RESOURCE: Handbook for Making Water and Sanitation Accessible to Disabled People

Posted on 26 January 2008. Filed under: Health, Inclusion, Mobility Impariments, Poverty, Resources, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A book is available that can help water specialists, disabled advocates, and family members learn how to make water supply and sanitation services more accessible for people with disabilities and other vulnerable populations.

According to the World Bank, more than one billion poor people lack access to clean drinking water, and more than two billion people lack access to clean sanitation facilities such as toilets. Dirty water and lack of a clean place to defecate can make poor people sick. And sick people may die more easily, or become even poorer than they were before.

People with disabilities, particularly mobility impairments, may face even more barriers in accessing clean water or sanitation. Water pumps might be poorly designed for people who have difficulty using one or both hands, or toilets may not be appropriately designed for people who have difficulty squatting. Many other individuals who are not ordinarly thought of as “disabled” may also face similar barriers, including frail elderly people; pregnant women; people carrying or taking care of babies and young children; and other individuals.

The book, Water and Sanitation for Disabled People and Other Vulnerable Groups, was written particularly for planners and service providers in the water supply and sanitation sector. Disabled people’s organizations, and service organizations targeted at disabled people and their familieis, may also find some of the information useful to their work. It provides practical information, ideas, and guidance about how to meet the needs of people in “real communities”–meaning, places where people “come with a wide range of shapes, sizes, abilities, and needs.”

This book is written so that users can skip over the chapters they don’t need and focus on the chapters they want. The first, introductory chapter may be useful for all readers. The second chapter answers the question, “Why should the water and sanitation sector consider disabled people”: it is written primarily for people who have little contact with disability issues but might also be helpful for some advocates. For example, the pictures on page 10 could be useful in educating others about the multiple types of barriers that disabled people face in society–not only in water and sanitation.

Chapter 3 helps explain the water and sanitation sector to disabled people, disability service providers, and advocates. Chapter 4 helps explain disability issues to water and sanitation professionals, engineers, public health workers, and community development workers.

Chapters 5, 6, and 7 provide practical ideas for how to make physical facilities more inclusive: these can be useful both for professionals and also for disabled people and their families.

Chapter 8 offers ideas for planning and implementing services with disabled people in mind. Section 8.2 is particularly meant for water and sanitation service providers, while section 8.3 is mainly meant for the disability sector.

Chapter 9 presents case studies that illustrate how disabled people and their families have benefitted from improved access to water and sanitation facilities. Case studies are shared from Bangladesh, Cambodia, Uganda, and Tibet.

The appendices point readers to further resources that can help them learn more about either water and sanitation issues or disability issues.

A print version of the book can be purchased from the Water, Engingeering, and Development Centre (WEDC) of Loughborough University; or a PDF version can be downloaded for free. For more information about the book and how to obtain it, go to

http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk/publications/details.php?book=1%2084380%20079%209.

People with visual impairments should note that, in order to download the PDF file, you would need to enter a visual image “captcha.” I did not see any clear instructions for alternate means for people with visual impairments to download the file. (If they exist and I missed them, please alert me in the comments area below.) You can contact WEDC by email to either share your concerns/feedback or to request assistance at: WEDC@lboro.ac.uk. I would be interested in knowing about the experiences of anyone with a visual impairment who tries to obtain this (or any other) book from WEDC.

When I downloaded my own copy, I left a comment encouraging WEDC to offer auditory captcha in addition to visual captcha and to also give people the means of contacting them to ask for assistance in downloading or receiving PDF files. I haven’t heard back from them yet. If I do, I’ll try to remember to come back here and share what they say.



We Can Do learned about this resource by browsing the Siyanda on-line database of gender and development materials. Try entering key words such as “disabilities” into the Siyanda search engine.



Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Advertisements

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

2 Responses to “RESOURCE: Handbook for Making Water and Sanitation Accessible to Disabled People”

RSS Feed for We Can Do Comments RSS Feed

Some people overdo it and treat the professor as their personal assistant and that is unacceptable. ,

Hi
I’m one of the authors of the book, and have just seen this page. Firstly a quick amendment to the URL for the book, as our site has been re-structured:
http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk/wsdp
The email address is still valid.

Secondly I’ve just noted your comment about auditory captcha which I’ll follow up with our tech people. It may have been while the site was in the process of being re-built and the comment may have got lost.


Where's The Comment Form?

    About

    Ending poverty among and oppression toward disabled people in developing countries.

    RSS

    Subscribe Via RSS

    • Subscribe with Bloglines
    • Add your feed to Newsburst from CNET News.com
    • Subscribe in Google Reader
    • Add to My Yahoo!
    • Subscribe in NewsGator Online
    • The latest comments to all posts in RSS

    Meta

  • Help the U.S. Ratify the Disability Treaty!

    Image of an hour glass overlaid on image of the Capitol building in DC. Text says, "Time is running out! Now is the time for the Senate to Act! Ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities! www.disabilitytreaty.org #CRPD

    Learn why the CRPD matters and how to take action at www.disabilitytreaty.org!

  • Subscribe!

  • Bookmark and Share
  • Translate!

  • Connect to Andrea Shettle via Linked In

  • Archives

  • Topic Categories

  • Make WeCanDo Your “Favorite”

  • Stumble Upon It!

    Stumble It! Share this blog with other readers via "Stumble Upon"!
  • Follow We Can Do in Facebook!

  • We Can Do is in the GDRL!

  • Blog Stats

    • 709,543 hits
  • Map of Visitors

    Map
  • Meta

  • Facebook Networked Blogs

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: