Join the Thunder for the “Disability Treaty” (CRPD)!

Posted on 6 June 2014. Filed under: Announcements, CRPD, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[This was first posted two days ago at my other blog, Rambling Justice.]

Help bring attention to the “Disability Treaty” (Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, CRPD)!  We need the U.S. to ratify this important international human rights treaty protecting the civil rights of 1 billion people with disabilities worldwide. Sign up your Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr account NOW to join the next “Thunder Clap It” for the CRPD at http://thndr.it/1ky8p97 !

What’s A “Thunder Clap It”?

A “Thunder Clap It” is when 100 or more people sign on their Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr account to all send out the same message at the same time to all their followers.  To participate, you need to sign up in advance.  The next CRPD “Thunder Clap It” will be at 2pm EST on June 10, 2014 (1pm Central Time, 11am Pacific Time).  Sign up BEFORE this time or you will miss the Thunder Clap.

How Do I Sign Up?

  • Go to this link: http://thndr.it/1ky8p97
  • A message will ask you to share a message to support the #CRPD.
  • You will find three buttons—one each for Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr.  You need to have an account in at least one of these three in order to participate.
  • Click on whichever button is appropriate.  You will have an opportunity to personalize your message to your followers.
  • Hit the “Add My Support” button.
  • If you have successfully signed up, then you should appear at the top of the list of “Recent Supporters” in the right hand side bar.  Refresh the page if needed.

What Else?

Learn more about the CRPD and other ways to help at http://disabilitytreaty.org.  Sign up for the CRPD “action alert” mailing list at the link!  Ask your friends to do the same!

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

International Day of Mourning and Remembrance: Institutionalized Lives of People with Disabilities–Forgotten Lives and the Ones Who Fight Back

Posted on 23 January 2012. Filed under: Announcements, Cognitive Impairments, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opinion, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Blogger Dave Hingsburger is trying to make today, January 23, the first of what he wants to be an annual event in which we remember together people with disabilities who have lived in institutions and, in some cases, died in them.  Another blogger, Amanda Baggs, has also written extensively about her own experiences inside places that others label as “institutions”–and also some places that weren’t labeled “institutions” but were just as bad: I encourage readers to read today’s post at her blog, “What Makes Institutions Bad.”   Today, in Dave’s proposal, is meant to be a day to remember the people that we were meant to forget: people placed in institutions, not to help them, but to isolate them from so-called “normal” people.  And, it is meant to remember people who have been “put away” supposedly for “their own good,” people who others think “cannot live in the community” as if being human were not enough to qualify one to live among other humans.  It is meant to mourn the lives that people with disabilities could have led if they had been allowed to live in their own homes and allowed choice and self autonomy.  It is important to emphasize that the day is meant not only to consider people institutionalized years ago, in a time we think we can safely forget because we assume it belongs only in the past.   It is also meant to consider the millions of people worldwide, in both developing and also developed countries, who continue to be institutionalized today due to no crime other than being different, being someone who others has labeled as “disabled.”

Dave also means this day as a day to celebrate people with disabilities who have fought back against the mentality that strives to push them to the margins of society, making it easier to institutionalize them.  In this context, Dave Hingsburger mentions a woman named Sandra Jensen who fought literally for her life when she was initially denied a heart transplant simply because she had Down Syndrome.  Sandra, already a disability rights advocate, fought back and won her transplant in 1996–and also won change in organ transplant policies in Canada.  In addition to individuals Sandra Jensen, I can also think of certain organizations that work hard to promote de-institutionalization and other closely related causes:  Disability Rights International (DRI), ADAPT, MindFreedom International, World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (WNUSP), various chapters of People First worldwide, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and others.   I have probably missed many other organizations that are also devoted to ending institutionalization: feel free to mention them in the comments area below.

If these organizations don’t choose to carry forth Dave’s proposal, or if these international and national bodies like the concept but choose a different date or take the idea in a different direction, then Dave’s International Day might well still catch on at some local organizations scattered throughout Canada, US, the UK, and Australia.  Dave, after all, has been in the field of intellectual disability and disability rights for more than 30 years: he has delivered hundreds (possibly thousands) of lectures around the world, his blog reaches thousands more readers every month, and some of his many books are required reading in some training programs for future service providers who will be working with people with disabilities.  Dave is certainly not without some clout and influence all on his own.   But without the support of large and highly visible organizations, his concept could remain a relatively obscure event known only in certain circles in certain cities in, predominantly, English speaking developed countries.  It will spread only slowly, if at all, to non-English speaking countries or to developing countries.

Also critical to the success of this event in the future is the International Disability Alliance (IDA) and its member organizations.  IDA, as many of We Can Do’s more regular readers probably already know, is a major umbrella organization for various international disability organizations that include WNUSP (listed above), the Disabled Peoples’ International (an organization run by people with various disabilities, with national assembly members in more than 100 countries), Inclusion International (representing people with intellectual disabilities and their loved ones), World Federation of the Deaf, World Blind Union, and others.  Each of IDA’s member organizations themselves have many more member organizations in dozens of countries around the world, and many of these in turn have member organizations at the local level in their countries.  If some of these organizations adopt Dave’s idea, then many more organizations around the world would surely also pick it up as well–whether their local language is English, Spanish, French, or something else, whether in developed countries or in developing countries.

Is this day an event that should catch on more widely?  I hesitate to issue a firm position on this issue.  I do feel that it is worthwhile to have some kind of event that could prompt us, not only to mourn people who would otherwise be forgotten, and to celebrate people who have promoted the cause of freedom, but also to take some action that could help set free the many people who are still institutionalized against their will today.  For this reason I do like Dave’s general concept and feel it is worthwhile putting it in front of the readers of We Can Do for their consideration.  But I also feel that the issue of how to frame such an event, how to promote it, what activities should be done to acknowledge it, and what date it should be held on, should ultimately be determined by people who have themselves experienced institutionalization, or been threatened with the possibility.  People with intellectual disabilities who are confined because they learn more slowly than others.  People with psychosocial disabilities and people on the autistic spectrum who are confined because others view their behaviors as “bewildering” and would rather not have to see them at all than try to understand.  People with mobility impairments, and people who are acquiring a range of conditions related to old age, who are institutionalized because government legislation, budgeting policies, and the medical profession make it easier to place them in nursing homes than to get support to continue living at home.  People who are deaf, or blind, who may be mistaken for having other disabilities, or who others may assume are incapable of learning or being independent because they cannot hear or see.  Organizations such as People First, WNUSP, MindFreedom, ASAN, ADAPT, and other international and national organizations run by people who themselves are most commonly targeted for being institutionalized come to mind.  I think this is a choice that needs the involvement of many advocates and leaders around the world, not just one man–even a powerful leader like Dave Hingsburger.  And not just one woman either, including me as the author of this blog site.

For now, readers may want to read a few blog posts that Dave wrote about what today’s date means to him and why he feels it is important to have an International Day of Mourning and Remembrance:

January 23: International Day of Mourning and Memory in which Dave first sets forth his proposal.  Note that he seems open to revising the concept, or at least the name, for future years.

Cousin Mattie: The International Day of Mourning and Memory — Dave’s post from today, January 23, honoring the day itself.

She Never Knew: The Interviews — in which Dave presents an interview he conducted with a woman who performed a song that Dave feels fits in well with the spirit of the International Day.

I also encourage readers to consider taking a few moments–or a few hours, or days–to learn more about the reality of institutionalization today and what is being done to end it.  A few of the links from above are good resources.   Disability Rights International (DRI) has a huge collection of reports and videos documenting institutionalized abuses from around the world, from Ukraine to Mexico to the United States to Romania to Paraguay and elsewhere.  Many People First organizations fight against the institutionalization of people with intellectual disabilities.  The Global Disability Rights Library has content and links related to institutionalization of people with disabilities–particularly try the information portal of the same name (Global Disability Rights Library) and check under specific disabilities for psychosocial disabilities and intellectual disabilities.  Also in the same information portal, check the section on Independent Living for some of the solutions that allow people with mobility impairments and a range of other disabilities live freely in the community instead of in nursing homes (the link goes to GDRL’s primary page on independent living, but don’t miss the sub-sections under this page with more resources).  And check out some of the personal stories on MindFreedom’s website.

A blog post on institutionalization from me would be incomplete without also mentioning another blogger besides Dave Hingsburger who has taught me a great deal about what it really means to be institutionalized:  Amanda Baggs.  Amanda has herself been institutionalized: although most of her experience in places others would recognize as institutions was in the 1990s, she still knows people who have been institutionalized much more recently than that.  And she has had experiences in places that, although technically are not institutions, can be harmful in ways she feels is very similar.  Amanda’s entire blog is very well worth reading: I regularly encourage people interested in disability rights to read her blog front to back, or back to front, or inside out, or outside in, or sideways or upside down or right side up or any way at all as long as they read it, throughly and often.  Both Amanda and Dave are in developed countries (the United States and Canada, respectively) and I suspect most of their contacts and most of what they have learned about disability rights is also somewhat oriented to developed countries as well.  But many of the concepts that both of them wrestle with day in and day out on their blog sites and elsewhere, much of the philosophy they espouse, the values they uphold, and their insightful analysis of how even very lovely, good, kind people can still do terrible things are not bound to any one country.  I suspect that disability rights advocates from any country, whether developed or developing, will find ideas of value both in Dave’s blog and in Amanda’s blog.

Here are a few of Amanda’s blog posts that have helped teach me about what it is actually like to be inside an institution, or in an environment that is harmful in similar ways:

What Makes Institutions Bad (today’s post)

Outposts in Our Heads

Everything I Need to Know in Life I learned in Institutions

Identical Behavior, Constrasting Responses

What it Means to Be Real  (These events were at a day program, not technically at an institution. But apparently much of the way people in the program is treated is similar)

Being an Unperson (Not specifically about institutionalization, but the process of dehumanization described in this video does occur in many institutions)

And one more from Dave, from the perspective of a person who once worked in institutions early in his career:

Patty  — In this video (deaf and hard of hearing people can read the full transcript below the video) Dave describes an incident in which he reached out to Patty, a woman in the institution where he worked, and the reactions of his co-workers.

At least one more blogger has also blogged about this day: International Day of Mourning and Memory at Lounalune.  And one individual, Kristine Snider, sent Dave a video in honor of the day.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 7 so far )

Disability Rights Fund Announces Letter of Interest Process for Bangladesh, Peru, and Uganda (English y Español)

Posted on 5 May 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Funding, Human Rights, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

| English | Español|

Disability Rights Fund Announces Letter of Interest Process for Bangladesh, Peru, and Uganda

May 5, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                      

BOSTON, MA – The Disability Rights Fund (DRF) is announcing a new letter on interest process for Disabled Persons’ Organizations (DPOs) in Bangladesh, Peru and Uganda. 

DRF is a grantmaking collaborative between donors and the global disability community which supports the human rights of persons with disabilities. Officially launched in March 2008, DRF empowers DPOs in the developing world and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union to participate in ratification, implementation and monitoring of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD). DPOs in Bangladesh, Peru and Uganda have received DRF support since 2008.

Now, instead of preparing full proposals as a first step, DPOs from Bangladesh, Peru and Uganda may submit a letter of interest as a first step to determine if their project fits DRF eligibility criteria. DPOs may apply as single organizations or partnerships to build skills and develop rights-based advocacy and monitoring on the CRPD. The activities should take place during a 12-month period beginning in January 2012. Grant awards range from USD 5,000 to 20,000.

Interested organizations are urged to review the eligibility criteria and letter of interest details posted at the Fund’s website, http://www.disabilityrightsfund.org/grant. The letter of interest process helps determine fit with DRF criteria and priorities before applicants expend time and resources to put together a full proposal. If eligible, applicants will be requested to submit a full proposal.  

Any questions on the letter of interest process should be directed to info@disabilityrightsfund.org. The deadline for receipt of Letters of Interest is June 15, 2011.

In expanding the LoI process, Director Diana Samarasan said, “DRF aims to make our application process as accessible as possible, to ensure that a diversity of organizations of persons with disabilities can and do apply.” To date, the Fund has given out $5 million to organizations in 17 countries (Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Ukraine, Ecuador, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Ghana, Namibia, Uganda, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu). Grants have ranged from USD 5,000 to 100,000 and support CRPD skills-building, local rights advocacy, and national-level CRPD promotion, implementation and monitoring by DPO-led coalitions.

DRF’s donors include the American Jewish World Service, the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID), the Leir Foundation, the Open Society Institute, The Sigrid Rausing Trust, and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID).

####

 Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad anuncia proceso de formulario pre-solicitud para Bangladés, Perú y Uganda

5 de mayo de 2011

PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA

BOSTON, MA – El Fondo por los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (DRF) anuncia un nuevo proceso de formulario pre-solicitud para organizaciones de personas con discapacidad (OPD) en Bangladés, Perú y Uganda.

El DRF es una iniciativa de colaboración financiera entre donantes y la comunidad mundial de personas con discapacidad que apoya los derechos humanos de estas personas. Iniciado oficialmente en marzo de 2008, el DRF fortalece a las OPD del mundo en desarrollo y de Europa Oriental / antigua Unión Soviética a fin de que participen en la ratificación, aplicación y seguimiento de la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad (CDPD). OPD en Bangladés, Perú y Uganda han recibido apoyo del DRF desde 2008.

Ahora, en lugar de preparar solicitudes completas al principio, OPD de Bangladés, Perú y Uganda pueden enviar un formulario pre-solicitud como primer paso para determinar si su proyecto es compatible con los criterios de elegibilidad del DRF. Las OPD pueden presentar una solicitud como organizaciones que trabajan independientemente o en alianza con otras para desarrollar habilidades, promoción, defensa y seguimiento en torno a la CDPD basándose en los derechos de las personas con discapacidad. Las actividades deberán llevarse a cabo durante un periodo de 12 meses a partir de enero de 2012. Los subsidios oscilan entre USD 5,000 y 20,000.

Se recomienda a las organizaciones interesadas leer los criterios de elegibilidad y detalles del formulario pre-solicitud que se encuentran en esta página del DRF: www.disabilityrightsfund.org/es/otorgamiento. El proceso de formulario pre-solicitud ayuda a determinar si un proyecto es compatible con los criterios y prioridades del DRF antes de que las organizaciones inviertan tiempo y recursos en preparar una solicitud completa. De ser elegibles, se pedirá a las organizaciones que presenten una propuesta completa.

Cualquier pregunta relacionada con el proceso de formulario pre-solicitud debe dirigirse a info@disabilityrightsfund.org. La fecha límite para enviar formularios pre-solicitud es el 15 de junio de 2011.

Al amplia el proceso de formulario pre-solicitud, dijo Diana Samarasan, directora del Fondo, “el DRF procura hacer nuestro proceso de solicitud lo más accesible que sea posible, para asegurar que diversas organizaciones de personas con discapacidad puedan solicitar fondos y lo hagan”.

Hasta la fecha, el DRF ha otorgado un total de USD 5 millones a organizaciones en 17 países (Bangladés, Ecuador, Estados Federados de Micronesia, Fiyi, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Islas Salomón, México, Namibia, Nicaragua, Papúa Nueva Guinea, Perú, Tuvalu, Ucrania, Uganda y Vanuatu). Los subsidios, entre USD 5,000 y 100,000, se han destinado al desarrollo de habilidades de las OPD para abordar la CDPD y defender los derechos de las personas con discapacidad a nivel local; también fueron otorgados a coaliciones lideradas por OPD para la promoción, aplicación y seguimiento de la CDPD a nivel nacional.

Entre los donantes del DRF están la Agencia Australiana para el Desarrollo Internacional (AusAID), el Departamento para el Desarrollo Internacional (DFID) del Reino Unido, el Fondo Sigrid Rausing, la Fundación Leir, el Instituto de la Sociedad Abierta y el Servicio Judío Americano Mundial (AJWS).

####

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Master of Arts Degree in International Development with Persons with Disabilities

Posted on 9 February 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

I graduated from the following program in 2009. I feel it can provide a good background in the field for people who want to work with people with disabilities in developing countries to support them in their struggle for human rights and to escape poverty. The most valuable course for me personally was a course in project design that helped me gain more confidence in my ability to evolve a clearly focused project idea and develop it into a cohesive plan of action.

Master of Arts Degree in International Development with Persons with Disabilities

Do you want to work with persons with disabilities in developing countries in ending the discrimination, stigmatization and exclusion they endure in violation of their guaranteed human rights? Imagine yourself becoming the expert to implement policies and practices inclusive of people with disabilities within federal agencies, international organizations and non-governmental organizations and in their overseas development assistance programs?

The Master of Arts degree in International Development at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC focuses on advocating for and with persons with disabilities. The program’s coursework is taught through a transformative lens where political, social and development issues become a means through which ID graduates study topics, such as, the latest global trends and issues concerning disability and development, gender, models of disability, the micropolitics of development, the design of sustainable and effective development projects and programs, and economic development. Your two years of coursework includes a practicum placement at one of several Washington, DC agencies, as well as an internship overseas using the skills you will learn through your coursework at Gallaudet and the international experiences you will be exposed to in our nation’s capitol.

For more information, please go to our website: http://edf.gallaudet.edu and/or write to amy.wilson@gallaudet.edu

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 3 so far )

Disabled women activists change the world through YouTube music video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)

Posted on 6 January 2011. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Capacity Building and Leadership, Cross-Disability, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, News, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mobility International USA
Website: www.miusa.org

Disabled women activists change the world through YouTube music video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)

January 6, 2011 – Signing and singing with passion in Arabic, Spanish and English, 54 disabled women activists from 43 countries celebrate the achievements, pride and solidarity of women with disabilities around the world. These leaders are revolutionizing the status of women and girls worldwide. Filmed during MIUSA’s 5th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD), the Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)  music video release marks the beginning of MIUSA’s 30th Anniversary year-long celebration.

Please share the YouTube link to Music Video: Loud, Proud and Passionate!(SM)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxxomUVsSik

Our goal is to reach 2,500 views and to raise funds through donations for the next WILD program empowering women and girls with disabilities. Every donation large or small brings us closer to that goal! To donate, visit http://www.miusa.org/donate/wild.

WILD delegates in the video come from Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Bangladesh, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria, Palestinian Territories, Peru, Philippines, South Africa, Sri Lanka, St. Lucia, Syria, Turkey, Uganda, United States of America, Vietnam, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The video is captioned. For the text video description in English click here.

Mobility International USA (MIUSA) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to empower people with disabilities around the world to achieve their human rights through international exchange and international development. For more information visit www.miusa.org.

###

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 3 so far )

JOB POST: Spanish-speaking Grants Consultant, Disability Rights Fund, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Posted on 23 January 2010. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Jobs & Internships, Latin America & Caribbean, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Disability Rights Fund seeks Spanish-Speaking Grants Consultant

Application Deadline: February 15, 2010

About the consultancy

This consultancy position offers a unique opportunity to collaborate with a groundbreaking grantmaking initiative supporting the rights of persons with disabilities. For an interim period (mid-April – mid-September 2010), on a part-time basis, the Grants Consultant will help the Fund manage relationships with its grantees in Latin America. The main objectives of the position are to support DRF staff with grantee communications and oversight and to review and evaluate Spanish-language grant applications. The Fund is looking for a candidate who is able to work in a fast-paced environment, is flexible, takes initiative, and is independent, but team-oriented.

Astrong>About the Disability Rights Fund
Launched in January of 2008 as a project of the Tides Center, the Disability Rights Fund is a grantmaking collaborative aimed at building community capacity to achieve the rights of all persons with disabilities. The Fund makes modest grants (USD $5000-70,000) to Disabled Persons’ Organizations in the Global South and in Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union for advancing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) at country-level.

About the DRF Grants Process
In 2010, the Fund will launch its second year of grantmaking to organizations in Mexico and its third year of grantmaking to organizations in Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru (as well as in 20 other countries around the world; in Africa, Ghana, Namibia and Uganda; in Asia, Bangladesh and India; and 14 Pacific Island Countries). A request for proposals for Mexico will be posted February 15; the deadline for applications is in April. A request for proposals for Ecuador, Nicaragua and Peru will be posted July 8; the deadline for applications is in late August. Grant applications are evaluated in a staged process, with the consultant and DRF staff completing a first and second review and preparing dockets for a third review by the DRF Steering Committee.

Current grantees from Ecuador, Nicaragua, and Peru (who began projects January 1 2010) will be submitting grant mid-term reports in end June 2010. The consultant will aid DRF staff in review of these reports and communications with grantees about their project implementation. The consultant will also aid in communication with current grantees from Mexico (who began projects September 1, 2009).

Consultant Responsibilities

· Interface with DRF staff and current LAC grantees to ensure that projects are progressing smoothly.
· Support DRF staff in LAC grantee mid-term report review and communications with grantees about reports.
· Conduct grants review, evaluation and tracking process for LAC applicants, in conjunction with DRF staff.
· Serve as liaison between DRF and Spanish-speaking prospective grantees to help translate emails, answer questions, complete application paperwork, and build relationships.

Skills and qualifications

The ideal candidate should demonstrate:
· Grantmaking or grantseeking experience preferred
· Professional written and verbal translation skills Spanish to English and English to Spanish
· Strong administrative and organizational skills; the ability to manage time efficiently
· Computer proficiency (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint)
· Demonstrated ability to work well with diverse populations from around the world
· Familiarity with the Latin American community of DPOs and the CRPD preferred
· Bachelors degree, or equivalent with minimum 5 years of relevant experience; advanced degree desired

Compensation
Commensurate with experience.

Time Commitment
Mid-April – Mid-September 2010, 5-40 hours per week (average 15)

How to apply
Disability Rights Fund, a Project of the Tides Center, is an equal opportunity employer. We strongly encourage and seek applications from women, and people of color, including bilingual and bicultural individuals, as well as members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender communities. People with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Please email or mail a cover letter, resume, three references (with contact information and relationship), writing sample (five page maximum) to:

Disability Rights Fund
Diana Samarasan, Director
Third Sector New England’s NonProfit Center
89 South Street, Suite 203
Boston, MA 02111-2670
dsamarasan@disabilityrightsfund.org (please no phone calls)
Fax: (617) 261-1977

Deadline: Applications must be received by February 15, 2010.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY for Research on Accessibility of US-Funded Overseas Programs

Posted on 12 June 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Funding, Human Rights, Inclusion, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

NCD Announces Funding (Research) Opportunity
On May 13, the National Council on Disability in the US announced a Notice of Funding Opportunity (NCD-09-02) for a cooperative agreement to study “The Accessibility of U.S.-funded Overseas Facilities and Programs.”

NCD is interested in examining and understanding the responsibilities of U.S.-funded overseas facilities and programs, both public and private. NCD is seeking applicants to research and develop an NCD report with the following three components: 1) An analysis/examination of international law, to determine how U.S.-funded international development organizations will be required to comply with Article 32 of the Convention in those countries which have ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and 2) an empirical follow-up to NCD’s 2003 report on how USAID is implementing its own disability policy overseas and its impact thus far, along with its compliance with Sections 501, 503, and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act in its overseas operations. The report should review whether these protections against discrimination are being implemented by government employees and contractors working abroad, and will examine whether U.S.-funded programs are being operated in a manner that is accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities; and 3) evaluate progress on NCD’s recommendations regarding the accessibility of U.S. embassies and missions, as well as Department of Defense (DoD)-funded programs and facilities.

The deadline for received full proposals is 5:00 p.m. EDT on July 1, 2009.

For additional information, please contact Joan Durocher at 202-272-2117 or jdurocher@ncd.gov.



This announcement received via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Training Opportunity: Digital Storytelling Project, June 8-12, 2009, for African Youth with Disabilities and Allies

Posted on 16 April 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Arts, Call for Nominations or Applications, Capacity Building and Leadership, Children, Education and Training Opportunities, Families, Funding, Media & Journalism, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, technology, Women, youth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD)
APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet
invite you to
Submit an application to participate in a Digital Storytelling Project
Application DUE 3 May 2009
Workshop dates 8 -12 June 2009

“It’s in the telling of our stories that we discover how much of our experiences and learning we have in common with others. Stories make our connection with others and with the world real. They weave together our individual experiences to reveal a picture of a community, a group and a country.”

Introduction

The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) in partnership with APC-Africa-Women and Women’sNet, invite you to submit an application to participate in a digital storytelling workshop. We are inviting people living and working in Africa who would like to empower others and affect change by documenting their journey and telling their story. Applicants must be:

(1) parents/carers of children with disabilities and youth
(2) young people with disabilities
(3) people working in organizations to promote the rights of children and youth with disabilities e.g. Advocates, students, CBR workers, teachers, journalists, information activists, content developers, programme officer/managers,

Participants will develop short videos reflecting the experiences of parents and youth with disabilities in particular with regards to challenges and successes in accessing inclusive education, health, employment and acceptance in their communities and country. Participants will also examine the power dimensions of story-telling and how we retain the authenticity of our own voice, as well as the voices of the people whose stories we document, preserve or disseminate.

Parents, youth and individuals working in the field have many stories to tell, but never have the time, knowledge, equipment and space to reflect, understand and tell their own stories, share their responses, understandings and experiences.

There is a large amount of information on the internet but very little that reflects the lived realities of those affected and people working in the field of disability in Africa.

The workshop aims to:
• document real-life stories of a cross-section of parents and youth with disabilities as well as those working in the field
• empower people to tell their own stories, while at the same time create a powerful advocacy tool that can be used in their country and beyond.
• develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills,
• enable parents and youth with disabilities to share and network amongst each other.

More about the workshop

In the workshop we will explore people’s own stories and learn how to develop a story line, use photo’s, video clips, and drawings to tell your story in an effective way.

There is space for twelve applicants who will participate in a five day digital storytelling workshop, 8 -12 June 2009.

In the month before the workshop delegates will need to join an online study group, collect content for their story (pictures etc) and begin to learn some of the software.

At the workshop participants will learn to use computer software and other equipment necessary for making a short (3-5 minutes) multimedia digital story.

The digital storytelling workshop is hands-on and computer intensive, requiring commitment and willingness to develop a short, personal story; learn new software and edit a short digital video of five minutes in length.

Digital storytelling is not like writing a formal document; it’s more like creative, autobiographical writing. To see an example, check out the website
http://www.takebackthetech.net
http://www.silencespeaks.org

In order to be eligible to participate, you must be able to attend all five days of the workshop, and be able to travel to South Africa to arrive by 7 June, departing 13 June 2009. Travel and accommodation will be sponsored by the SADPD. You must be willing to allow your story, or part of it, to be used in advocacy by SADPD and APC WNSP’s Take Back the Tech campaign. The workshop will be conducted in ENGLISH so other language speakers must have a good proficiency in English. Sign language and French / Portugese interpretation will be provided if necessary (Please motivate for this in application form).

This workshop is a chance to learn new skills and tell your story in a creative and visual format. It’s a lot of work . . . AND a lot of fun.

Copyright:
All stories are owned by the person who made them. The story is your story and will be licensed under a Creative Commons license. We are open to discussing a formula that respects your privacy and confidentiality should you be uncomfortable with the widespread sharing and dissemination of some parts of your story. We would like your stories to be part of a public effort promote the rights and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities and their families.

Who Should Apply?
• We are looking for stories told by parent, youth and individuals working in the field of Disability.
• Applicants must be living and working in Africa (preference will be given to women)
• Applicants must preferably be based in an organisation, institution or network, but individuals will also be considered.
• Youth should between the ages of 18 – 35
• The training is in English. Participants must speak and understand English but are welcome to produce their story in any language they choose. If however you require translation into French and Portuguese please motivate in your application.
• The story you tell has to be about you and your experiences. It can be about situations or events but it must be a personal story told in the first person
• The workshop requires a basic level of computer literacy.
• Applicants must be willing to avail themselves for future advocacy work or training in digital stories in their country.

Instructions:
Please complete the form below and email it as a file attachment to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za
DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING APPLICATIONS is 3 May 2009. If you have any questions, feel free to email or Skype Nafisa on nafisababoo. Incomplete forms will not be considered for selection.

APPLICATION FORM

Date:
Name:
Address:
Country:
Organisation:
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Age:
Date of birth:
Disability:
Support needs (Enlarge print, Braille, translation etc)

Please describe in a few sentences the main point of the story you would like to tell.

What issues does your story address?

What do you hope to get out of the digital storytelling workshop?

Have you talked to anyone about the story you’d like to share, or is this the first time you’ll be talking about it in a group?

If this is your first time talking about it, what do you think it’ll be like for you to share the story with a group of people ?

Please write a draft of the story you’d like to share, below. It should be no more than 500 words (about one and ½ pages, double-spaced, typed). Your story should be written in the first-person. Note: If you’d like to see examples of other people’s digital stories, you can go to http://www.silencespeaks.org or http://www.womensnet.org.za or http://www.takebackthetech.net

Please briefly describe to us what you use computers for.

What is your familiarity with the following Software Programs and Processes? Please put an “x” to the right of the statements that most apply.

Using a PC (Windows Operating System) or a Macintosh Computer
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Scanning Photos or Other Images
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Photoshop
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Adobe Premiere
I know nothing
I know next to nothing
I can get around fairly easily
I’m really comfortable
I know a lot

Do you know how to (please mark YES or NO)
Open software applications YES/NO
Save documents and find them again YES/NO
How to use a mouse, cut and paste, drag and drop. YES/NO

It would be useful to know the following applications – Microsoft office or Open office, and using web browsers such as Internet Explorer or Firefox.

There are a limited number of spaces in the workshop. So please note that the submission of an application is no guarantee that APC-Africa-Women will be able to support you to attend. Successful applicants will be notified 5th May 2009.

Thank You!

INFORMATION ABOUT THE ORGANIZATIONS

About the Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities
The African Decade of Persons with Disabilities was proclaimed by the African Union for the period 1999 – 2009. The main goals of the African Decade are to raise awareness about the situation of the estimated 60-80 million persons with disabilities in the region and to identify solutions tailored to the African Experience that enhance participation, equality and empowerment of Africans with Disabilities. The overall aims and priorities of the Decade are stipulated in an AU- Continental Plan of Action. A Secretariat was established to facilitate the realization of these objectives.
The Secretariat is an international Non Governmental Organisation, established in 2004 by all the major Regional Disabled People’s Organisations to give a new dynamism to the implementation of the Continental Plan of Action. It is hosted, at the request of African Union by South Africa in Cape-Town where its headquarters are located. The mission of the Secretariat of the African Decade is to empower Governments, DPO´s, Decade steering committee’s (DSC) and development organizations to work in partnership to include disability and persons with disabilities into policies and programs in all sectors of society. The strategy of action of the Secretariat is to
• Build the capacities of DPOs, persons with disabilities who are most vulnerable and the Decade Steering Committees to enable them to advocate and lobby their respective government so that they integrate disability into all their development processes.
• Advocate and lobby for mainstreaming of disability in the policies and programmes.
• Raise awareness around the main issues related to persons with disabilities in society.
Http://www.sadpd.org

About APC-Africa-Women

APC-Africa-women is the African regional network of the Association for Progressive Communications Women’s Networking Support Programme (APC WNSP). APC WNSP is a global network of women who support women networking for social change and women’s empowerment, through the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). We promote gender equality in the design, development, implementation, access to and use of ICTs and in the policy decisions and frameworks that regulate them. We have a special focus on redressing inequities based on women’s social or ethnic background – through the provision of research, training, information, and support activities in the field of ICT policy, skills-sharing in the access and use of ICT, and women’s network-building.
Http://www.apcwomen.org

APC-Africa-Women hosts Women’s Electronic Network Training (WENT) workshops every two years. WENT workshops aim to build the skills and capacities of women and their organisations to utilise ICTs in women’s empowerment, social development work and policy advocacy. In 2003 participants at WENT Africa developed skills in the repackaging of information through the convergence of old and new technologies using radio and in building websites using a Content Management System. Weaving through the training were sessions on gender and ICT policy issues. In 2005 WENT Africa was hosted in Kampala and using a two-track system, trained women technicians in the use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and women managers of NGOs in technology planning. More information can be viewed at http://wentafrica.blogspot.com/

About Women’sNet
Women’sNet works to advance gender equality and justice in South Africa through the use of ICTs by providing training and facilitating content dissemination and creation that supports women, girls, and women’s and gender organisations and networks to take control of their own content and ICT use. The organisation is one of the few working on technology for social change in South Africa, and the first to do this from a gender perspective our work has focused on technology for purpose – strengthening women’s organisations specifically and civil society in general – to use ICTs for achieving gender justice.
Http://www.womensnet.org.za



This announcement was disseminated on the EENET Eastern Africa listserver. All applications and inquiries should please be directed to Nafisa Baboo nafisa@africandecade.co.za , NOT to We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). You also can follow We Can Do via Facebook.

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 3 so far )

NEWS: Disability Inclusion in Poverty Reduction Strategy in Mozambique

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Case Studies, Inclusion, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

[Note from We Can Do editor: Many developing countries are required to develop a "Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper" (PRSP) as a condition for receiving debt relief from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). This strategy paper is meant to describe how the country will reduce poverty among its citizens. A country's PRSP can have a profound impact on the policies and programs it implements to fight poverty. But not all PRSPs are fully inclusive of people with disabilities. This can mean they are left behind while others are gaining new opportunities to lift themselves out of poverty. Rosangela Berman Bieler, at the Inter-American Institute on Disability recently circulated the following email on the mailing list for the Global Partnership on Disability and Development describing how people with disabilities were included in the process of developing the PRSP in Mozambique.]

by Rosangela Berman Bieler

Dear Colleagues:

This message is to share a brief report on the Inclusive Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper project in Mozambique, launched in January in Maputo. Our civil society counterparts in Mozambique are FAMOD (Forum of Disability Organizations) and Handicap International. Maria Reina and Deepti Samant of the Global Partnership on Disability and Development Secretariat also joint us for part of the mission.

During the mission, we could establish many alliances with local and international agencies and government officials. Among the various activities that we were involved, we had a very good and participatory DPO training with 25 leaders of FAMOD. Following the meeting, FAMOD is constituting a working group, composed by civil society organizations, to follow up on country Projects like the FTI on Education for All, the Mozambique Tourism Anchor Program (IFC), School Health (MoE), HIV-AIDS and other possible entry points.

We also had a presentation meeting for general stakeholders, held at the World Bank Office in MZ. The activity was a success – full house and many potential partners from all sectors, very interested in working with inclusive approaches for the next cycle of the Country’s poverty reduction plan that may follow the current PARPA, finishing in 2009.

Besides other Inclusive PRSP training and activities to be held in MZ during 2009, we are also planning with GPDD, an International Seminar on Accessibility and Inclusive Tourism in Maputo, in June, and we are looking forward to be able to work in alliance with all the agencies working in the field as well. Inclusive approaches in Tourism can generate local accessibility and development for those who live in the country. Mozambique can really benefit from such an initiative.

In the field of Education, we are very excited with the possibility of having the local NGOs and Networks – such as the Education for All Network that accompanied us during the events – to interact and influence the school construction that will happen now, for the FTI, to make sure they are built accessible.

We are also working in synchrony with the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities, that will go on until 2019. It is possible that MZ hosts the launching of the African Campaign on HIV-AIDS and Disability in October. There are two major FAMOD projects going on in the field and hopefully this can also generate good mainstreaming opportunities.

Our plan is to involve other Portuguese Speaking Countries in most of these activities, as language is on other important cause of exclusion from participation. Hopefully Development Agencies working in other Lusophone countries in Africa (Angola, Cape Verde, Guiné Bissau, Sao Tomé and Prince), and also in East Timor, will be able to partner with this initiative and facilitate this process as well.

All the best,

Rosangela Berman Bieler
Inclusive Development Specialist

Inter-American Institute on Disability & Inclusive Development
– Doing our part on the construction of a society for all -

Rosangela Berman Bieler
Executive Director
Inter-American Institute on Disability & Inclusive Development
Website: www.iidi.org

[Another Note from We Can Do editor: People who wish to learn more about the PRSP process, and how it can be more inclusive of people with disabilities, are encouraged to consult the on-line manual, "Making PRSP Inclusive" at http://www.making-prsp-inclusive.org/]



I received Rosangela Berman Bieler’s note via the GPDD mailing list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

9th Intl Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific 9-13 August 2009, Bali, Indonesia

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, East Asia Pacific Region, Events and Conferences, Health, HIV/AIDS, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , |

9th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific (ICAAP 9): “Empowering People, Strengthening Networks”

August 09-13, 2009
Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia

The 9th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific in Bali in August 2009 aims to address, among others, issues of mobility, migration, as well as gender and people with disabilities in order to empower the people and strengthen networks to effectively respond to AIDS.

Read more at the official conference web site at http://www.icaap9.org/

Those who wish to present may submit up to two abstracts; the deadline is March 15, 2009. (Under strictly limited circumstances, some abstracts may be accepted as late as June; please consult the official web site for details, NOT We Can Do.)

A limited number of scholarships are available for a few participants to attend the conference.

All people with questions, or who wish to apply to participate in the conference, should please consult the official conference web site at http://www.icaap9.org/ for instructions on how to communicate with the people organizing the conference (NOT We Can Do!), thank you.



I first learned of this conference via an email forwarded from the AWID mailing list. I gathered additional information and links at the official conference web site.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

TRAINING: Labour Market Inclusion of People with Disabilities, 20-29 April 2009

Posted on 24 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Education and Training Opportunities, Employment, Inclusion, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

“Labour market inclusion of people with disabilities”
International Labour Organization (ILO) Training course for professionals from developing and transition countries

Dates: 20 – 29 April 2009 – Language: English – Venue: Turin, Italy

Application deadline: March 13, 2009

The ILO International Training Centre is offering a course on “Labour market inclusion of people with disabilities” (course A901286). The course language will be English and registration is open to staff involved in policy making, planning, implementation, research of Ministries, Social Partners and other institutions working on disability and social inclusion. Please note that this course is especially designed for participants from developing and transition countries.

The course programme offers the possibility to learn more about legislation and mechanisms for labour market inclusion of people with disabilities in developing and transition countries, provides the opportunity to get to know different international experience and good practice.

The conditions of participation are the following:

COSTS
The price of the course is EURO 2,950. This amount includes the cost of training and subsistence (full board and lodging at the Turin Centre).

FELLOWSHIPS
The ILO International Training Centre offers a number of partial fellowships to co-finance the costs of the course. If you wish to apply for a fellowship, please contact us as soon as possible. The partial fellowships are for EURO 1,200, the difference is EURO 1,750.

AIR TRAVEL
Not included is the cost of international air travel from the country of origin to Turin, which has to be covered by the participants.

APPLICATION
In order to register and to apply for a partial fellowship, candidates should send us:
1. A completed nomination form (Word format, 67 Kb);
2. A “letter of commitment” by the participant’s organization (or a donor organization) stating that it will cover:
a) the cost of the course, namely EURO 2,950 – or in case you request a fellowship, the remaining cost of the course of EURO 1,750.-;
b) the international return ticket to Turin.

These documents should be sent to:
Ms. Alessandra MOLZ: a.molz@itcilo.org. Tel: +39011693 6428
Ms. Elisabetta BELLORA: e.bellora@itcilo.org. Tel: +39011-693 6561. Fax: +39011-693 6451

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION
13 March 2009
.

Yours sincerely,
Alessandra Molz
Programme officer
Employment and Skills Development Programme

ILO INTERNATIONAL TRAINING CENTRE
Viale Maestri del Lavoro, 10, 10127 Torino, ITALIA
Tel.: +39-011-693 64 28, Fax: +39-011-693 64 51

Interested in our courses? Visit our on-line training calendar:
http://www.itcilo.org/calendar
http://www.itcilo.org

Tiene interés en nuestros cursos? Nuestro calendario de actividades se encuentra en:
http://www.itcilo.org/calendar/view?set_language=es
http://www.itcilo.org/es



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development (GPDD) email-based discussion group .
Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

JOB POST: Local Diagnostic Expert, Handicap International, Maputo, Mozambique

Posted on 12 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Handicap International is looking for Local Diagnostic Expert
COUNTRY : Mozambique CITY : Maputo
Starting date: 01/04/09 (April 1, 2009)
Length of the assignment : one year
Closing date for application : 01/03/09 (March 1, 2009) Advertisement reference : HB-LDE-Moz0902

Handicap International is an international organisation specialised in the field of disability. Non-governmental, non-religious, non-political and non-profit-making, it works alongside people with disabilities, whatever the context, in response to humanitarian crises and the effects of extreme poverty. Handicap International implements programmes of assistance to persons and local organisations, inclusion programmes and programmes focusing on the fight against the main causes of disability. It runs projects in almost 60 countries, with the support of a network of 8 national associations ( Germany, Belgium, Canada, United-States, Luxembourg, United Kingdom and Switzerland)
The organisation employs almost 3300 people worldwide, 330 of whom work in France and in its European and North American sections.
For more details on the association: http://www.handicap-international.fr/en/s/index.html

JOB CONTEXT :
This project is the result of a short emergency project, which objective was to support the victims of PAIOL, the arsenal explosion in Maputo in 2007. The PAIOL project highlights the lack of knowledge and skills of basic services to welcome and take care of people with disabilities. It was also the opportunity to work with the municipalities of Maputo and Matola, and to make a first assessment on the situation of people with disabilities.

This post is based in RAVIM offices, our principal partner for the project. The characteristics of the relationships between the Local Diagnostic Expert, Handicap International Project Team and RAVIM will be detailed within the Partnership Agreement Addendum between Handicap International and RAVIM.

JOB DESCRIPTION :
Challenges and goals :
The decentralization process is quite complex in Maputo and Matola: all the different levels of governmental representatives are present (district, municipal, province and nation). One of the issues will be to get involved and coordinate with all these different governmental levels, in a same objective. The local diagnostic should clarify which are the main competences for each administrative level: district, municipal, province and nation, in the frame of the decentralization process.

Activities :
In collaboration with RAVIM, you will support the realisation of a local diagnosis on the social and economical situation of people with disability, the social representation of Disability and the situation of existing healthcare and social services, regarding the welcoming of vulnerable people (including people with disability and people living with or affected by HIV/AIDS).
Your responsibilities will be to:
==> carry out the local diagnosis
==> analyze the local diagnostic results and propose recommendations in respect to the project objectives.
==> create a database and directory of services
==> organize the dissemination of the results of the local diagnosis among the civil society and government
==> prepare the final evaluation of the project, based on monitoring tools and mechanisms to evaluate the progress of the situation of people with disability and healthcare and social services at regular intervals
==> capitalize documentation and tools used during these activities

CANDIDATE PROFILE :
Mandatory :
We are looking for someone with a Master in Local development field, Social sciences or a Diploma in the healthcare and social sector. Ideally with experience in implementing local/territorial and participative diagnosis or/and realisation of quantitative and qualitative survey,

You have good analysis and synthesis capacities and a good team spirit, you have already worked on mobilising people around a common objective.

Complementary :
Experience in a developing country, knowledge on Disability, inclusive approach and HIV/AIDS

REQUIRED LANGUAGE SKILLS : Portuguese mandatory, English a plus

JOB ENVIRONMENT : possibility to travel with family, access to international school and hospital

EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS :
Volunteer : 750 or 850 Euros monthly indemnity + living allowance paid on the field + accommodation + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance
Salary : 2000 to 2300 gross salary + 457 Euros expatriation allowance + 100% medical cover + repatriation insurance + family policy

Please send resume and covering letter with the reference: HB-LDE-Moz0902 to :
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL – 14, avenue Berthelot – 69361 LYON CEDEX 07
by Email : recrut04@handicap-international.org
or by our website : www.handicap-international.org
Please do not telephone

Candidates from Canada or the United States, and nationals of these countries, should send their application to the following address :
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL CANADA
1819 Boulevard René Lévesque, bureau 401 – MONTRÉAL, QUÉBEC – H3H 2P5
Or by email : jobs@handicap-international.ca or fax : 514-937-6685
Please do not telephone



I received this job announcement via the Global Partnership on Disability and Development mailing list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

JOB POST: Project Manager: Making HIV-AIDS Strategies Inclusive, Tanzania

Posted on 6 February 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Health, HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, Inclusion, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

CCBRT is Seeking to Employ a Project Manager for a PEPFAR funded Project

“Making HIV/Aids Strategies Inclusive for People with Disabilities”

Application Deadline February 21, 2009

*Introduction*
Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation Tanzania (CCBRT) is a locally registered Non Governmental Organization (NGO) first established in 1994. It is the largest indigenous provider of disability rehabilitation services in the country. CCBRT aim is to improve the quality of life of people living with disabilities as well as their families and to enable them to claim and use their legitimate human rights.

*Objective*
The PEPFAR project is aimed to considerably increase access for people with disabilities and their care givers to appropriate HIV/AIDS prevention, care, treatment and support services in Tanzania. The project is funded by PEPFAR for the duration of 3 years beginning 2009. CCBRT will coordinate the project in collaboration with the Government of Tanzania, civil society and other stakeholders.

* *

*The Project Manager will have the following responsibilities*

· Setting up, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project.

· Recruitment of part time HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinators in consultation with the Community Program Director.

· Setting up of the National Platform in consultation with governmental, non-governmental and international stakeholders.

· Selection of target districts and partners in consultation with TACAIDS and NACP.

· Coordination and monitoring of the development of minimum guidelines (VCT, care and treatment), development and distribution of various Information Education and Communication (IEC) materials, and respective training manuals.

· Initiation, coordination and evaluation of trainings in collaboration with technical experts and target organizations.

· Further development of IEC, training materials and programs after lessons learnt in collaboration with technical experts.

· Establishment of follow up mechanisms to support trained experts.

· Establishment of collaborations and referral mechanisms between district authorities, disability and HIV/AIDS organizations.

· Provision and coordination of technical / advisory support to partners.

· Assessment and approval of small project proposals for infrastructure adjustments and campaigns in collaboration with CBM US and a representative of the National Platform.

· Development of public awareness programs on disability, equal right and HIV/AIDS.

· Generation of lessons learnt and continuous integration during the project implementation.

· Development of a reader on making HIV/Aids strategies inclusive in collaboration with technical experts.

· Development of annual work plans and setting of annual targets.

· Compilation of narrative / financial reports in collaboration with the CCBRT Finance Manager.

· Coordination and support of the work of the CCBRT Health, HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinator and three HIV/AIDS and Disability Coordinators.

*Experience*
The project manager should have

· a minimum of 5 years working experience in HIV/AIDS

· In depth knowledge about HIV/AIDS strategy framework in Tanzania including HSHSP, NGPRS, NMSF as well as HIV/AIDS related working structures and relevant stakeholders in Tanzania.

· Experience in guideline and training programme development

· Proven working experience with vulnerable groups, preferably persons with disabilities

· Good analytic, report writing and presentation skills

· Experience in coordinating and managing larger teams

· Strong written and oral communication ability, both Kiswahili and English

CCBRT will offer an attractive salary package.

The Project manager is expected to start working latest 16th March 2009.

*How to apply*
If you believe you are the ideal candidate with the necessary background, please submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae detailing your experience, supportive documents as well as contact details of three referees to info@ccbrt.or.tz or by post to

CCBRT Executive Director/ P.O Box 23310, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Tel: +255 (0) 22 260 1543 / +255 (0) 22 260 2192 Fax: +255 (0) 22 2601544

Email: info@ccbrt.or.tz Website: http://www.ccbrt.or.tz

*People with disability are highly encouraged to apply.*

*Closing date for applications: 21st Feb* (only short listed candidates will be contacted)



I received this job post via the Intl-Dev news distribution service, which people can subscribe to via email for free.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 5 so far )

Networking Among People with Disabilities in Developing Countries and Allies

Posted on 30 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

If you’re reading this, then you probably share a passion for promoting human rights and fighting poverty among people with disabilities in developing countries. I know that some We Can Do readers are themselves people with disabilities in developing countries working as grassroots advocates. Other We Can Do readers are professionals, with and without disabilities, in the international development or disability fields.

We don’t all come from the same continent. We don’t all share the same disabilities. We don’t all work in the same sector or for the same cause (education? HIV/AIDS? signed languages? human rights? other?). Some readers are actively working with the disability community in a developing country. Others are far away in a comfortable office in a developed country.

We are all very different from each other. But we all want, ultimately, the same thing. We all believe that people with disabilities in developing countries should not have to confront barriers that exclude them from education, employment, health care services, life in the community, and even the most basic human rights–including the right simply to be alive.

I have now created a new Facebook group entitled Networking Among Disabled People in Developing Countries and Allies. This group is meant to facilitate friendly networking among like-minded people. If you already have a Facebook account, then you can join the group with the click of a button. If you are new to Facebook, then it only takes a few additional moments to create your own first, free Facebook account.

Once you join the group, you can write on the “Wall,” or write in one of the “discussion groups.” Introduce yourself … and find out who else in the group shares experiences, challenges, frustrations, and joys in common with yours. You might think that you only really want to meet people from your own country, or people in the same profession as you. But perhaps you will be surprised to find that someone with a different disability, in a different continent, working in a project completely different from yours, has interesting insights you could learn from.

I hope to meet a few We Can Do readers in the Facebook group! Please join by following the link to:

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=58529958419



Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

PAPER: Disability and Contraception in Developing Countries

Posted on 24 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Cognitive Impairments, Families, Health, Mobility Impariments, Psychiatric Disabilities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Doctors, social workers, neighbors, and even family members often mistakenly assume that people with disabilities cannot possibly be interested in sex. Or if they are, others believe they cannot physically participate. Or if they can, others think that no one would want to have sex with them. Because of these myths, people with disabilities are often deliberately excluded from sex education programs and reproductive care services. These include contraception to prevent pregnancy, as well as support for people with disabilities who wish to bear and raise healthy, happy children.

The fact is, a great many people with a wide range of disabilities are capable of having children and desire the rewards that can come with parenthood. And many become excellent parents who raise well-adjusted children. But they often lack family planning services that allow them to make their own choices about how many children to have and when to have them. This may be partly because even family planners who understand the need and importance of counseling for people with disabilities may not know how.

Although people with physical disabilities frequently can and do have children, the nature of some physical disabilities may sometimes affect what kind of contraceptions they can use or how to use them. An article published in 1999 by Family Health International’s journal Network, entitled Disabled Have Many Contraceptive Needs, explains how some physical disabilities, or the medications taken for them, may affect the kinds of contraceptions they are able to use. Family planning professionals may consult this article at http://www.fhi.org/en/rh/pubs/network/v19_2/disableneeds.htm

People with mild intellectual disabilities, and also people with psychosocial disabilities, are often as interested in sexuality as the general population. They also may in some cases wish to have children. Both intellectual disabilities and psychosocial disabilities may affect how well contraceptive options or instructions are understood, or how well they may follow instructions. Another article entitled Mental Disabilities Affect Method Options” discusses various examples of how family planning professionals can account for these factors. This article, also published in 1999, can be read at http://www.fhi.org/en/RH/Pubs/Network/v19_2/mentaldisab.htm



I learned about these articles through a class I’m taking on Gender, Disability and Development this semester. Thanks, Barbara Earth!

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan

Posted on 19 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, South Asian Region, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Pakistan Disabled People’s Organization

Subject: Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan

Respected All,

Greetings from Pakistan Disabled Peoples’ Organization (PDPO/DPI – Pakistan),

The issue of disability is gaining more and more importance all over the world as well as in Pakistan due the disability movement for a “rights based society” initiated by organizations of PWDs themselves since almost two decades. World Bank, World Health Organization and other donor and development agencies have included this issue in their mandates. Governments have framed various policies for PWDs including reservation of jobs, concession facilities in travelling, special training institutions etc. The Government of Pakistan has made efforts to support the rights of Persons with Disabilities in the view of BMF and National Policy on disability and now Alhamdurillah Pakistan has signed the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

However, despite these efforts, the sad fact is that most people with disabilities especially women with disabilities and their families remain completely un-served by government, NGOs and even DPOs.

Women with disabilities are disadvantaged in several key areas when compared with other women, men with disabilities, and the society as a whole. These women face a triple handicap and discrimination due to their disability, gender and developing world status. At the same time, Stigma remains in society at large, within communities, and even, in many cases of uneducated segments of society, within families who see disabled women as a loss of productive potential and a drain on family resources. So, while on the one hand, the strong cultural family network ensures their financial security, on the other, the stigma often results in their remaining invisible members of society.

The major barrier to employment and other socio-economic benefits for Women with Disabilities in our society continues to be attitudinal barriers; stereotypical thinking and assumption about what women with disabilities can and can’t do.

The truth is that, the range of abilities of persons within any disabilities group is enormous, we have a large number of women with disabilities in Pakistan who are taking part in the activities of daily life with courage, there is dire need to involve that women as a role model or highlight their efforts to understand the social and economic realities and possibilities with regards to disability.

We need to get rid of our stereotypical images and view each “individual” as just that “an individual”. Access to and sharing of information resources can build the capacity of local and national disability organizations, promote advocacy by and for people with disability and improve the quality of life experienced by women with disabilities.

The fist humble step of this forum is to bridge the information and communication gap between all the leading women with disabilities in Pakistan.

On behalf of PDPO/DPI – Pakistan, I would like to request you all to share your short profile with us by the end of this week, after the completion of selection process of forum members, we will decide the date for Coordination Meeting.

Your feedback and coordination will assist us to make it successful

Looking forward to hear from you,

Regards,

Abia Akram,
Women Coordinator – PDPO/DPI, Pakistan
Abia.m.ilc@gmail.com
92-321-5278021



This email from Abia Akram came to me via Ghulam Nabi Nizamani. People or organizations who wish to network with the Forum of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan should communicate directly with Abia Akram, NOT We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

Disability Conferences in 2009

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

One common reason why many We Can Do readers come to this blog is because they want to learn about upcoming conferences related to disability issues in developing countries. The single most popular page at this blog carries the quite inelegant but pragmatic title of Conferences, Events, Call for Papers, Training Opportunities (which also includes the very few job listings posted here and other things that didn’t fit in the title).

But, there is another page that We Can Do readers can consult to learn about upcoming disability and rehabilitation related conferences for the year 2009:

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/conference.php

This page, maintained by the Center for International Rehabilitation, Research, Information, and Exchange (CIRRIE), has listings that go as far out as December 2009. People who monitor We Can Do regularly will find a few of these announcements are familiar. But many have never been announced at We Can Do.

In some cases, this may be because they don’t quite fit my parameters. Before I publish a conference announcement, I try to determine whether it would be of genuine interest or use to people living or working in developing countries. This is not to say that I do this perfectly. But I strive to do this. Some conferences may carry the word “international” in their title, but on closer examination, “international” may often mean “North America and Europe.” I often skip over such conference announcements.

But in other cases, I simply had not heard of these conferences. For example, there is Neurorehabilitation 2009, held by the Southern African Rehabilitation Association in Johannesburg, South Africa, August 26-28, 2009. Or a conference being held by World Association for Psychosocial Rehabilitation, One World: Quest for Integration, November 12-15, 2009, in Bangalore, India. And some others.

It is worth exploring the list of conferences on your own at
http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/conference.php
Those who know how to use RSS Feeds can also subscribe to the CIRRIE listing to learn of new conference announcements as they are posted.



I discovered this listing of conferences by browsing the CIRRIE web site.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Disability in Non-Western Societies: A Bibliography of Bibliographies

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Disability Studies, East Asia Pacific Region, Education, Middle East and North Africa, Poverty, Resources, signed languages, South Asian Region, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Researchers who need to locate journal articles and other publications about people with disabilities throughout history in developing countries face significant barriers. People with disabilities outside of North America and Europe tend to be invisible in much of the published literature and throughout history.

Researchers can consult a list of annotated bibliographies at the Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange (CIRRIE) as a starting point in seeking out thousands of articles that may meet their needs.

These bibliographies do not directly link to the articles in question. In many cases, I suspect these articles may not exist on-line. But the bibliographies could be used to help researchers know what publications they should seek out through the inter-library loan program at their university library.

A few examples of annotated bibliographies include: Disability in the Middle East; Disability and Social Responses in Some Southern African Nations; Disability and Social Response in Afghanistan and Pakistan; Disability & Deafness in North East Africa; Disability and Deafness in East Asia: Social and Educational Responses, from Antiquity to Recent Times; Sign, Gesture, and Deafness in South Asia and South-West Asian Histories; Social Responses to Disability & Poverty in Economically Weaker Countries: Research, Trends, Critique, and Lessons Usually Not Learnt; and more.

Researchers may begin exploring the various bibliographies (by author M. Miles) at

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/bibliography/index.php



I found the page listing M. Miles’ various bibliographies by browsing the CIRRIE web site.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and www.RatifyNow.org. Other sites are most likely plagiarizing this post without permission.

This page also accessible via http://tinyurl.com/atp4tn

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Disability in the Middle East, a bibliography

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Middle East and North Africa | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

by M. Miles

The partly annotated open online “Disability in the Middle East, a
bibliography”, first web published in 2002, was much revised, extended and updated to June 2008, and now lists about 1,750 items, at:

http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/bibliography/mideast/index.html (also .pdf)

It aims to record the cumulative formal knowledge base in the disability field in countries of the Middle East, especially Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, and some smaller neighbours.

Around 45% of the items in the bibliography, listed in the last two sections with a brief introduction, comprise historical materials of the Middle East from 1751 to 1970 and from Antiquity to 1750, as an essential part of the cultural background. This earlier material has more annotation (and so takes about 60% of the total word-count), to enable potential readers to find the disability-related parts that are sometimes hidden in odd corners or footnotes, and also to indicate some cultural features that might be less easily understood nowadays.

No sensible explanation exists for how I [M. Miles] came to put this stuff together. There was already far too much material when it went online in 2002. Planning to spend a few weeks on a short update, I had a swing at disability and deafness in Egyptology, Assyriology, and the Hittite Kingdom in Anatolia,
which actually took six months. Of course, the material is utterly fascinating.

The past 30 years of “disability studies” in North America and Western Europe can look like a few buckets of water compared with the rolling 5000-year ocean of Middle Eastern disability. But just because of that contrast, I guess the majority of western students of disability won’t dip a toe into this ocean. The bibliog and annotations give a basic map for the adventurous minority… Also, of course, for the millions of non-western people who
might be happy to know something about disability before The West was invented.

best, miles

[Note to We Can Do readers: people interested in researching people with disabilities in the Middle East, African, East Asian, South Asian, and South-West Asian regions regions may find it helpful to begin with M. Miles’ collection of annotated bibliographies, of which this is only one.



This email was circulated by the author, M. Miles, on the Disability-Research email discussion list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

4th Annual International Shafallah Forum, April 20-22, 2009, in Doha, Qatar

Posted on 18 January 2009. Filed under: Academic Papers and Research, Announcements, Call for Papers, Children, Education, Employment, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Note that the deadline to submit abstracts is January 23, 2009, at 5 pm EST.

On behalf of the Shafallah Center for Children with Special Needs, I would like to extend a warm invitation for you to submit abstracts for the 4th Annual International Shafallah Forum in Doha, Qatar from April 20th – April 22nd , 2009. For the past three years our Center has been delighted to welcome more than 250 experts in the field and Wives of Heads of State from all over the world to our Forum and we anticipate that this year’s Forum will be no exception.

The 4th Annual International Forum will bring together advocates, family members, scholars, members of government, and professionals from a variety of perspectives to explore the theme of /Achieving Independence/. Together we will explore how to overcome factors that perpetuate disability marginalization, including widespread poverty due to lack of access to education, opportunity, and unfair labor practices. We look to our work, cutting-edge research and programs, to promote independence through universal access to education, inclusive societies, innovative technologies, and poverty-reduction strategies – including micro-enterprise and encouragement of the corporate sector to value and include the disabled in the workforce.

The Forum will feature keynote addresses by global leaders, roundtable discussions, symposia, paper presentations, and exhibits. We welcome the submission of such presentations and have included more detailed information on the following pages.

An accepted presentation to the Shafallah Forum includes complimentary airfare, meals, and accommodation. We hope that you will join us this April in Doha and participate in international dialogue among your peers. Please visit our website at www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org

Abstracts are *due by 5pm EST January 23rd, 2009. *

Sincerely,

*I. Modes of Presentation*

Delegates can present their programs and research in several different formats:

*Symposia *(1 hour – 3 x 15 minute presentations, plus 15 minutes discussion)

A collection of 3 papers presenting the results of different programs/studies/experiences relating to a common research theme. Each should be presented by a different person. The symposium coordinator should provide details for the three papers following the instructions below.

*Individual Papers *(15 minute presentation, plus 5 minutes discussion)

A paper presenting the results of a program/study/experience on a particular topic. Papers will be grouped into symposia according to an identified theme. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each paper offered following the instructions below.

* *

*Posters*

Individuals may present their research on the form of a poster. Posters allow for more extended discussion with delegates interested in the content area of the poster. Posters should be attended by at least one author/director who can address questions related to the poster’s content. Individuals should submit title and abstract details for each poster presentation offered following the instructions below. Submission of poster collectives (related research) is encouraged.

* *

*Roundtable Discussions or Debates *

(1 hour)

Discussion about the interpretation of existing research, the state of knowledge in a particular area or the need for more or different kinds of research/programming/policies, can be as important as presenting the results of new studies. Individuals wishing to organize such roundtable discussions or debates should identify three or four speakers, who can each present a point of view. Where discussion and audience participation is the purpose, speakers’ presentations might be limited to 5 minutes. Where debate between the speakers is the purpose, presentations may be longer (10 minutes). Organizers should submit the details of the discussion or debate following the instructions below.

*Exhibit *

Individuals or groups that have a demonstration, specialized equipment, and/or materials that they would like to exhibit are invited to submit a proposal. Exhibits will be given a table with specific presentation time, where they will be asked to be present and are encouraged to leave materials/equipment out for attendees to peruse throughout the Forum.

*II. Abstracts*

Abstracts must be in English. Abstracts longer than permissible will be abridged at the discretion of the program planning committee.

*Theme & Topic:* The conference is to be organized into themes and include general and break-out sessions. Please specify which theme that best fits your session. All abstracts should be prepared using the following headings:

*Instructions for Submitting Paper/Poster Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of authors. Give the email address of person(s) presenting the paper

*Contact details:* Type an asterisk after the presenter’s name and give the affiliation address of the presenting author only

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Preferred mode: *State whether: (a) individual paper or (b) poster

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

*Instructions for Submitting Symposia Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*List:* Authors, affiliations, e-mail addresses and titles of papers to be included in the symposium.

*Moderator: *Give the name and affiliation of the person who has agreed to moderate the symposium. Give the contact details for moderator (email, phone & address).

*Abstract:* Each paper should submit an abstract. This should be no more than 200 words and describe the /Aim, Method, Outcomes, and Conclusions/ of the study using these headings.

*Type of presentation: *State whether (a) research-based paper with data or (b) review paper or (c) service description or (d) personal experience.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Roundtable Abstracts*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Author(s):* Give the name and affiliation of each participant noting the moderator with an asterisk.

*Contact details:* Give the full contact information (email, phone, & address) of all participants

*Abstract:* This should be no more than 400 words and describe the background behind the issue to be discussed or debated and the views to be put forth by each speaker.

* *

*Instructions for Submitting Exhibits*

*Title: *Brief (no more than 100 characters)

*Host: *Give the name, affiliation, e-mail, and phone of the person hosting the exhibit.

*Abstract:* Submit a description of the demonstration/exhibit, its intent, and space requirements

*III. Submission Deadline: 5pm EST, January 23, 2009*

Kindly submit abstracts to: Valerie Karr @ valeriek@brownlloydjames.com

Please label the subject line: _Shafallah Forum Abstract_. Failure to do so may result in abstract not being viewed.

Information about the Shafallah Center and Previous International Forums please visit:

http://www.shafallah.org.qa or http://www.shafallahforum2009.org



We Can Do received this announcement via the Intl-Dev email news list. All queries and applications should be emailed to Valerie Karr at the Shafallah Center, NOT to We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 13 so far )

JOB POST: CBR Officer, Dadaab Refugee Camp, Garissa, Kenya

Posted on 19 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Assistive Devices, Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR), Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Health, HIV/AIDS, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities, Rehabilitation, Sub-Saharan Africa Region, Violence, Water and Sanitation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

*_VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT_*

*_Position_** : CBR Officer ( Prosthesis & Orthotic) _Responsible to _: CBR Coordinator*

*_Location_** : Dadaab Refugee Camp (Garissa) _Family Status_ : Non Family duty Station*

*_Closing Date_** : Open *

*_THE ORGANIZATION_*

HI began its operations in 1992 as an emergency support programme in Garissa (North Eastern Province). Currently, HI is operating a medical referral project for refugees in this region in partnership with the UNHCR. HIV and AIDS activities are also being provided for the local community.

In 1994, HI launched another emergency support programme for internal displaced persons (IDPs) following inter-ethnic clashes, in Trans Nzoia District (Kitale town). Today, we are running in Kitale the most comprehensive HI Programme on HIV and AIDS in Kenya.

In 2002, in Nairobi we began disability activities with local partners (community-based organisations) focusing on support to networking, inclusive education and access to resources.

In April 2005, we have started a Mine Risk Education (MRE) project for the refugees living in the Kakuma Refugee Camp (near the Sudan border).

*_Rehabilitation project in Dadaab refugee camp:_*

Dadaab Refugee Camps, located in Garissa district, are the main settlement for Somali refugees, with a total population of 170,000 refugees, with a recent new influx^^[1] ^ due to the latest political events and severe drought in the southern parts of Somalia. To date some basic services have been developed to meet the refugees with disability needs. UNHCR, CARE International and other implementing partners working in Dadaab refugee camps raised a concern about the critical situation of the refugees with disability and scarce services provided to them. Therefore, UNHCR solicited Handicap International to support and contribute to develop initiatives towards disabled refugees in Dadaab camps.

An assessment carried out by HI from in February 2007 defined HI intervention with focus in two main areas:

(i) */To develop access to adequate rehabilitation services for persons with disability/*, with particular attention to be paid to technical aids and prosthetic production and rehabilitation and counselling services for children with intellectual disability and/or cerebral palsy; and

(ii) */To facilitate access to humanitarian aid and community development for persons with disability/*, through information sharing, counselling and sensitization of staff and agencies in charge of food distribution, sheltering, health, watsan and construction works, education, community development services and livelihood, etc.

The Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) Project Team will consist of 1 x Project Manager, 1 x CBR Coordinator , 1 x Mainstreaming Officer, 3 x CBR Officers (with technical expertise in differing but complimentary areas), 6 x rehabilitation workers, 6 x technical aids workers (leather work/shoe making and carpentry), and 30 x CBR workers.

* *

*THE POSITION*

Under the responsibility of CBR Coordinator, the CBR Officer (Prosthesis & Orthotic) will offer technical support to the CBR team in ensuring quality production and fitting of prosthetics, esthetics, & other orthopedic devices to persons with disability among refugees and host communities. She/he will also build capacity of the local technicians and rehabilitation staff and take lead in the referrals and follow ups of patients.

*S\he will be responsible for :-*

*1) Supervision and management of mobility aids workshops*

· Supervise operations in all mobility aids workshops present in all the three camps including Dadaab workshop.

· Closely monitor and arrange procurement of equipment and materials as required for workshop – production.

· Provide advice on installation of equipment in the workshops including workshop planning and utilization of workshop consumables

· Ensure P&O workshops’ set up are all up to standards and accepted specifications

· Ensure mobility aids workshops are barrier-free for the easy access to persons with disabilities.

· Ensure all safety measures are observed within the workshops to reduce hazards in the operation of various machinery and equipment.

· Develop proper workshop management systems to ensure effective and efficient P&O workshop management.

· Carry out regular monitoring of workshop activities, technicians’ performance and manufacture of devices.

*2) Capacity Building*

· Identify and provide on-the-job training to local technicians in Prosthetics and Orthotics.

· Develop training curriculum for on-the-job training of local technicians.

· Conduct regular evaluation of the on-job training.

· Provide basic orientation to community CBR workers on the maintenance and repair of devices in the field.

· Train P&O Assistants in Workshop Management and information systems.

*3) Supervision of P&O Assistants*

· Develop job descriptions for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Together with the team, develop weekly work plan for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Carry out induction and appraisal for the P&O Assistants/Technicians.

· Monitor P&O Assistants/Technicians performance and production.

* *

*4) Referrals and Physical rehabilitation*

· Ensure persons with disabilities receive good quality and appropriate prosthetic and orthotic devices and services from the workshops as well as in the field and from Garissa/Kangemi.

· Develop a good and effective patient’s follow up mechanism for patients who are fitted with P&O devices from Garissa general hospital and Kangemi.

· Maintain individual file for each person with disability receiving P&O devices and carry out regular follow up as per the requirement of the particular person.

· Maintain all records pertaining to service delivery.

· Ensure required gait training is provided to the clients after prosthetic and orthotic fitments.

· Ensure that the clients receive rehabilitation therapy as required, e.g. release of contracture and healing of stump edema before fitting devices.

*5) Coordination and networking *

· Maintain necessary coordination with Rehabilitation Therapists.

· Work closely with the Physiotherapist and Occupational therapist for patient treatment, follow-up and evaluation.

· Liaise with Technical Advisors for various technical matters and training programs as necessary.

· Represent the organization at forums, workshops and conferences in the areas of Prosthetics and Orthotics as may be required.

*6) Reporting*

· Produce updated reports at regular intervals as required by the project in terms of donor and organizational requirements.

*7) Others*

· Advice Management on various costs related to P&O materials, equipment, maintenance, training and service delivery.

· Capitalize on new areas of learning in P&O or any specific case histories for internal learning and for external dissemination when required.

*/ /*

*Qualifications and experience required:-*

· Diploma in Orthopaedics with 2 years of experience

· Knowledge of CBR implementation and management

· Ability to work in and lead a team

· Good report writing, presentation, communication and interpersonal skills

· Demonstrated ability to transfer knowledge through informal and formal trainings

· Computer literate with Knowledge of Word, Excel and Internet

· Experience with an International NGO is an added advantage

*Conditions*

Living conditions in Dadaab camp may be challenging (remote area, climate very hot), although facilities are offering minimum of comfort.

R&R leave of 7 days will be provided every 8 weeks of continuous accommodation within Dadaab.

If you feel you are the right candidate for this position, kindly send your application along with an up-to-date CV(including 3 referees) by email to the Human Resources Officer : hrofficer@handicap-international.or.ke

*NB: Applications will be processed as they are received and interviews conducted until the appropriate candidate is selected.*

*The email subject line should be marked: “Application for CBR Officer – Dadaab position”*

* *

*Please do not send your academic certificates and other testimonials they will be requested at a later stage.*

Only short listed candidates will be contacted.

*Handicap International is an Equal Opportunity Employer – Females and Persons with Disability are encouraged to apply ***



This job post was recently distributed on the Intl-Dev mailing list. As with all job posts and other opportunities announced at We Can Do, any applications or inquiries should please be directed to the sponsors, NOT to We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 49 so far )

NEWS: Emergency Response for Bangladesh Disability Community Following Cyclone Sidr

Posted on 18 December 2008. Filed under: Disaster Planning & Mitigation, News, South Asian Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

SSDP’s Program Achievement Nov’07 – Oct’08
The Southern Socio-economic Development Program (SSDP) is a non profitable NGOs working for underprivileged rural community especially for people with disabilities (PWDs) in southern coastal area of Bangladesh. We are very proud of to extend our service to Cyclone SIDR affected people by the support of various donor.

A snapshot of our achievement of Emergency Response activities against SIDR 2007.

1 st phase:
1. Distributed survival package among 3750 household those who are with SIDR affected vulnerable people including PWDs in the area of Barguna District
2. Distributed 400 tents among the household those who were living under the open sky.
3. Distributed Food and hygiene kinds among 500 women.
4. Distributed milk (DANO) among 200 babies & Mother

Phase -2
1. Supported 2000 household through providing 20 kg rice by food for work
2. Supported 2000 household through providing 10kg paddy seeds.& 25gm vegetables seeds
3. Supported 4000 household through providing seeds for agricultural production.
4. Distributed 55000 plants among 5500 household
5. Providing boat, net and others materials to 300 nos fisherman for restoring live and livelihood
6. Installation of 45 nos Deep Tube well for 910 household.
7. Installation of 2184 nos sanitary latrine for the 2184 household.
8. Reconstruction of 75 nos DHTW platforms
9. Construction of 24 nos School sanitary latrine.
10. Distributed hygienic kits among 6000 household

Also:
• Disbursed a total amount of Tk.14,50,000/= among 250 PWDs HH for goat purchase
• Disbursed a total of Tk.11,50,000/= among 1000 PWDs HH in cash
• Distributed survival package among 1000 PWDs HH 3 rd phase:
• Provided 10 accessible house to PWDs and income generation support.
• Installation of 280 tin shed pacca sanitary latrine to 280 HHs
• Education support for 176 CWDs (children with disabilities)
• Facilitating IGA (Income Generating Activities) supports to 230 PWD HHs

During addressing emergency response activities SSDP also have some visitors from National and International donors.
1. Mr. Roger Bodary, National Director, Habitat for Humanity International Bangladesh
2. Mr. Oliver Broua, Rapid response Coordinator, Regional Support Office-South Asia from European Commission.
3. Mr. Norbert Nicoup, Mission chief , handicap International from France
4. Country Director-save the children –USA
5. Farrah Kabir, Country Director, Action aid Bangladesh
6. Dr. Malay Chandra Mirdha , ICCDDRB
7. Abdur Rashid, Executive Director NGO Forum for WSS
8. Mr.Jahid Hasan with MJF team and more

Core programmatic achievement of SSDP
With a view to sustainable development of underprivileged community especially people with disabilities (PWDs) SSDP is working since 1990 and supported the PWDs through inclusive education, IGAs for self-employment, assistive devise, medical support, PTR Self-help group (SHGs) formation, skill training, social mobilization advocacy and lobbing etc. With a view of capacity building also provide/ facilitate awareness raising program, different training like leadership, decision making, involvement in various social activities and curricular activities.

Some case of remarkable successful as well as achievement of SSDP can be present in following manner.
Case -1. Sarmin, a physically WWD girl passed her 16 years of life within a room with attached bath room. She never comes outside her room. SSDP discover her and provide an assistive device. It was a joyful day in her life when she sees the open sky and the socio-culture environment first during her 16 years life. She moved whole the Barguna District town by her wheel chair. She looked every thing with her surprising eyes every moment. Every body also enjoys this scenario.

Case -2. Jamal, a physically disabled person beneficiary is running a grocery shop taken support from SSDP through its IGA support program. He started the business with the capital of Tk.4000.00 and at present he is running with the capital of Tk20000.00. Now he is happy with his family with a monthly income of Tk.4000.00 – 5000.00 per month..

Present scope of work at the SSDP working area rehabilitation and sustainable development.
a. Accessible housing support for changing life’s of the PWDs families with sanitation facilities.
b. Livelihood support for Income generating.
c. School based forestation
d. Inclusive Educational for CWDs.
e. Self help Group promotional activities for social inclusion
f. Medical and Assistive Devise support for the PWDs
g. Primary health care support, and medical support for the PWDs
h. Psycho-social care support program
i. Home based gardening.
j. Long term agriculture rehabilitation program for food security. k. Climate change protection and disaster management program support.

Present supporters & Donors :
a. Action aid Bangladesh. ECHO.
b. Manusher Junnay Foundation ( MJF)
c. Stings Lillian Fonds through DRRA
d. Cristfel Blind Mission (CBM), GARMANY -Centre for Disability and Development ( CDD)
e. Nari Pakha.
f. Steps towards Development, Gender & Development Alliance
g. Bureau of Non-formal Education (BNFE), GOB and DAM
h Action on Disability and Development (ADD)
i. Health Link UK through SARPV-Bangladesh
j. Dark and Light Netherlands through CDD
k. Habitat for Humanity International – Bangladesh Country Office.
l. ADDIN Welfare Centre- HASAB Consortium

Additional cooperation requirement:
a. Program support for livelihood and food security for the fishermen community along with PWDs.
b. Disaster Risk reduction and management program.
c. Training center cum cyclone shelter establish organizational sustainability
d. Program support for the self-help group promotional activities for social inclusion for PWDs

If you have any queries please communicate with SSDP and /or visit their program area.
Md. Habibur Rahman
Executive Director
Southern Socio-economic Development Program (SSDP)
Amtali Natun Bazar
Amtali Barguna , Bangladesh
Phone: 04452-56136, Mobile: 01712-163604
E-mail: ssdp_2004@yahoo.com, habibssdp@gmail.com



Thank you to Ghulam Nabi Nizamani for circulating this report from the SSDP.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

IntraHealth Seeks Information on Access to Sexual Reproductive Health in Developing Countries

Posted on 16 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Health, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

IntraHealth International is seeking both facts and personal stories on access to Sexual Reproductive Health in developing countries.

IntraHealth International, a global health organization, wants to increase awareness about the importance of inclusion of people with disabilities in sexual and reproductive health programs in developing countries. They need:

– Facts on what is being done currently to increase access to health care services,
— Information on local disability organizations in developing countries
— What are the specific barriers and problems that limit access to health care services in general and to SRH in particular
— Any relevant data
— Personal stories about disabled persons and their experiences accessing, or trying to access, sexual and reproductive health care services in developing countries

Please send any info or resources you may have to Cornelia Kip Lee, or to Jim McMahan at:

Cornelia Lee: corneliakip@mac.com U.S. phone: 919-428-3335
Jim McMahan: jmcmahan@intrahealth.org



I received this notice via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

NEWS: AusAID Prioritizes People with Disabilities

Posted on 16 December 2008. Filed under: News, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , |

MEDIA RELEASE
BOB MCMULLAN MP
PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE
MEMBER FOR FRASER
AA 08 67 25 November 2008
The Australian Government has for the first time made people with disability a priority for Australia’s international development
program.

Parliamentary Secretary for International Development Assistance, Bob McMullan, will today launch Australia’s first strategy to guide
Australia’s aid program in supporting people with a disability in the developing world.

An estimated 10 per cent of the world’s population, or around 650
million people, live with a disability. Of these, about 80 per cent
live in developing countries.

“Australia is committed to including people with disability in the
fight against global poverty and supporting them to improve the
quality of their lives,” Mr McMullan said.

“People with a disability are among the poorest and most vulnerable in developing countries,” he said.

The new strategy, ‘Development for All’, aims to improve quality of life for people with disabilities, strengthen prevention efforts and promote international leadership on disability and development.

It also seeks to improve understanding of disability and development across the Asia Pacific region.

“With good leadership, attitudes towards people with disability can change, services can be improved and people’s lives can be transformed -– not only the lives of the person with a disability, but their families and those around them,” Mr McMullan said.

People with a disability face many barriers preventing them from
participating in society, and are more likely to be socially excluded. Women and children with disability often face the greatest challenges.

The Australian Government recognises that poverty and disability are linked and is committed to ensuring that the benefits of development reach those who are most excluded.

Australia has recently ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of
Persons with Disabilities, and, in addition to launching the strategy is also preparing a national disability policy to be released in 2009.

Media Contact: Sabina Curatolo (Mr McMullan’s Office) 0400 318 205
AusAID Public Affairs 0417 680 590
http://www.ausaid.gov.au/media/release.cfm?BC=Media&ID=5342_2977_992_462_1249



I received this press release via Ghulam Nabi Nizamani.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

JOB POST: Consultant, Vocational Education and Training for Vulnerable Groups in Eastern Europe, Bulgarian Roma

Posted on 4 December 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Employment, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Subject: [Bulgarian Roma] Job: Consultant, Vocational Education and Training for Vulnerable Groups in Eastern Europe

A Washington D.C based government contractor is looking for a consultant to compose a report for USAID regarding vocational education and training in Eastern Europe for vulnerable groups, specifically people with disabilities.

The report, work on which would start in immediately, will include two major sections, one addressing training for people with disabilities and the second, training for institutionalized adolescents who will graduate from institutions. Both of these sections of the report should contain a review of best practices and lessons learned from vocational and job skills training programs for persons in the group. As much as possible, this review should rely on information from programs that have been evaluated and on information from programs that have been implemented in the E&E region (although these do not need to have been implemented by USAID). The report should also include a very concrete guide and set of recommendations for Missions who wish to program in this area. These recommendations should include practical, “how-to” advice including a discussion of the conditions that are necessary for these types of programs to be successful, descriptions of types of programs that seem to work best, links and other references to strong model programs so that readers can easily access more information, etc.

Previous experience with writing reports for USAID while certainly and advantage, is not necessarily a must, as long as the candidate has a proven record of producing reports for other governmental agencies, international organizations, and NGOs. The key qualities would be expertise in vocational education and training for people with disabilities in Eastern Europe, the ability to gather and analyze cross-county data from the region, and good writing skills.

Please email rtsanov@jbsinternational.com



This notice was recently circulated, among other places, on the Intl-Dev mailing list, which people may subscribe to for free.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

Filipino Women with Disabilities Wishes to Network

Posted on 30 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, East Asia Pacific Region, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Poverty, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Hello,
I’m sharing the website of WOWLEAP- Women With Disabilities Leap to Social and Economic Progress- an organization organized by Filipino Women with disabilities and working towards the empowerment of women with disabilities since 2000. We are slowly getting the participation of women with disability leaders in creating our voice to be heard and be a part of the national advocacy movement for persons with disabilities. Please visit our page http://wowleap2000.tripod.com/index.html and we will be happy to establish network with organizations who are willing to help us in achieving our vision.
Thank you,
Carmen Zubiaga



Carmen Zubiaga recently circulated the above email on the AdHoc_IDC email discussion list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Disabled People Must Not Pay for Crisis, Says European Disability Forum

Posted on 27 November 2008. Filed under: Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Employment, Human Rights, News, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

français

EDF Statement on the Economic Crisis: Disabled People Must Not Pay for the Crisis

Paris, 16 Novembre 2008 – The European Disability Forum, which is the voice of more than 50 million European people with disabilities, calls on the European Council, Commission and Parliament and other European institutions and all the governments of Europe to ensure disabled people and their families do not pay for the worldwide economic crisis by the reduction in their income, benefits, employment opportunities or in cuts in support to our representative organisations.

The crisis was caused by the irresponsible lending and unacceptable negligence by those in charge of the financial institutions and regulatory bodies of the world. Governments’ response to the ‘credit crunch’ has been to create financial resources to bail out the banks. Now as this lack of confidence feeds its way into the general economic system it is vital that poor, elderly and disabled people and their families of Europe do not pay for this crisis. We already in a precarious position prior to the crisis, therefore call for a reflationary approach to spend more on investment in accessible infra structure, on benefits and the provision of tax relief, so that these groups can buy goods and services so improving the economic situation.

The world through the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities has only just recognised the urgent need to extend the international human rights law framework to disabled people. Society cannot afford to dilute its commitment to human rights including the right to employment and family life. Traditionally disabled people have been the ‘reserve army of labour’, ’the last to be hired the first to be fired’, seen as expendable at times of economic crisis. Disabled People, their families, the unemployed and the poor cannot become the scapegoat for a crisis not of their making. Already the worsening economic position has led to attempts to cut benefits in many countries such as Ireland, Hungary, Sweden and Italy.

The lesson of this crisis – the value of investing in people – is far more important than speculative investment and it benefits the whole of society and strengthens its resistance to such crisis driven changes. If the gap between the disadvantaged and the wealthy widens, it will cost society more in the long run. The EDF will ensure the equality and rights of disabled people come to the top of the political agenda in the forthcoming European Elections.

Cutbacks and mass unemployment will develop a fertile ground for violence, hate crime, undermine solidarity and produce dangerous attitudes for democracy. We call on all those with political and economic decision making responsibility to do all they can to ensure that disabled and poor people are treated with equality and their economic well being is assured by the measures they take at this time. Now is the time for strong action so that in 2010-European Anti Poverty Year- disabled people and other disadvantaged groups do not again come to the top of the agenda.

The European Disability Forum (EDF) is the European umbrella organisation representing the interests of 50 million disabled citizens in Europe. EDF membership includes national umbrella organisations of disabled people from all EU/EEA countries, as well as European NGOs representing the different types of disabilities, organisations and individuals committed to disability issues. The mission of the European Disability Forum is to ensure disabled people full access to fundamental and human rights through their active involvement in policy development and implementation in Europe.

Forum européen des personnes handicapées
>>> Communiqué de presse

Déclaration du Forum Européen des personnes handicapées à propos de la crise financière: Les personnes handicapées ne doivent pas payer la crise

Paris, le 16 novembre 2008 – Représentant 50 millions d’européens en situation de handicap, le Forum Européen des Personnes Handicapées appelle le Conseil Europeén la Commission Européenne et le Parlement Européen, les Institutions Européennes et tous les Gouvernements des pays européens à s’assurer que les personnes handicapées et leurs familles n’aient pas à payer les conséquences de la crise financière internationale par une réduction de leurs revenus, de leurs accès à l’emploi, de leurs moyens de compensation ou par une réduction des moyens attribués à leurs organisations représentatives.

La crise financière a été causée par des accords de prêts irresponsables et des négligences inacceptables de la part des responsables d’Institutions financières et de régulation financières. La réponse des Gouvernements à cette déroute bancaire a été la création de ressources financières pour sauver les banques. Maintenant que la perte de confiance gagne l’économie réelle, il est essentiel que les européens exposés à la pauvreté, à la maladie et aux situations handicap n’aient pas à faire les frais de cette crise. Déjà affectée par la précarité avant cette crise, nous pensons au contraire qu’une politique de relance devrait augmenter les allocations, investir dans l’accessibilité et accorder des avantages fiscaux pour que ces groupes puissent consommer des biens et des services et ainsi soutenir le développement économique.

Avec l’adoption par les Nations Unies de la Convention Internationale pour le droit des personnes handicapées le monde vient juste de reconnaître le besoin urgent d’un élargissement du cadre des Droits de l’Homme aux personnes handicapées. La société ne peut pas se permettre maintenant de d’affaiblir son engagement pour les Droits de la Personne et notamment le droit à l’emploi et le droit à fonder une famille.

Il est depuis longtemps d’usage que la réponse aux besoins des personnes handicapées représente une « réserve d’emploi », ce sont les dernières à être engagées et les premières à être licenciées, perçues comme quantité négligeable. La dégradation de la situation économique a déjà conduit plusieurs pays à vouloir supprimer des avantages acquis, comme en Irlande, en Hongrie, en Suède et en Italie.

La leçon de cette crise est que l’investissement sur le développement des personnes est beaucoup plus essentiel que les investissements spéculatifs, qu’il bénéficie à l’ensemble de la collectivité et qu’il renforce les capacités de réponse collective à ce type de crise. Si le fossé entre les riches et les pauvres s’élargit encore la crise coûtera plus cher et durera plus longtemps. Le Forum Européen des Personnes Handicapées veillera à ce que l’égalité et les droits des personnes handicapes devienne une priorité de l’agenda politique européen lors des prochaines élection européennes.

Les restrictions et l’augmentation du chômage vont créer un terrain propice au développement de la violence, d’attitudes dangereuses pour la démocratie et constituent une menace pour la solidarité. Nous appelons les responsables politiques et économiques à faire face à leur responsabilité et à prendre immédiatement les décisions nécessaires pour que les personnes handicapées, leurs familles et les personnes pauvres soient traitées avec équité et leur avenir économique assuré.

Le Forum européen des personnes handicapées (FEPH) est la plateforme européenne qui représente les intérêts de 50 millions de citoyens handicapés au sein de l’Union européenne. Les organisations membres du FEPH incluent les plateformes nationales des personnes handicapées de tous les Etats membres de l’UE et de l’Espace économique européen, ainsi que les ONG européennes représentant les différents types de handicap. La mission du FEPH est de garantir le respect total des droits fondamentaux et humains des personnes handicapées par le biais d’une implication active dans le développement et application des politiques européennes.



This press release was circulated on the AsiaPacificDisability listserver.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 3 so far )

E-Discussion on Disability and Climate Change, 8-12 December 2008, Via Email

Posted on 24 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Disaster Planning & Mitigation, Events and Conferences, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Invitation to Join GPDD Electronic Discussion On DISABILITY & CLIMATE CHANGE
8 – 12 December 2008
Sponsored by: The Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD) and The World Bank (Human Development Network – Social Protection/Disability & Development Team)

The Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD) is pleased to invite you to an e- discussion on Disability & Climate Change.

Climate change causes grave consequences for human well-being, development, and security, by increasing severe weather conditions that raise the risks of disease, food scarcity, loss of livelihoods, migration, violence, and conflict. Climate change threatens the effectiveness of development efforts by disproportionately affecting people with disabilities and other vulnerable groups in low- and middle-income countries. In the face of these imminent challenges, people with disabilities and their families require adaptation and robust systems that promote sustainable access to basic necessities, secure livelihoods, health care, and social and civic participation.

This e-discussion will be a week-long electronic exchange among all interested stakeholders to create a shared understanding of how climate change may impact the lives of people with disabilities in low- and middle-income countries, and summarize the major themes that must be addressed in future research activities.

The e-discussion will take place from 8 – 12 December, and be facilitated by Dr. Maria Kett, Assistant Director of the LCI Disability and Inclusive Development Centre of Leonard Cheshire Disability, and Valerie Sherrer, Emergency Coordinator of Christian Blind Mission. Discussion topics will center on two primary themes:
1. Disasters, Emergencies, Conflicts and Disability, and
2. Basic Necessities, Health, & Poverty Reduction.

The main objective of the e-discussion is to build on existing knowledge and exchange ideas on developing practical strategies to cope with the diverse effects of climate change, which will directly or indirectly impact the lives of people with disabilities and their families. The information and insight gathered in the discussion will be converted into a report for wide dissemination in multiple formats.

The discussion is open to all interested parties and participation is free. Please be sure to register before 28 November, 2008 to ensure inclusion in the entirety of the discussions.
To register, please submit an email in the following format:
To: listserv@listserv.syr.edu
Subject: GPDD-eDisc2008 [First Name Last Name Country]
*e.g.: GPDD-eDisc2008 Joe Smith Australia
Message Body: Subscribe GPDD-eDisc2008 [First Name Last Name]
*e.g.: Subscribe GPDD-eDisc2008 Joe Smith

For questions or further information regarding this event, please contact Kelly Hamel at kmhamel@law.syr.edu.

We very much look forward to having you join us!



This announcement was recently circulated on the <a href=”http://www.gpdd-online.org/mailinglist”GPDD mailing list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Information Wanted: Africans with Disabilities, Policies, Programs, Organizations

Posted on 23 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Middle East and North Africa, Opportunities, Policy & Legislation, Resources, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

**The Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities needs your Help**
The Secretariat is currently collecting and updating information on the situation faced by persons with disabilities in the 54 African countries. It will enter this information into the country folders on its website. The information collected relates to policies, programmes, contact details for organisations engaged in disability work, best practice in the inclusion of disability in mainstream programmes, etc. If you have such information to share, please write to info@africandecade.co.za.

We Can Do readers will want to explore the excellent web site for the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities. As implied in the above paragraph, their web site has a section with information on the 54 individual countries of Africa. Your assistance can help them expand the information provided in these folders. Providing information to the Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities can also be an opportunity for you to help bring attention to policies, programs, organizations, and practices that have benefited people with disabilities in your country. Again, you can email relevant details to info@africandecade.co.za

It is also well worth exploring their collection of training materials for organizations of people with disabilities. Some of their training materials have been highlighted in past We Can Do posts, but not all of them. Training materials include a guidebook for journalists; material on lobbying and advocacy; resource mobilization and fund raising; evaluation; capacity building; and more.



The first paragraph of the above text is copy/pasted from a recent issue of the email newsletter for Disabled People’s International.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Call for Papers, World Bank Conference on Employment and Development, Bonn, Germany, May 4-5, 2009

Posted on 18 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Employment, Events and Conferences, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

This conference is not specifically focused on disability issues, but it could be an opportunity for presenters to submit proposals that introduce a disability dimension to the issue of Employment and Development. People interested in attending may wish to monitor the conference website to see how many sessions focus on disability issues. People who would need disability-related accommodations should contact the conference organizers directly to inquire.

Call for Papers – Fourth IZA/World Bank Conference on ‘Employment and Development’
Bonn, Germany
– May 4-5, 2009

Dear Colleagues,

In many developing countries, the number of workers facing unemployment, low pay and poor working conditions is high and often growing. Policy makers everywhere are searching for answers, yet significant knowledge gaps persist in our understanding of the functioning of labor markets in low and middle income countries.

The World Bank has put forward a strategy that aims at assisting the international research community to address priority areas in the field of labor markets and development. In 2006, the World Bank and the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) have launched a new IZA research area on “Employment and Development.” At the core of this partnership are the series of international annual conferences to provide a platform to bring together researchers and policy makers from around the world to discuss and present their work in these priority areas.

IZA and the World Bank will organize a two-day conference in Bonn, Germany on 4-5 May 2009. Parallel sessions will be organized. Conference organizers invite you to submit your contribution by December 15, 2008. Decisions will be made by the end of January 2009.

We invite submission of papers on labor markets, job creation and labor market policies in developing countries. We will consider detailed abstracts, but will favor full papers – particularly empirical ones – that focus on one of the 7 topics of research listed at: http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/research/ra7/index#topics
Papers dealing with developed countries and transitions economies are welcome if they prove to be relevant for the purpose of the conference and our understanding of labor market mechanism for the developing world.

The keynote speakers and panel sessions will focus on the topic of “Causes and Consequences of Formality and Informality”.

Keynote Speakers:
Gary Fields, Professor of Labor Economics, Cornell University
Santiago Levy, Vice President for Sector and Knowledge at the Inter-American Development Bank

For more information on this event, please refer to the conference website at:
http://www.iza.org/conference_files/worldb2009

The online application form is available at:
http://www.iza.org/conference_files/formApplication?conf_id=1642

Previous IZA/World Bank conferences have attracted prestigious researchers and policymakers from a wide variety of developed and developing countries (see the above link for details).

Organizers: Markus Frölich (University of Mannheim and IZA), Randall Akee (IZA), Jean Fares (World Bank) and Stefano Scarpetta (OECD and IZA)

Please do not hesitate to contact the organizers at development@iza.org for any questions regarding this event



I received this announcement via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development mailing list

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Human Rights Advocates Program, Columbia University: Training for human rights advocates

Posted on 18 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Education and Training Opportunities, Human Rights, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , |

The following program is not specific to human rights in the disability community. However, it does emphasize marginalized communities in general. Disability rights advocates ready for a one-semester graduate-level training program may wish to apply on that basis. If you have missed the December 19, 2008 deadline for the 2009 session, then you may still wish to consult the Columbia University web site for information on future sessions.

Dear friends and colleagues:

The application for the 2009 session of the annual Human Rights Advocates Program (HRAP) at Columbia University is now available (deadline December 19, 2008). Columbia University asks that people disseminate this information to human rights activists based in the Global South as well as grassroots activists in the United States.

HRAP is designed to prepare proven human rights leaders from the Global South and marginalized communities in the U.S. to participate in national and international policy debates on globalization by building their skills, knowledge, and contacts. The Program features a four-month residency at Columbia University in New York City with a structured curriculum of advocacy, networking, skills-building, and academic coursework.

Since 2004, HRAP has concentrated its support on individuals and organizations that address issues broadly related to globalization.

The four-month intensive capacity building program based at Columbia University in New York focuses on the following key issue areas:

* Environmental injustice
* Labor rights violations
* Ramifications of resource extraction
* Public health crises
* Unsustainable development
* Intolerance, xenophobia, and social exclusion related to globalization

Special attention is given to the above issues and their intersection with gender, race, ethnicity, sexual identity, and/or other sources of marginalization.

Participants are selected on the basis of their previous work experience on human rights and globalization, commitment to the human rights field, and demonstrated ability to complete graduate-level studies. Advocates must originate from and reside in either the Global South or the United States. Fluency in English is required. Advocate s must secure institutional endorsement from their organizations for their participation in the Program and must commit to returning to that organization upon completion of the Program. If accepted, they must also commit to participating in the program fully.

This extremely competitive Program will admit approximately six participants. We make every effort to provide full fellowships to cover program costs as well as travel and living expenses for selected Advocates each year.

Attached please find the 2009 application form. Completed applications are due by December 19, 2008. Incomplete applications will not be considered. The 2009 HRAP will take place from the middle of August to the middle of December 2009.

For further information or to download the application form, please refer to Columbia University’s website at: http://hrap.hrcolumbia.org/

Thank you.

Yours sincerely,

Stephanie V. Grepo
Director, Capacity Building Programs
Center for the Study of Human Rights
Columbia University



Thank you to Catherine Townsend for circulating this announcement.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Marketing and Communications Internship (paid), Global Partnership for Disability and Development, Washington DC

Posted on 18 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Jobs & Internships, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS INTERNSHIP
Location: Washington, District of Columbia, 20006, United States
Organization: Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD)

Area of Focus: Disability Issues, International Cooperation
Skill(s): editing, special events planning, Writing
End date: July 9, 2009
Language(s): English
Start date: January 9, 2009
Last day to apply: December 6, 2008
Paid or unpaid: Paid

Description:
The Marketing and Communications Intern will provide critical support in raising awareness about the GPDD and its programs, disseminating information and outcomes, and providing outreach to a large number of diverse stakeholders. The duties of the GPDD Communication Intern include:
* Identifying key constituencies and stakeholders for the organization
* Assisting with the development of communications and marketing strategies to effectively engage them
* Assisting with the development and maintenance of communities of practice and work groups, comprised of individuals and institutions, in order to facilitate the GPDD programmatic and development goals
* Assisting with the development of informational materials about the GPDD, including website content, newsletters, annual reports, videos and other organizational materials
* Assisting with the development of press releases and management of media relations
* Assisting with the coordination of organizational mailings
* Coordinating special events
* Assisting with the maintenance of the organization’s contact and membership databases
* Staying abreast of local events, seminars and publications of interest to the organization and facilitating the organizations participation as necessary
* Management of special projects related to the communications strategy of the organization

Qualifications:
Required Skills: A minimum of 3 years of under-graduate education.
Experience in communications field, disability issues, international relations, or development. Knowledge of information gathering and data building. Fluency in written and oral English; communication skills and ability to draft, edit and proofread. Computer proficiency.

Desired Skills: Experience or knowledge of communications and development. Master’s degree, or working towards a degree, in relevant field. Work experience in non-profit organizations.

Required Attributes: Proactive attitude and ability to work independently. Attention to detail and strong organizational skills. Creative and thorough approach to research. Interest in disability issues.

Application instructions:
To apply, please submit your resume/CV and cover letter to
kmhamel@law.syr.edu.
Please include “Marketing and Communication Internship” in the subject line.
Qualified candidates will be contacted by phone and/or email.



This announcement was disseminated on the GPDD mailing list.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

CONFERENCE: Persons with Disabilities as Actors of Sustainable Development, December 2-3, 2008, Berlin

Posted on 11 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Bezev (disability and development cooperation in Essen, Germany) would appreciate very much if you could spread this invitation within your networks, and send it to people you think could be interested.

Thank you very much for your attention, and cooperation,
with warm regards,

Mareike Bübl
www.bezev.de

International Congress in Berlin „´Nothing About Us Without Us´ – Persons with Disabilities as Actors of Sustainable Development”

On 3rd December, the worldwide Day of Persons with Disabilities, the international congress „´Nothing about us without us´ – Persons with Disabilities as Actors of Sustainable Development”, will take place from 2-3 December 2008 in Berlin/Germany.
The purpose of the congress is to make its contribution towards the implementation of the UN Convention marking a paradigm shift in the role of persons with disabilities.
It aims to show how persons with disabilities can be included to take an active part in development activities. The congress will conclude with a discussion by a panel of politicians and representatives of non-government organisations and associations about their contribution towards the realisation of the UN Convention and the demand for inclusive development implicated therein.

Speakers from all over the world will share their experiences with us, and we will discuss the implementation of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities.

We are very glad to welcome Mrs Evers-Meyer, the federal government comissioner for persons with disabilities in Germany, Mrs Venus M. Ilagan from the USA (Rehabilitation International), Dorothy Musakanya from Zimbabwe (Southern African Federation of Disabled People SAFOD), Mrs Tuija Halmari from Finland (Finnish Disabled People´s International Development Association FIDIDA), Mr Shikuku Obosi from Great Britain (Action on Disability and Development ADD), Mr Raghavan Ramachandran from India (ebenfalls ADD) and many other interesting guests.

The congress is directed to actors working in the areas of development and disability, as well as anyone interested in these issues.

It is organised jointly by Disability and Development Cooperation (bezev), CBM (Christian Blind Mission), Deutsche Lepra- und Tuberkulosehilfe (DAHW), Interessenvertretung Selbstbestimmt Leben in Deutschland (ISL) and Misereor.

Learn more about the conference and how to participate at http://bezev.de/bezev/aktuelles/index.htm



Thank you to Mareike Bübl at bezev for submitting this announcement to We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Change for People with Disabilities: Time to Email Obama!

Posted on 7 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Comments or Information, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Inclusion, News, Opportunities | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Change for People with Disabilities: Time to Email Obama!

[Addendum, 21 January 2009: Please note that this blog site has no association with the Obama administration or the US government. This means that comments left here will NOT be passed along to the White House.  People who wish to contact Obama's administration will wish to try the White House web site, or you may wish to communicate with the White House Office of Public Liaison.]

On November 4, 2008, millions of people with disabilities across the United States and around the world joined our non-disabled peers in watching the United States election results. Obama supporters cheered or wept to learn that the next US president would be Obama. Then we cheered or wept again when Obama mentioned people with disabilities in his acceptance speech. History was made–not only for America, not only for Black people, not only for Kenya and all of Africa, not only for Indigenous peoples, but also for people with disabilities.

But we cannot afford to allow the moment to end here. Whether we supported Obama, McCain, or another candidate, we all know there is far too much work ahead before we can say, “Yes, we have made real change for people with disabilities.”

It is time for people with disabilities, our loved ones, our neighbors, and colleagues to join together, across ideological divides, to reach out to Obama. We should all send an email to Kareem Dale, Obama’s National Disability Vote Director (at kdale@barackobama.com), WITH COPIES TO Anne Hayes, a volunteer on the Obama Disability Policy Committee (at ahayesku@hotmail.com).

First, we should thank Obama — and also Kareem Dale — for mentioning people with disabilities in Obama’s acceptance speech on November 4. Ensure that they understand how much it matters simply for us to be included. How did you feel when Obama mentioned us? Share your story.

Second, we should tell Obama and Kareem Dale that we are aware of Obama’s disability platform. He promised to increase educational opportunities; end discrimination; increase employment opportunities; and support independent, community-based living for Americans with disabilities. And he promised to sign the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), the first international, legally-binding human rights treaty for people with disabilities. Tell Obama and Kareem Dale that we are ready to call Obama to account if he fails us. But more importantly, we are ready to work with him for change for people with disabilities.

It is important to send your disability-related emails to BOTH Kareem Dale AND Anne Hayes (kdale@barackobama.com AND ahayesku@hotmail.com) between now and inauguration day. Kareem Dale’s email address may change between now and January 20, 2009. Anne Hayes can help ensure that emails sent to Kareem Dale are not lost during this time of transition.

Both Kareem Dale and others who have worked on disability issues within the Obama campaign are ready to receive YOUR emails on disability-related issues for US President-elect Obama. Emails are welcome from across the United States and around the world. If you are a US citizen, then please say so in your email.

Learn more about Obama’s plan for people with disabilities at: http://origin.barackobama.com/issues/disabilities/

Yes, the video is captioned. And if you scroll down to the bottom of the page, you can download Obama’s Full Plan for people with disabilities in PDF format (62 Kb).

Read Obama’s acceptance speech at: http://www.barackobama.com/2008/11/04/remarks_of_presidentelect_bara.php

Want to read someone else’s letter to Obama before you write your own? Some links to a few letters to Obama are posted at: http://reunifygally.wordpress.com/2008/11/13/emails-to-obama-creating-change-for-people-with-disabilities/

Learn more about the CRPD at http://ratifynow.org/ratifynow-faq/

If you wish to contact Obama’s staff on some topic other than disability, then you can send an email via his web page at http://www.change.gov/page/s/ofthepeople

Please circulate this email freely, or post this at your own blog, web site, or Facebook page.

This text was first posted at http://wecando.wordpress.com/2008/11/07/disabilities-email-obama/ The most updated version will be here, so please consult before cross-posting.

“It is the answer spoken by young and old, rich and poor, Democrat and Republican, black, white, Latino, Asian, Native American, gay, straight, DISABLED and not disabled — Americans who sent a message to the world that we have never been a collection of Red States and Blue States: we are, and always will be, the United States of America.”
–President-Elect Barack Obama
Acceptance speech, November 4, 2008; emphasis added

The above text, with some alterations, is also available in this slide show:


_________________
The above text was written by me, Andrea Shettle. Please do copy/paste and circulate the text above the line among other people. Let’s send as many letters as we can to Obama and his staff to ensure they know that people with disabilities around the world are looking to him to stand by us during his tenure as US president.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 31 so far )

NEWS: African Decade of Persons with Disabilities Extended to 2019

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, News, Poverty, Sub-Saharan Africa Region | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ANNOUNCEMENT:

AFRICAN DECADE OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES EXTENDED TO DECEMBER 2019

A. CONGRATULATIONS AND GOOD NEWS!

We are ecstatic!

This is to announce that the AU Continental Decade of Persons with Disabilities has been extended to December 2019.

The Windhoek Declaration on Social Development adopted by Ministers in Charge of Social Development on 31 October 2008, adopted Resolution 6, which reads as follows:

‘6. ADOPT the extension of the Continental Decade of Persons with Disabilities for the period 2010-2019; CALL for the evaluation of the existing Decade and its Plan of Action (1999-2009) and the speedy conclusion of the evaluation and restructuring of the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI)’

In addition to the resolution extending the Decade, the Windhoek Declaration also adopted resolution 5(x) which reads as follows:

‘5. Further commit ourselves to implement the priority strategies under the key thematic social issues spelt out in the Social Policy Framework for Africa, through the following:

(x) Empowering and providing persons with disabilities with equal opportunities, safeguarding their rights and enlisting their participation and mainstreaming them in all development programmes’

The new Social Development Policy adopted by the Ministers in Windhoek Namibia has detailed coverage of disability work. We encourage organisations to get a copy of this policy and apply its contents in your programming processes.

We would like to thank all organisations (notably Pan African Federation Of the Disabled (PAFOD), African Union of the Blind (AFUB), and others), Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) Staff and leaders, Panel of Experts/Parliamentarians, Pan African Parliament, African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI), the African Union Social Affairs Commission, our Development Partners (Disabled Persons Organizations Denmark [DPOD], Sida, UK Department for International Development [DFID], and Southern Africa Trust), Christian Blind Mission (CBM) and those that supported our down-line networks and DPOs for their support during the first Decade and the campaign towards extension.

We look forward to hard work during the next ten years. We now have the benefit of learning from the mistakes that we made and the experience of managing an initiative of this nature.

B. MORE INFORMATION ON THE FIRST DECADE

The African Union declared the first decade of the new millennium (1999-2009) as the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities. In 2001 the African Union’s Labour and Social Affairs Commission along with its African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI) and the ILO held a meeting in Addis Ababa. In this meeting they designed a Continental Plan of Action (CPOA) to guide the member states of the African Union on how to implement the African Decade. The adoption of the African Decade of Disabled Persons (ADDP) placed responsibility on African States to implement Decade Programme activities.

With this declaration, the African Union adopted a Continental Plan of Action (CPOA) with twelve objectives that African States were to implement over the period.

The twelve objectives cover a wide range of themes that are of critical importance to improvement in the lives of persons with disabilities in Africa. These themes include ideas and strategies to:
1. Formulate and implement national policies, programmes and legislation to promote the full and equal participation of persons with disabilities.
2. Promote the participation of persons with disabilities in the process of economic and social development
3. Promote the self-representation of people with disabilities in all public decision-making structures.
4. To enhance support services for disabled persons.
5. Promote special measures for children, youth, women and elderly persons with disabilities.
6. Ensure and improve access to rehabilitation, education, training, employment, sports, the cultural and physical environment.
7. To promote and protect disability rights as human rights
8. To support the development of and strengthen Disabled Persons’ Organizations
9. Mobilize resources

These objectives where meant to be implemented by Africa States, with the cooperation of civil society organisations.
Prepared By:

Kudakwashe A.K. Dube, CEO
SADPD



This announcement is being circulated by The Secretariat of the African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD). Their website is at http://www.africandecade.org.za and is worth exploring for anyone with an interest in human rights or social and economic development for people with disabilities in Africa. I modified this announcement to spell out most of the acronyms.

I received this announcement via the mailing list for the Global Partnership for Disability and Development.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

25th Annual Pacific Rim International Conference on Disabilities, Honolulu, Hawaii, 4-5 May 2009

Posted on 2 November 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Papers, Cross-Disability, East Asia Pacific Region, Events and Conferences, Opportunities, Poverty | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Call for Proposals
25th Annual Pacific Rim International Conference on Disabilities

May 4-5, 2009
Honolulu, Hawai‘i
Hawai‘i Convention Center
Note that proposals for workshops need to be submitted by December 12, 2008.

Working toward a brighter future

The Center on Disability Studies (http://www.cds.hawaii.edu) at the University of Hawai‘i cordially invites you to the 25th Annual Pacific Rim International Conference on Disabilities on May 4-5, 2009 in Honolulu, Hawai‘i. Celebrate the collective achievements of the past and look forward to create an inclusive vision for the 21st century. As we face economic uncertainty and global challenges, it is even more important to honor tradition, and use this foundation to navigate our futures.

In the tradition of PacRim, the 2009 conference will revisit familiar themes and explore new directions through scholarship, best practice, and international networking. Join us, and continue this extraordinary journey. We will have several pre and post conference sessions,
including an accessible sports Sunday at the beach; an international film festival; and the 2nd Annual International Forum: Securing the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Eradicating Poverty.

Envisioning the Future

· To achieve human and social progress we will address poverty.

· To maximize human potential we will highlight indigenous/native peoples; girls and women; and veterans with disabilities.

· To realize our dreams for inclusion and self-determination, we will ensure all people have access to services and opportunities: transition to adulthood, employment, family support, independent living.

· To create an accessible world, we will showcase Universal Design for Learning and Living and feature products and design elements for home, school, play and office.

· To ensure our future we will prepare our youth to take responsibility for the future by bringing them together to dialogue about experiences, visions, insights, and futures.

· To support your attendance PacRim 2009 will provide an early acceptance notice within 2-3 weeks of your submission. Conference rates are very reasonable and we have secured room blocks for under $160 per night. We will also help facilitate room-shares if you are trying to
keep your costs low. We all need to be together!

If you are only able to attend one conference this year, choose PacRim 2009 in Waikiki, Hawaii at the beautiful Hawaii Convention Center.

Traditionally this conference is one of the most exciting for attendees and presenters – providing a unique balance of cultures, and issues of local, national and international importance. This year’s conference will seek to better these efforts and provide you with a most unique and exceptional experience – we hope to be seeing you in Honolulu in
May.

Robert Stodden
Director, the Center on Disability Studies

Charmaine Crockett
Co-Chair, PacRim 2009

Valerie Shearer
Co-Chair, PacRim 2009

People interested in learning more about the conference should please follow the web links listed below. Any inquiries regarding the conference should please be directed to the people organizing PacRim 2009, NOT to We Can Do.

Web Site Links
Text Only version of the Call for Papers:http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/ad/callforpapers2009/text.html
About PacRim: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/
PacRim Themes: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/pacriminfo/pacrim2009/topics/
Submission: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/submissions/
Registration: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/registration/
About the Convention Center: http://www.hawaiiconvention.com/



I received this conference announcement via the AsiaPacificDisability email discussion group. Again, all official information on the conference is on their web site, including information on how to contact the organizers as needed.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

[Published at wecando.wordpress.com (We Can Do)]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

New Global Email Network of Women with Disabilities Launches

Posted on 30 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Call for Nominations or Applications, Cross-Disability, Human Rights, Networking Opportunities, Opportunities, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Dear friends,

As you may know, a group of over 50 participants from 20 countries and various sectors (civil society, governments, academia, international organizations and private sector) met in Quebec, Canada on August 26-27 for a Global Summit on the Rights of Women with Disabilities. All Interational Disability Alliance organizations were invited to send a representative, and were actively engaged in the discussions.

The Summit was a great opportunity to talk about the key challenges facing women with disabilities worldwide, network, exchange ideas and take actions for us to “claim our rights”. Together, the Summit participants decided to form a new global network of women with disabilities and allies, charged with raising awareness and carrying out advocacy.. Attached and below is the Call for Action presented at the close of the Summit.
As the Call to Action say, this network aims to be inclusive of women of all ages from all parts of the world with ALL types of disabilities.

In order to move forward, an email list for the “International Network of Women With Disabilities” (INWWD) has been set up, and interested individuals are invited to join the email list by sending a message to: inwwd-subscribe@yahoogroups.com In this email, please include your name, affiliation and whether you agree to following principles:

Provisional guidelines for membership in the INWWD email list:
– Members accept the principle that this is a network OF women with all types of disabilities from all over the world, led by women with disabilities.
– Members of this email list are committed to the philosophy of women with disabilities advocating for themselves and identifying the issues of women with disabilities.
– Members support the principles in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
– Members of this email list support the goals of this network, which include sharing our knowledge and experiences, speaking up for our rights, bringing about change and inclusion in our communities, and empowering women with disabilities to be leaders of today and tomorrow.
– Members agree that the work of the network should be equally relevant to all women with disabilities irrespective of the type of disability or geographical location.
– Members agree to be respectful and constructive.

If you’d like to join an allied group of men with disabilities, please email mszporluk@disabilityrightsfund.org

The Summit participants also created a Working Group to develop the terms of reference for our network – to be finalized by the network over email by the end of the year. We are now reaching out to other networks, interested women and allies, and look forward to this partnership to promote the rights of women with disabilities around the world!

Best,
Shantha (a member of the INWWD)

GLOBAL SUMMIT on the Rights of Women with Disabilities
A Call for Action: Claiming Our Rights

Women with disabilities have been the world’s forgotten sisters. There are over 300 million women with disabilities around the world, representing a huge and important part of society. We face multiple forms of discrimination.

We, the participants in a global Summit on the Rights of Women with Disabilities, held in Quebec, Canada, in August 2008, have come together to claim our rights, through the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the human rights framework. Today, we take the first, historic step by creating a global network of women with disabilities, which must include women with ALL types of disabilities from ALL over the world.

We will use this network to share our knowledge and experiences, speak up for our rights, bring about change and inclusion in our communities, and empower women with disabilities to be leaders of today and tomorrow. We invite ALL women with disabilities to join us and we will achieve these goals TOGETHER.

Adopted on August 27, 2008, Quebec, Canada



This announcement was circulated by Shanta Rau of Rehabilitation International via the Global Partnership for Disability and Development (GPDD) email list. Queries about the new email network of women with disabilities, and allied men, should please be directed to inwwd-subscribe@yahoogroups.com or to mszporluk@disabilityrightsfund.org, NOT to We Can Do.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

RESOURCE: Manual on Mainstreaming Disability in Development Projects

Posted on 2 October 2008. Filed under: Announcements, Cross-Disability, Inclusion, Poverty, Resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Christian Blind Mission announces the publication of a new manual on including persons with disabilities in development projects. The manual is part of the “Mainstreaming Disability in Development Cooperation” project funded by the European Commission. The purpose of the manual is to give guidance and practical tools to operational staff to include a disability
perspective in the Project Cycle Management. [Note from We Can Do: Although this manual is written from a European perspective for European-based international development agencies and organizations, some of its content seems broadly relevant to mainstream international development organizations based outside of Europe.]

The manual aims to support the inclusion of the perspectives of persons with disabilities throughout the project management cycle, from program planning through evaluation. It contains examples of projects which include the perspectives of persons with disabilities, many of which are financed by the EC partnership with NGOs, including CBM. The manual is
accompanied by a web-based toolbox, which is available in September 2008.

To download the manual go to

http://www.cbm.org/en/general/CBM_EV_EN_general_article_36218.html

This manual comes in two parts. The first part, entitled Make Development Inclusive: Concepts and Guiding Principles (PDF format, 750 Kb), discusses what disability is; why all poverty reduction projects should include a disability perspective; the degree of disability inclusion needed for different types of projects; and the legal and policy framework in Europe and internationally. It also includes a discussion of the “twin-track approach” to development, which explores the difference between disability-inclusive mainstream projects and disability-targeted initiatives–and why we need both.

The second part of the manual, entitled Make Development Inclusive: A Pratical Guide (PDF format, 2.8 Mb) advises mainstream development organizations in how they can make their projects more inclusive to the benefit of everyone–without bankrupting themselves or consuming staff time that just isn’t available. Case examples are described that highlight how disability inclusion has been done at every stage of programming, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating projects around the world.

More information on the project Make Development Inclusive can be found online at www.make-development-inclusive.org

CBM is an international disability and development organization with 100 years of expertise whose purpose is to improve the quality of life of persons with disabilities and their families and prevent and treat those diseases which can lead to disability in the most marginalized societies
in the world. Working for and together with persons with disabilities, CBM advocates for meaningful and effective participation, equal opportunities and full inclusion in all spheres of society.



I learned of this resource from Joan Durocher, who learned about it from Karen Heinicke-Motsch. Most of the text in this blog post comes from an announcement from CBM; the text summarizing the content of the two parts of the manual is mine.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 4 so far )

NEWS: Jamaica HIV & AIDS Program Includes Disabled People

Posted on 2 October 2008. Filed under: Blind, Cross-Disability, Deaf, Health, HIV/AIDS, Inclusion, Latin America & Caribbean | Tags: , , , , |

The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS) program in Jamaica has been taking action to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind in HIV/AIDS education efforts. Initiatives include providing materials in Braille for blind people and incorporating sign language into television public service announcements for deaf people. Read more detail about the project at:

http://www.unaids.org/en/KnowledgeCentre/Resources/FeatureStories/archive/2008/20080905_disability_hiv_jamaica.asp

Learn more about HIV/AIDS in relation to people with disabilities, and some of the resources available to help, by clicking on HIV/AIDS in the pull-down menu under “Topics/Categories” in the right-hand navigation bar.



I learned about this project via a recent issue of the Disabled Peoples International electronic newsletter.

Subscribe to We Can Do
Learn how to receive an email alert when new material is posted at We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com).

Other Resources at We Can Do
Catch up with the news; explore resources, toolkits, or funding and fellowship opportunities; find research, reports, papers, or statistics; or look up conferences, events, call for papers, or education/training opportunities.

We Can Do Copyright
This blog post is copyrighted to We Can Do (wecando.wordpress.com). Currently, only two web sites have on-going permission to syndicate (re-post) We Can Do blog posts in full: BlogAfrica.com and RatifyNow.org. Other sites may be plagiarizing this post without permission.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

« Previous Entries

    About

    Ending poverty among and oppression toward disabled people in developing countries.

    RSS

    Subscribe Via RSS

    • Subscribe with Bloglines
    • Add your feed to Newsburst from CNET News.com
    • Subscribe in Google Reader
    • Add to My Yahoo!
    • Subscribe in NewsGator Online
    • The latest comments to all posts in RSS

    Meta

  • Help the U.S. Ratify the Disability Treaty!

    Image of an hour glass overlaid on image of the Capitol building in DC. Text says, "Time is running out! Now is the time for the Senate to Act! Ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities! www.disabilitytreaty.org #CRPD

    Learn why the CRPD matters and how to take action at www.disabilitytreaty.org!

  • Subscribe!

  • Bookmark and Share
  • Translate!

  • Connect to Andrea Shettle via Linked In

  • Archives

  • Topic Categories

  • Make WeCanDo Your “Favorite”

  • Stumble Upon It!

    Stumble It! Share this blog with other readers via "Stumble Upon"!
  • Follow We Can Do in Facebook!

  • We Can Do is in the GDRL!

  • Blog Stats

    • 616,999 hits
  • Map of Visitors

    Map
  • Meta

  • Facebook Networked Blogs

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,083 other followers

%d bloggers like this: