of the consultation events, (ii) the delivery of the initial note and the final report, and (iii) the briefings for the World Bank team.)

The National Consultant will work approximately 30 days, including 10 days before the arrival of the International Consultant in Vietnam. (It is expected that the International Consultant will work approximately 15 days [half of this time spent in Vietnam for the consultation sessions].)

The two members of the team will be selected to ensure that they are able to communicate effectively with each other, as well as – in some working combination – with stakeholders (in Vietnamese or a Vietnamese sign language, as appropriate) and with the World Bank supervisor (in English).

The Consultant will be responsible for: (i) arranging his/her own travel and accommodation; (ii) managing the stakeholder consultation sessions; and (iii) arranging for the production of the initial note and final report. (The World Bank team will be responsible for making all payments associated with stakeholder consultation events [space rental, food, participants’ per-diems, etc.]).

Administration
The work in this contract is supervised by Jeffrey Waite, Senior Education Specialist at the World Bank in Hanoi. The Japan Social Development Fund “seed fund grant” that finances this study ends on August 31, 2009.

Annex 1: Partial list of stakeholders

Haiphong Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hải Phòng)
Hanoi Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc Hà Nội) [http://www.deafhanoi.com & http://360.yahoo.com/clbnnkh/] [Contact: Trần Ngọc Tuần]
HCMC Deaf Association (Chi hội Người điếc TP.HCM)
See also: Asia Pacific Development Center on Disability: List of disability NGOs in Vietnam: http://www.apcdproject.org/Countryprofile/vietnam/nongov.html

Hoa Sua School, Hanoi (Trường Trung học Tư thục Kinh tế Du lịch Hoa Sữa) [http://www.hoasuaschool.com/]
Nhan Chinh School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Dân lập Dạy Trẻ điếc Nhân Chính)
Thanh Tri School, Hanoi (Trương Nuôi dạy Trẻ Khuyết tật Thanh Trì)
Xa Dan School, Hanoi (Trường Phổ thông Cơ sở Xã Đàn)

Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers College, Dong Nai (Dự án Giáo dục Đại học cho Người điếc Việt Nam, Cao đẳng Sư phạm Đồng Nai, TP. Đồng Nai) [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Hoa]
Hy Vong I School, HCMC (Trường Khuyết tật Thính giác Hy Vọng I)
Hy Vong Binh Thanh School, HCMC (Trường Hy Vọng Bình Thạnh)
Thuan An Education Center, Lai Thieu, Binh Duong (Trung tâm Giáo dục Trẻ Khiếm thính Thuận An) [formerly known as École des sourds-muets de Lái-Thiêu] [http://www.thuongvevietnam.org/webseiten/thuanan/html/thuanan_en.html]

Hanoi Pedagogy University Dại học Sư phạm Hà Nội, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt)
HCMC Pedagogy University (Dại học Sư phạm TP.HCM, Bộ môn Giáo dục Đặc biệt) [Contact: Cao Thị Xuân Mỹ]
Vietnam Institute for Educational Sciences (Bộ Giáo dục và Đào Tạo, Viện Khoa học Giáo dục, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Giáo dục Trẻ Khuyết tật) [Contact: Lê Văn Tạc]

Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi [Contact: Phạm Minh Hằng]
Save the Children UK, Hanoi [http://www.savethechildren.net/vietnam/] [Contact: Nguyễn Thị Bịch]

Annex 2: Partial list of resources

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2002). Ký hiệu Củ chỉ Điệu bộ của Người điếc Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (2004). Ký hiệu của Người điếc Việt Nam / Signs of the Deaf in Vietnam. (3 volumes). Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Dự án “Giáo dục Hoà ngập Trẻ Khiếm thính”. (n.d.). Tài liệu Ngôn ngữ Ký hiệu cho Trẻ Khiếm thính Việt Nam. Pearl S. Buck International, Hanoi Vietnam (with USAID and Vietnam Institute of Educational Science).

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Student Handbooks 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language Production Team. ̣(2007). Ho Chi Minh City Sign Language: Companion Dictionaries 1& 2. Project on Opening University Education to Deaf People in Vietnam through Sign Language Analysis, Teaching and Interpretation, Deaf Cultural Studies Program, Dong Nai Teachers’ College, Dong Nai, Vietnam (with the The Nippon Foundation, Tokyo, Japan). [Vietnamese language version also available.]

Locker-McKee, R. (2005). “As one Deaf person to another”: Deaf paraprofessionals in mainstream schools. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 1-48.

Reilly, C. & Nguyen Cong Khanh. (2004). Final Evaluation Report for Inclusive Education For Hearing-Impaired and Deaf Children in Vietnam. Pearl S. Buck International-Vietnam, U.S. Agency for International Development (Grant No. 492-G-0098-00040-00), Hanoi, Vietnam.
(http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/humanitarian_assistance/the_funds/pubs/reportlst.html)

Reilly, C. (2004-08). “Outside the Dream” Project (Thailand). UNESCO Programme for the Education of Children in Need / Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education and Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. (http://research.gallaudet.edu/sl/)

Woodward, J. (2000). Sign languages and sign language families in Thailand and Viet Nam. In K. Emmorey & H. Lane (eds.), The Signs of Language Revisited: An Anthology in Honor of Ursuala Bellugi and Edward Klima. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 23-47.

Woodward, J. (2003). Sign languages and Deaf identities in Thailand and Viet Nam. In L. Monaghan et al. (eds.), Many Ways to be Deaf. Washington, D.C., USA: Gallaudet University Press, pp. 283-301.

Woodward, J. et al. (2004). Providing higher educational opportunities to Deaf adults in Viet Nam through Vietnamese sign languages. Deaf Worlds, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 232-263.

Top of Page; Request for Expressions of Interest; International Consultant; National Consultant; Bottom of Page



We Can Do received this job post via a contact at the World Bank. Please note that all inquiries, applications, or expressions of interest should be directed to the World Bank, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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Ayudar a los niños sordos–en español: New Hesperian Foundation Title in Spanish

Posted on 19 August 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Deaf, Families, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, Resources, signed languages | Tags: , , , |

BILINGUAL POST in English and Spanish; bilingual articulo en ingles y español. (¡Ojala que mi español es bastante claro!)

The Hesperian Foundation has released its book entitled Helping Children Who Are Deaf in Spanish for the first time. It can be downloaded in PDF format for free, one chapter at a time.

El “Hesperian Foundation” ha publicado el libro, Ayudar a los niños sordos, en español. Se puede transferido el libro sin coste (en formato PDF) un capítulo a la vez.

Says, the Hesperian Foundation, “Ayudar a los niños sordos (Helping Children Who Are Deaf in Spanish) supports parents and other caregivers in building the communication skills of babies and young children. Packed with simple activities, this book is a great resource for people who care for children who do not hear well including parents, caregivers, health promoters, and
others in teaching a deaf child how to communicate to the best of his or her ability.”

El Hesperian Foundation ha dicho, “Ayudar a los niños sordos apoyo familiar y comunitario para niños que no oyen bien. Los niños que no pueden oír bien necesitan más ayuda para aprender un idioma hablado o un lenguaje de señas, lo cual es muy importante, porque el lenguaje es la base para pensar, solucionar problemas y relacionarnos con otras personas. Este libro está lleno de actividades sencillas y será un gran recurso para las personas que cuidan de niños sordos, ya sean padres, otros cuidadores y/o promotores de salud, ya que les ofrece herramientas para enseñarle al niño a comunicarse lo mejor que pueda.”
http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download_Sordos.php

The Hesperian Foundation produces a wide range of books for people and organizations in developing countries. It’s most famous book is “Where There is No Doctor,” which has helped many workers in rural areas save lives.

El Hesperian Foundation se publica muchos libros varios para personas y organizaciones en países en desarrollo. El libro más famoso es “Donde no hay medico,” lo cual ha ayuda mucho personas en areas campos salvar las vidas.

Download Ayudar a los niños sordos en español at http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download_Sordos.php

Hesperian Foundation has many other books that can be downloaded for free. Most are in English, some are in Spanish, and one is in French. You can find these at http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download.php

El Hesperian Foundation tiene muchos libros libres. Todos son en ingles. Algunos son en español. Uno es en francés. Se puede encontrar todos a http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download.php



I learned about this book through an announcement from the Hesperian Foundation.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Child Injuries, Violence, Disability

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Cross-Disability, Health, Opportunities, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Dear colleagues,

The World Health Organization Bulletin will publish a special issue on
Child Injuries, Violence and Disability in May 2009.

A call has gone out for related articles, see
http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/media/news/whobulletin/en/index.html

Authors are encouraged to submit papers by 1 September 2008.

Please forward this call to groups or individuals that you think may be interested.

Thanks
Alana

Alana OFFICER
Coordinator
Disability and Rehabilitation (DAR)
Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability
World Health Organization

Interested authors should please follow the link to the official webpage on the call the papers in order to obtain all details, including guidelines for authors and instructions on how to submit your papers. We Can Do is unable to answer your inquiries. Thank you.



This announcement was circulated by Alana Officer at the World Health Organization. I found this announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group.

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New Website Links Parents of Disabled Children to Information, Resources

Posted on 14 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Resources, South Asian Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

June 27, 2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Julie Holmquist 952-838-9000

julie.holmquist@PACER.org

New PACER Web site offers information, resources for children with disabilities and their parents across the globe

Parents of children with disabilities living in India, Uzbekistan and across the globe can find a new resource on the Internet.

A new PACER Web site (www.PACER.org/international) acts as a link to resources, organizations, program ideas and practices that can improve the lives of children with disabilities.

The site was recently launched by the nonprofit PACER Center, a National Parent Center for families of children with disabilities located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.

The Web site provides information on the history of disability rights in the United States, as well as a list of links to resources and organizations in the U.S.A. and other countries that focus on helping children with disabilities.

The idea for the site developed from PACER’s collaboration with professionals and government officials in India. This special connection with India began in 2005 when PACER Executive Director Paula Goldberg visited families in India, met with government officials and toured programs for children with disabilities.

Since that time, PACER has co-sponsored India’s first National Conference on technology for children and adults with disabilities, along with India’s National Institute for the Mentally andicapped. PACER has also supported the creation of a new center on assistive technology for children and adults, scheduled to open September 13 at the Spastics Society of Karnatka(SSK) in Bangalore, India.

Creating a Web site was a way to exchange even more information, Goldberg says. Because of PACER’s close ties with India, the site has a wealth of information about disability organizations and laws in that country. In the future, Goldberg says PACER hopes to expand the amount of resources on the Web site specific to other countries.

PACER has a global reputation for helping families of children with disabilities. More than 130 guests from 15 foreign countries have visited PACER in recent years, and in 2007, PACER staff made presentations on disability issues during a satellite conference with Uzbekistan disability leaders. The conference was hosted by the U.S. Embassy.

“We’ve hosted many international guests at PACER who are eager to find additional resources for children with disabilities,” said Shauna McDonald, PACER’s director of community resource development. “The Web site is another way to collaborate and work toward the goal of improving the lives of children with disabilities around the world.”

PACER Center is a National Parent Center for families of children and youth with any disability or special health need. PACER is located at 8161 Normandale Blvd., Minneapolis, MN 55437-1044. For information, call 952-838-9000 (voice); 952-838-0190 (TTY) or 888-248-0822 (toll-free). PACER’s Web site is www.PACER.org and its e-mail address is PACER@PACER.org



This announcement was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion group.

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JOB POST: General Manager, Intl Programs, Cambodia

Posted on 14 July 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, East Asia Pacific Region, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

POSITION: Asia with Save the Children Australia, Cambodia based
Deadline: July 25, 2008

RESPONSIBLE TO: General Manager, International Programs
LOCATION TO: Phnom Penh, Cambodia
DURATION: Two year position pending visa approvals
 
CONTEXT
Save the Children Australia (SCA) is a non-profit, non governmental, non sectarian organisation dedicated to upholding the rights reflected in UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC).  Our programs focus on long-term development and promoting children’s rights, to ensure children have the means for survival, receive protection, and have access to nutrition, primary health care and basic education.  Our mode of operation emphasises capacity building and local partnerships, encourages children’s participation and is responsive to emerging trends identified by partners, communities and government agencies in the region.  SCA is a member of the International Save the Children Alliance, which is the largest global movement for children.
 
Save the Children Australia manages child-centred development programs, working in a child rights programming framework, in seven countries: Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Vietnam, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea (with SCNZ), Vanuatu and in Australia. Sectoral experience includes: health, education, child protection, child participation, youth development, HIV/AIDS and juvenile justice. 

SCA has been working in the Mekong region for 25 years and in Bangladesh since 1987. We have country offices in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Laos, and projects in Vietnam and Myanmar.  Projects  are diverse and vary in size, with donors including the Asia Development Bank, AusAID, UNICEF, the Global Fund and other member of the Save the Children Alliance, in addition to SCA’s own funds. Current and potential focus areas include child rights and advocacy, child protection, youth outreach, HIV/AIDS, health, basic education and community development.

JOB PURPOSE
The Regional Director Asia is responsible for developing and delivering SCA’s portfolio of development programs in Asia to maximise our impact on realising the rights of vulnerable children. A key focus of the role is to lead the strategic direction of the Programs in Asia consistent with SCA’s strategic plan and to develop and enhance strong links with key stakeholders including governments, communities and other SC Alliance members.  In addition, the role will provide strong leadership to the Country Directors (CDs) who are based in Bangladesh, Cambodia and Laos and the International Program Team based in Melbourne. 

As part of the International Save the Children Alliance move towards one Save the Children presence in each operational country the Regional Director Asia will play a key role in supporting country teams in the transition to Unified Presence.
 
The position will require regular travel within the region, sometimes at short notice, as well as travel to Australia.
 
This position is a National Office position based in Cambodia.

KEY OBJECTIVES
Strategic Direction
 

  • Ensure the SCA organizational strategic plan is implemented in the Asia region.
  • Lead the country strategic and annual planning process in each of the programs and monitor implementation of the plan.
  • Advise on strategic direction for SCA in the Asian region, in consultation with Country Directors, taking into account SCA’s policies and strategic plan and SC Alliance strategic plan.
  • Work closely with other Save the Children Alliance members in the region, fostering collaborative working relationships, and strengthening common program directions.
  • Act as a member of the Country Leadership Group (CLG) in countries where a Unified Presence is implemented and support country teams through the process of organizational change.

Read more information about this job post at:
http://cambodiajobs.blogspot.com/2008/07/regional-director-asia-with-save.html  



This announcement was recently circulated on the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group, which focuses on discussion of issues related to people with disabilities in the Asia and Pacific region.

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RESOURCE: Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Case Studies, Children, Cross-Disability, Deaf, East Asia Pacific Region, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Education, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Resources, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Less than a decade ago, more than 100 million primary-school aged children still had never entered a classroom. Today, that number has dropped below 80 million, even though the world’s population has grown in that time. Clearly progress has been made. But children with disabilities are being left behind: one-third of the world’s children out of school are disabled. Many of the rest are excluded for other reasons that pose their own set of challenges: some are left behind because they are girls; or because they don’t speak the dominant language of their country; or because they experience discrimination on the basis of their ethnicity.

How can Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) and other Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) help schools in their country be more inclusive of students who have commonly been excluded? Save the Children UK has released a new report that offers guidance: “Making Schools Inclusive: How Change Can Happen: Save the Children’s Experience” (PDF format, 4.14 Mb). This report describes successful projects, and the lessons learned, from countries as diverse as Vietnam, Kyrgyzstan, Peru, Bangladesh, China, Somalia, Brazil, Western Balkans, Mongolia, Nepal, Tajikistan, Serbia, India, and Morocco. Children with disabilities are targeted for many of these projects.

The report begins by describing both the conditions that prevent inclusive education and the conditions that can help make it possible. It also analyzes projects that have made it possible for linguistic minority students–and Deaf students–to obtain a bilingual education. Teacher training programs have helped encourage teachers to create more inclusive classrooms for children with disabilities and other students who have historically been excluded. Several countries have used Community-based Education Management Information Systems (C-EMIS) to draw upon the knowledge and motivation of local community members in making education more inclusive. Each chapter ends by discussing what lessons other communities in other countries may find helpful in implementing their own projects.

Advocates who tire of hearing governments complain there isn’t enough money will especially wish to read the 6th chapter on “Addressing financial barriers to inclusive education.” Funding issues are also discussed briefly throughout earlier chapters of Making Schools Inclusive (PDF format, 4.14 Mb).

The 8th chapter points readers to further materials and resources that may be helpful to them in advocating for more inclusive education in their countries.

The full 64-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (4.14 Mb) at http://www.eenet.org.uk/downloads/Making%20schools%20inclusive%20SCUK.pdf.



We Can Do learned of this report through an announcement posted on the EENET Eastern Africa email discussion group. The discussion group is devoted to issues relating to inclusive education in Eastern Africa.

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JOB POST: Inclusive Education Consultant Tibet Autonomous Region

Posted on 25 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Application deadline: July 4, 2008. Applications should be sent to hr@handicap-int.org.cn, NOT We Can Do.

TERMS of REFERENCE

Inclusive Education Consultant – Tibet Autonomous Region

1. Background Information
Handicap International (HI) has been operating in the Tibet Autonomous Region since 2000, in cooperation with the Tibet Disabled Persons’ Federation (TDPF) at regional level and the Lhasa, Shigatse and Chamdo Disabled Persons’ Federation at prefecture level. Four different projects have been established in the fields of orthopaedics, physiotherapy, support to deaf people’s association and community-based rehabilitation services (CBR).

The present consultancy will contribute to the CBR project. This project started in 2001, focusing on children and young adults with disabilities under 21 years old in Lhasa Urban District. Eight rehabilitation workers were trained in basic physical rehabilitation and are now well experienced. They follow-up children with disabilities at home, teaching the families with basic rehabilitation, providing counselling, referring the children to appropriate rehabilitation and
medical care services.

School inclusion for children with disabilities remains a major difficulty in the region, even at the level of primary education. While the rehabilitation workers are also in charge of referring the children into mainstream schools, it is done on a case-by-case basis and there is neither close accompaniment of the children in those schools nor adaptation of the school environment and teaching methods within the classrooms. 

During the last 2 years, the CBR project has changed its orientation to address other needs (e.g. access to leisure services) and get more participation and support from governmental bureaus and community members. It has also started acting in rural areas of Lhasa prefecture.
In addition to the rehabilitation workers, the current CBR team working on the project implementation includes an HI project manager, a physiotherapist (partner staff from the TDPF) acting as a team leader, and a representative of the partner at prefecture level (Lhasa Disabled
Persons’ Federation, Lhasa DPF) acting as a coordinator with the different governmental bureaus involved in the action. One person from the civil affairs bureau at County/Urban District level is also supporting the field coordination and monitoring process. When activities are related to education, the person in charge of the education sector at Lhasa DPF and a reference person from the research department of the relevant county/urban district education bureau also join the team.

In 2007, two primary pilot schools have been selected in Lhasa prefecture in collaboration with the regional and municipal education bureaus where to start inclusive education projects including building adaptation and development of child-to-child groups. One of the schools is located in Jia Er Duo, a rural village in Medrogonkha County, the other one being Zangre school in Lhasa Urban District. In September 2007, a seminar on inclusive education has been organized to present the basis of inclusive education concepts. Attendees were teachers from different primary schools as well as staff from education bureaus and Lhasa DPF.

2. Objective of the assignment
By the end of the assignment, the teachers of the two pilot schools will have gained the specific technical skills to better support and follow-up children with disabilities in their schools and start child-to-child support activities. The partners’ staff (Lhasa DPF representing the education sector, staff from research departments within education bureaus, civil affairs representatives, county education bureau representatives) will start monitoring efficiently the
implementation of the activities within the schools.

3. Methodology
First phase:  The first phase will focus on the following topics:

  • Conduct an assessment of the current situation in the pilot schools in terms of existing facilities and resources to analyze their capacity for integration of children with disabilities
  • Develop intervention and training strategies including monitoring and evaluation procedures in close collaboration with the partners. The intervention should consider the involvement of community members acting as volunteers within the school.

Second phase: The second phase will consist in trainings delivery. The trainees will be teachers and managers from the two pilot schools, staff from municipal education bureau, county/urban district education bureau, civil affairs, Lhasa DPF and TDPF. The reference team will consist in one person from Lhasa DPF in charge of education, one person from the research department of county/urban district education bureau, one rehabilitation worker in charge of supervising the social rehabilitation activities of the CBR project, one person from the county civil affairs and one person from each of the two pilot schools.

The trainings will cover, but will not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Identification of children in the schools with learning difficulties
    or in needs of a support
  • How to assess that a child is ready to go to school
  • Setting-up an individual curriculum for each of the child to be
    followed-up (Individual Action Plan)
  • How to organize, carry out and monitor child-to-child support
  • Training for the teachers on how to organize and provide awareness on
    disability for the students
  • Training of the reference team on how to follow-up and monitor the
    implementation (activities and needs analysis)
  • Possibly, if there is no time constraint, training on special teaching skills: Braille, sign language and intellectual disability. This will be organized in collaboration with other organizations (Tibet Deaf Association, Braille without Borders, Lhasa Special Education
    School).

Third phase: The third phase will be organized as follows:

  • Close follow-up of the implementation process with the trainees, implementation of corrective measures
  • Provide refresher training for all the trainees and reference team.

4. Duration
The assignment is expected to be conducted from July 1st to November 30th 2008 as follows:

  • First phase: 1 month
  • Second phase: 2 months
  • Third phase: 2 months
  • Restitution on the mission with key stakeholders (1 day).

5. Expected outputs

  • A first report containing an analysis of the situation and the description of the principles for the development of intervention and training strategies, monitoring and evaluation processes
  • Training handouts for the education professionals
  • Guidelines for the volunteers who can support inclusive activities within the schools
  • End of mission report with recommendations

The reports be submitted in English; handouts and guidelines will be submitted in Chinese.

6. Qualifications

  • University degree, preferably in the field of education or social sciences
  • Experience in working with Chinese governmental departments
  • Experience in working in rural and urban schools in China
  • Good knowledge of existing education policies and strategies for children with disabilities in China
  • Previous experience as a trainer in the field of education
  • Computer literacy (Word, Excel, Power Point)
  • Good English writing skills
  • Chinese national.

7. Submission requests
Handicap International invites experts to express their interest through submission of a current CV and a cover letter in English addressing each of the following:

a. Availability for the period
b. Major experiences in the field of inclusive education
c. Relevant work experience in China from previous
d. Consultancy fee in RMB (rate per day) with a detail on what it covers.

Please send your application at the following E-mail address: hr@handicap-int.org.cn

For more details on the job content, please contact Ms. Kalsang Dickyi at                0891 68 37 899        

Deadline for application: 4th July, 2008



We Can Do received this job posting via the listserve for the RatifyNow organization.

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LISTSERVE: On-line Discussion of Inclusive Education in Eastern Africa

Posted on 24 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear Colleagues,
 
To support the growing interest in the area of Inclusive Education throughout Eastern Africa, an Eastern Africa Discussion Group was set up to help facilitate discussions, networking and information sharing on this topic.  This discussion group is associated with EENET – The Enabling Education Network, which is a UK based information sharing network which promotes the inclusion of marginalized groups in education world wide.
 
The initial discussion group that was established was inundated with SPAM.  To overcome this problem the discussion group is now utilizing a Yahoo Group for discussion, which is free of SPAM.
 
If you would like to join the Eastern Africa Discussion Group, please send an email to eenet_eastern_africa-owner@yahoogroups.co.uk stating your interest to join the discussion group.   Or you may also join via the web at http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/eenet_eastern_africa/

If you join and decide later you do not want to be a part of the group any longer, you can unsubscribe at any time.
 
If you know any one else who you think might be interested in joining this group, please pass this message to them so as they have the information necessary to join.
 
Kind Regards,
 
Dimity Taylor
Coordinator
EENET Eastern Africa



Thank you to Dimity Taylor for submitting this announcement to We Can Do.

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Publication Seeks Stories by and about Children, Youth with Disabilities

Posted on 19 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Audio & Visual Materials, Call for Papers, Children, Cross-Disability, Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Disabled Peoples’ International (DPI) is collecting articles related to children with disabilities for its next issue of Disability International. Disability International is an on-line magazine focused on the international disability community that publishes one or two issues each year, in English, Spanish, and French. The following kinds of submissions are welcome:

  • Written pieces and art work by children and youth
  • Stories about what it is like to be a young person with a disability, told in their own words
  • Stories from groups or organizations about a successful project they have done involving children or youth with disabilities. Please include pictures.

Stories should be about 450 words long. The deadline for submissions is July 31, 2008.

Prior issues of Disability International, from 2002 through 2008, can be downloaded for free on-line at http://v1.dpi.org/lang-en/resources/details.php?page=116. Themes for past issues have included: independent living (PDF format, 554 Kb); human rights (PDF format, 463 Kb); invisible disabilities (PDF format, 506 Kb); HIV/AIDS in Africa (PDF format, 1.63 Mb); a special edition on the launch of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in December 2006 (PDF format, 2.5 Mb); another issue on implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2007 (PDF format, 2 Mb); and, most recently, disability and the arts (PDF format, 1.5 Mb).

For inquiries, or to submit stories and pictures for the next issue, please contact Cassandra at Disabled Peoples’ International at info@dpi.org.



We Can Do first learned about DPI’s search for stories by or about children and youth with disabilities through the DPI weekly electronic newsletter. Thank you to Cassandra for supplying additional details about the guidelines for Disability International.

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EENET Recruiting Steering Group Members to Promote Inclusive Education

Posted on 10 June 2008. Filed under: Call for Nominations or Applications, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Opportunities, Volunteer Opportunities, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Please note that applications should be directed to EENET, not to We Can Do; read carefully for links, email address, and instructions. The deadline is June 24, 2008.

EENET steering group: user group representatives

Background to EENET’s Steering Group
The Enabling Education Network (EENET) is a global information network that helps education practitioners and stakeholders to document and share their experiences of inclusive, child-friendly education. The network prioritises the information needs of southern countries. It aims to reach those who are often excluded from other international information systems or debates, or who cannot afford to buy information resources. EENET’s users include local and international Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), teachers, parents, students, government officials, academics, etc.

EENET has a very small co-ordination office in the UK, employing one staff member and a few volunteers, but still manages to support the information needs of thousands of people in 200 countries. Independent regional networks, based on EENET’s vision and mission, are also being developed in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

To find out more about EENET’s information sharing activities visit www.eenet.org.uk; email info@eenet.org.uk; or write to EENET, c/o ESI, School of Education, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK

EENET’s role is to champion inclusive education. But it also seeks to challenge the status quo, to ask difficult questions and encourage debates on controversial topics. To ensure that EENET fulfils this role, and continues to meet the information needs of its diverse target audience, the network has a Steering Group which has not been very active for several years, but is now being reformed.

EENET Steering Group function and role of members

  • The Steering Group will monitor EENET’s activities and makes suggestions for changes.
  • Steering Group members will represent the views of EENET’s founders, its regional networking partners, international NGOs/donors, and, very importantly, its target users.
  • Steering Group members will assist EENET staff with taking action in key areas of EENET’s development (e.g. fundraising) if they have skills and experience in a relevant area.

User group representatives
Two or three Steering Group representatives will be appointed from among EENET’s ‘grassroots’ users. While they will not be able to represent the full diversity of EENET’s users, they will bring to the Steering Group a valuable ‘reality check’ on the needs, challenges and potential contributions of EENET’s users.

These ‘grassroots’ Steering Group representatives will be selected based on the following criteria:

Essential

  • Good communication skills, preferably in English.
  • Able to communicate by email, and also if possible by telephone or using internet phone or chat systems.
  • Able to travel to the UK and other countries (e.g. must have a passport, or be able to obtain a passport and travel visas without difficulties).
  • Enthusiasm about the aims, values and principles of EENET, and a commitment to contributing as fully as possible to the Steering Group.

One or more of the following are desired:

    Awareness of:
  • child rights
  • education issues
  • disability and/or other diversity issues
  • community development issues.
  • First hand experience of inclusive education (as a student, teacher, parent, local education official, teacher trainer, etc).
  • Experience of being an activist or in other ways representing a marginlised, discriminated against or excluded group (e.g. women/girls; disabled people; refugees; working children, etc).
  • Awareness of EENET and/or an active member of EENET’s network.
  • Awareness of and/or an active member of other south-based, south-focused information sharing and advocacy networks.
  • Financial issues
    Steering Group members are unpaid volunteers. There is no salary for being a Steering Group member. However, EENET will cover all costs relating to attending meetings (e.g. travel, accommodation, meals and other essential daily living expenses) and participating in telephone conferences or internet chats.

    Application to become an EENET Steering Group member

    Closing date for applications: 24th June 2008

    Personal details
    Name:
    Nationality:
    Postal address:
    Tel. no:
    Fax no:
    Mobile no:
    Email:
    Other, e.g. Skype name:

    Do you have a passport?

    Are you aware of any possible restrictions to your freedom to travel to other countries?

    Are you available 8-12 September 2008 (the dates for the next Steering Group meeting)?

    Supporting information
    Describe your involvement with EENET so far (e.g. when did you first learn about EENET; when did you first read the newsletter; what communication have you had with EENET; what other EENET activities have you been involved in?)

    Why are you interested in becoming a member of EENET’s Steering Group?

    Explain any experience you have with the following (this can be experience gained through your personal life or through work):

    • education/inclusive education
    • child rights/human rights
    • community development
    • equality and diversity issues.

    Explain what you think inclusive education means.

    Why do you think it is important for EENET to promote inclusive education and help people to share information on inclusive education?

    Please provide any other information you think will support your application.

    References
    Please supply the names and contact details of 2 people who can provide references for you. At least one referee should know you in a professional or work capacity or have direct experience of your involvement in inclusive education activities/advocacy.

    Referee 1
    Name:
    Address:
    Email:
    Tel:
    Fax:

    Referee 2
    Name:
    Address:
    Email:
    Tel:
    Fax:
    Please return your completed form to:
    Email: info@eenet.org.uk
    Address: EENET, c/o ESI, School of Education, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
    Fax: +44 (0)161 275 3548



    We Can Do received this announcement via the EENET Eastern Africa listserv. Again, applications should please be directed to EENET in accordance to the instructions above, NOT to We Can Do. Thank you.

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    International Conference: Inclusive Education, the Way of the Future

    Posted on 2 June 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Opportunities, Reports, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The International Bureau of Education is holding its 48th session of the International Conference on Education (ICE) this 25 – 28 November 2008 in Geneva, Switzerland. The theme will be “Inclusive Education: the Way of the Future.”

    The International Conference on Education is usually predominantly tailored for the needs of Ministers of Education who represent country governments around the world. However, other partners such as researchers, practitioners, representatives of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations also participate in the ICE dialogue.

    Debates at the November 2008 session of ICE are expected to focus on the following themes:

    (i) approaches, scope and content (to broaden the understanding of the theory and the practice of inclusive education);
    (ii) public policies (to demonstrate the role of governments in the development and the implementation of policies on inclusive education);
    (iii) systems, links and transitions (to create inclusive education systems which offer opportunities for lifelong learning);
    (iv) learners and teachers (to foster a learning environment where teachers are equipped to meet the learners’ diverse expectations and needs).

    As of this writing (June 2, 2008), I could not locate registration information at the ICE conference web site. However, even for people unable to attend the November conference, the web site still offers an abundance of materials that may be of interest to people involved in the education field.

    If you scroll down the page at the ICE conference site, you will see a listing of past Preparatory Meetings on Inclusive Education. Many of these include links to Executive Summaries or other reports based on the results of these past meetings. Further down the page, you will see links to reports from Working Groups of the International Bureau of Education Council regarding planning for the 48th ICE conference.

    For further (or upcoming) details on the November 2008 conference on Inclusive Education, please consult their web site directly at

    http://www.ibe.unesco.org/International/ICE48/English/index.html

    Let me please amplify that We Can Do is unable to respond to individual inquiries about this or any other event, toolkit, funding source, or other resource publicized at this site. Instead, please follow the above link.



    I first learned about this conference by browsing the Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development web site.

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    REPORT Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children

    Posted on 23 May 2008. Filed under: Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Inclusion, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    There are 77 million children around the world who have never entered a primary school classroom. Most are from poor families in developing countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. And, according to a recent report (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), one-third of them have disabilities.

    This is an enormous proportion when you consider that the World Health Organization estimates that only about 10 percent of the overall world population are people with disabilities. The World Bank has estimated that possibly as many as 15 to 20 percent of the world’s poorest people have disabilities. But even by this estimate, children with disabilities are still disproportionately represented among primary-school-aged children who are not in school.

    So, what can be done to address this challenge? A recent 74-page report, Education’s Missing Millions: including disabled children in education through EFA FTI processes and national sector plans (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), explores this question. Education’s Missing Millions was funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) through a Partnership Programme Agreement with World Vision UK.

    Country governments and international donors have been working together on the Education For All Fast Track Initiative (FTI) to put all primary-school aged children into a classroom by the year 2015. This goal cannot possibly be met until disabled children, too, are able to obtain an education. Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb)
    analyzes education sector plans that the FTI has endorsed in 28 countries to examine how well they include children with disabilities.

    Some efforts have taken place to include disabled children in education in some of these countries. However, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) still identifies many gaps that must be addressed. For example, many countries do not even have data on how many of their children have disabilities. Also, few countries have explored how they can use funding mechanisms or incentives to support the inclusion of children with disabilities. And countries often do not work as closely as they could with parents, communities, or non-government organizations (NGOs).

    Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) calls upon FTI partners to actively target children with disabilities to ensure that they, too, can obtain a free, good-quality education. The report makes a series of recommendations for pragmatic ways in which country governments and donors can promote dialogue about policies and practices within the FTI Partnership; act as a “champion” for inclusion; and close gaps in data, policy, capacity, and financing that would otherwise exclude disabled children.

    Both grassroots advocates and policy makers may be interested in the 8th chapter, on local community and NGO initiatives. This chapter presents examples of projects that helped promote the inclusion of a wider number of disabled children in the classroom and their communities.

    You can download the full report, Education’s Missing Millions, in PDF format (1.2 Mb) at:

    http://www.worldvision.org.uk/upload/pdf/Education%27s_Missing_Millions_-_Main_Report.pdf

    People interested in education for children with disabilities in general may also be interested in reading about a report on the human rights approach to Education For All (EFA). Or you might be interested in joining a network on inclusive education in Eastern Africa; this is an email discussion group that allows you to exchange ideas and information with other people via email.



    We Can Do found Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) by browsing the <a href=”http://www.AskSource.infoAskSource.info database on disability, health, and development.

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    Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

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    JOB POST: Director, Perkins International Program, in Watertown, Massachusetts, USA

    Posted on 11 May 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Blind, Children, Deaf, Education, Jobs & Internships, Multiple Disabilities, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

    Perkins School for the Blind
    Job Description

    Job Title: Director
    Program: Perkins International Program
    Supervisor: President
    Location: Watertown Campus and Frequent Traveling

    The following statements describe the principal duties to be performed. It is not intended to be a complete description of all the requirements of the position.

    GENERAL SUMMARY

    Provides leadership, collegial supervision and oversight of programs and services for children who are deafblind or blind with multiple disabilities and their families. Coordinate the national and the international work of the Hilton/Perkins Program and other international initiatives. Serve as a member of the Perkins senior management team.

    The mission of Perkins International is to improve the quality of life for children who are blind, deafblind or blind with multiple disabilities throughout the world. We collaborate with hundreds of local partners to provide direct services to children and their families, create innovative education programs, expand local and regional expertise, augment leadership skills in teachers and professionals, and promote Braille literacy. We also advocate for policies and programs that impact the lives of children with visual and other disabilities at local, national and international levels. (www.perkins.org)

    DUTIES TO BE PERFORMED

    • Regularly visit international program partners to support regional staff in meeting program goals and objectives.
    • Work with government and non-government organizations to develop programs and services, to improve and expand the quantity and quality of services for children who are deafblind or blind with multiple disabilities.
    • Recruit, supervise and manage the work of all national and international program staff, including the oversight of work assignments.
    • Supervise the activities of the Educational Leadership Program.
    • Supervise the activities of on campus projects including research library and information services, DBLINK, and other projects as appropriate to meet national objectives of program.
    • In collaboration with program staff, identify program priorities and additional funding needs for project development. Liaison between program staff and Trust Office for new and ongoing project development and identifying and securing financial and material support with existing and new supporters and donors.
    • Communicate effectively with all staff, trainers and partners.
    • Provide leadership and collegial supervision to insure that all program goals and objectives are being addressed and evaluated, including but not limited to:
    • Working with local personnel to assess the future needs of all Hilton/Perkins and other international projects in the region and arrange for appropriate training, consultation and technical support.
    • Working with colleges, universities and other entities internationally to maintain and establish formal training programs of pre-service training for teachers of the target population.
    • Arranging for the production, translation and dissemination of appropriate literature for parents and professionals in print and on-line formats.
    • Supporting parents and agencies to establish improved services to parents and family members, including the establishment of parent organizations.
    • Supporting the content, logistics and other arrangements for trainings provided by the Program
    • Prepare and manage an annual program budget. Oversee the financial resources allocated to projects. Work with regional staff to draft grant agreements to sub-grantees, and define and monitor a reporting system for each project.
    • Prepare regular narrative reports on activities for inclusion in the Program’s reports to donors.
    • Function as liaison between Perkins management team and international and national program staff. Work collaboratively with personnel on the campus, to plan jointly for training and experiences provided to international visitors to Perkins School for the Blind.
    • Function as the focal point for planning, communication and collaboration between the Perkins International Program and other national and international non-profit organizations, multi-lateral organizations and key governmental agencies to further enhance program’s mission.
    • Coordinate the work with all other Perkins offices including the on-campus programs, the Business Office, Howe Press, Trust office, Communications Office and other Perkins departments.
    • Provide oversight of program office staff and support service operations to ensure facilitation of program objectives.
    • Represent Perkins International at international events which include international development, education, and disability conferences.

    COMPENTENCIES
    To perform the job successfully, an individual should demonstrate the following competencies:

    Problem Solving – Identifies and resolves problems in a timely manner; Gathers and analyzes information skillfully; Develops alternative solutions. Able to deal with frequent change, delays, or unexpected events

    Oral and Written Communication – Speaks and writes clearly and persuasively, listens and gets clarification; responds well to questions. Knowledge of technology for communicating.

    Leadership – Effectively influences actions and opinions. Inspires and motivates others to perform well.

    Diversity – Demonstrates knowledge of EEO policy; Shows respect and sensitivity for cultural differences; promotes a harassment-free environment.

    Ethics – Treats people with respect; Keeps commitments. Works with integrity and ethically.

    Organizational Support – Follows policies and procedures; Completes administrative tasks correctly and on time.

    Judgment – Displays willingness to make decisions; Exhibits sound and accurate judgment. Includes appropriate people in decision-making process and delegates appropriately.

    Professionalism – Approaches others in a tactful manner; Reacts well under pressure; Treats others with respect and consideration regardless of their status or position; Accepts responsibility for own actions; Maintains a positive attitude regarding required duties and changes in routines and assignments.

    Quality – Demonstrates accuracy and thoroughness; Looks for ways to improve and promote quality; Applies feedback to improve performance.

    MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

    Master’s Degree in Special Education with a preference on education of children who are deafblind, or with multiple disabilities or relevant work experience.

    A minimum of 7-10 years of experience in a position of increasing management experience and responsibility for consultation to and training of other teachers and personnel. Preference will be given to work in the fields of blindness, deafblindess or multiple disabilities with international work experience.

    Extensive knowledge of educational techniques for children who are deafblind and/or blind with additional disabilities.

    Understand and appreciate the cultural diversity of the programs and areas in with which Perkins works and the implications for program support and development.

    PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS

    Ability to travel independently and frequently to international destinations.

    PREFERENCE MAY BE GIVEN FOR THE FOLLOWING:

    Prior experience in international work as a trainer of teachers within the specific field of blind or deafblind education.

    Candidates with Masters in deafblind or multi-handicap education, or the equivalent job experience in working with this same population

    Prior experience, whether paid or voluntary, in working for other international governmental or non-governmental organizations.

    Perkins School for the Blind is an Affirmative Action Employer. Candidates from diverse background are strongly encouraged to apply.

    For more information contact Charles Pimlott at 617-972-7235 or send resumes to Human Resources, Perkins School for the Blind, 175 North Beacon Street, Watertown, MA 02472 or email Employment@Perkins.org.

    May 2008

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    Deaf Child Worldwide Launches Family Friendly Resource

    Posted on 1 May 2008. Filed under: Children, Deaf, Families, Resources | Tags: , , , , |

    Deaf Child Worldwide News Release

    For release: Thursday 1 May 2008

    Deaf Child Worldwide launches Family Friendly resource

    Deaf Child Worldwide, the only UK-based international development agency dedicated to enabling deaf children to overcome poverty and isolation, has launched a new action learning resource to help organisations working with deaf children and families throughout the world.

    ‘Family Friendly – working with deaf children and their communities worldwide’ has been produced to raise awareness of the important role that parents and families can play in the lives of their deaf children and in their communities.

    Sofia Garavito, Director of Deaf Child Worldwide, explains:

    “Families with deaf children in developing countries face some huge challenges, the biggest one being widespread poverty. For this reason, family priorities are focused on finding a way to look after the basic needs of their children and less time is available for engaging with and finding out the best way to support the development of their deaf children.

    “The Family Friendly resource has been designed to help families with deaf children and the organisations working with them to learn quickly and easily how they can help improve the lives of deaf children by working together, or though self-help initiatives.”

    The resource is based on real-life examples and is packed with case studies written by parents and practitioners in over 20 countries around the world.

    “A very great job has been done; this is a beautiful book – interesting and inspiring. We are sure the book will be very useful to many organizations and families with deaf children worldwide.” Joana Vanagiene Association of Families with Deaf and Hearing Impaired Children, Lithuania

    “This book looks great and will be very useful to several of our programmes. Can we have 50 copies please?” Helen Pinnock, Education Advisor, Save the Children UK.

    “This book will be an inspiration to all who read it and it will really help to make sure best practices are replicated all over the world” George Gachanja, Kenya Society for Deaf Children

    For a free copy of Family Friendly, contact Deaf Child Worldwide by email info@deafchildworldwide.org or write to Deaf Child Worldwide at 15 Dufferin St, London, EC1Y 8UR. You can also download a copy from www.deafchildworldwide.info

    • Deaf Child Worldwide is the only UK based international development agency dedicated to enabling deaf children to overcome poverty and isolation.
    • We work with partners in the countries where need is the greatest throughout the world and we are the international development agency of the National Deaf Children’s Society in the UK.
    • There are 20 million deaf children worldwide, 80 per cent of whom live in the developing world. 98 per cent of all disabled children in the world do not go to school.
    • For many children and families a diagnosis of deafness means a life of inequality and isolation.
    • For more information about Deaf Child Worldwide, visit www.deafchildworldwide.org



    Thank you to Deaf Child Worldwide for submitting this announcement to We Can Do for publication.

    We Can Do readers who share an interest in working with the families of deaf or other disabled children may also wish to consult various books from the Hesperian Foundation on taking care of people’s health and raising children who are deaf, blind, or have other disabilities.

    Subscribe to We Can Do
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    NEWS: Disability Advocate, Gladys Charowa, Dies

    Posted on 21 April 2008. Filed under: Children, Education, Human Rights, News, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The following email was recently circulated on the AdHoc_IDC listserv, an email discussion group devoted to disability rights and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), as a tribute to fellow listserv member and disability rights advocate, Gladys Charowa.

    Hi folks,

    The vast majority of you will have seen many posts here from Gladys Charowa from the DWSO. She was a great supporter of the Convention and worked hard to ensure that her group were not going to be excluded from the Convention nor from the process.

    It is with great sadness to that I have to inform you of Gladys Charowa who was the Executive Director of Disabled Women Support Organisation (Zimbabwe). Gladys suffered a stroke on the 6th of March and her health subsequently deteriorated leading to her death on the 7th of March, 2008 in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Gladys Charowa was involved in the disability movement since February 2002 during her rehabilitation in Harare after breaking her back in a car crash in December 2001. She was released from hospital in April 2002 after experiencing the conditions tolerated by the women who were also being rehabilitated. She decided to set up the Disabled Women Support Organisation (DWSO) after helping some of the service users at the centre; for example, she successfully petitioned an education examination board to allow a student with disabilities additional time to sit her examinations. Gladys wanted to challenge the traditional view that there is nothing that can be done to support women and girls who are spinally injured.

    DWSO works alongside hospitals, often in rural areas, to provide support for individuals and their families to become both physically and financially independent; this includes training to sensitise the community, peer group education and micro-finance projects. DWSO is one of the first disability organisations to have projects in each of the 10 provinces of Zimbabwe.

    DWSO also works with schools, setting up Disability Clubs and projects to help children and parents to increase their understanding of the needs of disabled people. Since 2002, she worked tirelessly as a disability activist fighting for poverty reduction, particularly among disabled women. Gladys was an active disability activist at both national and international level, and contributed immensely to disability related literature. Gladys will be greatly missed in disability activism and may her soul rest in peace after working so hard for a good cause.

    Some of Gladys Charowa’s publications

    (i) Reply to a statememt for discussion: investing in education for children with disabilities is economically not interesting

    March 1, 2006 – Published by: Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development (DCDD), Available at http://www.dcdd.nl/default.asp?2905

    (ii) Body blows: in the thick of Zimbabwe’s current turmoil, women with disabilities face hellish prejudice, hunger and rape. Gladys Charowa bears witness.(POVERTY & GENDER)(Column) – Published in New Internationalist, November 1, 2005

    Best wishes,

    Frank

    Frank Mulcahy



    Thank you to Frank Mulcahy of Ireland for sharing this sad news with the AdHoc_IDC listserv.

    Subscribe to We Can Do
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    Other Resources at We Can Do
    Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

    Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

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