RESOURCES: Making Sanitation and Water Accessible for Disabled People

Posted on 11 June 2008. Filed under: Mobility Impariments, Reports, Resources, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The World Bank tells us that 2.6 billion of the world’s population do not have access to basic sanitation and hygiene. In rural areas, that means people may defecate in open fields. In cities, they may defecate into plastic bags and throw them into street. The result? Disease and sometimes death. But access to sanitation isn’t only a health issue. It is also an education issue. When girls don’t have a sanitary, private place to take care of their needs during menustration they skip school.

The World Bank also tells us that a billion of the world’s population lack access to a clean source of water. This is again both a health issue and an education issue. Dirty water makes people sick. And children who must spend upwards of two hours a day simply fetching water from the nearest water source may have no time left to attend school or study.

Data on sanitation and water access for people with disabilities is hard to find. But the little literature I have seen on the topic suggests that their needs are often left out when projects strive to bring either to a new village or neighborhood. This means they are left more vulnerable to disease than their neighbors. This situation also unequally deprives disabled people of their right to dignity.

So what can be done?

No single answer will suit all cases. First of all, the facilities themselves vary widely: a toilet, for example, might be a Western-style seat in some countries but an Asian-style porcelain bowl in the ground in other countries. Second of all, a person who walks on crutches due to the after-effects of polio may have different needs than a person who walks without aid but who cannot bend easily. Both of these individuals may have different needs still from the person who uses a wheelchair due to spinal cord injury, whose needs will also differ from those of another wheelchair rider who has cerebral palsy. Creativity and resourcefulness will always need to be key components of any plan to make water and sanitation services accessible for all.

The Water, Engingeering, and Development Center at Loughborough University has gathered a list of links to articles and resources related to water and sanitation access for disabled people. Here, you can find a briefing note on why the East African water and sanitation sector needs to consider the needs of disabled people. Or scroll further down their web page to find links to reports about water and sanitation projects for people with disabilities in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Uganda, and elsewhere.

Start exploring at:

http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk/projects/new_projects3.php?id=60

Author Mahesh Chandrasekar in India has also written an article based on his own experience in making sanitation more accessible for himself, entitled “Water and Sanitation for All,” available at http://www.geocities.com/mahesh_mobility/water_sanitation.htm

People interested in on-going discussion about the topics of disability, water, and sanitation may be interested in joining the Disability, Water, and Sanitation listserv. More information is available on the listserv at http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DWS.html. You will note from a quick glance at the archives that discussion on this list seems to be somewhat slow and sporadic. But many lists do revive once new members join them, so it may be worth a try.

Another We Can Do post related to water and sanitation includes one about a handbook on how to make water ans sanitation accessible to disabled people, also from the Water, Engineering, and Development Centre of Loughborough University.



I learned about the literature at the Water, Engineering, and Development Centre of Loughborough University after browsing some links from the World Bank web page on rural development and disability. I learned about Mahesh Chandrasekar’s article through email correspondence with the author. We Can Do readers might be interested in browsing some of Mahesh Candrasekar’s other articles on disability and human rights; disability and discrimination; universal access/barrier free environment; disability and development; and access to education.

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3 Responses to “RESOURCES: Making Sanitation and Water Accessible for Disabled People”

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Dear All
The water and sanitation leads for poor hygiene and health hazards. The poverty with these hygiene and health issues results for the disability. So, this clearly reflects that access for good water and sanitation may work in two ways as: one to prevent the disability and the second to work for the empowerment of the people with special needs.

Though at present there exists little information, it is necessary to link the component of water and sanitation with disability as poverty, disability and development works as cause and consequence one to another.

I am working in this direction as in most of the rural villages, the access for water and sanitation either out of poverty or real situation forces them into health issues and thus possibility of having disability. I am interested to share on this issue and request the readers to contribute for the benefit of the people living in the rural villages in general and particularly developing countries.

Looking forward for better networking in reaching the needy people with matching solution suiting to their challenges, skills, needs and living circumstances.

N LAKSHMI NARAYANA
Director, GEO REHAB CENTRE.

Access for the water by the Persons with Disabilities is the most needy and the situation is alarming.

It is the fact that water controls everything on this world. Like, Poverty, Disability and Development are the cause & consequence of each other, the WATER can be added which is the cause and consequence of all the three factors mentioned above.

There is need to work in this direction as the situation is alarming in general and particularly in the rural / coastal villages.

Looking forward for better networking and thus to reach the needy with better solution.

with thanks

Hi all
I just found your blog which refers to our work at WEDC – happy to see the issues being taken up. One thing – our website has been rebuilt, so your hyperlinks no longer work.
WEDC website: http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk
link to the Resource book: http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk/wsdp
link to project webpage: http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk/research/project.html?p=12


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