Academic Papers and Research

Disability and Development Online Consultations March 8-28, 2013

Posted on 13 March 2013. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Housing, Human Rights, Inclusion, indigenous people, Latin America & Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Poverty, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, universal design, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

These online consultations (from March 8 to 28th, ie RIGHT NOW) are an opportunity to influence important decisions about how people with disabilities will be included in efforts to reduce poverty around the world.

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have been profoundly influential in making decisions on how to prioritize foreign assistance and government funds in more than 100 developing countries. The global community is now working to identify what goals should replace them after 2015. This means that the next few months will be critical for ensuring that people with disabilities are not again forgotten.  It is important for the global disability community, our constituency organizations, and professionals in the fields of international development and human rights be engaged.

Read below and follow the links for more detail on how individuals can participate in this on-line dialogue.

Online Consultations
As part of the preparatory process for the United Nations General Assembly High-level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD), the HLMDD Online Consultations (HOC) will be conducted from 8 to 28 March 2013. The consultations are co-organised by DESA and UNICEF under the existing platform of the World We Want 2015 (http://www.worldwewant2015.org/enable) in multiple languages.

Please register at: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/register.  If you have difficulty registering, then please email enable@worldwewant2015.org for assistance.

Simultaneous consultations will take place in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. The site is compatible with screen readers, however, if you are unable to access the site, please email your response to: enable@worldwewant2015.org. Please note that the forum is moderated, therefore your post will not appear immediately but will be posted within twenty-four hours.
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FUNDING OPPORTUNITY for Research on Accessibility of US-Funded Overseas Programs

Posted on 12 June 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Funding, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

NCD Announces Funding (Research) Opportunity
On May 13, the National Council on Disability in the US announced a Notice of Funding Opportunity (NCD-09-02) for a cooperative agreement to study “The Accessibility of U.S.-funded Overseas Facilities and Programs.”

NCD is interested in examining and understanding the responsibilities of U.S.-funded overseas facilities and programs, both public and private. NCD is seeking applicants to research and develop an NCD report with the following three components: 1) An analysis/examination of international law, to determine how U.S.-funded international development organizations will be required to comply with Article 32 of the Convention in those countries which have ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and 2) an empirical follow-up to NCD’s 2003 report on how USAID is implementing its own disability policy overseas and its impact thus far, along with its compliance with Sections 501, 503, and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act in its overseas operations. The report should review whether these protections against discrimination are being implemented by government employees and contractors working abroad, and will examine whether U.S.-funded programs are being operated in a manner that is accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities; and 3) evaluate progress on NCD’s recommendations regarding the accessibility of U.S. embassies and missions, as well as Department of Defense (DoD)-funded programs and facilities.

The deadline for received full proposals is 5:00 p.m. EDT on July 1, 2009.

For additional information, please contact Joan Durocher at 202-272-2117 or jdurocher@ncd.gov.



This announcement received via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list.

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Competition for Best Masters Thesis on Sub-Saharan Africa, 1000 Euros (English and Français)

Posted on 28 May 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Awards & Honors, Call for Nominations or Applications, Call for Papers, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

en français

Africa Thesis Award 2009

[Editor’s Note: Although this award is not specific to disability issues, it does say that topics should be “socially relevant.” We Can Do readers in Africa or the Netherlands may wish to consider using this competition as an opportunity to submit Masters’ theses on disability issues in Sub-Saharan Africa. I also hope that students with disabilities will compete for the 1000 Euro prize, regardless of the topic of your thesis. Please do NOT inquire with We Can Do. Instead, please consult the official award web site directly for instructions on how to participate in this competition.. The submission deadline is June 16, 2009. Missed the deadline? This is an annual opportunity—consult the official award web site for future details.]

The African Studies Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands, has an annual award for the best Masters thesis on Sub-Saharan Africa by a student at a university in the Netherlands or in Africa. Any final-year student who has completed his/her Masters thesis with distinction (80% or higher or a Dutch rating of at least 8) can apply. The ASC specifically encourage students from Sub-Saharan Africa to submit their theses for this annual competition.

Any thesis thematically related to socio-geographical, economic, political, juridical or anthropological issues or focusing on the humanities such as history, religion and literature (but with the exception of language and/or semiotic studies) can be submitted. The thesis must be socially relevant and can be be written in English, French or Dutch.

The award consists of a price of 1000 euros. The winning thesis will also be published in the ASC African Studies Collection. Submitted theses may be (partially) published on The Broker’s website: www.thebrokeronline.eu.

More detail is available on ASC’s website, including instructions for contacting the people responsible for organizing this opportunity: http://www.ascleiden.nl/Research/Award/

Date limite: le 16 juin 2009!

Vous vous intéressez à l’Afrique et vous avez écrit votre thèse de Master sur un sujet ayant un rapport avec l’Afrique ? Le Centre d’Études africaines (Afrika-Studiecentrum, ASC) vous offre la chance de gagner le Prix de la thèse d’études africaines d’une valeur de 1000€.

Ce prix vise à encourager les étudiants à faire des recherches et à écrire sur l’Afrique sub-saharienne, et à promouvoir les études sur les cultures et les sociétés africaines. Il est décerné une fois par an à un étudiant qui aura achevé sa thèse de Master sur la base d’un travail de recherche sur l’Afrique.

In French/en français: http://www.ascleiden.nl/Research/Award/MastersThesisAward-FR.aspx



I learned of this opportunity via the Deaf Studies Africa listserver and collected additional information via the official award web site.

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JOB POST: Research Assistant for AFrican Policy on Disability and Development

Posted on 10 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Vacancy – Research Assistant Position for African Policy on Disability and Development (A-PODD)

Application Deadline: 13 March , 2009

A-PODD has a Research Assistantship position for 1 Year, and the candidate has to be from Sierra Leone. We seek a person with experience in researching disability issues for the above position. The project is housed at the Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and the Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin and The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disability, being other partners.

The Research Assistant should have a degree in a relevant social or health science, or evidence of operating at an equivalent level. The Research Assistant will be considered for fully-funded registration for a Masters in Research at Stellenbsoch University. Limited travel to South Africa will be required, with the Research Assistant based in Sierra Leone.

This is a re-advertisement as only two applicants with the relevant qualifications have been shorted listed. We need 3 interviewees so that we have a wide selection. The teleconferencing interview will take place on the 19th April 2009. People with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Project Description
A-PODD is a three year project funded by the (Irish) Health Research Board and Irish Aid. A-PODD is led by Prof Mac MacLachlan, Centre for Global Health and School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin; Ms Gubela Mji, Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and Mr A.K. Dube, The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disability.

This research investigates how disability can be put on the agenda of national and international development initiatives. It focuses on how research evidence can be utilised to inform the policy environment (such as PRSPs and SWAps), development institutions (such as the IMF, World Bank and WHO), as well as less formal local, community and grass-roots decision making and inclusion efforts.

A-PODD will undertake four country case studies: in Sierra Leone, a country emerging from conflict that resulted in many people being disabled; Malawi and Uganda, the only two African countries that have Ministries for people with disabilities; and Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Africa, with significant geographical barriers and a highly dispersed population, presenting significant challenges to the inclusion of people with disability.

Our comparative analysis will inform disability policy and implementation within the region. Barriers and facilitators will be identified along implementation pathways, and so too will local means and mechanisms of addressing these. Country reports will be discussed at a concluding workshop to which governments, civil society, donors, researchers and others will be invited. A code of best practice will be drawn up for Moving Evidence to Action on African Disability Policy.

Other collaborating partners on this project are:

International Partners:
Department of Psychology at Stellenbosch University
Southern African Federation of the Disabled
Ministry of Persons with Disabilities and the Elderly, Government of Malawi
Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa
South African Medical Research Council’s Cochrane Centre
SINTEF Health Research (Norway)
World Bank

Irish Partners:
Institute for Nursing Research, University of Ulster Law & Policy Research Unit, NUI Galway.
National Institute for Intellectual Disability, Trinity College Dublin
Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin.

Bursary
Research Assistants will be appointed in the range EUR8,000-10,000 (Euro)

Applications
Interested applicants should send
1) A statement of interest – 1 page
2) A Curriculum Vitae –
3) Contact details for at least two referees (at least one of which should be an academic).

For any quiries, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Please forward your application to:

Dr Tsitsi Chataika (Post doctoral Research Fellow)
E-mail: tchataika@sun.ac.za

Dr Tsitsi Chataika – Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Stellenbosch University
Tygerberg Campus
Faculty of Health Science
Centre for Rehabilitation Studies
African Policy On Disability and Development (A-PODD) Project
P.O Box 7505
Tygerberg, 7505
South Africa
Tel: +27 219389816 (office)
+27 7764085148 (Cell/Mobile)
Fax:+27 219146875



I received this job post announcement via the Disability-Research listserv.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24, 2009

Posted on 9 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I am re-posting the following announcement, partly as a reminder for people who wish to register but also to correct and clarify the instructions for registration:

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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E-Discussion on Women with Disabilities in Development, March 10-24

Posted on 4 March 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, accessibility, Announcements, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Health, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

People from around the world are invited to participate in an e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, to be conducted on-line from March 10 to 24, 2009. The email-based discussion is meant to involve aid agencies; government officials dealing with gender and disability; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); Disabled People Organizations (DPOs); and World Bank operational and technical staff.

The intent of this e-discussion is to collect experiences, problems, solutions, and unresolved issues related to the inclusion of women with disabilities in development. Participants will also be encouraged to provide references to analytical work (studies, books, articles, reports, etc.) on women with disabilities and their situation and inclusion in economic and social life. These references will be gathered into a bibliography.

The e-discussion will cover the following topics: framing the issue of women with disabilities in development; reproductive health of women with disabilities; violence against women with disabilities and access to justice; education of women with disabilities; women with disabilities and the environment; women with disabilities and employment; issues of specific concern to women with disabilities that are missing from the development agenda and what can be done to ensure that these issues receive appropriate attention; and, what concrete actions can be taken to enable women with disabilities to claim their place in the development agenda.

Participation is free, and will be in English.

If you are interested in joining the two-week e-discussion on women with disabilities in development, then you may register by following these steps:

1. Send an email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu

2. Put the following command in the SUBJECT LINE of your email:

Subject: EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name, Your Country]

FOR EXAMPLE:
EDISCWWD Jane Smith Australia

3. In the SAME EMAIL, please put the following command in the MESSAGE BODY of your email to listserv@listserv.syr.edu:

Subscribe EDISCWWD [Your First Name, Your Last Name]

FOR EXAMPLE:

Subscribe EDISCWWD Sita Lal

If you have any questions regarding registering for the E-Discussion, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu

This e-discussion is brought to you by the Disability & Development Team (HDNSP); the Office of Diversity Programs; and the Gender and Development Group at the World Bank; and the Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD)

Please feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested in participating in the E-Discussion.

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Call for Papers: Poverty and Intellectual Disabilities

Posted on 10 February 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Cognitive Impairments, Families, Inclusion, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability is seeking submissions for a special issue of their publication that will examine poverty, deprivation, social exclusion and disadvantage. The particular focus of this issue will be on understanding the role that poverty and social deprivation play in shaping the life chances of children and adults with intellectual disabilities, and the role of policy in reducing inequalities and inequity for this population. The aim of this special issue is to explore issues of poverty and social disadvantage in the broadest terms. Papers that express the points of view of people with disabilities and/or their families are particularly welcome. This includes having those with disabilities and their families serve as researchers and/or co-authors as well as participants in the research. We would also particularly welcome papers addressing issues of poverty and deprivation from low and middle income countries. This topic is appropriate for both qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

The closing date for submission is 31st December 2009, although later submission dates may be possible with the agreement of the editors. The anticipated date for publication is 2011. If the special issue is oversubscribed papers will be selected by date of submission.

The Guest Editors, Eric Emerson and Susan Parish, will manage the editorial process. Enquiries and papers for consideration should be directed to Dr Eric Emerson (eric.emerson@lancaster.ac.uk) or Dr Susan Parish (parish@unc.edu) with a copy to JIDD’s Editorial Assistant, Penny Crino (pcrino@med.usyd.edu.au), clearly identified as a Special Issue submission. Electronic submission is preferred.



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Developing (GPDD) listserver.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Life-Long Learning

Posted on 28 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Education, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Enabling Education Network (EENET) is looking for articles for the 2009 issue of its newsletter “Enabling Education”. (First draft and article ideas should be submitted by January 30, 2009.) The theme of the newsletter is life-long learning. If you could write an article about your experiences of inclusive education in relation to informal, non-formal, alternative, pre-school, vocational or higher education, EENET would love to hear from you.

EENET’s goal with the 2009 newsletter is to publish an entire newsletter that contains no articles that look purely at formal primary and secondary education. They hope you can help them achieve this! If you are not an experienced writer, don’t worry. Send EENET your ideas and they will try to help you to develop these ideas into an article. You may also find it helpful to look at some previous newsletter articles when you are developing ideas for your own article. If you don’t already have copies of “Enabling Education”, please look at the EENET newsletters on their website (click on the highlighted text in this sentence to follow the link).

EENET really encourages you to send them articles that have been researched/written by, or in collaboration with, children and young people. EENET also always welcome articles that make use of drawings, photos, etc.

Number of words: articles should be about 600 words long.

Deadline: first drafts or article ideas should be sent to us by
30th January 2009.

More details are available at: http://www.eenet.org.uk/events/call_for_articles_eenet_newsletter_2009.shtml

Or email: info@eenet.org.uk



I learned about this call for papers via EENET’s Facebook page. The text is copied from their original announcement and also from their more detailed call for articles. Inquiries and submissions should please be directed to EENET, NOT We Can Do.

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REPORT: Disability in 28 Asian-Pacific Countries

Posted on 28 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Policy & Legislation, Reports, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons (2003-2012) was meant to promote a rights-based approach toward disability in the Asian-Pacific Region, in place of the older welfare-based approach. The “Biwako Millennium Framework for Action towards an Inclusive, Barrier-free and Rights-based Society for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific (BMF)” was meant to provide countries in the Asian region with a set of principles to help them make the shift. How well has it succeeded?

In 2004, the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), a part of the United Nations system, conducted a survey to find out. The result is an 87-page publication entitled “Disability At a Glance: Profile of 28 Countries in Asia and the Pacific” (PDF format, 780 Kb), released in 2006. It is meant to provide disability-related data and policy information so that readers can compare definitions of disability; statistics; the implementation of the Biwako framework; and government commitments to disability issues across the Asian-Pacific region. The countries and regions covered in the publication include: China; Hong Kong; Japan; Mongolia; Republic of Korea; Cambodia; Indonesia; Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Malaysia; Philippines; Singapore; Thailand; Timor Leste; Vietnam; Afghanistan; Bangaldesh; Bhutan; India; Maldives; Nepal; Pakistan; Kazakhstan; Pacific Australia; Cook Islands; Fiji; Kiribati; and Solomon Islands.

Each country is represented with a one- or two-page table filled in with relevant statistics and one-paragraph summaries of disability-related legislation and policies in the country. This publication is not the place to seek out in-depth information about the complexities and nuances of daily life for people with disabilities in the Asian-Pacific region. But then, it is not meant to be. It’s strength is that it allows quick and easy comparison of certain specific types of information across many countries within the region. Or, people who wish to gain a broad sense of disability demographics, policies, and inclusion in the Asian-Pacific region as a whole will wish to read the section sub-headed “Key Findings,” starting near the bottom of page 9.

Download the full report (PDF format, 780 Kb) at http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/disability/publications/glance/disability%20at%20a%20glance.pdf.

People interested in reading reports about disability in the Asian-Pacific region will also want to browse the Social Policy Papers on disability listed on the ESCAP web page at http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/publications/index.asp. Two examples of additional reports and publications include Focus on Ability, Celebrate Diversity: Highlights of the Asian and Pacific Decade published in 2003, following the 1993 to 2002 decade; and Hidden Sisters: Women and Girls with Disabilities in the Asian-Pacific Region, 1995.

People also may wish to read the original Biwako framework on-line, or read the 2007 “Biwako Plus Five” update on progress since the Biwako framework was written.



I learned about this publication through the AsiaPacificDisability listserver, which people can subscribe to for free.

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PAPER: Disability and Contraception in Developing Countries

Posted on 24 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cognitive Impairments, Families, Health, Mobility Impariments, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Doctors, social workers, neighbors, and even family members often mistakenly assume that people with disabilities cannot possibly be interested in sex. Or if they are, others believe they cannot physically participate. Or if they can, others think that no one would want to have sex with them. Because of these myths, people with disabilities are often deliberately excluded from sex education programs and reproductive care services. These include contraception to prevent pregnancy, as well as support for people with disabilities who wish to bear and raise healthy, happy children.

The fact is, a great many people with a wide range of disabilities are capable of having children and desire the rewards that can come with parenthood. And many become excellent parents who raise well-adjusted children. But they often lack family planning services that allow them to make their own choices about how many children to have and when to have them. This may be partly because even family planners who understand the need and importance of counseling for people with disabilities may not know how.

Although people with physical disabilities frequently can and do have children, the nature of some physical disabilities may sometimes affect what kind of contraceptions they can use or how to use them. An article published in 1999 by Family Health International’s journal Network, entitled Disabled Have Many Contraceptive Needs, explains how some physical disabilities, or the medications taken for them, may affect the kinds of contraceptions they are able to use. Family planning professionals may consult this article at http://www.fhi.org/en/rh/pubs/network/v19_2/disableneeds.htm

People with mild intellectual disabilities, and also people with psychosocial disabilities, are often as interested in sexuality as the general population. They also may in some cases wish to have children. Both intellectual disabilities and psychosocial disabilities may affect how well contraceptive options or instructions are understood, or how well they may follow instructions. Another article entitled Mental Disabilities Affect Method Options” discusses various examples of how family planning professionals can account for these factors. This article, also published in 1999, can be read at http://www.fhi.org/en/RH/Pubs/Network/v19_2/mentaldisab.htm



I learned about these articles through a class I’m taking on Gender, Disability and Development this semester. Thanks, Barbara Earth!

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Disability in Non-Western Societies: A Bibliography of Bibliographies

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Middle East and North Africa, Poverty, Resources, signed languages, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Researchers who need to locate journal articles and other publications about people with disabilities throughout history in developing countries face significant barriers. People with disabilities outside of North America and Europe tend to be invisible in much of the published literature and throughout history.

Researchers can consult a list of annotated bibliographies at the Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange (CIRRIE) as a starting point in seeking out thousands of articles that may meet their needs.

These bibliographies do not directly link to the articles in question. In many cases, I suspect these articles may not exist on-line. But the bibliographies could be used to help researchers know what publications they should seek out through the inter-library loan program at their university library.

A few examples of annotated bibliographies include: Disability in the Middle East; Disability and Social Responses in Some Southern African Nations; Disability and Social Response in Afghanistan and Pakistan; Disability & Deafness in North East Africa; Disability and Deafness in East Asia: Social and Educational Responses, from Antiquity to Recent Times; Sign, Gesture, and Deafness in South Asia and South-West Asian Histories; Social Responses to Disability & Poverty in Economically Weaker Countries: Research, Trends, Critique, and Lessons Usually Not Learnt; and more.

Researchers may begin exploring the various bibliographies (by author M. Miles) at

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/bibliography/index.php



I found the page listing M. Miles’ various bibliographies by browsing the CIRRIE web site.

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Disability in the Middle East, a bibliography

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Middle East and North Africa | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

by M. Miles

The partly annotated open online “Disability in the Middle East, a
bibliography”, first web published in 2002, was much revised, extended and updated to June 2008, and now lists about 1,750 items, at:

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/bibliography/mideast/index.html (also .pdf)

It aims to record the cumulative formal knowledge base in the disability field in countries of the Middle East, especially Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, and some smaller neighbours.

Around 45% of the items in the bibliography, listed in the last two sections with a brief introduction, comprise historical materials of the Middle East from 1751 to 1970 and from Antiquity to 1750, as an essential part of the cultural background. This earlier material has more annotation (and so takes about 60% of the total word-count), to enable potential readers to find the disability-related parts that are sometimes hidden in odd corners or footnotes, and also to indicate some cultural features that might be less easily understood nowadays.

No sensible explanation exists for how I [M. Miles] came to put this stuff together. There was already far too much material when it went online in 2002. Planning to spend a few weeks on a short update, I had a swing at disability and deafness in Egyptology, Assyriology, and the Hittite Kingdom in Anatolia,
which actually took six months. Of course, the material is utterly fascinating.

The past 30 years of “disability studies” in North America and Western Europe can look like a few buckets of water compared with the rolling 5000-year ocean of Middle Eastern disability. But just because of that contrast, I guess the majority of western students of disability won’t dip a toe into this ocean. The bibliog and annotations give a basic map for the adventurous minority… Also, of course, for the millions of non-western people who
might be happy to know something about disability before The West was invented.

best, miles

[Note to We Can Do readers: people interested in researching people with disabilities in the Middle East, African, East Asian, South Asian, and South-West Asian regions regions may find it helpful to begin with M. Miles’ collection of annotated bibliographies, of which this is only one.



This email was circulated by the author, M. Miles, on the Disability-Research email discussion list.

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4th Annual International Shafallah Forum, April 20-22, 2009, in Doha, Qatar

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that the deadline to submit abstracts is January 23, 2009, at 5 pm EST.

On behalf of the Shafallah Center for Children with Special Needs, I would like to extend a warm invitation for you to submit abstracts for the 4th Annual International Shafallah Forum in Doha, Qatar from April 20th – April 22nd , 2009. For the past three years our Center has been delighted to welcome more than 250 experts in the field and Wives of Heads of State from all over the world to our Forum and we anticipate that this year’s Forum will be no exception.

The 4th Annual International Forum will bring together advocates, family members, scholars, members of government, and professionals from a variety of perspectives to explore the theme of /Achieving Independence/. Together we will explore how to overcome factors that perpetuate disability marginalization, including widespread poverty due to lack of access to education, opportunity, and unfair labor practices. We look to our work, cutting-edge research and programs, to promote independence through universal access to education, inclusive societies, innovative technologies, and poverty-reduction strategies – including micro-enterprise and encouragement of the corporate sector to value and include the disabled in the workforce.

The Forum will feature keynote addresses by global leaders, roundtable discussions, symposia, paper presentations, and exhibits. We welcome the submission of such presentations and have included more detailed information on the following pages.

An accepted presentation to the Shafallah Forum includes complimentary airfare, meals, and accommodation. We hope that you will join us this April in Doha and participate in international dialogue among your peers. Please visit our website at www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org

Abstracts are *due by 5pm EST January 23rd, 2009. *

Sincerely,

*I. Modes of Presentation*

Delegates can present their programs and research in several different formats:

*Symposia *(1 hour – 3 x 15 minute presentations, plus 15 minutes discussion)

A collection of 3 papers presenting the results of different programs/studies/experiences relating to a common research theme. Each should be presented by a different person. The symposium coordinator should provide details for the three papers following the instructions below.

*Individual Papers *(15 minute presentation, plus 5 minutes discussion)

A paper presenting the results of a program/study/experience on a particular topic. Papers will be grouped into symposia according to an identified theme. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each paper offered following the instructions below.

* *

*Posters*

Individuals may present their research on the form of a poster. Posters allow for more extended discussion with delegates interested in the content area of the poster. Posters should be attended by at least one author/director who can address questions related to the poster’s content. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each poster presentation offered following the instructions below. Submission of poster collectives (related research) is encouraged.

* *

*Roundtable Discussions or Debates *

(1 hour)

Discussion about the interpretation of existing research, the state of knowledge in a particular area or the need for more or different kinds of research/programming/policies, can be as important as presenting the results of new studies. Individuals wishing to organize such roundtable discussions or debates should identify three or four speakers, who can each present a point of view. Where discussion and audience participation is the purpose, speakers’ presentations might be limited to 5 minutes. Where debate between the speakers is the purpose, presentations may be longer (10 minutes). Organizers should submit the details of the discussion or debate following the instructions below.

*Exhibit *

Individuals or groups that have a demonstration, specialized equipment, and/or materials that they would like to exhibit are invited to submit a proposal. Exhibits will be given a table with specific presentation time, where they will be asked to be present and are encouraged to leave materials/equipment out for attendees to peruse throughout the Forum.

*II. Abstracts*

Abstracts must be in English. Abstracts longer than permissible will be abridged at the discretion of the program planning committee.

*Theme & Topic:* The conference is to be organized into themes and include general and break-out sessions. Please specify which theme that best fits your session. All abstracts should be prepared using the following headings:

*Instructions for Submitting Paper/Poster Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of authors. Give the email address of person(s) presenting the paper

*Contact details:* Type an asterisk after the presenter’s name and give the affiliation address of the presenting author only

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Preferred mode: *State whether: (a) individual paper or (b) poster

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

*Instructions for Submitting Symposia Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*List:* Authors, affiliations, e-mail addresses and titles of papers to be included in the symposium.

*Moderator: *Give the name and affiliation of the person who has agreed to moderate the symposium. Give the contact details for moderator (email, phone & address).

*Abstract:* Each paper should submit an abstract. This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Roundtable Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of each participant noting the moderator with an asterisk.

*Contact details:* Give the full contact information (email, phone, & address) of all participants

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 400 words and describe the background behind the issue to be discussed or debated and the views to be put forth by each speaker.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Exhibits*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Host: *Give the name, affiliation, e-mail, and phone of the person hosting the exhibit.

*Abstract:* Submit a description of the demonstration/exhibit, its intent, and space requirements

*III. Submission Deadline: 5pm EST, January 23, 2009*

Kindly submit abstracts to: Valerie Karr @ valeriek@brownlloydjames.com

Please label the subject line: _Shafallah Forum Abstract_. Failure to do so may result in abstract not being viewed.

Information about the Shafallah Center and Previous International Forums please visit:

http://www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org



We Can Do received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email news list. All queries and applications should be emailed to Valerie Karr at the Shafallah Center, NOT to We Can Do.

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SCHOLARSHIPS: International Students at the University of Leeds

Posted on 19 December 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Awards & Honors, Education and Training Opportunities, Fellowships & Scholarships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The University of Leeds is offering at least twelve Fully-Funded International Research Scholarships (FIRS), which are available for high quality international students who will be commencing PhD research study from Session 2009/10. The Scholarships will provide full international fees together with a maintenance grant of £13,290 for Session 2009/10. Closing date for applications: 31 January 2009.

Fully-Funded International Research Scholarships (FIRS)
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/rds/postgraduate_scholarships/irs-info.doc

Session 2009/10
Closing Date 31 January 2009

As ORSAS awards are no longer being offered from Session 2009/10, the University of Leeds is providing a number of Fully-funded University International Research Scholarships, which are available for high quality international students who will be commencing PhD research study from October 2009 for study in any Faculty at the University of Leeds.

Awards provide full international fees together with a maintenance grant of £13,290 and will be made for one year in the first instance, renewable for a further two years, subject to satisfactory academic progress.

Details about the eligibility criteria and regulations relating to these Scholarships are available from the Application Form. Completed application forms should be returned to the Postgraduate Scholarships Office

As applicants will only be considered if they have received an offer of an academic place for PhD research study from the University of Leeds, applicants are advised to submit their application for an academic place as soon as possible and well before 31 January 2009.
http://www.sociology.leeds.ac.uk/prospective-students/postgraduate-research/

Other Scholarships at the University of Leeds

Details about other Postgraduate Scholarships at the University of Leeds may be found on the Postgraduate Scholarships Website.



This announcement was recently distributed on the AsiaPacificDisability email-based discussion group. In this context, “international students” refers to students from outside of the European Union. If you have missed the January 2009 deadline then you may wish to monitor the University of Leeds website for information on similar scholarship opportunities in future years.

We Can Do readers will note that the University of Leeds has a Center for Disability Studies and also a School of Politics and International Studies.

As with all scholarship and other opportunities announced at this blog site, applications and inquiries should please be directed to the sponsors, NOT to We Can Do.

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PAPER: Deaf People in African Histories c. 960s – 1960s

Posted on 19 December 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Deaf, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Individuals interested in investigating the history of Deaf, deaf, or hard of hearing people in any African nation may wish to read the paper entitled, “Deaf People Living and Communicating in African Histories, c. 960s – 1960s” by M. Miles (2005).

The abstract for this paper is as follows:

“Glimpses of the lives and communication of deaf and hearing impaired people are seen in one thousand years of history across Africa. Textual evidence of 100 historical deaf adults and children, of hundreds more in groups, and of gestural communication and formal Sign Language, appears from 42 African nations, sourced in travellers’ accounts, legal and genealogical records, government reports, institutional and missionary archives, academic theses, linguistic studies, folklore, ethnography, novels, religious narrative, mime and dance. The data may assist in construction of valued identities and evidence-based cultural histories. Uses and interpretations remain for deaf people to discuss and choose according to their own varied interests and objectives.”

The article has 190 references, and notes some Africa-wide activities of deaf people, including in relation to deaf studies and sign language studies.

The author, M. Miles, has suggested that organizations of deaf people in each African nation should build their own archives and records of deaf people in order to help create an understanding of what it means to be deaf in Africa in the late 20th and early 21st century.

Read the full text of the article at:

http://www.independentliving.org/docs7/miles2005a.html



Thank you to the author, M. Miles, for announcing this article on the DeafStudies-Africa email-based discussion list.

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International Seminar on CBR for Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities, 27-28 April 2009, Hyderabad, India: Call for Papers

Posted on 6 December 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Events and Conferences, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Jan 24 Addendum: I have just now learned that this seminar, originally scheduled for April 27-28, 2009, is now being postponed. Thank you to one of the conference organizers who left this information in the comments area further below. People interested in the seminar will wish to communicate directly with the seminar organizers (NOT We Can Do). The organizers will issue further information on rescheduled dates when available.

Abstracts for original, unpublished papers need to be submitted by February 7, 2009. Authors will be notified by March 15, 2009. Papers selected for the conference will need to be submitted by April 4, 2009. For participants, early bird registrations (with the cheapest rates) are accepted until February 5, 2009; standard registration is accepted until March 10, 2009; and late registrations are accepted through April 10, 2009.

Sub: Call for nominations and papers for International Seminar on CBR (Community Based Rehabilitation)

Dear Sir / Madam,

Byrraju Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing about a tangible improvement in the quality of lives of the rural underprivileged, with a mission to create a world-class platform for holistic sustainable rural transformation. BF is currently working in 199 villages across six districts of Andhra Pradesh impacting a million people. Its programmes include Healthcare, Disability Rehabilitation and Mental Health, Education and Adult Literacy, Water, Environment and Sanitation, Agri advisory services and Livelihood Skills.

Byrraju Foundation in partnership with National Institute for the Orthopaedically Handicapped (NIOH) Kolkata is organizing International Seminar on CBR for Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities from 27th- 28th April 2009 at Hyderabad. The co-sponsors are National Institute for the Mentally Handicapped (NIMH) Secunderabad, National Institute for empowerment of Persons with Multiple Disabilities (NIEPMD) Chennai and Mission for Elimination of Poverty in Municipal Areas (MEPMA), Indira Kranti Padam (IKP), Rehabilitation Council of India (RCI) and Codraid, The Netherlands.

The objectives of the seminar are to create a platform for confluence of best practices and share the knowledge, to provide a forum to discuss issues involved in CBR, to discover new strategies in CBR, to give direction to capacity building in CBR and to come out with recommendations for adaptation in public policy.

The takeaways of the seminar are publication of abstracts of all research articles on CBR during the past 5 years, publication on best practices containing select readings, publication of abstracts and full papers of seminar, publication of Seminar proceedings.

We are aware of the interesting work you are doing in the field of disability and community based rehabilitation. It gives us great pleasure to invite you to participate and even present a paper/poster in the above international seminar. Authors are invited to submit original unpublished manuscripts. Please send your abstracts by 7th February, 2009. The review process will be completed by 15th March 2009. Papers selected for the conference must be submitted no later than 4th April 2009.
Nominations will be accepted until April 10th 2009 by 5:00 p.m. Please fill in the enclosed application form for registration.
Enclosed is the first announcement of seminar and the registration form. We hope to receive a positive response from you.

Detailed instructions for writing and submitting abstracts are in the full-length call for papers (PDF format, 128 Kb). People who wish to register for the conference will wish to download the registration form (PDF format, 16 Kb).

Email correspondence in relation to this seminar can be directed to cbr.seminar09@byrrajufoundation.org

Thanking you,

Yours sincerely,

Dr. L. Govinda Rao,
(Former Director, NIMH, GOI),
Lead Partner, Empowerment of PWDS and Mental Health,
Byrraju Foundation,
Satyam Enclave, N.H 7,
2-74, Jeedimetla Village,
Secunderabad 500 055 AP, India,
Ph 91-40-23191725, 23193881,82,
Fax 91-40-23191726
www.byrrajufoundation.org
Mobile: +996 301 9993

Call for Papers and Nominations
The major change in strategy in rehabilitation and empowerment for the persons with disabilities over the past 25 years has been the expansion of services into the community. This has slowly gathered momentum and has developed into a differentiated programme called Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR). To improve the quality of community services and to upgrade professional skills, there is a need of sharing knowledge at the level of professionals, grass root level workers and various NGOs and implementing agencies of CBR. There is also a need to disseminate best practices for public policy modulation, Therefore, an International on CBR has been planned which will be organized jointly by Byrraju Foundation and National Institute for the Orthopaedically Handicapped at Hyderabad on 27th and 28th April, 2009.

Objectives:

  • To create a platform for confluence of best practices and share the knowledge.
  • To provide a forum to discover new issues involved in CBR.
  • To discover new strategies in CBR.
  • To give direction to capacity building in CBR.
  • To come out with recommendations for adaptation in public policy.

The seminar committee invites you to contribute to the 2009 seminar to be held at Byrraju Foundation, Hyderabad. You are invited to submit abstracts outlining oral and/or poster presentations for peer review by the scientific committee.

Themes:
The theme of the seminar will be on comprehensive access, rehabilitation and empowerment of persons with disabilities through CBR approach. Policies and best practices are vital for promotion of CBR. Similarly access to environment (A2E), empowerment in practice is critical to the inclusion and independent living of the PWDs. These are prerequisites to effectiveness of services based on full life-cycle needs (FLCN) and holistic development (HD) that are centered around individuals. Papers and proceedings are, therefore, designed to cover topics, issues and concerns under the broad categories of public policy (PP), access to environment (A2E), full life-cycle needs (FLCN) and holistic development (HD).

There will be one plenary session in each broad theme. There will also be concurrent sessions (two or more) depending upon the number of papers considered for presentation.

Poster Session:
Poster Session is an alternative approach for the presentation of projects/new work which will be available for seminar participants. Posters are strongly invited as they allow extended informal discussions, active participation of co-authors, and are displayed throughout the seminar. All the works submitted to the poster session should be based on the seminar themes.

Abstract specifications:

  • The abstract should be written in English, typed in Arial font and single spaced.
  • The title of paper should be concise in bold capital letters, size 12 and centered.
  • The author(s) name should begin with full first name and family name (the name of the presenting author should be bolded), size 12, normal and centered. Ensure that the author(s) have an affiliated organization listed (aligned left)
  • Presenters contact information – name, address, phone number, email.
  • Text of the abstract should be in font size 12, normal and justified.
  • The body of the text should cover the purpose of introduction, method, results and conclusions (200-250 words).
  • An indication if the abstract is submitted for poster or podium presentation
  • Please indicate the theme you would like to have the abstract included in Key Words – Capitalize the KEY WORDS and include no more than five.
  • Presentations should be 20 minutes long, with 5 minutes allotted for questions afterward.
  • PowerPoint visual support is preferred

Delegates:
All rehabilitation professionals, member of DPOs, CBR workers, CBR managers and administrators, persons with disability, parents, leaders/ social workers working for the empowerment of the PWDs are most welcome to participate in the seminar.

Downloading forms; contacting conference organizers
Detailed instructions for writing and submitting abstracts are in the full-length call for papers (PDF format, 128 Kb). People who wish to register for the conference will wish to download the registration form (PDF format, 16 Kb). If PDF format is not accessible for you, then please contact the conference organizers directly to request alternate format. I have tried to copy/paste the most critical information into this blog post in cases where the file formatting permitted copy/pasting.

Email correspondence in relation to this seminar can be directed to cbr.seminar09@byrrajufoundation.org



Thank you to Lakshmi Narayana with the Byrraju Foundation for submitting this conference announcement for publication at We Can Do.

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BOOK: Rehabilitation of Persons with Disabilities

Posted on 6 November 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) |

Editor Bhanushali Kishorkumar has released a book for sale, entitled Rehabilitation of Persons with Disabilities.

[Note to We Can Do reader: I normally try to link only to resources that are free because I know many people in my target audience may have difficulty purchasing publications. But I’m making an exception here in part because I had previously publicized the editor’s call for papers for this book. More information about the book, including an abstract for each article, is provided below. For inquiries, please <a href=”go to the main web page for this book.

Rehabilitation Of Persons With Disabilities
by Bhanushali Kishorkumar D
ISBN: 978-81-314-1479-8
Pages: 272 Price:US$ 17
(Overseas Orders)
INR 425(Special Indian price)

Contents of the Book
1. Disability and Development: A Contribution to Promoting the Interests of Persons with Disabilities in German Development Cooperation
2. Rehabilitation of Persons with Disabilities : Concepts and Challenges
3. Role of Family in Rehabilitation of Persons with Disabilities
4. A Review of Community Based Rehabilitation Evaluations Quality of Life as an Outcome Measure for Future Evaluations
5. Summary on National Policy for Persons with Disabilities
6. Index
7. The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities The Road Ahead
8. Empowering the Disabled through Inclusive Education
9. Consumer Rights with Special Reference to the Disabled
10. The Changing Educational Scenario for Children with Deafblindness and Multiple Disabilities in India
11. Issues and Challenges for Rehabilitation of Mentally Ill Persons in India
12. The Protection of Rights of People with Disabilities in China
13. Vocational Reintegration of People with Spinal Cord Lesion in Bangladesh An Observational Study Based on a Vocational Training Project at CRP
14. Social and Structural Dimensions of Dependency, Participation and Social Exclusion among People with Mobility Impairments, Peninsular Malaysia
15. Survivor in Ukraine: Living Disability in a Post Soviet State

Overview

Introduction
With total world population of 650 million, persons with disabilities constitute the largest majority. As per United Nations report, 10 percent of population in underdeveloped countries is facing disabilities of one or the other type. If we include family members, advocates and all those affected by the problem of disabilities this is as high as 25 percent of population. Moreover, this number is constantly increasing through population, growth, medical advances and aging process, says World Health Organisation (WHO).

When a large section of population is facing the problem of disability of one or the other type, social and economic costs of sidetracking them will be very high. The concept of rehabilitation embodied the democratic and humanitarian ideal that each individual is important and each member of the community should contribute to society to the fullest extent. A persons handicap may be due to any type of disablement, i.e., either birth defects, sickness, diseases, industrial and road accidents or the stresses of war, work and daily life. Likewise, people are also handicapped by social and cultural disadvantage i.e., social, financial or educational. Whenever any of these conditions cause difficulties in life adjustment, the person is handicapped. The process of rehabilitation enables the person with handicap to attain usefulness and satisfaction in life. Rehabilitation programmes are concerned with helping the disabled person as a human being who requires specialized help to enable him to realize his physical, social, emotional and vocational potential. The objective of long-range planning for rehabilitation is to achieve maximum adjustments of the maximum number of disabled persons in maximum walks of life when the formal rehabilitation process is completed through good teamwork among medical, surgical, physiological, social, educational and vocational personnel. International Labour Organisation convention defines Rehabilitation of disabled is essential in order that they be restored to the possible physical, mental, social, vocational and economic usefulness of which they are capable (ILO 1955 recommendation).

Considering the size of population of persons with disabilities, it is necessary to have proper rehabilitation strategies. In designing country specific rehabilitation strategy, knowledge of rehabilitation practices followed in different countries and best practices world over is of significant importance.

In this context this book intends to focus on different approaches to rehabilitation of persons with disabilities, including medical, social and vocational. Rehabilitation strategies for different categories of persons with disabilities in different countries will be covered. Experiences of different counties towards rehabilitation of persons with disabilities will be included in the book. The book will also focus on the role played by international agencies like the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the United Nations (UN) and the World Health Organisation (WHO).

The main objective of this book is to highlight rehabilitation strategies for persons with disabilities along with best practices followed in various countries of the world. Different approaches for better integration of persons with disabilities in mainstream society are captured through various articles. At the same time the book also covers the legal framework for the rehabilitation of persons with disabilities.

The book is divided into three sections. The first section tries to give an overview of disability and rehabilitation process along with the role that the family has to play in the process of rehabilitation of persons with disabilities. The second section deals with strategies that are followed in the process of rehabilitation of persons with disabilities like education, human rights, training, awareness about consumer rights, societal awareness. The final section talks about experiences of different countries, including India, China, Bangladesh, Malaysia, Ukraine and Germany. Attempt has also been made to give the highlight of the national policy for persons with disabilities, designed by the Government of India in the form of an annexure.

Section I: Overview
The first article “Rehabilitation of Persons with Disabilities: Concepts and Challenges” by Kishor Bhanushali defines different types of disability as given by various organisations and used in legislative provisions. Various types of disability such as visual, movement, hearing, speech, mental illness and mental retardation are covered. Causes and consequences of disability are discussed. The article also talks about various disability models such as moral, social, economic and human rights. Magnitude of disability in various countries estimated by various organisations like the World Health Organisation and the United Nations is covered. The latter part of this article deals with the need for rehabilitation of persons with disability and concepts of various types of rehabilitation like physical, psychological, social and vocational.

The second article “Role of Family in Rehabilitation of Persons with Disabilities” is an invited article written by Neeti Sharma. It discusses the importance and role of family in the rehabilitation process. Disability affects family in all areas, including financial, social and educational. The success of the rehabilitation process depends on the role of family. Every family needs counselling and it should be given from time to time. It not only clears the myths and misconceptions about disability but also helps in understanding the disability, rehabilitation process and expectations.

The third article is “A Review of Community-Based Rehabilitation Evaluations: Quality of Life as an Outcome Measure for Future Evaluations” by Hasheem Mannan and Ann P Turnbull. This article highlights Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) as a means to enhance the opportunities for people with disabilities and their families in reference to social rehabilitation. The five basic principles of CBR are covered here. They are (1) utilization of community resources (2) knowledge transfer (3) community involvement (4) referral services and (5) coordinated approach toward education, health and social system as an outcome measure for rehabilitation evaluations. The article reviews the concept and evaluation of CBR and how it proposes to make quality of life an outcome measure. It presents a practical approach to future evaluations of CBR programmes through some of its features like service delivery system, technology transfer, community involvement, organisation and management, methodology and findings.

Section II: Approaches
The first article in this section “The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities The Road Ahead” is an invited article written by Akhil S Paul. This article briefs about the convention adopted by UN General Assembly on 30th March 2007. The convention marks a paradigm shift in the way disabilities are looked at and in the manner in which persons with disabilities are perceived. It is pertinent to clarify that the convention is NOT asking for anything NEW but asking persons with disabilities to enjoy the same opportunities in society that everybody already enjoys. This convention discusses about legislation, which is not the only means of social progress; it represents one of the most powerful vehicles of change, progress and development in society. Measures to address the existing discrimination and to ensure the rights of people with disability in all aspects are discussed in this article.

The second article “Empowering the Disabled through Inclusive Education” by Moiz Tundawala considers as to how empowerment of disabled is being carried through rehabilitation process of inclusive education, where disability is not viewed as something invoking pity or in need of a cure. Social model presents disability as a consequence of oppression, prejudice and discrimination by society against disabled people. The disabled can be transformed from passive community gears to productive human resources, capable of making a useful contribution in social development, with the help of education. The author concludes with some remarks, which hint at urgent necessity for integration of persons with disabilities, realization of inclusive education, coordination between governmental agencies and private sector, reservations for the disabled in Government and private educational institutions as per the law and effective implementation mechanisms for the welfare of the disabled.

The last article of this section “Consumer Rights with Special Reference to the Disabled” by Ami Divatia looks at diversity of the issue relating to disabled as consumer by rehabilitation process through consumer rights. Since the Indian consumers are naive and disorganized, business enterprises exploit them for their personal benefits, where the Indian consumer suffers due to traditional attitude of silence. Study revealed that persons with disabilities had good knowledge about the consumer rights and they had utilized the consumers rights to a large extent. Variable barriers which affected the extent of utilization of the benefits were age, marital status, education, occupation, family income and type of school.

Section III: Experiences
The first article of this section “The Changing Educational Scenario for Children with Deafblindness and Multiple Disabilities in India” is by Akhil S Paul. This article briefs about the changing educational scenario for children with deafblindness and multiple disabilities in India. Deafblind children are educationally isolated, as impairments of sight and hearing stop them from reaching their full potential for unique educational approaches. The initiative for Multi- Sensory Impaired (MSI) in the country is need-based and as a result, the services got much localised and led to the development of many forms of interventions and models such as the persons with disabilities and its equal opportunities, protection of rights and full participation Act and the National Trust For Welfare of People with autism, cerebral palsy, mental retardation and multiple disabilities.

The second article “Issues and Challenges for Rehabilitation of Mentally Ill Persons in India” is an invited article written by Harshit Sinha. This article talks about rehabilitation services in the mental health sector in India, having a broad spectrum of services but are being labour-intensive and costly affairs. Due to this both institutional and community-based rehabilitation programme practices have made the process loosely bounded. The issue of lack of clarity for the clear definition of Rehabilitation in mental health gave birth to misconception and false practice in the name of rehabilitation of mental health. As there is no uniform framework that can be adopted in imparting rehabilitation services there are great possibilities of missing links of ethical and legal issues; quality standards and quality of care without proper service deliver system. An attempt has been made in this article to discuss the current challenge status of the existing rehabilitation services, addressing the issues concerned, that can be strengthened by developing rehabilitation framework by creating better coordination and understanding between implementing agencies and the ministries concerned.

The third article “The Protection of Rights of People with Disabilities in China” by Eric Guozhong Zhang. This article discusses Chinas current status, which is the largest developing country in the world, where people with disabilities still remain a vulnerable group and many encounter specific difficulties in society. In spite of the countrys rapid economic growth and social development such as series of positive legislative, administrative actions and work of disability organisations and the general living conditions, the overall social status of people with disabilities in the country still remains vulnerable and many encounter specific difficulties in a society where economy is experiencing a tremendous market-oriented transition. How the Government is reportedly taking action to review its disability legislation and policies, including the Law on the Protection of Disabled Persons, and continuing its efforts to formulate more specific regulations on the promotion of rights in the Constitution through specific areas such as education, employment, communication, health services, housing, accessibility, culture, sports and recreation and civic participation for persons with disability is explained.

The fourth article “Vocational Reintegration of People with Spinal Cord Lesion in Bangladesh An Observational Study Based on a Vocational Training Project at CRP” is written by Christian Holm Hansen, Ilias Mahmud and Afsana Jahan Bhuiyan. This article outlines the components of the employment situation for disabled people in the Dhaka district of Bangladesh, which was found to be extremely poor. The study was engaged in a new rehabilitation initiative, aiming at bringing people with spinal cord injury back to their previous occupations. This article discusses its initiative, and assesses its success on the basis of an Observational Study on Vocational Training Project by the Centre for Rehabilitation of Paralyzed (CRP) from 2002 to 2005. Economic constraints imposed by the changed circumstances became a hurdle for people with disabilities from regaining employment whether it is a question of building an access ramp, buying mobility aids, or raising initial capital for setting up a small business. The issues considered were particularly emphasizing on the implications for policymakers and organisations working with disabled people, which were most important in influencing their ability to re-enter the workforce with factors such as family cooperation and financial struggles.

The fifth article is “Social and Structural Dimensions of Dependency, Participation and Social Exclusion among People with Mobility Impairments, Peninsular Malaysia” by Zaliha Omar and Lenore Manderson is a resilience study on social aspects of impairments and disability conducted in urban and rural Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia, in 2003-04. People were living with impairments and their families living with this chronic health conditions and their impacts on self-esteem, social relationships and societal participation were measured using both quantitative and qualitative methods, including standardized and purpose-specific instruments. In-depth interviews were conducted with Malay, Chinese and Indian Malaysians. The urgent need for its review is necessary and reform of medical and health services has arisen concurrently with increased commitment to ensuring equity and maximizing the social participation and capabilities of all citizens.

The sixth article is “Survivor in Ukraine: Living Disability in a Post-Soviet State” by Sarah D Phillips. With the experiences of spinal cord injuries, the writer talks about how in Ukraine an individual with disabilities is reduced to bare life left to fend for himself and his social status is officially defined by his lack of health as a person with disabilities seeks physical, social, and political empowerment through social ties and advocacy network. The author discusses the concept of disability and bare life where living life as wheelchair users in Ukraine would not be very much different from living on an island. The article concludes that efforts to modernize and reform Ukrainian heath care services for mobility of the disabled are just getting underway and the reforms are very sluggish. Without adequate resources for health care and rehabilitation, disabled are obligated to cultivate their own deeply personal body culture which prevent fulfillment of social obligations.

The seventh article “Disability and Development: A Contribution to Promoting the Interests of Persons with Disabilities in German Development Cooperation” is sourced from www.disabilityworld.org. This paper intends to show the importance of taking into consideration the interests of persons with disabilities in connection with poverty reduction and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It presents the orientation of German Development Cooperation (GDC), and offers a brief outline of activities and provides impulses for further cooperation efforts in this sensitive area. International development community is increasingly guided by rights-based approach, which calls for participation of all groups of the population particularly disadvantaged persons in development process. Various activities of German Development Cooperation (GDC) within bilateral co-operation with various agencies are presented.

Annexure
This annexure titled “Summary on National Policy for Persons with Disabilities” is compiled by Meghna Sanghvi. It is a summary of the article National Policy for Persons with Disabilities, written by Meira Kumar and published by Government of India; Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment in 2006.

To buy the book Follow the link http://www.books.iupindia.org/newarticle.asp?isbn=978-81-314-1479-8&bookid=IB1101859



Thank you to Dr. Kishor Bhanushali for submitting this announcement. Any inquires should please go to the book publisher or author, NOT We Can Do.

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Stories of People with Disabilities in Developing Countries from Around the World

Posted on 15 September 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Democratic Participation, Education, Human Rights, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean, Mobility Impariments, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Too often, the voices of people with disabilities are simply not heard–within their country, within their community, or sometimes even within families. The voices of disabled people in developing countries are even more suppressed.

One special issue of the New Internationalist, released in 2005, brings us the voices of people with disabilities from India … Zimbabwe … Sri Lanka … Colombia … Bangladesh … and elsewhere.

The stories and interviews published in their magazine, available for free on-line, share the experiences of people with disabilities in developing countries in their struggle for sexual expression … the harrowing experience of rape … the push to achieve recognition for their human rights … the battle against severe poverty and starvation … success at becoming a blind teacher … getting involved with politics … and overcoming discrimination in the work force.

Browse the stories at the New Internationalist website at:

http://www.newint.org/issue384/index.htm

Each story can be read on-line in html format; they do not need to be downloaded.



I learned of this magazine issue when several of its stories were recently circulated via email on the Disability Information Dissemination Network, which is managed by the Centre for Services and Information on Disability (CSID), Bangladesh, and currently sponsored by Handicap International. People may subscribe directly to the CSID mailing list by sending an email to csid@bdmail.net, csid@bdonline.com, or info@csididnet.org, with the word “join” in the subject line.

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Are Development Programs Achieving Disability Inclusion? If Not, What Next?

Posted on 4 September 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Reports, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

We cannot put all the world’s children into school, or eradicate global poverty and hunger, or stop the spread of HIV/AIDS, until and unless mainstream international development programs proactively include people with disabilities. The good news is that a slowly growing number of international agencies and organizations have written policies declaring their support for disability inclusion, otherwise known as disability mainstreaming. These include, as a few examples, the US Agency of International Development (USAID); the World Bank; The Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD); and the UK Department for International Development (DFID).

But, how well do these nice-sounding policies translate into practice? Do these programs actually reach poor people with disabilities in developing countries, or improve the quality of their lives, any better than before they wrote these policies? One DisabilityKar publication explores this question: Has Disability Been Mainstreamed into Development Cooperation? (Word format, 921 Kb)

One of the conclusions of this report is that the question is harder to answer than you might think: even the definition of what makes a “policy” a “policy” is apparently not always as obvious as it might seem. Then there are even trickier concepts to define, such as “inclusion,” “mainstreaming,” and “disability.” But ultimately the answer is mostly disappointing. Apart from some limited progress, many policies fail to go beyond pretty words on a page into pragmatic action in the field. If they are implemented, it is more or less haphazardly.

This conclusion in itself will probably not be especially new to close observers of the development field. What makes this study interesting, however, is that it is one of the few attempts to formally document what it terms a “disconnect between promise and results.” More importantly, it makes an attempt to answer why this disconnect happens, and what committed organizations can do to ensure that disability-friendly policies are carried out in practice. The study was published in July 2005, so some information has changed since then. But many of the underlying challenges are likely still similar today. Organizations and agencies that are serious about disability inclusion may wish to review this study with their own policies and practices in mind and consider ways they can help close the gap.

Has Disability Been Mainstreamed into Development Cooperation? (Word format, 921 Kb) analyzes policies and practice at USAID, the World Bank, NORAD, and DFID. The most common reason why disability inclusion policies fail include: lack of institutional support; failure to communicate policies; failure to break down traditional attitudes toward disability; failure to provide practical guidance in how to implement the policies; and inadequate resources.

Download the full 107-page report in Word format (921 Kb) at:

http://handicap-international.fr/bibliographie-handicap/4PolitiqueHandicap/mainstreaming/MainstreamDevCoop.doc

People interested in the DisabilityKar report may also be interested in reading a study of US-based organizations with an international focus on the extent to which they proactively include the concerns of women and girls with disabilities in their programs. This study, entitled Gender And Disability: A Survey of InterAction Member Agencies: Findings And Recommendations on Inclusion of Women and Men with Disabilities in International Development Programs (PDF format, 286 Kb), explores both policies and practice in dozens of relief and international development agencies and organizations. It also includes recommendations for how mainstream organizations can move forward in promoting genuine disability inclusion. Published by Mobility International USA, it is a few years older than DisabilityKar’s study, but covers more organizations and includes a gender focus as well as a disability focus. It can be downloaded in PDF format (286 Kb) at:

http://www.miusa.org/publications/freeresources/media/genderdisabilityreport.PDF



I discovered DisabilityKar’s study by exploring Handicap International’s new, on-line, free CD on Disability Rights and Policies. I encourage readers to explore the on-line CD on their own to find more publications and resources of interest. I first learned of MIUSA’s publication when I took my first course in international development and disability a few years ago at Gallaudet University.

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RESOURCE: Refugees with Disabilities: Facts and Solutions

Posted on 27 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Inclusion, Resources, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

What population in the world is the most excluded, marginalized, or simply forgotten? Many readers of this blog probably would immediately say, “people with disabilities.” But if you were to talk with someone who is a refugee from war, or someone who works with them, they might immediately say, “refugees.” So who is right? I suspect probably both. So what then of refugees with disabilities–forgotten both by people in the wider disability community and by people who work with refugees? Even this blog, in more than 300 posts, has only barely mentioned them before.

The Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children in June 2008 released two publications highly relevant to this community. The first is a report, Disabilities Among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations (PDF format, 1.81 Mb, 76 pages), that provides an overview of the situation facing disabled refugees. The second publication is meant to give workers some guidance in how they can ensure that refugees with disabilities are fully included in their programs: Disabilities Among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations: Resource Kit for Fieldworkers (PDF format, 328 Kb, 32 pages).

The report estimates that there are about 2.5 to 3.5 million refugees with disabilities around the world–enough, I would point out, to fill a small country. Not surprisingly, the report finds enormous challenges: shelters, food and water distribution centers, latrines, schools, health centers, and other vital services are often inaccessible. Refugees with disabilities are sometimes actively excluded from vocational training programs. Or, if they’re not intentially denied the right to participate, then they are often inherently excluded by the lack of appropriate accommodations.

Refugees dispersed in urban centers, away from refugee camps, often are even worse off. In concentrated refugee populations, at least it becomes easier to identify people with disabilities and thus to tailor services for them. But refugees living in the community, because they may be undocumented, are reluctant to identify themselves to receive services, whether or not they have disabilities. Furthermore, refugees with disabilities in urban settings are often ignored both by services for refugees generally and also by local Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs): in short, they often are being served by no one.

The good news is, some services do exist, including efforts to provide education to children with disabilities at least in refugee settlements. In some locations, refugees with disabilities and their families have organized their own self-help groups.

The accompanying resource kit is targeted at United Nations, nongovernmental organization (NGOs), and Disabled persons’ organization field staff who work with refugees, asylum seekers, and internationally displaced people with disabilities. Readers can consult this kit for ideas on improving services and protection for people with disabilities so they can participate more fully in their communities. If you’re looking for concrete, prescriptive guidelines and checklists, you won’t find that here. What you will find are questions that planners and decision makers should know the answers to, or find the solutions for. These offer broad guidelines as to the kinds of problem areas they should be on the look out for, with suggestions for how to address them.

At first glance, it seems an excellent start–with plenty of room for improvement. The Women’s Commission seems to be highly conscious of this: the introduction indicates they hope to build upon this publication in the future with input from, among others, DPOs and displaced people with disabilities themselves.

Download the report (PDF format, 1.81 Mb) at:

http://www.womenscommission.org/pdf/disab_fulll_report.pdf

Download the resource kit for fieldworkers (PDF format, 328 Kb), at:

http://www.womenscommission.org/pdf/disab_res_kit.pdf



We Can Do found this resource via the Disabled People International electronic newsletter and also during the course of assembling resources to go up on the Resource section of the Disability Rights Fund website. (The latter is still being constructed, but check back in late August or early September.)

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Disabled Girls in the Classroom: Finding What We Don’t Know

Posted on 25 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Reports, Violence, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

A report entitled Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) discusses what we don’t know about girls with disabilities in relation to education, and what ought to be done about it.

Readers familiar with gender issues within education know that, in many countries, girls are still more likely to drop out of school–if they ever attend at all. They may be needed at home to fetch the water; they may be afraid of being sexually assaulted on the way to school; or they may be embarrassed about managing their menustration at schools where there is no separate bathroom for girls–or perhaps no bathrooms at all.

Regular We Can Do readers and others familiar with the education field may also recall that about 77 million primary school-aged children today are not enrolled in school–and about one-third of them have disabilities. Schools are reluctant to enroll disabled students; parents may fear subjecting children with disabilities to bullying from the community and thus keep them at home; or decision makers may simply assume that disabled students either cannot learn or would be unable to use their educational degree later on because “no one wants to hire disabled workers.”

But what of girls with disabilities? Being a double minority does tend to come with a triple whammy. Disabled girls are excluded because they have disabilities; they are excluded because they are girls; and then they are excluded yet again when programs might target girls without including disabled girls, or when programs might target children with disabilities without considering the impact of gender.

This would seem to imply that girls with disabilities may face a unique set of barriers when pursuing an education–barriers that neither non-disabled girls nor disabled boys need to consider. If a unique set of barriers, then surely a unique set of solutions would also be needed to ensure that the push to put the last 77 million children into school does not leave behind girls with disabilities. But, how can we tackle these barriers if we don’t have a clear picture of what they are?

The 35-page paper, Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb), is an attempt to pull together what is known about girls in education with what is known about disability in education, coupled with anecdotcal information about how girls with disabilities are affected differently. It provides recommendations for areas researchers should be focusing on and gives a few ideas for things that can help.

This paper was published in 2003. But, unfortunately, I doubt it is significantly dated. I don’t pretend to be intensively familiar with the literature on education among students with disabilities internationally. But a quick skim through a more recent report on disability in education, Education’s Missing Millions (PDF format, 1.2 Mb), suggests that advancements since 2003 have been far from dramatic.

Perhaps one of the most important purposes of Education for All: a gender and disability perspective (PDF format, 151 Kb) is to help remind gender specialists that girls with disabilities are first and foremost, girls–but will be inherently excluded if not consciously targeted. For We Can Do readers already working on disability issues in education, another purpose is to remind that barriers excluding women and girls from full participation in society impact disabled girls and women just as much–if not more so.

If issues impacting girls with disabilities interests you, then you might also be interested in some of the following We Can Do posts:

Equalizing Educational Opportunity for the Nigerian-Ghanaian Blind Girl Child
Violence Against Blind/VI Girls in Malawi
Report on Violence Against Disabled Children (which I include in this list because violence against girls is often cited as a reason why some girls quit school)
Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children
Report on Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities (the referenced report includes brief references throughout to girls, including in the context of education)
Online discussion of inclusive education in Eastern Africa

Advocates working to promote more educational opportunities for girls with disabilities also may wish to consult, and cite, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), with particular attention to Article 6 (Women with Disabilities); Article 7 (Children with Disabilities); and Article 24 (Education).



I found this report by browsing the AskSource.info database.

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Disabled, Poor–and Ignored: Results of Research in Zimbabwe and South Africa

Posted on 6 August 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Research conducted in Zimbabwe and South Africa has confirmed what grassroots advocates have known all along: people with disabilities aren’t just at higher risk of poverty. People with disabilities are also more likely to be ignored by many donors who support programs to end poverty.

The 77-page study is entitled, “Are Disabled Peoples’ Voices from both South and North Being heard in the Development process? A Comparative analysis between the situation in South Africa, Zimbabwe, United Kingdom and Northern Europe.” Conducted in 2005, this research explores the extent to which Disabled Peoples’ Organizations (DPOs) in Zimbabwe and South Africa have access to funding, and the extent to which DPOs were able to explain to donors what kind of funding would help them best.

People with disabilities who were interviewed for this study said they wanted to be involved with disability programs, from the planning stage through implementation. However, they felt they were often excluded, both by the government and also by DPOs themselves. The study concludes that many DPOs lack the capacity to reach large numbers of people with disabilities at the grassroots level. As a result, many people with disabilities in South Africa and Zimbabwe are not part of any network. They also usually lacked awareness of policies and programs that were meant to benefit them, such as the African Decade on Persons with Disabilities or the Millennium Development Goals.

DPOs, too, said they lacked opportunity to contribute to dialogue about what kinds of projects would be most beneficial for them. DPOs in South Africa and Zimbabwe said that donors from developed countries often impose their own tailor-made programs on them without asking for their input. They wanted to be more involved with designing the programs that they implement. DPOs usually were more aware than grassroots individuals of programs such as the African Decade or the Millennium Development Goals, but even some DPOs were not aware of them.

Even in the UK and Northern Europe, DPOs felt that they were struggling for donations. DPOs also complained that non-disability oriented international non-governmental organizations used information about people with disabilities to obtain donations for themselves instead of for DPOs.

The study makes recommendations based on its findings, including the need for more capacity building for DPOs in developing countries; stronger partnerships among DPOs in developing and developed countries and donors; and closer involvement of people with disabilities and DPOs in planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating programs.

Learn more about the study; download the 6-page executive summary (Word format); or the full 770-page report (Word format) at:

http://www.disabilitykar.net/research/thematic_voices.html



We Can Do found this study on the DisabilityKar.net site after exploring links from the Heathlink Worldwide site.

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Siyanda Database: Publications on Gender and Disability

Posted on 16 July 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Opportunities, Poverty, Resources, Women | Tags: , , , |

Researchers, international development professionals, and disability advocates who have an interest in gender issues may wish to explore the many gender-related publications at http://www.siyanda.org/.

The Siyanda database offers a wide range of articles and other publications related to gender and international development. Many are in English, but some materials are also available in other languages. Some of the materials available at Siyanda relate to people with disabilities in developing nations. Try a keyword search for words such as “disabilities” and “disabled” (note that each of these words brings up a slightly different set of results). Or try more specific key words such as “blind” or “mental illness.”

(Side note: the World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry prefers the term “people with psychosocial disabilities.” However, many existing publications continue to use other terms such as “mental illness.”)

Siyanda also has a database of experts and consultants. Three names turned up when I tried plugging in the search term “disabilities.”

Authors will want to submit their own publications to the Siyanda database.

Start exploring at: http://www.siyanda.org/.



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RESOURCE: HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey

Posted on 14 July 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Learn about HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities and find resources that can help at the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

A few years ago, the World Bank and Yale University worked together to conduct a global survey on HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities. The findings from this global survey are available in PDF format (about 500 Kb each) in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. People who are serious about learning all that is known about HIV/AIDS among disabled people will also want to browse the many other research articles available on the topic within the “Research” section of the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

People who are more interested in the pragmatic side of how to address the challenge of HIV/AIDS may find it helpful to browse through the materials available within Resources section of the HIV/AIDS and Disability Global Survey website.

Start exploring the website at:

http://cira.med.yale.edu/globalsurvey/

People who wish to gather more information or resources related to HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities around the world will also want to explore the reports, training materials, and other resources at the AskSource.info listing of resources on HIV/AIDS and disability.

You may also wish to browse through previous We Can Do posts on HIV/AIDS for more leads to follow.



I have been familiar with this resource since the World Bank and Yale University released its global survey in 2004. I’ve mentioned the website in passing before at We Can Do, but I thought this resource was important enough to warrant a blog post all to itself.

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CALL FOR PAPERS on International Disability Convention

Posted on 10 July 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Opportunities, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , |

Dr. Kishor Bhanushali circulated the following call for papers on the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in late June:

Dear All:

This is Dr. Kishor Bhanushali from India, working as a faculty member with ICFAI Business School. I am working on edited book on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. I am looking for authors to contribute articles related to various aspects of convention and its likely impact on persons with disabilities. For further information, pls contact me at kishorkisu@rediffmail.com,
kishor@ibsindia.org

Thanks for your overwhelming response to my book on U.N. Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Let me share with you some information about the proposed book and also
about ICFAI Books and ICFAI University Press.

Introduction:
United Nations estimated that there are about 650 million persons living with disabilities in the world. If we include the members of their families, there are approximately 2 billion persons who are directly affected by the disabilities, representing almost third of the world’s population. Persons with disabilities are generally overlooked in the development process as they do not enjoy rights at par with their non-disabled counterparts. Therefore ensuring equality of rights and access for these persons will have an enormous impact on the social and economic situation in countries around the world. In this scenario 2008 is a significant yeasr because of the entry of Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol, which are legally binding documents obligating the state governments to promote and protect the rights of persons with disabilities. U.N. Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities ensures that all persons with all types of disabilities must enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms on an equal basis with others. It clarifies and qualifies how all categories of rights apply to persons with disabilities and identifies areas where adaptations have to be made for persons with disabilities to effectively exercise their rights, where their rights have been violated, and where protection of rights must be reinforced.

The Convention marks a “paradigm shift” in attitudes and approaches to persons with disabilities. It takes to a new height the movement from viewing persons with disabilities as “objects” of charity, medical treatment and social protection towards viewing persons with
disabilities as “subjects” with rights, who are capable of claiming those rights and making decisions for their lives based on their free, and informed consent as well as being active members of society (U.N.).

Theme:
The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol was adopted on 13 December 2006 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, and was opened for signature on 30 March 2007. It was the first comprehensive human rights treaty of the 21st century and is the first human rights convention to be open for signature by regional integration organizations. Countries that join in the Convention engage themselves to develop and carry out policies, laws and administrative measures for securing the rights recognized in the Convention and abolish laws, regulations, customs and practices that constitute discrimination. Countries are to guarantee that persons with disabilities enjoy their inherent right to life on an equal basis with others, ensure the equal rights and advancement of women and girls with disabilities and protect children with disabilities.

Objective(s):
1. To understand the need of convention to protect the rights of persons with disabilities
2. Understand various aspects of convention on rights of persons with disabilities
3. Understand various aspects of convention and its expected impact on the life of persons with disabilities in various countries of the world
4. To discuss the issues involved in implementation of convention in various countries of the world

About Icfai University Press
In order to survive and thrive in a rapidly transforming economic and business environment, executives and professionals need to continuously acquire emerging knowledge and skills. The Icfai University Press therefore brings out a portfolio of publications to make the much-needed knowledge available to its readers who include students, research scholars and working executives. Presently, the Icfai University Press brings out 18 magazines and 57 journals.

About Icfai Books
Icfai Books is the initiative of the Icfai University Press to publish a series of professional reference books in the areas of accounting, banking, insurance, finance, marketing, operations, HRM, IT, general management and allied areas with a special focus on emerging and frontier themes. These books seek to provide, at one place, a retrospective, current as well as prospective view of the contemporary developments in the environment, with emphasis on general and specialized branches of knowledge and applications.

These professional books are based on relevant, authoritative and thought-provoking articles written by experts and published in leading professional magazines and research journals. The articles are organized in a sequential and logical way that makes reading continuous and helps the reader acquire a holistic view of the subject. This helps in strengthening the understanding of the subject better and also enables the reader stretch their thoughts beyond the contents of the book. These books are designed to meet the requirements of working executives, research scholars, academicians, students of professional programs and Indian and foreign universities. Around 40 books are sent to print every month.

The books are meant for the purpose of dissemination of knowledge and information and are sold at highly discounted prices. The publishing unit is, therefore, heavily subsidized by the parent organization involved in higher education. If you need any more information about Icfai Journals and Magazines, please visit www.iupindia.org. At this juncture, we are pleased to inform you that we now have launched our own website www.books.iupindia.org and we wish to allow readers the facility of e-downloading the books from our website and also from some other websites we may work in future. We are sure, you will agree that this will result in larger distribution of books and also give better visibility to the source(s)/author(s) and the books. Therefore, we now seek your permission to reprint the above article in the electronic version. Kindly let us know that we have you permission for the same.

You are requested to forward the abstract of your paper at earliest. Final paper can be submitted in month time. If you have already published some paper which you think is suitable for the book can also be reprinted.

Awaiting Response
 

Dr Kishor Bhanushali
Faculty – Economics
ICFAI Business School
ICFAI House



We Can Do first saw this call for papers on the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group, which is devoted to the discussion of disability issues in the Asian and Pacific regions. Dr. Kishor Bhanushali was kind enough to supply additional details.

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Successful Projects–What Makes Them Work?

Posted on 2 June 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Case Studies, Cognitive Impairments, Reports, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Ideas are easy. Any 10 disability advocates will have 100 ideas for projects to fight poverty or otherwise improve the lives of people with disabilities in developing countries. But knowing how to implement projects that actually do what advocates and funders hope they will do is much harder. So, what makes successful projects work? Why do they work? What lessons can other project leaders learn from them?

Inclusion International has released a 66-page study entitled “Successful Projects–What Makes Them Work?” (PDF format, 3.5 Mb). As it happens, their analysis focuses on projects for people with intellectual disabilities in India, Romania, Kenya, and South Africa. But its conclusions are broad enough that this guide may be useful across disability groups and regions.

Successful Projects by Anders Gustavsson and Johans Sandvin and Annika and Lennart Nilsson examines 13 different projects. Each project was chosen because it was interesting, successful, or outstanding in improving the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. Chapters 1 and 2 describe the research process and the national reports used. Chapters 3 to 7 provide a cross national analysis of the 13 projects, and chapter 8 presents conclusions and implications. The study aimed to answer the following questions (taken from page 8 of the report):

  • Which projects resulting in sustainable improvements of life conditions for adults and children with intellectual disabilities can be found in the four countries?
  • What are the most strategic change agents, internationally, nationally and locally?
  • Which methods are most effective at initiating and maintaining the processes of change?
  • What other factors, deliberate project interventions as well as contextual factors, are important to achieve a positive change?

Experienced leaders, advocates, and professionals may agree with some of Inclusion International’s conclusions but may disagree with others. The study’s conclusion suggests, for example, that any criteria used to measure improvement in the quality of life must be specific to the local culture. The rationale is that different cultures define “quality of life” very differently. This seems a valid point.

But then the study goes further to baldly assert, “the idea of developing a model of best practice to be applied across cultural contexts would never work” (p. 57). This seems too overgeneralized a conclusion from my view.

If by “a model of best practice” you mean “a rigidly prescribed, one-size-fits all project plan,” then I have no hesitation in agreeing. Projects that are too strict in emulating their original model adapt poorly to the unique needs of the people they serve. I also agree wholeheartedly with the study’s assertion that projects work best when they are generated by local people themselves, in response to their own ideas and passions. Projects imposed by outsiders rarely work as well, either because they are not responsive to actual local problems or because local leaders don’t support them as strongly.

But it is a dangerously false assumption to believe that projects originated in other cultural contexts can never offer lessons for leaders elsewhere. As one example (though not disability specific): some years ago, Mexico and Brazil each launched what is now called “conditional cash transfer” programs. Governments give the very poorest families cash. In exchange, parents must do certain things such as sending their children to school or bringing them to health clinics.

The original conditional cash transfer idea has now proliferated not only within Latin America but also to countries as culturally disparate as Kenya, Turkey, Indonesia, and even New York City in the United States. They help improve school attendance, child health, and family nutrition as well as helping families cope with poverty. Yes, each project does need to be carefully tailored for the local culture and conditions. But the broad concept of this program has survived the transition across cultures very well.

Surely there must be broad strategies for certain types of projects targeted at people with disabilities that could similarly survive the transition from one culture to another, even if the details must be dramatically altered.

I should hasten to point out I may be over-reacting to an admittedly superficial glance at the study’s conclusions and accompanying powerpoint programs. The flaw may well be in my reading rather than in the study.

These caveats aside, project leaders, disability advocates, and international development professionals all may find it interesting to read the common “story line” of how successful projects tend to get started. And, as mentioned further above, some of its conclusions do strike me as valid and interesting.

The 66-page report can be downloaded for free in PDF format (3.5 Mb) at:

http://www.inclusion-international.org/site_uploads/File/Inclusion%20International%20Study%20-%20A%20Cross-National%20Analysis%20-%20Final.pdf

An accompanying powerpoint program, and more detailed reports on individual countries, can be found at the Inclusion International web site at:

http://inclusion-international.org/en/projects/10.html



I first found this study by browsing the Inclusion International web site.

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PUBLICATION of Emergency Management Research and People with Disabilities: A Resource Guide

Posted on 26 April 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

From: Gracer, Bonnie
Sent: Friday, April 04, 2008 7:09 PM
Subject: NIDRR Announces New Document – Emergency Management Research
and People With Disabilities: A Resource Guide

The National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research is pleased to announce the release of a new online publication: Emergency Management Research and People With Disabilities: A Resource Guide.

This resource guide is the culmination of cooperative efforts by NIDRR, the Department of Education, the Research Subcommittee of the Interagency Coordinating Council on Emergency Preparedness and Individuals with Disabilities (ICC), and the New Freedom Initiative Subcommittee of the Interagency Committee on Disability Research.

The guide provides a listing and description of research projects funded by the US federal government and nonfederal entities, research recommendations that have come out of conferences on emergency management and disability, and a bibliography of relevant research publications. It is our hope that this guide will facilitate the development and implementation of a nationwide research agenda on emergency management and people with disabilities, so that we can develop a strong evidence base about the best ways to ensure the safety and security of people with disabilities in emergency and disaster situations.

This report is available on the U.S. Department of Education’s Web site at: http://www.ed.gov/rschstat/research/pubs, the National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research Web site at http://www.ncddr.org/new/announcements.html the National Rehabilitation Information Center (NARIC) Web site at http://www.naric.com/public/pubs.cfm, and the Interagency Committee on Disability Research Web site at http://www.icdr.us/.

You can download the Emergency Management report in Word format (2.1 Mb), or you can downlaod the Emergency Management report in PDF format (813 Kb).

On request, this publication is available in alternative formats, such as Braille, large print, audiotape or computer diskette. For more information, contact the Department’s Alternate Format Center at 202-260-0852 or 202-260-0818.

Please feel free to spread the word.



Thank you to Bonnie Gracer for circulating this notice.

We Can Do readers will note that the publication described here is written in the United States and, accordingly, seems to be oriented more toward the needs of people in developed countries. But I share it here in case some of the content may be of use to people in developing countries or among international development and disaster preparedness professionals working on related issues. We Can Do readers will also want to see an earlier post on the World Disasters Report 2007 which focuses on how discrimination can put people’s lives at risk during disaster.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Disability and Inclusive Economic Development

Posted on 26 April 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Education, Employment, Health, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for Papers for the Review of Disability Studies

Special Issue on Disability and Inclusive Economic Development.

 
The Review of Disability Studies is requesting papers for an upcoming special issue on Disability and Inclusive Development, to be edited by Rosangela Berman Bieler of the Inter-American Institute on Disability and Inclusive Development and Daniel Mont of The World Bank.

This issue is intended to highlight recent research on the links between disability and socio-economic outcomes in developing countries, as well as evaluate attempts to move towards a more inclusive model of development

In particular, we are soliciting papers about the developing world that answer questions such as:

What is the relationship between disability and poverty?

How does the presence of a disability affect people’s access to education, training, and employment?

What is the relationship between health status, disability, and mortality?

What are the key barriers that prevent access to public services such as education, healthcare, transportation, water and sanitation, etc.?

What are some examples of programs or policy interventions aimed at including disabled people, and how effective have they been?

We particularly encourage submissions from authors from developing countries. We also encourage submissions across all disciplines, as long as they are aimed at helping to build more effective inclusive policies.

Please send electronic copies of a 1-2 page abstract to both Daniel Mont at dmont@worldbank.org and Rosangela Berman Bieler at RBBieler@aol.com by August 1, 2008.

Completed articles should be approximately 3000-5000 words and should follow all RDS formatting guidelines found at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/submissions/. Note that an invitation to (submit an abstract or) participate in the forum does not guarantee publication of that article in The Review of Disability Studies.

For more information about The Review of Disability Studies, please go to www.rds.hawaii.edu



Daniel Mont recently circulated this announcement on the Global Partnership for Disability and Development listserv.

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RESOURCE: Disability Survey Toolkit for Researchers

Posted on 10 March 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability advocates who work in the field know first hand there is never enough money for the projects they want to run for disabled people. One reason is because society may undervalue people with disabilities. But another is lack of data. Policy makers and funders are reluctant to release valuable funds unless there is a clearly documented need.

Household surveys on disability can be immensely helpful in collecting the data needed to persuade policy makers to commit resources to programs that include, or target, disabled people. But such surveys can be highly variable in quality depending on the researchers’ familiarity with disability-specific research issues. For example, surveys that simply ask, “Are you or someone in your household disabled?” tend to significantly underestimate true disability prevalence.

Researchers who intend to conduct household surveys on disability can begin with a resource released from Handicap International, entitled “Conducting Surveys on Disability: A Comprehensive Toolkit” (PDF format, 1.1 Mb).

This toolkit offers guidance in designing, conducting, implementing, and analyzing household surveys meant to help understand disability within a specific social, political, cultural, and religious context. Researchers can learn appropriate methodologies for this type of research, including selecting samples, designing questionnaires, training interviewers,
conducting field operations to collect the data, and analyzing and disseminating the results.

The toolkit is targeted at anyone with an interest in data collection, surveys, disability, and development. It was inspired in part by a National Disability Survey that was conducted in Afghanistan from November 2004 to July 2005. The NDSA was carried out by Handicap International for the government of Afghanistan to obtain more accurate information on the
prevalence rates, living conditions, and coping strategies of people with disabilities.

This survey brought together researchers with prior experience with the particular challenges of researching disability and stimulated discussions about the sampling process and tools that should be used. The resulting document includes their recommendations and presents these debates.

People may download the full disability survey toolkit in PDF format (1.1 Mb) for free at:

http://www.handicap-international.fr/uploads/media/Final_pdf_for_Web__2__01.pdf



We Can Do learned about this resource from AskSource.info. AskSource is a comprehensive database on health, disability, and development.

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REPORT: Violence Against Disabled Children

Posted on 8 March 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Reports, Resources, Violence | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

UNICEF has released a summary report entitled, “Violence Against Disabled Children” (PDF format 245 Kb), with the subtitle “UN Secretary Generals Report on Violence against Children, Thematic Group on Violence against Disabled Children, Findings and Recommendations.”

The first half of this report, released in July 2005, summarizes what is known about violence toward children with disabilities at home, in schools, in institutions, in the criminal justice system, within the broader community, and at work (in child labor situations). Children with disabilities are known to be at higher risk for abuse, partly because they may be perceived as “easy victims.” Also, abuse toward disabled children is less likely to be investigated or persecuted, which means abusers know it is easier to escape consequences even if the abuse is discovered.

Many children, with or without disabilities, may face adults who fail to listen or to believe them when they try to report abuse. But children with disabilities face additional barriers. As one example, some adults may mistakenly assume that a child with intellectual disabilities or psycho-social disabilities must surely be “confused,” or unable to tell right from wrong, or unable to make their own decisions about what is done to their bodies.

Disabled children may also be targeted for child murder, either because parents perceive them as bringing shame to the family or because adults may be convinced they will be “better off” dead than disabled. In countries where many men share the belief that sex with a virgin will “cleanse” them of HIV/AIDS, girls, boys, and adults with disabilities may be targeted for rape on the assumption that they do not have sex. Children with disabilities also may be forcibly sterilized, sometimes as early as the age of 8 or 9.

The report makes a series of 13 recommendations for families, communities, policy makers, governments, advocates, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) or Civil Society Organizations, United Nations agencies, and other stakeholders with an interest in preventing violence toward disabled children. These recommendations include, as a few examples: increasing public awareness; reforming legislation so that the laws can better protect children with disabilities; advocating change to improve inclusion of disabled people throughout society; improving reporting mechanisms so that people who become aware of abuse have a way to report it; closing down institutions and integrating disabled children into the community; but also improving government oversight of institutions for as long as they continue to exist.

The 33-page report can be downloaded in PDF format (245 Kb) at:

http://www.unicef.org/videoaudio/PDFs/UNICEF_Violence_Against_Disabled_Children_Report_Distributed_Version.pdf

People interested in the topic of violence against children may also wish to read an article on violence and disabled children in the 2003 issue of the joint Rehabilitation International and UNICEF newsletter, One in Ten:

http://riglobal.org/publications2/10_24.htm

Also of possible interest:

A recent report, Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities could give ideas to advocates and families for how they can use international human rights laws to protect the rights of children with disabilities.

Learn about a report on human rights abuses of disabled children and adults in Serbia, including the use of violence.

Read a paper on Violence Against Blind and Visually Impaired Girls in Malawi

Those interested in abuse and human rights violations in institutional settings may also wish to read the following first-hand accounts written by the same author, Amanda Baggs. These are well worth reading. Some talk about the more obvious kinds of violence that most people are used to thinking of as “abuse.” Some talk about forms of psychological manipulation that are so subtle that outside observers might miss them. But Amanda Baggs makes powerful arguments for why “outposts in our head,” or the uses of power nevertheless can be at least as important for anyone who cares about the well-being of children (and adults) with disabilities. Click on any title below to see Amanda Bagg’s post:

Why It’s So Hard to Write Directly About My Life
Outposts in Our Heads: The Intangible Horrors of Institutions that Must Not Be Forgotten
The Meaning of Power
Extreme Measures, and Then Some



We Can Do learned about the UNICEF report on violence against disabled children from the AskSource.info database. Asksource.info provides a library of information, resources, and toolkits related to people with disabilities and to health issues, particularly in developing countries.



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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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PAPER: Disability and Poverty: A Survey of World Bank Poverty Assessments and Implications

Posted on 4 March 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

The World Bank Group has released a new paper entitled “Disability and Poverty: A Survey of World Bank Poverty Assessments and Implications,” by Jeanine Braithwaite and Daniel Mont.

The paper surveys World Bank poverty assessment literature on the relationship between disability and poverty. It finds that it is difficult to accurately assess the link between disability and poverty because household surveys on consumption (used to assess consumption-based poverty) frequently don’t ask about the disability status of household members.

Also, it is difficult to define or measure “disability.” For example, simply asking if people are disabled misses many disabled people because they may wish to avoid the stigma of disability. Or,some people may assume that “disability” necessarily refers only to significant impairments. These people might not bother to report mild or moderate impairments.

Another complication in poverty and disability research is that many existing surveys do not account for the fact that people with disabilities have different consumption needs than other people. For example, they might need to spend income on Braille, wheelchairs, or other items that non-disabled people do not need. The money spent on these items diverts income from other consumption that could raise the living standards of the household. Thus, a disabled person with the same income as a non-disabled person may actually be poorer.

The authors suggest directions for further research into disability and poverty.

The full, 32-page paper can be downloaded in PDF format (250 Kb) at:

http://siteresources.worldbank.org/SOCIALPROTECTION/Resources/SP-Discussion-papers/Disability-DP/0805.pdf



We Can Do learned about this paper via contacts within the World Bank.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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PUBLICATION: Feb Issue UN Enable Newsletter

Posted on 28 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Human Rights, News, Psychiatric Disabilities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The second monthly issue of United Nation’s Enable Newsletter has now been released. The initial launch of this newsletter was announced at We Can Do last month.

A sampling of headlines for the February issue is listed below, except that I have modified them to spell out most acronyms. To read the full stories (usually one or two paragraphs each), consult the February issue of the Enable Newsletter at http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=312

  • UN Commission Renews Mandate for Special Rapporteur and Agrees on Mainstreaming Disability in Development.
  • United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator Makes New Commitment to Disability
  • World Bank and Organizaiton for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Conduct Joint Effort for the Achievement of Millennium Development Goals 2 & 3. [We Can Do note, for those new to international development: the Millennium Development Goals are a set of targets agreed upon by country governments and development agencies for reducing global poverty and improving global health; more information at http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/
  • World Bank Psycho-Social Listserv is Open for Sign-Up at http://go.worldbank.org/SIP5GYWK00
  • International Labour Organization (ILO) to Produce Advocacy Kit on Decent Work for Persons with Disabilities
  • Ratification Talk in Serbia
  • Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Raises Awareness in the Maldives
  • Sharing Experiences on Best Practices in Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Services for Persons with Disabilities
  • Identifying Concrete Actions in Mozambique Towards Implementation of the Convention
  • Atlas: Global Resources for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities (Atlas-ID) (We Can Do note: The launch of this Atlas also was announced at We Can Do).
  • United Nations Information Center (UNIC) Moscow Hosts Discussion on Persons with Disabilities

The February issue of the Enable Newsletter also lists several publications and upcoming events. You can read the January or February issue for free. Or you can sign up for a free subscription to receive each month’s newsletter via email, for free. All available at:

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=312



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Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere else, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people.

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PUBLICATION: Promoting the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Posted on 26 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Education, Employment, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, Policy & Legislation, Rehabilitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Rehabilitation International’s publication, International Rehabilitation Review, has published a special edition focused on promoting the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). People with disabilities, advocates, disability experts, and human rights experts, all contributed 20 articles to the December 2007, 48-page edition.

The CRPD is the first comprehensive international legislation to focus on protecting the human rights of people with disabilities. It needs to be ratified by 20 countries before it will take full legal force; it has now been ratified by 17 countries.

Several of these articles celebrate the heavy involvement of the disability community and various disability and human rights organizations in promoting the CRPD. Other articles discuss the relevance of the CRPD to themes such as promoting inclusive education; including people with disabilities in programs to prevent HIV/AIDS; the importance of habilitation and rehabilitation to empowerment; and how the CRPD may help countries bring more people with disabilities into the work force.

Some more examples of articles included in the December 2007 issue of the International Rehabilitation Review include the following:

An article entitled “A Unified Disability Community: The Key to Effective Implementation of the Convention” by Maria Veronica Reina and Stefan Tromel highlights the importance of people with disabilities themselves being actively involved in ensuring that the CRPD actively protects the human rights of disabled people around the world.

Author Ann M. Veneman discusses the importance of children with disabilities in the CRPD in her article, “The UN Disability Rights Convention: Moving Children with Disabilities Center Stage.”

Of particular relevance to We Can Do readers in the international development field is the article “Toward Inclusive Development: The Implementation Challenge,” by Charlotte McClain-Nhlapo. This article calls for country governments and development organizations to incorporate the principles of the CRPD into their plans, programs, and policies, including those that fight poverty.

Anne Hawker and Sebenzile Matsebula discuss the importance of mobilizing women with disabilities to successfully implementing the CRPD in “Women with Disabilities: A Call to Action.”

In some countries, people with certain disabilities are denied the right to open their own bank account, or to say “no” to medical treatment that they don’t want. Article 12 of the CRPD can help, says Tina Minkowitz in her article, “Legal Capacity: Fundamental to the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.”

Once the CRPD takes legal force, then what? Governments will need people with disabilities themselves to monitor how well the CRPD is implemented in their countries. The article “Interational Monitoring: The Right to Inclusion, The Obligation to Participate” by Kirsten Young and Shantha Rau, discusses how.

This special issue of Rehabiliation International’s International Rehabilitation Review can be downloaded in PDF format (1.8 Mb) at
http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_web.pdf

Or you can downlaod it in Word format (233 Kb) at
http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_WORDversion.doc



We Can Do learned about this special issue through RatifyNow.org‘s email discussion list. This article is cross-posted at the RatifyNow.org web site with permission of author. See the RatifyNow website for more information on the CRPD and the global movement to ratify and implement it.

Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. If you are reading this anywhere else, then you are most likely reading a web site that regularly plagiarizes the work of other people.

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SURVEY: Process for Ratifying the CRPD

Posted on 20 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Press release
On 15 February 2008

The  Center  for  Human  Rights  of  Persons  with  Disabilities  (VIKE)  is
conducting a survey on the processes of ratification of  the  Convention  on
the Rights of Persons  with  Disabilities  in  seven  European  states.  The
chosen states are Finland, Germany, Hungary,  Serbia,  Sweden,  Ukraine  and
the United Kingdom.

The main focus of this survey is to analyze both  the  official  information
of the governments and the feedback of NGOs and human  rights  institutions.
The views  of  the  civil  society  are  an  important  source  for  finding
information on the weaknesses and development of the ratification process.

The report on the CRPD Survey will be published in English as a  comparative
analysis at a seminar in Helsinki on 20-21 May 2008.  The  speakers  of  the
seminar are human rights specialists from Finland and abroad. The  programme
of the seminar will be  released  on  the  VIKE`s  website.  The  survey  is
carried out  within  a  project  entitled  "CRPD  Survey".  The  project  is
financed by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs in Finland.

Visit VIKE website for more information – www.vike.fi.

The Center for Human Rights of Persons with Disabilities (VIKE)

For further information:
Mr. Riku Virtanen
Researcher
Address: Biskopsgatan 19/ IMR, 20500 Åbo, Finland
E-mail: rvi@sci.fi
Tel: +358 45 7731 0106
Fax: +358 2215 3465

 



This announcement has also been posted at the RatifyNow.org web site. RatifyNow is an organization that works to maximize the number of countries that sign, ratify, and implement the CRPD and the accompanying Optional Protocol.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



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SURVEY: HIV/AIDS Among Jamaicans with Disabilities

Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Latin America & Caribbean | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Graduate student Nalini Asha Reyes at San Diego State University in California, USA, is conducting a survey about HIV/AIDS among people with disability in Jamaica. Her survey is based on an earlier, similar global survey by researcher Dr. Nora Groce at Yale University.

Nalini Asha Reyes is looking for people to participate in her survey. She is particularly looking for people in or from Jamaica but will also welcome survey results from elsewhere in the Caribbean. If interested in participating, please read her letter below then contact her at naliniasha@gmail.com to request a copy of the survey. She can send it to you in Word document or PDF format.

HIV/AIDS and Disability in Jamaica Survey

Please help:

Today, little is known about HIV/AIDS among people with disability. We would like to know how the epidemic is affecting individuals and groups with all types of disability in Jamaica and we ask you to help. We are interested in disabled people of all ages, and disabled people living with their families, on their, own, or in institutions.

We send this survey with the request that you fill it out on behalf of the organization or advocacy group you work with. (If you think someone else in your organization would know more about these questions, please give it to them to fill out). Your information has been provided either through the public website of the National Aids Committee of Jamaica, or by an Internet search using the words, “HIV/AIDS,” “Jamaica,” and “Disability.”

We are interested in hearing both from organizations that are working on HIV/AIDS issues and from organizations that are not currently involved in HIV/AIDS issues.

We will be looking for information about programs that provide HIV/AIDS education, interventions and services to disabled people and communities. We would also welcome stories from Disability advocates about attempts to get help for HIV/AIDS in one’s community, examples about not being able to get help for one’s community, stories about governments and HIV/AIDS voluntary organizations that have tried to reach disabled people and so forth.

You must be over the age of 18 to complete and return this survey.

This survey should require less than 30 minutes of your time, and can be saved and emailed back as a PDF or MS Word document. Please note that there are no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers to any of these questions. Also, feel free to leave blank any questions for which you may not know the answer or which you may not feel comfortable answering. However, keep in mind we realize there is often little information available on this topic and so we are also interested in people’s ideas, impressions, knowledge, practices and attitudes. All information submitted will be kept completely confidential and will never be linked to your organization or team. Also, please note that we are not asking (and do not want) personal information or names of individuals who might have HIV/AIDS – we feel it is very important that we do not invade anyone’s privacy.

If you already have information about HIV/AIDS and Disability from your own organization or educational materials, information on training, studies, meetings, newspaper articles, or other materials relating to HIV/AIDS that you would like to share with us, we would appreciate it. If you know of a program or project that you think we should learn more about, please let us know. Finally, if you know of other Disability organizations, advocates, or government agencies who might have information about HIV/AIDS and Disability, we would appreciate it if you would forward this announcement on to them.

Language: If it is easier for you to write in a language other than English, please fill out the form in whatever language is easiest for you.

Sincerest thanks,

Nalini Asha Reyes
Graduate Student and Special Education Teacher
San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego, CA 92182-1170, USA
Phone: + 858.531.0847
e-mail: naliniasha@gmail.com

John R. Johnson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
San Diego State University
College of Education; Department of Special Education
5500 Campanile Dr., San Diego, CA 92182-1170
Phone: +619.594.3841; Fax: +619.594.6628
Email: johnson7@mail.sdsu.edu

Again, people interested in participating in the survey should send an email to Nalini Asha Reyes at naliniasha@gmail.com to request a copy of the survey.



Thank you to Nalini Asha Reyes for alerting me to this survey. I hope to be able to eventually post or link to the results of this survey.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



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PUBLICATION: Human Rights Africa Newsletter

Posted on 13 February 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Media & Journalism, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Readers interested in human rights issues affecting Africans with disabilities can catch up with past issues of the newsletter Human Rights Africa. Issues are available in both English and French, and in both Word format and PDF format. This publication from the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities was published four times in 2006 and two times in 2007.

All past issues may be worth browsing for people with a special interest in disabled Africans. But readers may particularly want to note the following (this is NOT a comprehensive list of articles):

The first issue of 2006 has an article that lists five challenges and seven opportunities for the Secretariat of the African Decade on Persons with Disabilities.

The second issue of 2006 focuses on HIV/AIDS among people with disabilties. This includes a story about how genocide helped spread HIV in Rwanda, and a story about efforts to prevent HIV/AIDS among women in Ethiopia. There is also a story about a new African Network of Women with Disabilities that is meant to help regional and national organizations share experiences in improving the lives of disabled women. Also see the article on how you can help influence development projects in your area so they will better include poor people with disabilities.

The third issue of 2006 has an article that lists practical tips for how you can approach journalists and persuade them to cover issues that matter to the disability community in your country. Another article discusses how sports can be used to help meet the Millennium Development Goals.

The fourth issue of 2006 has many articles about war and conflict in Africa with a focus on disability issues. Also see the article on how you can become involved in helping your country develop a Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) that is inclusive of people with disabilties.

The first issue of 2007 provides more information about the campaign against HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities in Africa and an article about violence against women.

The second issue of 2007 contains articles on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; a new African Federation of the Deafblind; and
lessons learned from lobbying in Uganda.

You can download copies of Human Rights Africa for free at:

http://www.africandecade.org/humanrightsafrica



We Can Do first learned about this newsletter after reading the Disabled People International (DPI) newsletter and exploring the web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities.

A modified version of this article has now been posted at RatifyNow with permission of author.



Also at We Can Do: catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities that might be helpful for your organization; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.



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REPORT: World Disasters Report 2007: Focus on Discrimination

Posted on 29 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Human Rights, Inclusion, Reports, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The World Disasters Report (2007) examines what happens to various vulnerable groups during disaster situations, particularly women, elderly people, minorities, and people with disabilities. This report from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies includes many stories of how discrimination and exclusion has made it harder for some people to survive or meet their needs during and after disaster situations. It also includes guidance and recommendations on how agencies, governments, and communities can improve efforts to ensure that emergency aid reaches the most vulnerable people. Discrimination can occur on the basis of ethnic or social origin, language, religion, gender, age, physical or mental disability, and sexual orientation.

The World Disasters Report points out that, although discrimination exists before disaster, an emergency can exacerbate it. However, that discrimination is often invisible because official data on older people, ethnic minorities or people with disabilities may not exist. Furthermore, aid agencies often do not even analyze the needs of vulnerable people when they carry out emergency assessments. And vulnerable groups are usually not included in the disaster planning process before, during, or after emergencies. This accummulative discrimination can be life-threatening during a crisis. Even after the crisis, people who have suffered discrimination may take longer to recover or to regain their livelihoods.

The World Disasters Report calls for agencies to do better in planning for the needs of vulnerable populations, saying bluntly, “One-size-fits-all relief planning is unhelpful in overcoming discrimination” (p. 15).

We Can Do readers will clearly have a particular interest in the chapter that focuses on the needs of people with disabilities during disasters. Information for this chapter was gathered from both industrialized and developing countries. Stories of discrimination are presented, including stories of how emergency shelters and emergency relief agencies have sometimes contributed to the problem. But you can also find stories highlighting the valuable contributions people with disabilities could make for everyone when they are included in disaster planning efforts. This chapter provides an overview of the barriers that can make it harder for people with disabilities to survive disasters or recover their lives afterwards. And it reviews how agencies and others can remove these barriers.

However, even people who wish to focus primarily on the needs of disabled people may still wish to read the full report. In particular, some of the needs of elderly people are similar to some of the needs of people with disabilities. Also, all the issues covered in this report are cross-cutting issues: any population of disabled people will clearly have people among them who are elderly, or women, or children, or gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender, or ethnic minorities, or other minorities. Disabled people who also belong to some other minority group may experience dual or triple discrimination that can create additional barriers during crisis situations.

Read chapter summaries, download individual chapters for free, or order print copies of the report at:

http://www.ifrc.org/publicat/wdr2007/summaries.asp

The full report can be downloaded in PDF format (4 Mb) at:

http://www.ifrc.org/Docs/pubs/disasters/wdr2007/WDR2007-English.pdf



We Can Do learned about the World Disasters Report through the Disabled People’s International newsletter. Further information was gathered from the report itself.

This article has been cross-posted, with some modifications, at the RatifyNow web site with permission of author.

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This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

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CALL FOR ARTICLES: Language and Inclusive Education for EENET Newsletter 2008

Posted on 28 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Cross-Disability, Education |

Enabling Education Network (EENET) Newsletter 2008: Call for articles

In the 2008 edition of EENET’s newsletter, “Enabling Education”, we hope to focus on the topic of:

language and inclusive education

Could you write a short article on this topic? If so, EENET wants to hear from you! Here are some ideas for what you could send to EENET:

They’d like to receive articles that discuss:

  • The development of national education policies that focus on language issues as part of a move towards inclusive education.
  • Practical programmes/projects that are promoting educational inclusion through the use of mother-tongue, bilingual or multilingual approaches.
  • Inclusive education programmes that target indigenous populations, refugees, internally displaced people or other migrants, with a focus on language and cultural issues.
  • Inclusive education policies and/or programmes that take into account other language issues (e.g. sign language, use of Braille, etc).
  • Inclusive education programmes/projects that focus generally on spoken language accessibility and accessibility of written teaching/learning materials for all learners (in terms of using language that is easy-to-read/understand).
  • Inclusive practice in the teaching of foreign languages as curriculum subjects.
  • Any other issues relating to inclusive education and language!

If you are not an experienced writer, don’t worry. Send us your ideas and we will try to help you to develop these ideas into an article.

You may also find it helpful to look at some previous newsletter articles when you are developing ideas for your own article. If you don’t already have copies of “Enabling Education”, please ask us to send you some, or look at the newsletters on our website www.eenet.org.uk. Newsletters are usually in English, but some selected articles and issues are available in translation to other languages such as Portuguese, Spanish, French, Kishwali, and Arabic.

We really encourage you to send us articles that have been researched/written by, or in collaboration with, children and young people. We also always welcome articles that make use of drawings, photos, etc.

Number of words: articles should be about 700 words long.

Deadline: first drafts or article ideas should be sent to us by 18th February 2008.

Images: if you would like us to print a photograph or drawing with your article, please send us either the original print/drawing or email us a high resolution digital image.

If you are not able to write about language issues, don’t worry. We still need articles about other aspects of inclusive education for our newsletter and website.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Some general guidelines for writing newsletter articles can be found on our website at http://www.eenet.org.uk/about/guidelines.shtml

Contact details:
Ingrid Lewis, EENET Co-ordinator
EENET – The Enabling Education Network
c/o ESI, School of Education
University of Manchester
Oxford Road
Manchester M13 9PL
UK

Tel: +44 (0)161 275 3711
Mobile/SMS: +44 (0)7929 326 564
Fax: +44 (0)161 275 3548
Email: info@eenet.org.uk



We Can Do received this announcement via the EENET East African email discussion list. The East African on-line discussion group is targeted at people who wish to share ideas, information and debates related to inclusive education for students with disabilities in East Africa. Participation is free.



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REPORT: State of Disabled People’s Rights in Kenya (2007)

Posted on 17 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Blind, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Human Rights, Mobility Impariments, Reports, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/27gxpy]

A recent publication, entitled “State of Disabled People’s Rights in Kenya (2007) Report,” analyzes national and regional Kenyan legislation on disability; government programs and policies on disability, and case law in disability. The report also presents the results of interviews with disabled people in three selected regions within Kenya about their human rights situation, in respect to dignity, autonomy, equality, and inclusion. Deaf people, blind people, and people with mobility impairments, and intellectual disabilities were interviewed. An overview of the disability rights movement in Kenya is given.

The examination of legislation and policies found that the Constitution of Kenya guarantees the human rights and liberties of all citizens. However, although the constitution outlaws discrimination on grounds such as race, tribe, or color, it does not specifically outlaw discrimination on the basis of disability. Further, anti-discrimination laws have not been enforced in cases where disability-related discrimination has occurred.

Interviews with individual disabled people in Kenya found that nearly three-quarters had been denied the right to make decisions affecting their own lives. Also, 80% report experiencing segregation, isolation, and lack of support for their needs. More than one-third reported that their own families had committed abuse or violence on them, and more than 45 percent said their families did not allow them to participate in family activities on the same basis as other family members.

The report recommends strengthening the capacity of Disabled People’s Organizations to address human rights issues; mainstreaming disability rights issues into government bodies and the national development strategy; involving disabled people and their organization in improving anti-discrimination legislation; and making the court process more accessible to disabled people so they can more effectively challenge disability-based discrimination.

The “State of Disabled People’s Rights in Kenya (2007) Report” was commissioned by the African Union of the Blind in collaboration with the Kenyan Union of the Blind, the World Blind Union, and the Centre for Disability Rights Education and Advocacy (CREAD), with support from the Swedish International Development Agency, the Swedish Association of the Visually Impaired, and Disability Rights Promotion International (DRPI).

The report can be read on-line at http://www.yorku.ca/drpi/Kenya07.html#startContent

The report also can be downloaded in PDF format (1.2 Mb) at http://www.yorku.ca/drpi/files/KenyaReport07.pdf



This article has been reposted at the RatifyNow.org web site with permission of author. RatifyNow is an organization working to maximize the number of countries signing, ratifying, and implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).



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JOURNAL: The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal

Posted on 17 January 2008. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Children, Cross-Disability, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Rehabilitation, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Originally published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do) at http://tinyurl.com/2gkrzx]

Skip to list of articles

Researchers and students, but especially people new to their field, can find it challenging to locate research, essays, and other academic literature about people with disabilities in developing countries. This may be in part because there are few international, disability-oriented journals available to publish such literature. One of the few exceptions is The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal (RDS).

The RDS journal publishes research articles, essays, and bibliographies on the culture of disability and people with disabilities. On occasion, it also publishes poetry, short stories, creative essays, photographs, and art work related to disability. It publishes four times a year, with approximately 50 pages in each issue. People can subscribe to RDS for a fee, or people can download past issues of RDS for free. Issues from 2006 onward are available in either Word format or PDF format; older issues are available in text-only format.

This publication is not focused solely on developing countries. In fact, many of its articles are written by researchers and writers in industrialized countries, particularly the United States. But some of its articles may be of interest to We Can Do readers. Some examples are listed further below. I chose some of these articles because they deal specifically with disabled people in developing countries; I list others because they deal with broader themes, such as exclusion, that transcend national and income boundaries.

Please note that it is not possible to download separate articles. To read a specific article that interests you, you will need to download the full issue it is in and then skip ahead to the correct page. Page numbers given are based on the PDF version where applicable. Page numbers will be slightly different in the Word version. Or click on the hyperlink within the Word file to be taken directly to the article you select.

Please also note that this is not a comprehensive listing of all articles in past issues of RDS. For example, I usually skipped over book reviews–but I did see a few for books that would be relevant to disabled people in developing countries. You may wish to explore the RDS on your own by following this link.

Selected RDS Articles

A Little Story to Share

A Little Story to Share” by Lee-chin Heng, Volume 1, Issue 2, 2004, page 109-111. Abstract: An autobiographical story of a person from Malaysia with physical disabilities who possesses an associate diploma in music. Download in text-only format (2.1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSissue012004.pdf .

Who is Disabled?

Who is Disabled? Who is Not? Teachers Perceptions of Disability in Lesotho” by Christopher Johnstone, Ph.D. Candidate Educational Policy and Administration University of Minnesota, Volume 1, Issue 3, 2005, starting on page 13. Abstract: This paper reports on educational research conducted in Lesotho, Southern Africa. Mixed methods of research were used to elicit and describe teachers’ attitudes toward children they perceived as disabled. The study took place in a country where discussions on ‘the Continuum’ of services, specialist diagnoses, and Western notions of assistive technology are largely irrelevant. Over-arching themes are compared to themes that have emerged from special education and Disability Studies literature over the past decade. Download in text-only format (715 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01032005.pdf

Evaluation of MA Program in Rehabilitation Counseling

Evaluation of Master of Arts Program in Rehabilitation Counseling and Guidance Service for Persons with Disabilities in Thailand” by Tavee Cheausuwantavee, M.Sc. Ratchasuda College, Mahidol University, Thailand, Volume 1, Issue 3, 2005, starting on page 66. Abstract: This research examines the positive and negative aspects of the Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and Guidance for persons with disabilities in Thailand, since it began in 1997. A CIPP model was utilized for the program evaluation. Multiple methods were used to collect the data, and both retrospective and prospective data collection were undertaken. The research results indicated many positive outcomes. They also indicated certain features of rehabilitation within the Thai context differed significantly from traditional rehabilitation counseling programs in Western countries. Download in text-only format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01032005.pdf

Leprosy in South India
Leprosy in South India: The Paradox of Disablement as Enablement” by James Staples, Ph.D., School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Volume 1, Issue 4, 2005, starting on page 13. Abstract: Rooted in ethnographic fieldwork with people affected by leprosy in India, this article argues that certain impairments, in certain social contexts, are simultaneously disabling and enabling. This paradox poses difficult challenges, not only for those working with individuals affected with leprosy, but for disability activists
andpolicy-makers. Download in text-only format (3 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS01042005.pdf

Social and Economic Stress Related to HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Botswana
Social and Economic Stress Related to the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Botswana” by Thabo T. Fako, Ph.D. & Dolly Ntseane, Department of Sociology,University of Botswana & J. Gary Linn, Ph.D. & Lorna Kendrick, R.N., Ph.D. School of Nursing Tennessee State University, Volume 2, Issue 1, 2006, starting on p. 33. Abstract: The paper describes the consequences of HIV/AIDS in Botswana; the country with the highest HIV prevalence rate in Africa. In addition to frequently experienced trauma due to sickness and death, many households experience rising health expenditures and a sharp deterioration of incomes. High levels of morbidity and mortality among workers result in depressed returns on investment, reduced productivity and increased expenditure on training and replacement of workers. As the health care system finds it increasingly difficult to cope, home-based care provides an inadequate solution since the home infrastructure of many households is inadequate for proper care of seriously ill patients. The stigma associated with AIDS often isolates fragile households and provides an environment in which abuse of infected individuals and of orphans whose parents have died of AIDS is not uncommon. The quality of education also suffers, resulting in an ill prepared skilled manpower, with adverse consequences for social, economic, and political development as well as for good future governance of the country. Download in PDF format (3 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02012006.pdf or in Word format (800 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02012006.doc

Toward a Global History of Inclusive Travel
Toward a Global History of Inclusive Travel” by Laurel Van Horn, M.A., Open Doors Organization, USA; José Isola, President, Peruvian Polio Society, Peru, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting on page 5. Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the development of inclusive travel and tourism, from its origins in the United States and Europe following World War I and II to its current status as an increasingly important and viable movement worldwide. The paper investigates the key roles played by disability organizations, disability rights legislation, technological change, international organizations and pioneers within the travel and tourism industry. Developments are described sector by sector for air travel, ground transport, the cruise lines and the hospitality industry. While the primary historical focus is the U.S., the paper also highlights advances taking place in Dubai, Egypt, India, Japan, South Africa, Thailand and other countries. It concludes with a case study by José Isola of the development of inclusive travel in Peru. Mr. Isola also describes disability conferences that took place in South America in 2004. It is hoped others will begin to investigate the development of inclusive travel in their own countries and regions and contribute to a truly global history. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

Ethnobotany on a Roll!
Ethnobotany on a Roll! Access to Vietnam by My Lien T. Nguyen, Ph.D., Department of Botany, University of Hawai’i, at Mānoa, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting on page 36. Abstract: This article describes the research and experiences of an ethnobotanist with a physical disability working in Vietnam. Due to a spinal cord injury, the ethnobotanist uses a wheelchair and walking canes to explore the bustling food markets of Vietnam. Information and recommendations are provided for equipment and traveling to and in Vietnam, particularly for those interested in conducting scientific research and for travelers with physical disabilities. Success is largely due to the mutual respect and kindness shared by people along the way, and by accepting and accommodating to given situations. Appendices of resources for travel in Vietnam and educational granting sources for people with disabilities provided. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

The Benefits of Studying Abroad
Making an Impact: The Benefits of Studying Abroad” Michele Scheib, M.A., Project Initiatives Specialist, National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange, Volume 2, Issue 2, 2006, starting page 50. Abstract: Qualitative interviews with ten individuals with disabilities who participated in a study abroad program within the past eight years, compared equally to long-term outcomes cited in studies with the general study abroad alumni population. Students reported increased self-confidence, independence and career or educational gains related to their study abroad experiences. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS020206.pdf or in Word format (700 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS020206.doc

Esau’s Mission
Esau’s Mission, or Trauma as Propaganda: Disability after the Intifada” by Marcy Epstein, University of Michigan, Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting on page 12. Abstract: Israelis and Palestinians, while sharing an I/Abrahamic root, many chapters of Semitic history, and common values of resourcefulness and valor, both have defended their cultural boundaries through the exchange of mutilating, annihilative blows upon the other. The intifada (an Arabic word meaning to shake off or shiver because of illness, fear, or weakness) of the millennium signify a trope of body and status among the fragmented population in the region; specifically, the propagandizing of traumatic events that suggest victimization and invalidation. The discursive nature of “unnatural” catastrophe–devastation of Palestinian communities by Israeli Defense Forces, blitzing of Israeli civilians in planned attacks–substitutes the propaganda of trauma for the reality of disability experienced in both cultures. Reflecting the duality of rhetorical positions seen in I/Abraham’s disposition of both Isaac and Esau, this essay links the root of trauma propaganda to the ideology of religious fitness and righteousness. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

Natural Hazards
Natural Hazards, Human Vulnerability and Disabling Societies: A Disaster for Disabled People?” by Laura Hemingway & Mark Priestley, Centre for Disability Studies, University of Leeds (UK), Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting on page 57. Abstract: The policy and research literature on disaster management constructs disabled people as a particularly “vulnerable group.” In this paper we combine concepts from disaster theory and disability theory to examine this assumption critically. Drawing on primary, secondary and tertiary sources, we assess the vulnerability of disabled people in two globally significant disasters: Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 and the Asian tsunami of December 2004. In both cases, disabled people were adversely affected in terms of their physical safety and access to immediate aid, shelter, evacuation and relief. Using a social model analysis we contest the view that this vulnerability arises from the physical, sensory or cognitive limitations of the individual and show how it may be attributed to forms of disadvantage and exclusion that are socially created. The paper concludes that “natural hazards” are realized disproportionately as “human disasters” for disabled people, and most notably for disabled people in poor communities. Social model approaches and strong disabled people’s organisations are key to building greater resilience to disaster amongst “vulnerable” communities in both high-income and low-income countries. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

Politics and the Pandemic
Politics and the Pandemic: HIV/AIDS, Africa, and the Discourse of Disability” by Laura L. Behling, Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota, Volume 2, Issue 3, 2006, starting page 97. First Paragraph: In 2004, Africa News filed a report on then 12-year old William Msechu, a young African who lost both of his parents to AIDS in 1999. He, too, was HIV positive. Msechu is characterized as a “very bright boy,” although, the article reports, he is “yet to come to terms with his HIV status.” “I was told that I have tuberculosis and I am getting better,” the article quotes William as saying to journalists (“HIV-AIDS and STDs” 2004). William Msechu’s disbelief at having contracted HIV is unremarkable; persons diagnosed with severe diseases, including HIV/AIDS, often work through denial and incredulity.1 Just as unremarkable, however, is Msechu’s contention that he had not tested positive for HIV, but rather, had contracted tuberculosis, another widespread disease but not nearly as stigmatizing as HIV/AIDS. Substituting “tuberculosis” for “HIV” may be an affirming measure for Msechu, but it also provides one more example of the rhetorical slipperiness that historically, and still continues to accompany, the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Download in PDF format (1.4 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDS02032006.pdf or in Word format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDS02032006.doc

Seeing Through the Veil
Seeing Through the Veil: Auto-Ethnographic Reflections on Disabilities” by Heng-hao Chang PhD., Nanhua University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starting page 6. Abstract: This article is an auto-ethnography reflecting the interactions among society, my family and my brother who has Cerebral Palsy. The experiences of me and my family show the visible and invisible veils that segregate people with disabilities and their families from mainstream Taiwanese society.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

Building Familial Spaces
Building Familial Spaces for Transition and Work: From the Fantastic to the Normal” by Joakim Peter, MA, College of Micronesia—Federated States of Micronesia, Chuuk Campus, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starts page 14. Abstract: Transition for persons with disability is a process of negotiating difficult situations and barriers set by others and by systems. My strategies to overcome those barriers in my personal transitions through education systems and employment included the creations of familiar spaces in which group support plays a major role. This paper tracks my process through the familiar spaces and gives examples of encounters with barriers along my transition through hospital treatments to schools and then work.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

A Model for Learning from Children
Family Focused Learning: A Model for Learning from Children with Disabilities and Their Families via Technologies for Voice” by James R. Skouge, Kathy Ratliffe, Martha Guinan, & Marie Iding University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, Volume 2, Issue 4, 2006, starting page 63 Abstract: In this paper, we describe a collaborative multidisciplinary model for faculty and students learning about culture and children with disabilities and their families in Pacific Island contexts. The model, Family Focused Learning, incorporates aspects of case-based and problem-based learning within the context of “consumer” and “professional” partnerships (Ratliffe, Stodden, & Robinson, 2000; Robinson, 1999).Children with disabilities and their families share the daily challenges and successes of their lives with graduate students and faculty at the University of Hawai‘i, via video letters, video mapping, cultural brokering and satellite videoconferencing. To illustrate this process, we present the story of “Tomasi,” a child with cerebral palsy in American Samoa, a US territory. Tomasi and his family are “given voice” and act as teachers for an interdisciplinary team of faculty and students from public health, social work, physical therapy, speech pathology, nursing, special education, nutrition, medicine, political science and law.” Download in PDF format (1 Mb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv02iss04.pdf or in Word format (630 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv02iss04.doc

Social Change and the Disability Rights Movement
Social Change and the Disability Rights Movement in Taiwan 1981-2002” by Chang, Heng-hao. Ph.D., Department of Sociology, Nanhua University of Chia-Yi, Volume 3, Issues 1 & 2, 2007, starting on page 3. Abstract: This paper provides a historical overview of the disability rights movement in Taiwan from 1981 to 2002. It shows the major events in Taiwanese disability history, legislation, and development of disability rights organizations, with a focus on two influential advocacy associations: the Parents’ Association for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities (PAPID) and the League of Enabling Associations (LEAs). It also demonstrates that the disability movement has developed in concert with Taiwan’s democratic transition.” Download in PDF format (780 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss01.pdf or in Word format (770 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss01.doc

Disability and Youth Suicide
Disability and Youth Suicide: A Focus Group Study of Disabled University Students” by Esra Burcu, Ph.D., Hacettepe University, Department of Sociology, Volume 3, Issues 1 & 2, 2007, starting page 33. Abstract: For young people thoughts of suicide are based on various social factors. The research literature in this area reveals that there are two important interrelated factors that correlate with suicide rates: being young and being disabled. This study was undertaken in order to explore possible reasons for this increased tendency for young disabled people to commit suicide. The study was carried out at a university in Turkey with a group of disabled students. All the members of the focus group had thoughts of suicide and felt that their disability played an important role in creating these thoughts. The basic premise of the research was that physical disability increases the young person’s isolation and social loneliness and this can generate ideas of suicide in the young person’s mind that may be acted upon.” Download in PDF format (780 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss01.pdf or in Word format (770 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss01.doc

Impact of the South Asian Earthquake
Impact of the South Asian Earthquake on Disabled People in the State of Jammu and Kashmir” by Parvinder Singh, Ph.D. Candidate, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Volume 3, Issue 3, starting page 36. Abstract: On the morning of October 8, 2005, a devastating earthquake, measuring 7.6 on the Richter scale, struck the Kashmir region with its epicentre near Muzzafarabad in Pakistan-administrated Kashmir. It took a while for both India and Pakistan to comprehend the scale of destruction that the quake had unleashed. In the two weeks following, the quake had left over 50,000 dead on the Pakistani side of the India-Pakistan border and claimed 1,300 lives on the Indian side. A second wave of deaths was expected with the onset of the region’s notorious winter. Download in PDF format (600 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss03.pdf or in Word format (380 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss03.doc. Or, this article has also been published at We Can Do with permission of the author and RDS.

The Scale of Attitudes Toward Disabled Persons
The Scale of Attitudes Towards Disabled Persons (SADP): Cross-cultural Validation in a Middle Income Arab Country, Jordan” by Kozue Kay Nagata, Senior Economic Affairs Officer of the Development Cooperation Branch, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Volume 3, Issue 4, 2007, starting page 4. Abstract: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the level of the existing attitudinal barriers towards disabled persons in four communities of Jordan. Jordan is a middle income Arab country, with a PPP-adjusted GDP/capita of US$ 4320. The study attempted to determine the present level as a baseline of prejudice against people with a disability in Jordan, and to examine the relationship between the randomly selected participants’ attitudes and their previous exposure to and experience with disability. The Scale of Attitudes towards Disabled Persons (SADP) was selected as the instrument. An Arabic translated version of the Scale was used for 191 participants. The respondents showed overall negative attitudes towards disabled persons, as illustrated by previous documented materials. The result of this survey was highly correlated with the collective opinion expressed by the focus group that was conducted by the author in Amman in January, 2005. Thus, the cross-cultural validity of this instrument has been confirmed, and the major findings of this pilot study could inform future policy directions and public awareness raising strategies to foster positive public attitudes. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

Barriers to Education
Barriers to Education for People with Disabilities in Bekaa, Lebanon” by Samantha Wehbi, MSW, Ph.D., School of Social Work, Ryerson University, Volume 3, Issue 4, starting page 10. Abstract: This paper presents the findings of a recent study on the educational situation of people with disabilities in Lebanon. The main findings of a survey conducted with 200 participants in the impoverished rural Bekaa region illustrate the inadequate educational situation of people with disabilities. The focus of the paper is on a discussion of the barriers that people with disabilities face in pursuing their education. Participants identified the following difficulties in pursuing their education: educational system barriers, inadequate finances, health issues, transportation difficulties, and family pressures. Although the focus of the article is not on factors that can facilitate educational achievement, some of these supports are identified, including family support and personal motivation. The article concludes with a discussion of current and planned community responses such as the development of an interdisciplinary community action network (The Inclusion Network), the provision of literacy courses, and a pilot project to foster the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream schools. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

Jordan and Disability Rights
Jordan and Disability Rights: A Pioneering Leader in the Arab World” by Kenneth R. Rutherford, PhD, MBA, Missouri State University, Volume 3, Issue 4, 2007, starting page 23. Abstract: This article investigates Jordan’s rationale for assuming a leadership role on the disability rights issue in the Arab World. Tens of millions of people, including over ten percent of Arab families, are impacted and impoverished because of disability. To address this substantial challenge, the Jordan Royal family has leveraged Jordan’s tradition of openness and generosity coupled with one of the best educational systems in the Arab World to promote disability issues. As a result, Jordan is recognized by the international community as leading the Arab World in promoting disability rights. Jordan’s international and regional leadership on disability rights was recognized in 2005 when Jordan received the Franklin Delano Roosevelt International Disability Award. Download in PDF format (530 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/pdf/RDSv03iss04.pdf or in Word format (410 Kb) at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/issues/doc/RDSv03iss04.doc

You can browse and download past issues of the Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/downloads/.

Or you can learn more about the RDS at http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/about/.

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